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What Can You Do with a Business Management Degree? #www.business.com

#business management degree

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What Can You Do with a Business Management Degree?

Sometimes taking care of your family means taking care of yourself. Your decision to earn your degree is as much for you as it is for them. This is why you want to choose a career that will not only support your family, but also allow you to enjoy going to work everyday.

Considering a degree in business management is a great place to start! It is understandable, though, to have questions the most obvious of them being: what can you do with a business management degree?

The answer isn t as simple as you might think. It is important to note that business management isn t only for professionals who desire to supervise a team. The education you ll receive while earning a business management degree is versatile and can prepare you for a wide variety of roles in the business world.

We used real-time job analysis software from Burning-Glass.com to examine more than 540,000 positions requiring a business management degree over the past year.* We then identified the five jobs in highest demand based on degree level.

Most common business management jobs with an associate degree

The chart above illustrates a large gap between employers desiring applicants with an associate degree and those with a bachelor s degree. The difference between the two might seem harrowing, but keep in mind that employers often list their preferred level of education in job postings. Often times they are willing to hire qualified applicants with slightly varying education levels.

Earning your associate degree in business management can take less than two years and wouldn t burden your family as much financially. Learn about the job descriptions and earning potential for positions requiring an associate degree:**

1. Sales representatives: $24,970 – $110,690/year

Sales representatives work with both a company and its potential and existing customers to promote the sale of company products. This can include working behind the scenes for small businesses as well as representing the front lines at a local.

2. Stock clerks: $17,040 – $37,540/year

A stock clerk s duties include receiving store products, maintaining and stocking merchandise displays, monitoring inventory and assisting customers in their buying experiences. Working as a stock clerk requires a healthy balance of people skills and independent productivity.

3. Administrative assistants: $20,370 – $49,370/year

Workers in this field are expected to perform routine clerical duties such as database management, updating and filing necessary paperwork, scheduling and confirming appointments with clients and directly assisting supervisors when asked.

4. Human resources specialists: $33,240 – $96,470/year

Human resources (HR) specialists are responsible for an array of tasks, including maintaining, hiring and employment records, scheduling new employee orientations and updating important HR documents such as performance evaluation forms and employee directories.

5. Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks: $22,020 – $55,170/year

Workers in these realms focus on monitoring and maintaining a company s financial records. Duties typically include coding documents according to procedure, recording and summarizing numerical data on behalf of the company and reconciling any financial discrepancies found all while complying to federal, state and company policies.

Most common business management jobs with a bachelor s degree

The career opportunities are exponentially higher for those with a bachelor s degree in business management. The good news is that you can earn your bachelor’s in as little as 18 months! Here s a look at what your career options and salary ranges could look:

1. Sales representatives: $37,300 – $145,730/year

The primary responsibilities of sales representatives include identifying prospective customers based on research conducted and business-related events attended, maintaining customer records and contacting new and existing customers to both discuss and meet their business needs this can consist of everything from negotiating prices to preparing contracts.

2. Sales managers: $53,770 – $155,090/year

Sales managers are responsible for what happens behind the scenes. This includes planning, directing or coordinating the actual distribution of a product to the customer. Sales managers are also responsible for establishing sales territories, analyzing sales statistics and assisting in the training programs for new sales representatives.

3. Human resources specialists: $33,240 – $96,470/year

The general duties of an HR specialist include hiring new employees, interpreting HR policies and procedures, maintaining employment-related records and often conferring with management in both developing and implementing policies and procedures.

4. Financial analysts: $48,100 – $152,420/year

Financial analysts conduct qualitative analyses concerning a company s finances and investments. This is done by composing charts, graphs and spreadsheets; forecasting business, industry and economic conditions through analysis of financial information; determining the prices at which a company should offer its product to the public market; and recommending and preparing investment plans through use of financial analysis.

5. Management analysts: $45,200 – $145,920/year

Management analysts spend their work days gathering data concerning problems or procedures within a company. They then analyze the collected information to conclude possible solutions or alterations. New procedures are designed based on interviews conducted with employees, on-site observation and close study of company documents.

