Tag: Who

Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #business #web #hosting


#small business tips

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21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

2. Add a personal touch.

Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

3. Leverage social media.

A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

4. Write your own business bible.

Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

5. Focus on your specialty.

In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

6. Outsource the things you don t do.

Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

7. Aim high and be persistent.

Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

8. Embrace a life less frantic.

Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

9. Follow your own path.

Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

11. Harness your keystone habits .

Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

12. Practise mindfulness.

Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

14. Hire from within your networks.

When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

15. Keep it manageable.

Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

16. Know when to work for free.

Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

18. Learn to say no.

Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

20. Turn competition into inspiration.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

21. Know when to take a dream detour .

Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.


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About Sumy Designs – Who We Are and What We Do – Sumy Designs

#business website design

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Who We are and What We Do

We are Sumy Designs, LLC. Our business is based in West Lafayette, Indiana.

Our History: Sumy Designs was created by two sisters, Susan Sullivan and Amy Masson in 2006. Susan had been working as an advertising and marketing director with a large publishing firm while Amy had been teaching computer technology. After leaving those respective career paths, a friend asked if we’d like to make a website for her. We said yes. A friend of this friend saw that website and asked us to make a website for her. We said yes. And so and so forth and now we have created many, many sites for many happy clients across the US, Canada, and England.

Susan is our designer, in charge of all things creative and beautiful. She has the vision and skills it takes to create custom masterpieces for every project.

Amy is our resident technical expert, with the skills to make every website function as it should.

Interesting fact: While the business is based in West Lafayette, Susan lives in the Dallas Forth Worth area. We work together virtually, via email and video chat, to seamlessly design, manage, and maintain projects of all sizes.

Where’d you come up with the name Sumy? It’s a combination of our first names. SU san and aMY.

Our Support Team

While Amy does the behind the scenes work and Susan does the design, there are a lot of other areas that need attention, so we have recruited a team of fabulous people to work with us to bring these jobs to completion. Being a virtual business, we are able to employ people from all over the country to work with us.


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6 Business Icons Who Made TIME Person of the Year #easy #business #ideas


#business icons

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TIME has dedicated one issue to the “Person of the Year. ” The award, which is “bestowed to those who have, for good or for ill, most influenced the news and our lives in the past year,” has gone to politicians, scientists, humanitarians and entrepreneurs. Click through to see the business icons who have graced the magazine’s famous cover over the years.

1928 – Walter Chrysler

Before starting what would become one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Walter Chrysler worked as a railroad mechanic and locomotive machinist in West Texas. After serving as the head of Buick for three years, Chrysler was tapped to turn around the failing Willys-Overland Motor Company in Flint, Michigan. The now defunct company would become the automaker known today as Chrysler. Two years after being awarded Person of the Year, Chrysler financed the construction of the Chrysler Building in New York City, all with his personal fortune. The building stood as the tallest in the world for 11 months, when the Empire State Building surpassed it. Upon his death in 1938, Chrysler’s estate was worth roughly $8.9 million dollars – almost $150 million by today’s standards.

1955 – Harlow Curtis

In 1914, Harlow Curtis, the son of a fruit vendor in rural Michigan, responded to a newspaper ad for a bookkeeper position at the AC Spark Plug Company in Flint, Michigan. Following 15 years of service at AC, Curtis was named president of the spark plug company. According to GM’s online history portal. Curtis worked his way up the Detroit-ranks, landed a position at Buick and eventually became president of the highly profitable GM branch. In 1953, Curtis was named president of General Motors, and at his helm became the first American company to reach $1 billion in profits. A year later, TIME named Curtis “Man of the Year” in recognition of this achievement.

1991 – Ted Turner

Now a household name and waiting room fixture nationwide, CNN had plenty of skeptics when Ted Turner launched the first 24-hour news network in 1980. Built on the foundations Turner had put into place as the head of his father’s advertising firm and as the owner of the Atlanta Hawks basketball team, Turner changed news from a once-daily occurrence to a never-ending cycle. As of 2010, CNN was streaming to 100 million American households and another 98 million satellite subscribers throughout the world. Turner is worth $2.2 billion, according to Forbes . making him one of the wealthiest men in the country. The wealthy conglomerate extends beyond media, too. Ted’s Montana Grill serves up western-inspired food sourced from Turner’s bison located on ranches throughout the west and abroad.

