Tag: Under

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

#cincinnati business courier

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Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.


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Businesses You Can Start For Under $5, 000 #business #finance


#low cost business ideas

#

Businesses You Can Start For Under $5,000

Eight years ago, Texas resident Cynthia Ivie, a 43-year-old sales rep for Newsweek. struck out for Chicago with no more than a business idea and a 1989 Toyota Corolla packed with clothes, books, a vacuum cleaner, a stereo and a cocker spaniel named Buckley. Ivie’s big moneymaking idea: organizing the apartments and offices of busy people.

Today, Ivie’s company, White Space, offers “clutter control” services to hundreds of clients across the country, many of them recently relocated by big companies like the Walt Disney Co. and Exelon. White Space now has five full-time and eight part-time employees; Ivie expects revenues to top $1 million in 2007. “I knew the business would take off if I could survive long enough,” she says. “I had a lot of gumption–and probably a little naivet that kept me going.”

Gumption, naivet and very little cash. Ivie couldn’t afford a cellphone, so she bought a pager and a voicemail system for $200–”I knew where every pay phone in Chicago was,” she claims–and scraped together another $1,000 for brochures and business cards. For six months, she slept on a futon mattress in her friend’s basement. Eventually, she moved into her own home office, outfitted with two hand-me-down computers ($107) and two desks made out of hollow-core doors laid across cheap file cabinets ($20) from Office Depot. Total startup costs: around $1,500, including gas.

There are plenty of Ivies out there. And a lot them didn’t have–or need–gobs of green to launch their businesses.

Indeed, there are myriad ways to preserve precious cash while starting and building a business. Our special report, called “Small Business On The Cheap ,” offers plenty of helpful tips–from slashing marketing costs and telecom bills to cutting health care bills and travel expenses.

Like Ivie, fledgling entrepreneurs can save a bundle by selling services rather than products. “It’s really hard to start any product-based business for under $5,000,” says Richard Stim, co-author of Whoops! I’m in Business: A Crash Course In Business Basics with Lisa Guerin. In general, he says, there is less overhead for service-based businesses, which don’t require large outlays for equipment and inventory.

The best services to choose from are those that people don’t want to do themselves. Think yard work or preparing legal documents. Educational services such as teaching yoga, ballroom dancing or how to take the SATs are attractive, too. Better, still, if you can help people avoid or solve a problem–say, by inspecting homes for water quality or environmental safety.

There are some startup costs, of course. But when it comes to service businesses, the nice thing is that many don’t require expensive technology, save for maybe a computer and an Internet connection. If you want to start a child-care facility, for instance, you’ll want to spend a few dollars on toys and perhaps some childproof locks.

In some cases, as with child-care providers or real estate agents, you may need a state license or other certifications to set up shop. Child-care licenses run up to $100, depending on the state; you’ll also have to be certified in first aid and CPR (maybe $50 all in) and you’ll need some liability insurance (say, $450 per year).

A service startup’s biggest expense is probably marketing, be it printing brochures and business cards or placing ads in local newspapers. (Check out VistaPrint, which specializes in low-volume runs for smaller shops.) Setting up a blog can be a cheap way to get your message out, and it’s a lot less expensive than maintaining a Web site.

The best–and cheapest–advertising, however, is word of mouth. Offering free initial consultation meetings is a good way to get people talking. When Ivie landed in Chicago, she sent postcards to 30 local business people, promising three hours of organization services for free. “People snapped it up, tried the services, liked them, referred me to other people and the business started to grow,” she says.

In smaller markets, getting on friendly terms with the competition also can be good for business. If one piano teacher has too many students, she might sluice the spillover to you.

Whatever you do, though, remember to be patient. “If you’re looking to get rich quick, forget about it,” says Stim. “Instead, try to make a profit, enjoy what you’re doing and make it something that can keep going and going.”


Tags : , , , , , , ,

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

#cincinnati business courier

#

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.


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Compare Travel Water Purifiers #water #under #carpet


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Travel Water Purifiers

Travel water purifiers are convenient for any type of trip or adventure. They are portable enough to be taken on camping trips, traveling abroad, hiking trips and more. Unlike water filters that work to actually remove impurities from the water, a water purifier works to change the composition of the water to be drinkable. It can use a variety of techniques to purify the water, such as a UV light, osmosis and chemicals such as iodine and chlorine. They sometimes run on batteries or a solar charge and will purify hundreds of bottles of water per charge.