What this means for you

Exploring your options before making a final decision is important. If you still have some lingering questions about which path you should take, check out this guide to a career in business management.

If you re confident that business management is the right path for you, head over to the Rasmussen College business management degree page for more information. Better yet, if you have an associate s degree you may be able to complete your bachelor s degree for as little as $9,900. If you d like to learn more about how you can potentially save time and money while providing yourself a chance at new business opportunities visit our Flex Choice Degrees Page .

*Burning-Glass.com (Analysis of 542,738 job postings requiring business management major AND bachelor s degree OR an associate degree, June 13, 2013 June 12, 2014)

**Job descriptions and salary ranges courtesy of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition. Salary data represents national, averaged earnings for the occupations listed and includes workers at all levels of education and experience. This data does not represent starting salaries and employment conditions in your area may vary.

External links provided on Rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced.

Jess is a Content Marketing Specialist at Collegis Education. She researches and writes student-focused content on behalf of Rasmussen College. As a trained and published poet, she loves discovering new ways to use her writing as a tool to further the education of others.

Connect with Jess Mansour Scherman

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14 Online Business Ideas You Can Start Tomorrow #loans #for #business

#online business ideas

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14 Online Business Ideas You Can Start Tomorrow

Being an entrepreneur doesn t mean you re pigeonholed to open a brick and mortar store to spotlight your skills and make money. The internet offers you a wealth of opportunities to start your own businesses, often with little to no cost. By focusing on your strengths, you ll be able to build a client roster and get your online-based business started.

These businesses allow you to be a full-time or part-time entrepreneur:

1. SEO consultant

Do you know the ins and outs of search engines and have skills in platforms like Google Analytics? The owners of a lot of smaller companies don t realize how much of an impact search engine optimization (SEO) can have on their business. Educate those business owners on the power of SEO to help transform their websites into a more SEO-friendly property. Use your skills to show business owners how to read and use their analytics data the right way, and how to properly use keywords and structure content to get more traffic.

2. Business coaching

If you possess a great deal of business experience and knowledge, why not create a business that helps aspiring entrepreneurs find success? You can use your skills to help new business owners get off to a good start and help experienced entrepreneurs keep up with demand. To show off your knowledge and skills and bring in clients, you can also write articles about business on platforms like LinkedIn.

3. Specialized retailer

Specialized stores are already a niche profession. When that s the case, it s best to set up an online store to reach those customers who are seeking your specific products. There s an audience for everything, whether it s making dollhouse furniture or creating organic dog food. Through a web-hosting service with an integrated shopping cart feature or with e-commerce software. your business will be operational in no time. Many vendors will even ship products to customers on your behalf, which means you don t need to own a lot of inventory.

4. Social media consultant

Larger companies can hire an agency or full-time staff member to run their Facebook and Twitter accounts, but small businesses often have to handle their own social media marketing. With so many responsibilities, business owners are often too busy, overwhelmed or undereducated about the importance of social media to spend time developing and implementing a great social media strategy. As a consultant, you can help them determine the best tactics, posting schedules and content for their target audience. As their follower count grows, so will your business.

5. Web design

There s nothing more off-putting than a poorly designed website, and often, it kills credibility. If you know some HTML and have a good eye for design, you can launch a service to create attractive, easy-to-use websites for small businesses. Put your skills to good use for business owners who want to take their online presence to the next level. Build a comprehensive portfolio, and then create your own website to show it off and attract a steady stream of clients.

6. Resume/cover letter writing

It s a tough truth to swallow, but a standout resume and cover letter can make all the difference when you re applying for a job. While listing career accomplishments might seem like an easy task, the fine art of humble bragging eludes some of us. Find work by helping others to get hired with the aid of stellar resumes. Capitalize on the increasingly important social media branding bandwagon and offer to fix LinkedIn profiles as well.