1997 – Andrew Grove

As he proclaims in his book, “Only the paranoid survive.” This is the driving principle that has made Andrew Grove so insanely successful. Born in Hungary, Grove escaped communism to finish his education, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from City College of New York and a Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Grove was a pioneer the burgeoning semi-conductor industry. Once at the helm of Intel, Grove revolutionized the company into the highest valued computer chip maker in the world today. Under Groves leadership, Intel saw an increase in revenue from $1.9 million in 1987 to an astonishing $26.27 billion in 1998. Steve Jobs idolized Grove, seeking his advice when considering a return to Apple as CEO. In 1997, a year before Grove relinquished his title of CEO, Grove was awarded “Person of the Year ” on the 50th anniversary of the invention of the transistor.

1999 – Jeff Bezos

The e-commerce pioneer is most well known for his establishment of Amazon as an Internet commerce icon. Originally a source for books, Amazon had expanded to almost everything by 1999 when Jeff Bezos was awarded “Person of the Year.” Born to a teenage mother, Bezos was technologically adept from a young age, tinkering in his parents’ garage. In 2013, Amazon reported net revenue of $74.5 billion and employed over 132,000. Alexa, the domain ranking service, credits Amazon as the seventh most-visited website in the world. Since his recognition, Bezos has been up to quite a bit. In addition to his continued innovations at Amazon (did someone say drones ?), he acquired The Washington Post from longtime owners, the Graham family. Bezos is betting on his knack for web innovation to bring the publication into the digital age.

2010 – Mark Zuckerberg

The same year as he was hailed as TIME’s “Person of the Year “, The Social Network film sealed Mark Zuckerberg ‘s place as an American demagogue, next to the likes of Steve Jobs and others. In a Harvard dorm room, Zuckerberg and friends created what would become Facebook. The website spawned an entire social networking industry. Facebook’s massive $5 billion IPO, the third largest in history, would increase Zuckerberg’s wealth to about $33.1 billion, according to Forbes . making him No. 16 on the list of wealthiest Americans. His wealth makes him part of an elite club – one of three people with more billions than they have years of age. As of September, Facebook boasted 864 million daily active users .


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Automobile History – Invention of the Automobile #history, #invention, #automotive, #automobile, #auto, #car, #inventor,

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In terms of the lives of average people, there is little doubt that the automobile is the most revolutionary invention in the history of transportation since the wheel. The basic premise of the automobile is simple; choose a wheeled vehicle from the many types typically pulled by horses or oxen, add a motor and create a self-propelled, personal transportation vehicle.

The earliest ancestor of the modern automobile is probably the Fardier, a three-wheeled, steam-powered, 2.3-mph vehicle built in 1771 by Nicolas Joseph Cugnot for the French minister of war. This cumbersome machine was never put into production because it was much slower and harder to operate than a horse-drawn vehicle.

Amedee Bollee, also a Frenchman, built an improved 12-passenger steam car in 1873, but the steam engine proved impractical for a machine that was intended to challenge the speed of a horse-and-buggy. The invention of the practical automobile had to await the invention of a workable internal combustion engine.

The milestone vehicle was built in Germany in 1889 by Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach. Powered by a 1.5 hp, two-cylinder gasoline engine, it had a four-speed transmission and traveled at 10 mph. Another German, Karl Benz, also built a gasoline-powered car the same year. The gasoline-powered automobile, or motor car, remained largely a curiosity for the rest of the nineteenth century, with only a handful being manufactured in Europe and the United States.

The first automobile to be produced in quantity was the 1901 Curved Dash Oldsmobile, which was built in the United States by Ransom E. Olds. Modern automobile mass production, and its use of the modern industrial assembly line, is credited to Henry Ford of Detroit, Michigan, who had built his first gasoline-powered car in 1896. Ford began producing his Model T in 1908, and by 1927, when it was discontinued, over 18 million had rolled off the assembly line.

ON THE BOOKSHELF:
100 Inventions That Shaped World History
by Bill Yenne, Morton, Dr. Grosser (Editor) / Paperback – 112 pages (1983) / Bluewood Books
This book contains inventions from all around the world from microchips to fire. This is a really good book if you are going to do research on inventions.
Popular Patents
by Travis Brown / Paperback – 224 pages / Scarecrow Press (September 1, 2000)
Eighty stories of America’s first inventions. Each includes a sketch of the invention, a profile of the inventor and a glimpse of how the invention has found its way into American culture.