Travel water purification is a more convenient way to have drinkable water anywhere you go and will give you peace of mind to know that you are eliminating harmful impurities from your drinking water. You have various options to choose from when it comes to purifying your water while traveling. This guide will help you choose between a UV water purifier. a water bottle filter and purifier, and a chemical tablet that will change the composition of your water.

SteriPEN

SteriPEN offers a variety of travel water purifiers for the traveling individual. The SteriPEN Traveler Mini UV Water Purifier using ultraviolet rays to kill waterborne microbes. It comes in a compact design, weighing only 3.6 ounces. The non-mini version weighs 8 ounces. It fits perfectly within a small bag, purse or fanny pack. It can purify hundreds of gallons of water before needing a replacement. It is the perfect travel companion for those who will be away from a fresh water source for extended periods of time. It can be used with river water, faucet water abroad or other sources of water such as a lake or well.

The SteriPEN Traveler Mini UV Water Purifier works best with high quality lithium batteries. With a push of a button, a 16oz bottle of water is purified in under a minute s time, without the extra work of testing strips, replacement filter and pumping that chemical travel water purifiers require. There is no aftertaste as well. It is also available in blue and is just as fast and effective as the original and is proven to eliminate 99.9% of viruses, bacteria and protozoa. The SteriPEN mini will cost you around $70 and the regular will cost you $90.

Katadyn Exstream Purifier Bottle

Another option when choosing a travel water purifier for your travels is to consider using a Katadyn water bottle that purifies the water for you. Instead of using an outside source to purify the water, all you need is a water bottle with a purifier built right in. This makes it more convenient and portable than other models. Like the SteriPEN. it also kills 99.9% of waterborne bacteria, waterborne viruses, protozoa and microbial water. Unlike the SteriPEN, however, it also uses a cartridge filter that traps impurities and sediments and removes odors by squeezing the bottle two times. The third squeeze uses the purifier to kill any additional microbes hiding in the water.

The water bottle itself, along with the cartridge weights 8 ounces and will hold an additional 26 ounces. It can filter up to 26 gallons of water before needing replacements.

The downside of the Katadyn is having to replace the cartridge every 4-6 weeks. The filter and cyst also require changing when water flow becomes restricted. If you are going on a long trip, it is important to pick up additional cartridges, filters and cysts as to not run out while traveling.

It does not require any type of battery or charge, which is a convenience. Since it utilizes both a filter and a purifier, your water is purified faster than other purifying methods. The Katadyn Exstream Purifier Bottle costs anywhere from $40 to $50 and come in various colors and designs.

REI Micropur

The alternative to UVA purification systems and the water bottle that uses both a filtration system and purifier, is to use chemicals. Chlorine dioxide tablets can destroy up to 99.9% of hazards lurking in water, such as river water and lake water. It helps destroy waterborne pathogens. This method is often used abroad in international countries where fresh water is not plentifully available. Travelers who visit these countries or spend a lot of time outdoors near natural water sources find chlorine dioxide tablets, such s the REI Micropur to be a convenient option for purifying water into a drinkable state.

These small tablets are portable and lightweight and simply require dropping in a tablet into a water bottle. The downside is that it can take 30 minutes to purify. While this is an easy way to purify water, it takes a longer amount of time than other purifiers. 25 tablets cost around $10 a box.

2 Responses to Travel Water Purifiers

Vanessa Fierens says:

We are importing UK brand Pure Hydration s aquapure traveller that uses Mechanically Advanced Technology (chemical free) and removes bacteria, viruses, pathogens, toxic chemicals and bad odours. The filters have an average life of up to 350L and is a squeezable bottle that allows you to squirt water and invert the bottle. It weighs 150g with the filter and has a capacity of 650mL with the filter in the bottle.

We re interested in getting a review from your site, are we able to send a sample bottle?


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Businesses You Can Start For Under $5, 000 #ideas #for #a #business


#low cost business ideas

#

Businesses You Can Start For Under $5,000

Eight years ago, Texas resident Cynthia Ivie, a 43-year-old sales rep for Newsweek. struck out for Chicago with no more than a business idea and a 1989 Toyota Corolla packed with clothes, books, a vacuum cleaner, a stereo and a cocker spaniel named Buckley. Ivie’s big moneymaking idea: organizing the apartments and offices of busy people.