7. Assistant/task manager

Do you have impeccable organizational skills? What about cleaning skills? Can you quickly and efficiently carry out these tasks? Maybe it s time to put those skills to good use by becoming an online personal assistant or task manager. Companies like TaskRabbit or Zirtual allow you to sign up for tasks you want to complete including data research, virtual assistant or running errands and begin building clientele.

8. Professional freelancer

You might not think of freelancing as a business, but with more and more companies turning to part-time contract workers to fill their skill gaps, it s not hard to imagine making a living providing businesses with a variety of freelance services. Depending on your skill sets, you could work for multiple companies in a variety of fields that offer you flexibility and a refreshing change of pace. According to the freelance job listing website Freelancer.com. tech services, content creation and web design are popular fields for contract work.

9. Affiliate marketing

If you re a person who loves leaving customer reviews on sites like Amazon, stop doing it for free. Word-of-mouth advertising is still a huge lead generator for many companies, and a lot of businesses are willing to share a portion of their profits with persuasive individuals who will promote their products to the public. If you have a personal website with a large following, this might be easier to accomplish (PR reps are always seeking out brand advocates they can send free samples to Smart Passive Income breaks down three types of affiliate marketing and explains which one is most profitable.)

10. eBook author

Achieving authorship is easier than ever. With e-readers now a staple in most households, self-publication has become a reality for many writers who might never get picked up by publishing companies. With the right marketing tools, you can successfully publish your own books on anything from cooking and weight loss to real estate. Hectorpreneur s advice from successful e-Book authors offers tips for writing content that sells.

11. Remote technical support

Many small businesses don t have room in their budget for a full-time IT employee, so when their systems go on the fritz, they ll usually call a computer-savvy friend or family member. If you have experience working on computers and networks, you can eliminate their need to call in a favor and offer immediate remote technical assistance.

12. Virtual-consignment store

Bargain hunters and thrift store enthusiasts can turn a nice profit reselling their vintage clothing finds. Brand yourself by setting up an independent website as your virtual storefront, but use a managed service like Google Checkout to handle transactions. High-resolution images and catchy copy for your products will make you stand out in the sea of internet users trying to sell their used items.

13. Handmade craft seller

Online sites like Etsy and ArtFire are platforms that make it extremely easy for crafters who can produce a steady supply of quality handmade items, like crocheted blankets or unique painted glassware. Startup costs are extremely low if you purchase your materials in bulk from a craft supplier, and if you can turn around orders quickly, you ll be making a profit in no time at all. It s even possible to turn your store into a full-time gig.

14. App development

Mobile applications are more popular than ever, and people are willing to pay good money for ways to manage their lives from their smartphones. If you have a great idea and happen to know coding, you can run with it and create your app yourself. If you just have an idea and don t know the ins and outs of how to turn it into a reality, there are plenty of software developers looking to collaborate with people on app creation.

Additional reporting by Nicole Taylor.

Shannon Gausepohl graduated from Rowan University in 2012 with a degree in journalism. She has worked at a newspaper and in the public relations field, and is currently a staff writer at Business News Daily. Shannon is a zealous bookworm, has her blue belt in Brazilian jiu jitsu, and loves her Blue Heeler mix, Tucker.

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  • Small Business Loans: How They Work and What You Should Know #business #lenders

    #how do business loans work

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    Small Business Loans: How They Work and What You Should Know

    Small Businesses are increasing their payrolls, but hours worked and wages earned are down slightly. Photo: Reuters

    For small business startups, knowing how loans work and getting them are absolutely crucial.

    Many entrepreneurs, however, wait until the last minute to think about loans and prefer to dwell on grandiose plans, never mind that they often need loans to fund those plans.

    Asking for loans is “unpleasant; it’s like asking your dad for the car keys,” said Charles H. Green, Executive Director at the Small Business Finance Institute and author of The SBA Loan Book .

    Small businesses should start this “unpleasant” process early, however, partly because it could prove to be long and difficult.

    One entrepreneur Green encountered secured his loan at the 60th bank he approached.