Wheels of Time: A Biography of Henry Ford (Limited availabilty.)
by Catherine Gourley / Library Binding – 48 pages / Millbrook Press – 1997
In association with the Henry Ford Museum to provide an accurate account of her subject’s life while relating an interesting story.
Setting the Pace: Oldsmobile’s First 100 Years
by Helen Jones Earley, James R. Walkinshaw / Hardcover / Publications International – 1997
Excellent information about Oldsmobile’s cars and people.
America on Wheels: The First 100 Years: 1896-1996
by Frank Coffey, Joseph Layden / Paperback – 304 pages / General Pub Group – 1998
Featuring three hundred archival color and black-and-white photographs, the companion volume to the PBS documentary chronicles the development of the American automobile, with contributions by past and present pioneers in the industry.
Classic American Cars

by Quentin Willson, Matthew Ward / Hardcover – 192 pages (October 1997) /DK Publishing
Celebrating 60 of America’s best-loved automobiles, this full-color car show spotlights the most glamourous cars of the golden era from 1945-1975.
The Art of the Automobile: The 100 Greatest Cars
by Dennis Adler (Photographer) / Hardcover: 256 pages / Harper Entertainment; (May 2, 2000)
Award-winning automotive historian, author, and photographer Dennis Adler takes you on a whirlwind tour through more than a century of automotive history, from the first production motorcar, the 1886 Benz Patent Motorwage, to fabled makes including Hispano-Suiza, Duesenberg, packard, and Hudson
My Father Mr. Mercedes ( Limited availability.)
by Guy Jellinek-Mercedes / Hardcover / G. T. Foulis Co (1966)
In next to no time he was the sole agent for Daimler outside Germany; in fact it was he who gave the name of his daughter to all the cars which he bought for re-sale from the Daimler Company thus establishing for all time the world-renowned car which carries the three pointed star. Later he was to add the name to his own and became known as Emil Jellinek-Mercedes

ON THE SCREEN:
Car Tech
DVD / 1 Volume Set / 100 Minutes / History Channel / Less than $30.00
This two-hour tour through the automotive future is peppered with exotic visions and groundbreaking engineering advances, from hyper-efficient vehicles with revolutionary drive trains to alternate fuel sources and the most radical designs currently coming off the drawing boards from Stuttgart to Detroit.

ON THE WEB:
DaimlerChrysler
The corporate site for the merged Daimler-Benz and Chrysler car companies. The most extensive corporate history site we have found on the web. Lots of COOKIES at this site.
(URL: www.daimlerchrysler.com)
Gottlieb Daimler
The man who is widely credited with pioneering the modern automobile industry apparently did not like to drive and may never have driven at all.
(URL: www.autonews.com/files/euroauto/inductees/daimler.htm)
Karl Benz
On January 29, 1886, Karl Benz registered his patent DRP 37435, for a three-wheeler with a four-stroke 0.9 PS engine. DRP 37435 patent today is recognized as the official birth certificate of the motor car.
(URL: www.autonews.com/files/euroauto/inductees/benz.htm)
Automotive Hall of Fame
The Automotive Hall of Fame recognizes and celebrates accomplished individuals in the world-wide motor vehicle industry; a unique people place of innovation and inspiration.
(URL: www.automotivehalloffame.org)
European Automotive Hall of Fame
Provided to the public by Automotive News newspaper.
(URL: www.autonews.com/files/euroauto/index.html)
Mercedes Benz for Kids
The Mercedes-Benz kids site has an interactive museum where you can see and hear the very first cars! Great place to learn about cars in a fun and informative way. And, Cedy is a great host.
The Auto Channel
Their goal is to create what can currently best be described as an interactive television network; with full motion video, high quality audio, multi-point AV user communication, and comprehensive information archives.
(URL: www.theautochannel.com/)
Ford Motor Company
Everything you ever wanted to know about Ford Motor Company. Lots of COOKIES at this site.
(URL: www.ford.com)
Oldsmobile
The official web site of General Motors, Oldsmobile Division. The end of an era.
(URL: www.oldsmobile.com)

HOW IT WORKS:
How Car Stuff Works
by Marshall Brain at How Stuff Works courtesy of The Auto Channel .