Today, Ivie’s company, White Space, offers “clutter control” services to hundreds of clients across the country, many of them recently relocated by big companies like the Walt Disney Co. and Exelon. White Space now has five full-time and eight part-time employees; Ivie expects revenues to top $1 million in 2007. “I knew the business would take off if I could survive long enough,” she says. “I had a lot of gumption–and probably a little naivet that kept me going.”

Gumption, naivet and very little cash. Ivie couldn’t afford a cellphone, so she bought a pager and a voicemail system for $200–”I knew where every pay phone in Chicago was,” she claims–and scraped together another $1,000 for brochures and business cards. For six months, she slept on a futon mattress in her friend’s basement. Eventually, she moved into her own home office, outfitted with two hand-me-down computers ($107) and two desks made out of hollow-core doors laid across cheap file cabinets ($20) from Office Depot. Total startup costs: around $1,500, including gas.

There are plenty of Ivies out there. And a lot them didn’t have–or need–gobs of green to launch their businesses.

Indeed, there are myriad ways to preserve precious cash while starting and building a business. Our special report, called “Small Business On The Cheap ,” offers plenty of helpful tips–from slashing marketing costs and telecom bills to cutting health care bills and travel expenses.

Like Ivie, fledgling entrepreneurs can save a bundle by selling services rather than products. “It’s really hard to start any product-based business for under $5,000,” says Richard Stim, co-author of Whoops! I’m in Business: A Crash Course In Business Basics with Lisa Guerin. In general, he says, there is less overhead for service-based businesses, which don’t require large outlays for equipment and inventory.

The best services to choose from are those that people don’t want to do themselves. Think yard work or preparing legal documents. Educational services such as teaching yoga, ballroom dancing or how to take the SATs are attractive, too. Better, still, if you can help people avoid or solve a problem–say, by inspecting homes for water quality or environmental safety.

There are some startup costs, of course. But when it comes to service businesses, the nice thing is that many don’t require expensive technology, save for maybe a computer and an Internet connection. If you want to start a child-care facility, for instance, you’ll want to spend a few dollars on toys and perhaps some childproof locks.

In some cases, as with child-care providers or real estate agents, you may need a state license or other certifications to set up shop. Child-care licenses run up to $100, depending on the state; you’ll also have to be certified in first aid and CPR (maybe $50 all in) and you’ll need some liability insurance (say, $450 per year).

A service startup’s biggest expense is probably marketing, be it printing brochures and business cards or placing ads in local newspapers. (Check out VistaPrint, which specializes in low-volume runs for smaller shops.) Setting up a blog can be a cheap way to get your message out, and it’s a lot less expensive than maintaining a Web site.

The best–and cheapest–advertising, however, is word of mouth. Offering free initial consultation meetings is a good way to get people talking. When Ivie landed in Chicago, she sent postcards to 30 local business people, promising three hours of organization services for free. “People snapped it up, tried the services, liked them, referred me to other people and the business started to grow,” she says.

In smaller markets, getting on friendly terms with the competition also can be good for business. If one piano teacher has too many students, she might sluice the spillover to you.

Whatever you do, though, remember to be patient. “If you’re looking to get rich quick, forget about it,” says Stim. “Instead, try to make a profit, enjoy what you’re doing and make it something that can keep going and going.”


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Criminal Defense Attorney in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – James M #lawyer, #attorney, #representation, #legal, #law,

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Criminal Defense Attorney in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

If you or a loved one are facing investigation, arrest, trial or jail time, in South Western Pennsylvania State or Federal Court, then you need an aggressive Criminal Defense Plan. You need James M. Herb. That includes having a Pennsylvania Criminal Attorney that is experienced and dedicated to seeking justice for people who are charged with a crime.

Whether you’ve been accused of:

  • Sexual Assault
  • Drug crime (possession, intent to distribute, or intent to manufacture)
  • Any Felony or Misdemeanor

You need your Criminal Defense Lawyer at your side.

Why Hire a Criminal Defense Lawyer?

Is there a warrant out for your arrest? Is it an arrest warrant or a bench warrant? Can you get out of jail on bond? How do you get a bail bond? How much does bond have to be? Do you want a jury Trial? Should you negotiate a plea bargain? What about your past criminal record? What if you were not alone? Does it matter if you are facing criminal charges in a State of Federal Court? How much does a Criminal Defense Lawyer cost? Will you lose your driver’s license (or child or car or gun)? An experienced Criminal Defense Attorney can answer all these questions for you, and help you decide what is best for your case.