    While this might be an extreme example, small business owners often need to try at more than one bank to get a small business loan.

    During the process of dealing with a bank, moreover, they may be asked to provide additional documents they previously did not anticipate needing.

    Green stressed that small business owners need to be patient in this entire process.

    Banks Want Their Money Back

    In making any small business loans, the goal of the bank is to get its money back. Even if the loan is made through the Small Business Administration (SBA), it is still a bank that ultimately risks its capital.

    Banks usually get their money back from the borrower’s revenues. If that is not possible, banks can also get their money back from selling assets pledged as collateral or from the small business owners personally.

    Therefore, besides documents relating to the business projections, banks may often request documents relating to the personal finances of the small business owner and whatever assets that can be pledged as collateral.

    Backing up Projection Numbers

    Regarding business projection numbers – that is, assessing the probability of repayment from borrower revenues – it is all about justifying those numbers, preferably with facts, said Green. For existing businesses, that may mean financial statements.

    Some of the hard questions a lender may ask include:

    *How many customers do you need?

    *How do you find them?

    *Who are satisfying these customers already?

    *Why would they feel compelled to buy from you?

    *What is your capacity to deliver those products?

    *What is the cost to deliver those products?

    Learning from Mistakes

    Sometimes, the best efforts of small businesses to secure a loan are not good enough.

    When rejections happen, Green recommended turning them into learning lessons. Often times, if the small business owner manages to remain calm and polite, he can get candid responses as to why he was rejected.

    These explanations often turn into keys to successfully securing a loan from another bank in the future.

    Choosing the Right Banks

    Other times, though, a rejection from a bank has nothing to do with the borrower at all. That is, a lender may not have any money to lend.

    Therefore, Green recommended that small businesses avoid banks under consent agreement with or issued a cease and desist order by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

    Generally speaking, smaller banks have more flexibility in their lending standards while bigger banks usually offer cheaper rates, added Green.





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    Everything You Need to Know about Minority Business Grants – Small Business Blog #stock

    #minority business grants

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    Everything You Need to Know about Minority Business Grants

    Minorities are choosing entrepreneurship in leaps and bounds. The pool of minority-owned business includes members of the African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American ethnic groups. According to the SBA, this number rose to 14.6 percent in 2012 in part because of the growing Hispanic population in the U.S.

    As with their non-minority counterparts, proper access to funding is crucial for the creation, growth, and sustainability of their businesses. Although minority business ownership is growing, there continues to be great disparities in their access to business funding. In their effort to even the playing field, minority business owners continue to search for various funding resources.

    Grants for Minority Business

    Federal Grants

    As part of their quest for funding, the first choice for minority business owners is to seek out grants. The belief that there are federal grants available for the start up and growth phases for small businesses is a myth. The federal government does not provide grants to businesses for start up, expansion, to cover operational expenses, or to pay off debts. However there are federal grants available in the areas of research in the fields of medicine, scientific research, education, and technology development. Here are a few such grants.

    1. Small Business Innovation Research(SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) – This grant is for the purpose of funding small business projects that are research related. Research areas include the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). See a full list of program descriptions and research topics allowed on their site.
    2. The USDA Rural Business Enterprise Grant (RBEG) Program – The purpose of this grant is to finance the development of small and emerging businesses in rural areas. The amount of the award ranges from $10,000 to $50,000.

    You can search additional federal grants at grants.gov .

    Corporate Grants

    We have included a list of some grants available to black and minority owned businesses.

    1. FedEx Small Business Grant Contest The FedEx Small Business Grant awards 10 different grants to small business owners in the following amounts: (1) grand prize grant of $25,000, (1) grant of $10,000, and (8) grants of $5,000. Deadline is January 12, 2015. To enter, the applicants must share their business story including their motivation and plans for growth. Winners will be announced April 21, 2015.
    2. The National Association for the Self Employed (NASE) Growth Grant Program This grant allows business owners to apply for financing for a particular business need. Each grant is worth up to $5,000. To apply visit nase.org, create an account, become a member, and click on the link apply today. Grants are awarded on a quarterly basis.
    3. MillerCoors Urban Entrepreneurs Series – This grant supports urban entrepreneurs by awarding up to $150,000 in business grants to five entrepreneurs annually.
    4. Huggies MomInspired Grant Program – Grant proposals are accepted from businesses that nurture the relationship between mother and child either through a product or service. The amount of the award is $15,000 plus additional business resources for further development.