DID YOU KNOW?:

  • January 29, 1886 For his three-wheel motor carriage Karl Benz receives the patent DRP No. 37435, the birth certificate of the automobile.
  • March 8, 1886 Gottlieb Daimler orders a coach from coach makers Wilhelm Wimpff Sohn in Stuttgart and has it equipped with a fast-running engine. It is the first four-wheeled automobile.
  • September 29, 1888 After acquiring the Daimler patent licenses for the U.S.A. the piano maker William Steinway founded the Daimler Motor Company at Long Island, New York.
  • The Selden automobile was never manufactured even though the first United States patent for an automobile was awarded to George B. Selden on an application filed May 8th, 1879. Selden licensed and collected royalities from all U.S.auto manufactures until a court decision in 1911.
  • Patent # 1,975,837 isssued October 9, 1934 for Ford V-8 Engine


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OHosti – Best Free Unlimited Hosting cPanel – Powerful Unlimited Free Reseller Hosting WHM

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Lead, Define Lead at, who discoverd lead.#Who #discoverd #lead


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lead 1

Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.

Such is her burgeoning popularity Toomey is looking to employ more instructors to lead her highly personalized exercise classes.

There were a lot of little pieces, pieces of lead and stuff.

Big Perm worries that the lack of policing the “small fry” will lead to more crimes by “big fry.”

Sting took over the lead role to try to draw an audience, but his thumpingly inspirational score was already the hero of the show.

This immediately raises the issue of who will lead the crash investigation.

And the only one she never forgets is, ‘When in doubt, lead your highest check.’

We can only crawl along, having to walk and lead the horses, or at least drag them.

Passively, he let Harry take him by the arm, and lead him on.

Surely those are not the steps that lead down toward the bath?

It was incumbent upon Mr. Gladstone to lead the opposition to this motion.

lead 1

  1. the first, foremost, or most prominent place
  2. ( as modifier ): lead singer
  1. the principal news story in a newspaper: the scandal was the lead in the papers
  2. the opening paragraph of a news story
  3. ( as modifier ): lead story

lead 2

  1. graphite or a mixture containing graphite, clay, etc, used for drawing
  2. a thin stick of this material, esp the core of a pencil

© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins

Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

“to guide,” Old English lædan “cause to go with one, lead, guide, conduct, carry; sprout forth; bring forth, pass (one’s life),” causative of liðan “to travel,” from West Germanic *laidjan (cf. Old Saxon lithan , Old Norse liða “to go,” Old High German ga-lidan “to travel,” Gothic ga-leiþan “to go”), from PIE *leit- “to go forth.”

heavy metal, Old English lead , from West Germanic *loudhom (cf. Old Frisian lad , Middle Dutch loot , Dutch lood “lead,” German Lot “weight, plummet”). The name and the skill in using the metal seem to have been borrowed from the Celts (cf. Old Irish luaide ), probably from PIE root *plou(d)- “to flow.”

c.1300, “action of leading,” from lead (v.1). Meaning “the front or leading place” is from 1560s. Johnson stigmatized it as “a low, despicable word.” Sense in card-playing is from 1742; in theater, from 1831; in journalism, from 1912; in jazz bands, from 1934.

early 15c., “to make of lead,” from lead (n.1). Meaning “to cover with lead” is from mid-15c. Related: Leaded (early 13c.); leading.

Any of the conductors designed to detect changes in electrical potential when situated in or on the body and connected to an instrument that registers and records these changes, such as an electrocardiograph.

A record made from the current supplied by one of these conductors.

A soft ductile dense metallic element. Atomic number 82; atomic weight 207.19; melting point 327.5°C; boiling point 1,749deg;C; specific gravity 11.35; valence 2, 4.

Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

A soft, ductile, heavy, bluish-gray metallic element that is extracted chiefly from galena. It is very durable and resistant to corrosion and is a poor conductor of electricity. Lead is used to make radiation shielding and containers for corrosive substances. It was once commonly used in pipes, solder, roofing, paint, and antiknock compounds in gasoline, but its use in these products has been curtailed because of its toxicity. Atomic number 82; atomic weight 207.2; melting point 327.5°C; boiling point 1,744°C; specific gravity 11.35; valence 2, 4. See Periodic Table. See Note at element.

Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.


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The Invention of the Internet – Inventions #who #founded #the #internet


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The Invention of the Internet

Introduction

Unlike technologies such as the light bulb or the telephone, the Internet has no single inventor. Instead, it has evolved over time. The Internet got its start in the United States more than 50 years ago as a government weapon in the Cold War. For years, scientists and researchers used it to communicate and share data with one another. Today, we use the Internet for almost everything, and for many people it would be impossible to imagine life without it.

History Uncut: Bill Gates unveils Microsoft Excel 1987 2min

Thomas Edison 3min

Eli Whitney: Fast Facts 4min

The Sputnik Scare

On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the world’s first manmade satellite into orbit. The satellite, known as Sputnik, did not do much: It tumbled aimlessly around in outer space, sending blips and bleeps from its radio transmitters as it circled the Earth. Still, to many Americans, the beach-ball-sized Sputnik was proof of something alarming: While the brightest scientists and engineers in the United States had been designing bigger cars and better television sets, it seemed, the Soviets had been focusing on less frivolous things—and they were going to win the Cold War because of it.

Did You Know?

Today, almost one-third of the world’s 6.8 billion people use the Internet regularly.

After Sputnik’s launch, many Americans began to think more seriously about science and technology. Schools added courses on subjects like chemistry, physics and calculus. Corporations took government grants and invested them in scientific research and development. And the federal government itself formed new agencies, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense’s Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), to develop space-age technologies such as rockets, weapons and computers.

The Birth of the ARPAnet

Scientists and military experts were especially concerned about what might happen in the event of a Soviet attack on the nation’s telephone system. Just one missile, they feared, could destroy the whole network of lines and wires that made efficient long-distance communication possible. In 1962, a scientist from M.I.T. and ARPA named J.C.R. Licklider proposed a solution to this problem: a “galactic network” of computers that could talk to one another. Such a network would enable government leaders to communicate even if the Soviets destroyed the telephone system.

In 1965, another M.I.T. scientist developed a way of sending information from one computer to another that he called “packet switching.” Packet switching breaks data down into blocks, or packets, before sending it to its destination. That way, each packet can take its own route from place to place. Without packet switching, the government’s computer network—now known as the ARPAnet—would have been just as vulnerable to enemy attacks as the phone system.

“LOGIN”

In 1969, ARPAnet delivered its first message: a “node-to-node” communication from one computer to another. (The first computer was located in a research lab at UCLA and the second was at Stanford; each one was the size of a small house.) The message—“LOGIN”—was short and simple, but it crashed the fledgling ARPA network anyway: The Stanford computer only received the note’s first two letters.

The Network Grows

By the end of 1969, just four computers were connected to the ARPAnet, but the network grew steadily during the 1970s. In 1971, it added the University of Hawaii’s ALOHAnet, and two years later it added networks at London’s University College and the Royal Radar Establishment in Norway. As packet-switched computer networks multiplied, however, it became more difficult for them to integrate into a single worldwide “Internet.”

By the end of the 1970s, a computer scientist named Vinton Cerf had begun to solve this problem by developing a way for all of the computers on all of the world’s mini-networks to communicate with one another. He called his invention “Transmission Control Protocol,” or TCP. (Later, he added an additional protocol, known as “Internet Protocol.” The acronym we use to refer to these today is TCP/IP.) One writer describes Cerf’s protocol as “the ‘handshake’ that introduces distant and different computers to each other in a virtual space.”

The World Wide Web

Cerf’s protocol transformed the Internet into a worldwide network. Throughout the 1980s, researchers and scientists used it to send files and data from one computer to another. However, in 1991 the Internet changed again. That year, a computer programmer in Switzerland named Tim Berners-Lee introduced the World Wide Web: an Internet that was not simply a way to send files from one place to another but was itself a “web” of information that anyone on the Internet could retrieve. Berners-Lee created the Internet that we know today.

Since then, the Internet has changed in many ways. In 1992, a group of students and researchers at the University of Illinois developed a sophisticated browser that they called Mosaic. (It later became Netscape.) Mosaic offered a user-friendly way to search the Web: It allowed users to see words and pictures on the same page for the first time and to navigate using scrollbars and clickable links. That same year, Congress decided that the Web could be used for commercial purposes. As a result, companies of all kinds hurried to set up websites of their own, and e-commerce entrepreneurs began to use the Internet to sell goods directly to customers. More recently, social networking sites like Facebook have become a popular way for people of all ages to stay connected.

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Invention – Adoption #who #created #the #first #cell #phone


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Invention Adoption

The mobile phone may be seen as a new technology in our day, but the idea was actually first conceived in the year 1908. This statement is only true because the mobile phone is actually a high-tech radio. In 1908 a man named Nathan B. Stubblefield who lived in Murray, Kentucky applied for the U.S. Patent 887,357 for a wireless telephone; he originally applied his patent to only radio telephones. But by doing this he only meant to create a telephone that could operate with strings. [1] The police department was the next to advance this technology by adding a feature which allowed officers to communicate while they were still in their cars. The concept of translating this technology into a phone was not thought of until the year 1947 by the Bell Telephone Company laboratories. Many attempts were made to get this technology working for the public, but nothing that was produced actually worked. [2] Finally in 1973 a man named Martin Cooper and his associates effectively masted the portable mobile phone. They used the technology of the police radio and applied it to the technology of the day to make the first working portable mobile phone. [3]

Martin Cooper did not make the first working mobile phone, he made the first portable mobile phone. In the past the phones that were being produced either did not work well, needed a power source that was not portable or they were to large for the average person to carry around comfortably. The product that Martin Cooper invented was titled the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X. Though this phone is ugly, bulky and unrealistic according to today standards, at the time of its invention it was seen as revolutionary. [4] What made this phone stand apart from all other past inventions other then portability was that it was the first mobile telephone which could connect to the telephone network without the assistance of a mobile operator. This phones’ popularity was seen around the world, but even though it was consumer friendly it was still very expensive to own. This was the first portable mobile phone to be accepted by the Federal Communications Commission which allowed it to go into production. [5] (PIC 1)

So now the question is how does the DynaTAC 8000X phone actually work. Basically, the mobile phone is a radio; it relies on a radio signal in order to transmit and receive voice and data information. Cell phones operate on what is called a duplex system which uses two different frequencies to broadcast calls. [6] One is used for talking or sending, and the other is used for listening or receiving. This is what distinguishes a basic radio from mobile phones. These phones can use up to but not limited to 1,664 channels. Overall the the mobile phone is a highly sophisticated radio and without the constant advancements from 1908 to 1973 this technology would not exist. [7]

[kml_flashembed movie=”http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/1328252/the_evolution_of_the_cell_phone.swf” width=”400″ height=”345″ wmode=”transparent” /]

Mobile phones are a very accepted accessory these days but this is not how the cell phone revolution began. When cell phones were first marketed to the public, many did not pick up on the technology. This may be in direct result to the price that the mobile phones were first listed as. The phone was way too expensive for the masses to buy; as well as the plan for the phone. Today we live in a world where if one would like a new phone it easy to go out to a store and get a plan with a decent phone. It is hard to imagine a world where a store like this did not exist. [8]

The mobile phone was originally a fashion statement for celebrities and television shows during its debut; they were the only ones who could afford to use the technology. Plus the phone was very large and impracticable to carry around for the average person. Once the technology began to evolve, phones became smaller. This then began to appeal to the masses as they saw the practicality of owning a mobile phone. Once the technology became cheaper, the public began to buy the new emerging models. As people began to see how efficient this technology actually was, the market for the mobile phone eventually evolved into what we know it as today. [9]

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6 Business Icons Who Made TIME Person of the Year #business #administration


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TIME has dedicated one issue to the “Person of the Year. ” The award, which is “bestowed to those who have, for good or for ill, most influenced the news and our lives in the past year,” has gone to politicians, scientists, humanitarians and entrepreneurs. Click through to see the business icons who have graced the magazine’s famous cover over the years.

1928 – Walter Chrysler

Before starting what would become one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Walter Chrysler worked as a railroad mechanic and locomotive machinist in West Texas. After serving as the head of Buick for three years, Chrysler was tapped to turn around the failing Willys-Overland Motor Company in Flint, Michigan. The now defunct company would become the automaker known today as Chrysler. Two years after being awarded Person of the Year, Chrysler financed the construction of the Chrysler Building in New York City, all with his personal fortune. The building stood as the tallest in the world for 11 months, when the Empire State Building surpassed it. Upon his death in 1938, Chrysler’s estate was worth roughly $8.9 million dollars – almost $150 million by today’s standards.

1955 – Harlow Curtis

In 1914, Harlow Curtis, the son of a fruit vendor in rural Michigan, responded to a newspaper ad for a bookkeeper position at the AC Spark Plug Company in Flint, Michigan. Following 15 years of service at AC, Curtis was named president of the spark plug company. According to GM’s online history portal. Curtis worked his way up the Detroit-ranks, landed a position at Buick and eventually became president of the highly profitable GM branch. In 1953, Curtis was named president of General Motors, and at his helm became the first American company to reach $1 billion in profits. A year later, TIME named Curtis “Man of the Year” in recognition of this achievement.

1991 – Ted Turner

Now a household name and waiting room fixture nationwide, CNN had plenty of skeptics when Ted Turner launched the first 24-hour news network in 1980. Built on the foundations Turner had put into place as the head of his father’s advertising firm and as the owner of the Atlanta Hawks basketball team, Turner changed news from a once-daily occurrence to a never-ending cycle. As of 2010, CNN was streaming to 100 million American households and another 98 million satellite subscribers throughout the world. Turner is worth $2.2 billion, according to Forbes . making him one of the wealthiest men in the country. The wealthy conglomerate extends beyond media, too. Ted’s Montana Grill serves up western-inspired food sourced from Turner’s bison located on ranches throughout the west and abroad.

1997 – Andrew Grove

As he proclaims in his book, “Only the paranoid survive.” This is the driving principle that has made Andrew Grove so insanely successful. Born in Hungary, Grove escaped communism to finish his education, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from City College of New York and a Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Grove was a pioneer the burgeoning semi-conductor industry. Once at the helm of Intel, Grove revolutionized the company into the highest valued computer chip maker in the world today. Under Groves leadership, Intel saw an increase in revenue from $1.9 million in 1987 to an astonishing $26.27 billion in 1998. Steve Jobs idolized Grove, seeking his advice when considering a return to Apple as CEO. In 1997, a year before Grove relinquished his title of CEO, Grove was awarded “Person of the Year ” on the 50th anniversary of the invention of the transistor.

1999 – Jeff Bezos

The e-commerce pioneer is most well known for his establishment of Amazon as an Internet commerce icon. Originally a source for books, Amazon had expanded to almost everything by 1999 when Jeff Bezos was awarded “Person of the Year.” Born to a teenage mother, Bezos was technologically adept from a young age, tinkering in his parents’ garage. In 2013, Amazon reported net revenue of $74.5 billion and employed over 132,000. Alexa, the domain ranking service, credits Amazon as the seventh most-visited website in the world. Since his recognition, Bezos has been up to quite a bit. In addition to his continued innovations at Amazon (did someone say drones ?), he acquired The Washington Post from longtime owners, the Graham family. Bezos is betting on his knack for web innovation to bring the publication into the digital age.

2010 – Mark Zuckerberg

The same year as he was hailed as TIME’s “Person of the Year “, The Social Network film sealed Mark Zuckerberg ‘s place as an American demagogue, next to the likes of Steve Jobs and others. In a Harvard dorm room, Zuckerberg and friends created what would become Facebook. The website spawned an entire social networking industry. Facebook’s massive $5 billion IPO, the third largest in history, would increase Zuckerberg’s wealth to about $33.1 billion, according to Forbes . making him No. 16 on the list of wealthiest Americans. His wealth makes him part of an elite club – one of three people with more billions than they have years of age. As of September, Facebook boasted 864 million daily active users .


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Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #online #businesses


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21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

2. Add a personal touch.

Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

3. Leverage social media.

A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

4. Write your own business bible.

Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

5. Focus on your specialty.

In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

6. Outsource the things you don t do.

Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

7. Aim high and be persistent.

Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

8. Embrace a life less frantic.

Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

9. Follow your own path.

Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

11. Harness your keystone habits .

Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

12. Practise mindfulness.

Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

14. Hire from within your networks.

When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

15. Keep it manageable.

Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

16. Know when to work for free.

Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

18. Learn to say no.

Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

20. Turn competition into inspiration.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

21. Know when to take a dream detour .

Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.


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