Choosing the Best Criminal Attorney for Your Case

Anyone facing an allegation that they have violated a criminal law needs a criminal defense attorney they can respect and trust. Money, jail time and even someone’s life may be on the line and a criminal lawyer has to be trusted to fight hard for his client’s best interests.

James M. Herb has more than 30 years experience in helping people who are facing criminal authorities in arrests, allegations, investigations, trials or appeals.

Before deciding on a criminal defense lawyer for your case, you should talk with the attorney and get a feel for how you will work together. There is no bond like that between a criminal defense lawyer and his client, and deciding who to hire as your criminal defense attorney may be the most important decision of your life.

Contact us in Pittsburgh, PA, for more information about our Criminal Law services.


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Businesses You Can Start For Under $5, 000 #home #based #business #ideas


#low cost business ideas

#

Businesses You Can Start For Under $5,000

Eight years ago, Texas resident Cynthia Ivie, a 43-year-old sales rep for Newsweek. struck out for Chicago with no more than a business idea and a 1989 Toyota Corolla packed with clothes, books, a vacuum cleaner, a stereo and a cocker spaniel named Buckley. Ivie’s big moneymaking idea: organizing the apartments and offices of busy people.

Today, Ivie’s company, White Space, offers “clutter control” services to hundreds of clients across the country, many of them recently relocated by big companies like the Walt Disney Co. and Exelon. White Space now has five full-time and eight part-time employees; Ivie expects revenues to top $1 million in 2007. “I knew the business would take off if I could survive long enough,” she says. “I had a lot of gumption–and probably a little naivet that kept me going.”

Gumption, naivet and very little cash. Ivie couldn’t afford a cellphone, so she bought a pager and a voicemail system for $200–”I knew where every pay phone in Chicago was,” she claims–and scraped together another $1,000 for brochures and business cards. For six months, she slept on a futon mattress in her friend’s basement. Eventually, she moved into her own home office, outfitted with two hand-me-down computers ($107) and two desks made out of hollow-core doors laid across cheap file cabinets ($20) from Office Depot. Total startup costs: around $1,500, including gas.

There are plenty of Ivies out there. And a lot them didn’t have–or need–gobs of green to launch their businesses.

Indeed, there are myriad ways to preserve precious cash while starting and building a business. Our special report, called “Small Business On The Cheap ,” offers plenty of helpful tips–from slashing marketing costs and telecom bills to cutting health care bills and travel expenses.

Like Ivie, fledgling entrepreneurs can save a bundle by selling services rather than products. “It’s really hard to start any product-based business for under $5,000,” says Richard Stim, co-author of Whoops! I’m in Business: A Crash Course In Business Basics with Lisa Guerin. In general, he says, there is less overhead for service-based businesses, which don’t require large outlays for equipment and inventory.

The best services to choose from are those that people don’t want to do themselves. Think yard work or preparing legal documents. Educational services such as teaching yoga, ballroom dancing or how to take the SATs are attractive, too. Better, still, if you can help people avoid or solve a problem–say, by inspecting homes for water quality or environmental safety.

There are some startup costs, of course. But when it comes to service businesses, the nice thing is that many don’t require expensive technology, save for maybe a computer and an Internet connection. If you want to start a child-care facility, for instance, you’ll want to spend a few dollars on toys and perhaps some childproof locks.

In some cases, as with child-care providers or real estate agents, you may need a state license or other certifications to set up shop. Child-care licenses run up to $100, depending on the state; you’ll also have to be certified in first aid and CPR (maybe $50 all in) and you’ll need some liability insurance (say, $450 per year).

A service startup’s biggest expense is probably marketing, be it printing brochures and business cards or placing ads in local newspapers. (Check out VistaPrint, which specializes in low-volume runs for smaller shops.) Setting up a blog can be a cheap way to get your message out, and it’s a lot less expensive than maintaining a Web site.

The best–and cheapest–advertising, however, is word of mouth. Offering free initial consultation meetings is a good way to get people talking. When Ivie landed in Chicago, she sent postcards to 30 local business people, promising three hours of organization services for free. “People snapped it up, tried the services, liked them, referred me to other people and the business started to grow,” she says.