    Organizations that Provide Minority Business Grants

    The Role of the SBA

    While the SBA has the authority to provide grants to certain non-profit and educational organizations, it is not permitted to provide grants to small businesses, including minority owned businesses. However, minority business owners can take advantage of the SBA (8) a Business Development Program. The program assists qualifying minority-owned businesses develop and growth through one on one counseling, training workshops, management, and technical assistance.

    The 8(a) program has been designed for some minority groups that are considered socially and economically disadvantaged. Those groups include: African American, Hispanic American, Native Americans, Asian Pacific Americans, and Subcontinent Asian Americans. A business must be at least 51% owned by a minority of the group listed. Other groups can apply for this program if they can prove that they have been discriminated against or are at an economic disadvantage. Those groups include: Alaska Native Corporations, Indian Tribes, Native Hawaiian Organizations, and Community Development Corporations.

    To learn more about this program contact the local SBA office in your area.

    The Minority Business Development Agency

    Another great resource for minority business owners is the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA). MBDA maintains a national network of 44 business centers whose purpose is to assist minority businesses with access to capital, contracts, and new markets. The specialists that work at the business centers can assist with the grant application.

    Minority Business Grants: The Process

    Applying for a grant is not a quick process. First the application can be more than a few pages and it is normally a detailed application. Most grants have an opening date, which is the date when the grant became available for application. The deadline date is the final date you must submit your grant by. Keep in mind that the decision may take a few months.

    Additional Grant Preparation Tips

    • Create a business plan – Writing a business plan is an important step. The business plan will act as the roadmap for your business. Be sure to provide specific information in the plan about your minority business and how it will improve the economy and your community.
    • Read through grant information thoroughly Once you have decided which grant you will apply for, make sure that you read through all of the information. This will ensure that you have all of your ducks in a row. Most grant synopsis’ are detailed and require a lot of specific information.
    • Keep track of the application deadline – Obviously it is important that you do not miss the deadline. So be sure to apply for the grant before the deadline. A good idea would be to create a project checklist which includes dates and milestones. It’s a good idea to submit the grant before the deadline approaches.
    • Gather all of your documents – Make sure you gather all of the documents required for the grant. Prepare a checklist, check, and double check. You do not want to have any missing documents that may cause the grant to be denied.




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    Businesses You Can Start For Under $5, 000 #home #based #business #ideas

    #low cost business ideas

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    Businesses You Can Start For Under $5,000

    Eight years ago, Texas resident Cynthia Ivie, a 43-year-old sales rep for Newsweek. struck out for Chicago with no more than a business idea and a 1989 Toyota Corolla packed with clothes, books, a vacuum cleaner, a stereo and a cocker spaniel named Buckley. Ivie’s big moneymaking idea: organizing the apartments and offices of busy people.

    Today, Ivie’s company, White Space, offers “clutter control” services to hundreds of clients across the country, many of them recently relocated by big companies like the Walt Disney Co. and Exelon. White Space now has five full-time and eight part-time employees; Ivie expects revenues to top $1 million in 2007. “I knew the business would take off if I could survive long enough,” she says. “I had a lot of gumption–and probably a little naivet that kept me going.”

    Gumption, naivet and very little cash. Ivie couldn’t afford a cellphone, so she bought a pager and a voicemail system for $200–”I knew where every pay phone in Chicago was,” she claims–and scraped together another $1,000 for brochures and business cards. For six months, she slept on a futon mattress in her friend’s basement. Eventually, she moved into her own home office, outfitted with two hand-me-down computers ($107) and two desks made out of hollow-core doors laid across cheap file cabinets ($20) from Office Depot. Total startup costs: around $1,500, including gas.

    There are plenty of Ivies out there. And a lot them didn’t have–or need–gobs of green to launch their businesses.

    Indeed, there are myriad ways to preserve precious cash while starting and building a business. Our special report, called “Small Business On The Cheap ,” offers plenty of helpful tips–from slashing marketing costs and telecom bills to cutting health care bills and travel expenses.

    Like Ivie, fledgling entrepreneurs can save a bundle by selling services rather than products. “It’s really hard to start any product-based business for under $5,000,” says Richard Stim, co-author of Whoops! I’m in Business: A Crash Course In Business Basics with Lisa Guerin. In general, he says, there is less overhead for service-based businesses, which don’t require large outlays for equipment and inventory.

    The best services to choose from are those that people don’t want to do themselves. Think yard work or preparing legal documents. Educational services such as teaching yoga, ballroom dancing or how to take the SATs are attractive, too. Better, still, if you can help people avoid or solve a problem–say, by inspecting homes for water quality or environmental safety.

    There are some startup costs, of course. But when it comes to service businesses, the nice thing is that many don’t require expensive technology, save for maybe a computer and an Internet connection. If you want to start a child-care facility, for instance, you’ll want to spend a few dollars on toys and perhaps some childproof locks.

    In some cases, as with child-care providers or real estate agents, you may need a state license or other certifications to set up shop. Child-care licenses run up to $100, depending on the state; you’ll also have to be certified in first aid and CPR (maybe $50 all in) and you’ll need some liability insurance (say, $450 per year).

    A service startup’s biggest expense is probably marketing, be it printing brochures and business cards or placing ads in local newspapers. (Check out VistaPrint, which specializes in low-volume runs for smaller shops.) Setting up a blog can be a cheap way to get your message out, and it’s a lot less expensive than maintaining a Web site.

    The best–and cheapest–advertising, however, is word of mouth. Offering free initial consultation meetings is a good way to get people talking. When Ivie landed in Chicago, she sent postcards to 30 local business people, promising three hours of organization services for free. “People snapped it up, tried the services, liked them, referred me to other people and the business started to grow,” she says.

    In smaller markets, getting on friendly terms with the competition also can be good for business. If one piano teacher has too many students, she might sluice the spillover to you.

    Whatever you do, though, remember to be patient. “If you’re looking to get rich quick, forget about it,” says Stim. “Instead, try to make a profit, enjoy what you’re doing and make it something that can keep going and going.”





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    5 Important Things You Need in Your Business Plan #stock #market #websites

    #business planning

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    5 Important Things You Need in Your Business Plan





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    So you want to be a business development manager? #business #savings #account

    #business development manager

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    So you want to be a business development manager?

    Business development managers are the cornerstone of any successful organisation because they ultimately generate new revenue and help a company grow. But what does the job involve on a day-to-day basis? We explore in more detail.

    What are the main responsibilities?

    The primary objective is to identify new business opportunities. What form this takes will depend on the exact nature of the company. But you ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets. And then you ll be expected use these opportunities to bring in more revenue.

    How that happens exactly depends on the industry. It can be a combination of attending events and networking, taking stands at exhibitions and conferences, cold calling, and responding to incoming leads. You will also more than likely be expected to identify partner opportunities to cross and up sell services.

    What will I be doing on a day-to-day basis?

    While it can be difficult to generalise, most business development managers will be expected to:

    What are the other aspects involved in the job?

    You ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets.

    You ll need to negotiate pricing with clients in line with internal guidelines. You ll also need to keep your superiors updated on both your progress and timeline, providing them with accurate forecasting of anticipated sales.

    This being a sales role, you will be subject to sales and KPI targets; this is a crucial part of the role. With face-to-face client meetings key, you ll be expected to travel although the extent to which this is the case will depend on where the job is based. If you re based in London, you may find that the majority of your meetings are in the capital. But if your employer is based elsewhere in the South-East, Midlands or the North, you may be required to travel a substantial amount.

    How much can I expect to earn?

    Our Salary Survey shows that salaries vary depending on sector and location. For example, an IT business development manager can expect to earn 50 70k in the North of the UK and 50 75k in the South-East. Similarly, a B2B business development manager can expect to earn 30 45k in the North and 35 50k in London and the South-East. But all these figures are basic salary exclusive of benefits/bonuses. Actual earning potential will be far higher than this.

    What knowledge and experience is required?

    To secure a business development manager job, you ll need a strong sales track record. Specifically, hiring companies look for a proven ability to hit targets, a consistent background of winning new business and often relevant sector experience. A good book of contacts is also looked upon favourably.

    In terms of personality traits, employers generally look for people who are articulate, polished and professional who have a good telephone manner. A self-motivated and disciplined approach is essential.





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    12 In-Home Business Opportunities You Can Start From Your Laptop #free #business #banking

    #home business opportunities

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    12 In-Home Business Opportunities You Can Start From Your Laptop

    Think you need a lot of complicated equipment to start a business from your home? Think again. There are actually plenty of opportunities out there for entrepreneurs to start businesses with just a laptop and maybe a couple of other simple items .

    If you want to start a business from your home, but you only have a laptop to work with, here are some work from home ideas for businesses you can start right away.

    Work From Home Ideas You Can Start on Your Laptop

    Virtual Assistant

    A huge variety of business owners and professionals need help organizing and managing their day-to-day tasks. That’s why they hire virtual assistants. You can start a virtual assistant business just by setting up a website and outlining your services and prices to potential clients. Then you can help them manage things like scheduling, email, social media and more communicating with your clients via chat, Skype, email or other means.

    Social Media Manager

    If you want to get more specific, you can start an online business just to help various businesses start and manage their social media accounts. You can work remotely and communicate with clients about their social media activity. And you can enact specialized social media campaigns and promotions to help them grow their networks on those sites.

    Copywriter

    Skilled writers, you can offer your services to clients as a freelance copywriter. You can provide a variety of different writing services, from blog posts and product descriptions to short ad copy.

    Blogger

    Or you can start your own blog about business or a variety of other topics. Then you can earn revenue through PPC advertising, sponsored content, affiliate promotions or even selling informational products related to your topic.

    Website Manager

    Web developers and tech savvy business owners can also offer services as a website manager. In this capacity, you’d be responsible for maintaining websites for different businesses and clients. You might also be able to help businesses set up and develop different features of their websites. You can do all the work yourself or outsource some of the day-to-day operations with services like Go Daddy Pro .

    eBay or Etsy Seller

    If you have physical or even digital products to sell, you can set up an eCommerce store on a number of different platforms from your laptop. eBay is one of the most popular platforms for home businesses. But you could also sign up for an account with Etsy, Amazon, or a number of other options.

    Translator

    Things like books, transcripts and reports all need to be translated into different languages from time to time. If you are fluent in multiple languages, you can offer your services as a translator to make content available in languages other than the one in which it was originally created.

    Proofreader

    Offering your services as an editor or proofreader is another option for a home-based business. You can have clients send you pieces of writing that you can check for errors. You can even provide suggestions for overall content improvement.

    Ebook Author

    Writers who have a more long-form story or subject in mind could opt for book authorship rather than short blogs or articles. And you can even become an author from your home with just a laptop thanks to the growing popularity of ebooks. Platforms like Amazon offer the opportunity for writers to upload entire books and offer them for sale to an eager community of online readers.

    Logo Designer

    Designers who create complicated pieces may require desktop computers or complicated equipment. But you can offer some simple branding packages like logo design to clients right from your laptop. You’ll need to create a website and outline your services. Then work with clients to develop designs for their brands.

    Marketing Consultant

    If you have some expertise in any area of marketing, you can offer your skills to businesses as a consultant. You can choose a specific niche or just work with businesses in a variety of different areas of marketing. Then communicate with your clients through email, phone calls or other online communications.

    Online Teacher

    Or you can share your knowledge with online consumers in another format. Whether your expertise is in business, marketing or another discipline entirely like French, history or creative writing you can create online courses within your niche and then sell them on your website or other online platforms. This option allows you to share your knowledge with more people in a shorter amount of time than if you were to just work with clients one on one.

    Annie Pilon is a Senior Staff Writer for Small Business Trends, covering entrepreneur profiles, interviews, feature stories, community news and in-depth, expert-based guides. When she’s not writing she can be found on her personal blog Wattlebird. and exploring all that her home state of Michigan has to offer.

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    Thank You for Your Service – 4 Business Funding Programs for Veterans #suntrust #business

    #business loans for veterans

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    Thank You for Your Service – 4 Business Funding Programs for Veterans

    September 24, 2014

    There are more than 2.4 million businesses operated by veterans nationwide, according to the SBA 2012 Veterans Report. Despite this growing trend towards entrepreneurship, funding options that specifically benefit veterans are difficult to find. Here are four unique funding programs if you are a veteran starting or expanding your business.

    1. Self-employment grants for service-disabled veterans. Service-disabled veterans can connect with a self-employment program offered through the Veterans Administration.

    Participants are required to submit a feasible and complete business plan for any funding considerations. As part of the process, veterans are assigned to either Category I or Category II. Those categories determine the level of self-employment funding may be available.

    Veterans designated Category I have the most serve service-connected disabilities and self-employment is considered a viable option. Category II is designated for veterans with serious employment challenges but not considered severe.

    Depending on the category, veterans can obtain a grant to fund purchase of equipment, inventory, supplies, training, licensing fees and marketing. Veterans interested in the program can contact their local VA office where a counselor will help them qualify for the self-employment program. Funds allocated for start-up enterprises are grants that do not have to repaid.

    2. Angel investment group supporting veterans. Hivers and Strivers is an angel investment group funding early-stage investments in start-up companies founded and run by graduates of the U.S. military academies. The company generally invests $250,000 to $1 million in a single round.

    A company seeking larger rounds can actively look to other investor groups in the Hivers and Strivers network for additional funds. Their goal is to support veteran entrepreneurs through a successful exit with a return 10 times the initial investment. Veterans can learn more about Hivers and Strivers and complete an application available on the front page of the company website.

    3.Venture capital fund serving veterans. The Veterans Opportunity Fund (VOF) is the first venture capital fund formed to invest in businesses that are started, owned and/or managed by veterans of the United States armed forces. The investments range up to $3 million.

    The fund focuses on companies based on the East Coast. The industries of interest include technology, healthcare, business services,and specialty manufacturing. The stage of interest is at early revenue or after a product or service can be evaluated.

    Veterans interested in pursuing an opportunity with VOF can submit a business plan directly through the company website.

    4. Online lending platform for veterans. Street Shares is an online lending platform designed to connect investors and small business owners to support veterans starting or expanding their business. Veteran-owned businesses can apply online in about 10 minutes.

    The online auction periods have ranged from five to 30 days. Business owners pitch directly to lenders for loans of $5,000 to $50,000 with one, three, of five-year terms. Accredited investors can fund any portion of up to 90 percent of the requested loan amount with bids as low as $25 per business. StreetShares takes the first 10 percent. Co-founder Mark Rockefeller describes the platform as Shark Tank meets eBay.

    While each of these programs follows standard due diligence in their funding, their social-driven goals include increasing the number of veteran-owned businesses nationwide.





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    5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #loan #application

    #small business magazine

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    5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

    You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

    Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

    1. Inc.

    Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

    iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

    2. Entrepreneur

    Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

    iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

    Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

    3. Fast Company

    Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

    One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

    iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

    4. Wired

    Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

    iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

    Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

    5. Bloomberg Businessweek

    Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

    iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

    Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

    What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

    About Jim Armstrong

    Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

    Comments

    I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.





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