In smaller markets, getting on friendly terms with the competition also can be good for business. If one piano teacher has too many students, she might sluice the spillover to you.

Whatever you do, though, remember to be patient. “If you’re looking to get rich quick, forget about it,” says Stim. “Instead, try to make a profit, enjoy what you’re doing and make it something that can keep going and going.”


Tags : , , , , , , ,

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

#cincinnati business courier

#

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.


Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Businesses You Can Start For Under $5, 000 #business #name #generator


#low cost business ideas

#

Businesses You Can Start For Under $5,000

Eight years ago, Texas resident Cynthia Ivie, a 43-year-old sales rep for Newsweek. struck out for Chicago with no more than a business idea and a 1989 Toyota Corolla packed with clothes, books, a vacuum cleaner, a stereo and a cocker spaniel named Buckley. Ivie’s big moneymaking idea: organizing the apartments and offices of busy people.

Today, Ivie’s company, White Space, offers “clutter control” services to hundreds of clients across the country, many of them recently relocated by big companies like the Walt Disney Co. and Exelon. White Space now has five full-time and eight part-time employees; Ivie expects revenues to top $1 million in 2007. “I knew the business would take off if I could survive long enough,” she says. “I had a lot of gumption–and probably a little naivet that kept me going.”

Gumption, naivet and very little cash. Ivie couldn’t afford a cellphone, so she bought a pager and a voicemail system for $200–”I knew where every pay phone in Chicago was,” she claims–and scraped together another $1,000 for brochures and business cards. For six months, she slept on a futon mattress in her friend’s basement. Eventually, she moved into her own home office, outfitted with two hand-me-down computers ($107) and two desks made out of hollow-core doors laid across cheap file cabinets ($20) from Office Depot. Total startup costs: around $1,500, including gas.

There are plenty of Ivies out there. And a lot them didn’t have–or need–gobs of green to launch their businesses.

Indeed, there are myriad ways to preserve precious cash while starting and building a business. Our special report, called “Small Business On The Cheap ,” offers plenty of helpful tips–from slashing marketing costs and telecom bills to cutting health care bills and travel expenses.

Like Ivie, fledgling entrepreneurs can save a bundle by selling services rather than products. “It’s really hard to start any product-based business for under $5,000,” says Richard Stim, co-author of Whoops! I’m in Business: A Crash Course In Business Basics with Lisa Guerin. In general, he says, there is less overhead for service-based businesses, which don’t require large outlays for equipment and inventory.

The best services to choose from are those that people don’t want to do themselves. Think yard work or preparing legal documents. Educational services such as teaching yoga, ballroom dancing or how to take the SATs are attractive, too. Better, still, if you can help people avoid or solve a problem–say, by inspecting homes for water quality or environmental safety.

There are some startup costs, of course. But when it comes to service businesses, the nice thing is that many don’t require expensive technology, save for maybe a computer and an Internet connection. If you want to start a child-care facility, for instance, you’ll want to spend a few dollars on toys and perhaps some childproof locks.

In some cases, as with child-care providers or real estate agents, you may need a state license or other certifications to set up shop. Child-care licenses run up to $100, depending on the state; you’ll also have to be certified in first aid and CPR (maybe $50 all in) and you’ll need some liability insurance (say, $450 per year).

A service startup’s biggest expense is probably marketing, be it printing brochures and business cards or placing ads in local newspapers. (Check out VistaPrint, which specializes in low-volume runs for smaller shops.) Setting up a blog can be a cheap way to get your message out, and it’s a lot less expensive than maintaining a Web site.

The best–and cheapest–advertising, however, is word of mouth. Offering free initial consultation meetings is a good way to get people talking. When Ivie landed in Chicago, she sent postcards to 30 local business people, promising three hours of organization services for free. “People snapped it up, tried the services, liked them, referred me to other people and the business started to grow,” she says.

In smaller markets, getting on friendly terms with the competition also can be good for business. If one piano teacher has too many students, she might sluice the spillover to you.

Whatever you do, though, remember to be patient. “If you’re looking to get rich quick, forget about it,” says Stim. “Instead, try to make a profit, enjoy what you’re doing and make it something that can keep going and going.”


Tags : , , , , , , ,

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

#cincinnati business courier

#

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.


Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , ,