Tag: Small

Top 5 Small Business Loan Requirements – How to get a Small Business Loan

#sba loan requirements

#

Top 5 Small Business Loan Requirements

The time has come to expand your business with new employees, a larger location or a new product line. It’s an exciting time, but stressful because you’re not sure you have the cash reserves to manage the expansion.

For many small businesses, this situation calls for a small business loan a cash infusion that pays for itself, plus the interest, with the new opportunities and extra income it allows you to create.

Many of our Kabbage customers are new to small business lending. Though they’re familiar with personal loans, they only know the basics of small business loans and lines of credit. For those who “resemble that remark” and for more experienced folks who would like a review of how to get a small business loan here is your expert-researched, Kabbage-curated list of the top five small business loan requirements to get the best possible small business loan.

#1: Strong Credit

The bad news about small business lending is it can be hard to qualify for the best rates and deals. The good news is this decade has more options for good small business loans than any other time in history. You can choose between platform lending. traditional loans (like from a bank) and a variety of hybrid options available from local vendors or via the internet.

This flexibility doesn’t mean your company shouldn’t look as good as possible on paper. Your FICO credit score will figure heavily in any lending decision, so (if time permits) spend time grooming that number in the months prior to applying. Research what other metrics the lenders you want use, and groom them as much as possible, too.

If you have a major ding in your credit, like a repossession or string of late payments, be prepared to discuss them and why things will go better in the future.

#2: Solid Business Plan

Part of understanding how to get a small business loan is ensuring you have a solid business loan. You should have one of these anyway, since a strong business plan is a prerequisite for stellar business success. Traditional lenders will expect to see an updated, professionally prepared business plan as part of the lending process. Lacking one tells them you’re not ready for the “big leagues” and are a bad credit list.

Though platform lenders like Kabbage won’t insist on seeing your formal business plan, similar documents about your social presence, industry statistics and unique market advantages all of which are part of a comprehensive business plan will go into decisions about what to lend you and how much it will cost.

Either way, get a business plan together.

#3: Compelling Personal Resume

Traditional lenders want proof that the people responsible for running a business are qualified to do so, and part of that proof will be seeing the resumes for you and other principles like owners and executive officers. This resume should be as solid, well-edited and up-to-date as any resume you’ve ever sent out.

Consider: the purpose of a resume is to get you the job you want. The purpose of this resume is to get you the job of running the company you want, instead of the company you have.

Platform lenders don’t look at your traditional resume, but they will look at your business’ curriculum vitae in terms of performance metrics and social sharing. Take time to groom those items as substantially as you would a regular resume.

#4: Bulletproofed P L Statements

Like your business plan, you should have these anyway. You should be using your profit and loss statements as part of a robust monthly “vital signs” check for your business. If you’re not doing them, dig into your accounting software for half an hour. You’ll find a tool that compiles P Ls from your records. If you’re not using software to keep track of your financials get started on doing that.

Lenders of all stripes are looking for three things in your P L: reliability, professionalism and ethicality.

  • Reliability – They want evidence that you will be able to make your promised payments, based on enough cash flow to cover the loan. If you don’t, the lender will assume that lending you money is too high a risk.
  • Professionalism – Lenders presented with incomplete, inaccurate or hastily prepared P L statements will assume that your business is similarly disorganized.
  • Ethicality – If you “fudge” your numbers to look better and get caught, you are done with that lender. The decision makers will assume that you cut ethical corners in other places.

#5: Knowledge of the Loan Needed

This is actually the first of the small business requirements that you should address, but we wanted to mention it last so it would be the freshest in your mind. Lending isn’t what it used to be – a situation where you went to a couple of banks, all of which offered the same basic products, and hoped they would agree to give you a loan.

Modern small business lending includes a wide array of traditional, platform and peer-to-peer options with wildly varying qualification requirements and rates of interest. Before you start working in earnest on the other four requirements for your loan, decide what kind of loan you need. That way you won’t waste time and effort preparing the wrong documents.

Do you have a tale of success or woe to share with the Kabbage community about when you aced a loan application or were embarrassingly unprepared? Share your story in the comments below.


Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy for Small Businesses #franchising #your #business


#business bankruptcy

#

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy for Small Businesses

Many small business owners find that a personal Chapter 7 case is best.

If you are a small business owner struggling with debt, Chapter 7 bankruptcy may help. Chapter 7 bankruptcy can eliminate most or all of the debts for which you are personally liable. If you are a sole proprietor or your business is a general partnership, you are personally liable for your business’s debts, and Chapter 7 may work well for you. If, on the other hand, your business is a separate legal entity, such as a corporation or LLC, you must file a bankruptcy on behalf of the business. While you may be able to use Chapter 7 in this situation, you’ll need a lawyer to represent you.

Get Informed Articles Information

Overview Articles

Overview Articles

If you are a struggling small business owner, filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy may help save your business or provide a simple way to liquidate it.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy can help you eliminate personal liability for business debts.

If you have primarily business debts, you don’t have to pass the means test in order to qualify for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Chapter 7 for Different Business Structures

Chapter 7 for Different Business Structures

Find out how Chapter 7 bankruptcy works for sole proprietors, partnerships, LLC, and corporations.

As a sole proprietor, you may be able to wipe out both your personal and business debts by filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Learn about Chapter 7 bankruptcy for partnerships and how it may affect you as a partner.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy can help corporations and LLCs going out of business by providing an orderly liquidation of the business.


Tags : , , , , ,

Small Business Advice Program #startup #business #loans


#small business advice

#

Small Business Advice Programme

This project is a voluntary response by the business community to the challenges that recession brings for small business across the country. We have assembled a panel of people, with significant business experience, who are volunteering their time to give practical advice to small businesses. Your business can benefit from tapping into this pool of knowledge by applying for an advice meeting through this site.

No cost.

No hassle.

No long application process.

Just practical advice from experienced people who are volunteering to help keep your business in business.

Tuesday, March 27 2012

Small Business Support Programme Expands Into The Dublin Region

On 28th March 2012, John Perry TD, Minister for Small Business will lauch the programme in the Dublin region.

Small Business Support Programme Expands Into Mid-West Region

‘Minister Peter Power launches voluntary programme to help small businesses’

A programme designed specifically to come to the aid of small businesses and help them ride out the recession is being expanded into the Mid West Region (Clare, Limerick and Tipperary), it was announced last night in Thomond Park, Limerick.

The move follows the success of the programme in Carlow, Cork, Kilkenny, Waterford and Wexford over recent months. More than 60 volunteer advisors with different skill sets have helped over 150 companies since the smallbusinessadvice.ie launched in late 2009, giving specific confidential help on the problems facing small business in a downturn.

Tuesday, May 11 2010

Small Business Support Programme Expands Into South-East Region

‘Minister O’Keeffe launches voluntary programme to help small businesses’

A programme designed specifically to come to the aid of small businesses and help them ride out the recession is being expanded into the South East Region (Waterford, Wexford, Kilkenny and Carlow), it was announced last night (Monday, May 10) in Waterford.

The move follows the success of the pilot in the Cork region over the past six months. More than 35 volunteer advisors with different skill sets have helped over 70 companies since the smallbusinessadvice.ie launch in late 2009, giving specific confidential help on the problems facing small business in a downturn.


Tags : , , ,

The 5 Worst Pieces of Advice for Small Business Owners #local #business


#small business advice

#

Mashable

The 5 Worst Pieces of Advice for Small Business Owners

When you’re starting a business, there’s no shortage of people eager to hand out advice. It seems that everyone, even someone you’ve just met, has an opinion on how you should be developing your product, running your marketing, handling your finances and much more.

I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve met some very smart people and have had great mentors over the years. Their contributions have been invaluable to my success. Yet after launching two companies over two decades, I’ve come across some terrible advice.

Below are the top five bits of advice that I could have done without.

1. “Hire people you know.”

I’ve had countless people tell me that it’s always better to assemble a team of “known quantities” — friends, colleagues or former employees whom you know and trust. But I’ve discovered that for me, the best hiring decisions are based on the specific positions I need to fill at that moment in time. In other words, I need to focus on the specific expertise and skill sets the company needs, rather than trying to piece together how Jill, Sally and Joe will fit into the new business.

In addition, if things aren’t working out between an employee and your company, you need to part ways (and usually, the sooner the better). You may be more reluctant to let friends go, even if you know they aren’t good fits.

2. “There’s no room for you in the market.”

When my husband and I launched a legal document filing company the second time around, the field was quite crowded, with several big names and established players. Many people told us to find a new space because there simply wasn’t room for us to compete.

However, the key to business success doesn’t always hinge on finding a completely empty field; rather, it’s how you define your company and its place in the market. Starbucks wasn’t the first company to sell coffee, but they did revolutionize the coffee shop by selling an experience along with a caffeine fix. Still, numerous boutique coffee shops are able to open and thrive today, even though there’s a Starbucks around the corner.

Rather than struggling to come up with a brand new idea, take a look at your target industry and see where there’s a void to be filled. Figure out the best possible way to fill that need and run with it. You don’t always have to blaze a new trail, but you need to know who you are.

3. “You have to be cheaper than the other guys.”

I admit that my husband and I fell into this pricing trap with our company. We felt that the only way we could compete with the “big guys” was to undercut them on price. So, we dropped our prices. Our business grew, customers were happy, more customers came in, yet we were nearly losing money with every new order.

Many young companies feel the pressure to discount their prices heavily in order to win business. While customer acquisition is important, attracting customers at unsustainable price levels will just result in a race to the bottom. I’ve learned that you’re better off in the long run to focus on how to bring more value to customers, rather than simply slashing your prices. After all, someone will always be able (or willing) to absorb a lower cost than you. You’ll need to find a new way to stand out, and then work as hard as you can to be exceptional in those differentiating areas.

4. “Social media is free.”

Over the past several years, I’ve had people tell me that starting a small business today is much easier than a decade ago, because of all the free marketing on Facebook. Twitter and Yelp. Sure, you don’t have to spend a dime to join Facebook, create a Twitter account or start a blog. But, I think a more apt comparison is that social media is free like a puppy. It may not cost much to bring a shelter puppy home, but from day one, it’s an endless whirlwind of training, toys and treats.

Likewise, social media is far from free once you factor in the blood, sweat and tears it demands. From developing fresh content to keeping up conversations, social media requires nonstop commitment once you start. Unless you consider your time (or the time of your employees) worthless, then there’s a significant cost involved with social media.

5. “You have to spend money to make money.”

This cliché never applied to our business, particularly at the beginning. We set up shop in our apartment and did everything we could to keep expenses down. Sometimes we thought things would be better if we just had the money for X, Y or Z. But it’s risky to think that throwing money at a problem is your silver bullet. Sometimes, creative thinking and strategy work far better than a checkbook.

We had to learn the difference between spending money and investing in the business. Certainly, money can scale a business faster, but only when you spend money on those things that will produce more money in return.

Final Thoughts

People will always give you advice — some good, some bad. The key is to never forget that you are running the show. Other people’s opinions should always be viewed through the context of your own experiences, convictions and value system.

Final decisions are always up to you, so there’s no blaming someone else for bad advice.

What’s New

What’s Rising

What’s Hot


Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Government grants for small businesses #e #business


#government grants for small businesses

#

Mr Mark Brennan commenced in his role as the Australian Small Business Commissioner on 2 January 2013.

Dr Craig Latham commenced in his role as Deputy Small Business Commissioner on 21 May 2013.

The role of the Australian Small Business Commissioner is to represent small business interests and concerns to the Australian Government.

There are Small Business Commissioners in Victoria, New South Wales, Western Australia and South Australia.

If you are in a business dispute, Dispute Support can assist you to find the right dispute resolution service

A good understanding of your dispute will help you to make informed decisions about the best way to try to resolve the dispute.

Tips from the Australian Small Business Commissioner to help you build strong business relationships and avoid disputes

Find out about dispute resolution services available in your state or territory.

There are publications available to assist you to understand, manage and prevent disputes.

It is difficult to know where to begin when starting your own business. It’s important to consider whether you really understand what’s involved and that you are aware of your tax and legal obligations.

Are you are thinking about expanding your business? Here are some suggestions that could help you grow your business.

Once you decide to sell or pass on your business, you need to consider how much your business is worth, the best time to sell and whether you should make use of a broker or other professionals to maximise selling opportunities.

There are resources available to assist you with starting and growing your business.

The family business sector accounts for 70% of all businesses in Australia.

Family Business Australia’s top ten tips for surviving a family business.

Family Business Australia’s best practice principles for family business.

Read case studies from family businesses.

Find out about upcoming events and training tailored for family businesses

Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about starting, growing and exiting a business.

Planning should always be the first step in developing a business.

Checklists that contain a series of questions to guide you through the various stages of setting up your business including before you start, when you start, when you buy and when you run your business.

Links to help guide your business.

View news articles from the Australian Small Business Commissioner.

Find out about upcoming small business events that Commissioner and his Office are involved in.

Keep up to date with the Commissioner’s newsletter.

View submissions and reports by the Office of the Australian Small Business Commissioner

The latest small business news from across the Australian Government, including ACCC, ASIC, ATO and business.gov.au

View blog posts from the Australian Small Business Commissioner.

View series of related blog posts.

Top 5 FAQs

Easy way to stay up to date

Support


Tags : , , , ,

5 Fantastic Small Business Payroll Services Compared – Capterra Blog #business #management #courses


#small business payroll

#

5 Fantastic Small Business Payroll Services Compared

Share This Article

If you didn’t have to hire, manage, and pay employees, life would be a lot easier. Unfortunately, that plan ends up with you sitting alone in a dark room, trying to do everything for your business while slowly losing your mind. Luckily, you can pay someone else to take care of this stuff. Payroll services will take the burden off you, give your employees a regular paycheck, and some can even manage your payroll taxes.

For many companies, hiring someone to manage HR operations like paying employees and managing benefits is cost prohibitive. Payroll services cost substantially less than hiring a new employee and can take a lot of work off your plate.

Here are five small business payroll services to compare.

Intuit Payroll

Inuit’s full-service payroll option covers basically everything. All you do is enter the hours to pay your employees for, and Intuit does the rest. In this case, “the rest” includes direct deposits, tax preparation, and even tax filing. The company also offers smaller options, which still manage payments, but which require you to do more work on the tax end.

Intuit also supports a wide range of secondary payroll features. You can add in health insurance contributions, 401(k) deductions, IRA payments, and other retirement plans. Pay period deductions can be modified with catchup payments for your older employees, as well.

Intuit’s options range from $25 per month to $99 per month, depending on how much handholding you’d like. All the options cost an additional $2 per month, per employee.

OnPay

OnPay is one of the newer payroll service providers on the scene, but reviewers and users have been happy with its offering. Like Intuit, OnPay can manage payments, payroll taxes, and can pay your employees by direct deposit or print-on-demand checks.

OnPay is geared toward the smaller end of the small-business spectrum. It lacks support for retirement and some other more advanced deductions.

OnPay costs $39.95 per month, and for that price you get ten employees. Beyond ten, you’ll pay $1 more per month, per employee. Direct deposit functionality costs an additional $8 per month.

Paychex Flex

Paychex is one of the biggest payroll processors around. The company claims that it “pays 1 in 15 US private sector workers.” Paychex Flex is the company’s online, payroll service option.

Paychex offers a lot of optional features. You can have checks issued, use direct deposit, or even use prepaid debit cards to pay your employees. The service can also administer retirement plans, do your taxes, and garnish wages when the IRS comes after your vice-president of sales.

Most reviewers have suggested that Paychex is best suited to companies with under 50 employees and it excels at managing complex payment systems, like if your business spans state lines. Paychex doesn’t advertising its pricing model.

Wagepoint

A relative newcomer, Wagepoint is a simple, clean option for small business payrolls. The company offers automatic deductions for 401(k) contributions, health insurance, and union dues, along with a whole host of other options.

Wagepoint has been adding new features along the way, so the service of 2016 may look very different from the service of 2015. I met the folks who run the show at a conference in New York earlier in 2015, and I was very impressed.

The CEO told me that in the first days of the company’s operation, they experienced a glitch which resulted in some employees being mispaid at one client company. To make things right, Wagepoint paid the employees of the affected company out of its own pocket. That’s how you respond to a customer issue.

Wagepoint costs $15 per pay period, plus $2 per employee, and is running smooth and glitch free, these days.

ZenPayroll

ZenPayroll lets your employees enter their own information when they join the business, saving you the manual data entry. The one last hurdle – removed. ZenPayroll also allows your employees to donate to charities and they’ll get neat little explanations of their pay breakdown on each paystub. It’s cool.

In addition to the self-onboarding process, employees get a login once they’re added in the system. They’ll have access to their own paystubs from any internet device, they can manage charitable contributions, and they can update their tax withholdings.

It also offers the usual stuff – direct deposit, taxes, etc.

ZenPayroll is $25 per month, plus $4 per month, per employee.

Final thoughts

Like most business software, payroll services aren’t black and white, good and bad. Depending on the size of your business, your payment frequency, and the number of benefits you offer, you’re going to have very specific best options.

If you need more, check out Capterra’s full payroll software directory. We can point you in the right direction, and get you spending more time on growing your business.

Image by Abby Kahler

Looking for Payroll software? Check out Capterra’s list of the best Payroll software solutions.


Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Small business owners: what does the King v #import #export #business


#small business owners

#

Blog Post

What is the King v. Burwell lawsuit?

Earlier this summer, in mid-June, the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, confirming that the purpose of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is to improve the healthcare market and not leave people uninsured.

Small business owners and health insurance

If the Supreme Court had sided with the plaintiffs, the federal subsidies that make insurance affordable for millions of people in the United States would have been erased. Some of these subsidies are worth thousands of dollars a year. According to the Huffington Post report, this would leave about 8 million people without insurance.

This is a relief for those who have purchased health insurance through the Obamacare health insurance exchanges because they won’t be losing their coverage anytime soon.

What if I don’t purchase insurance through the ACA Exchanges for myself or employers?

Small business owners are not required to purchase their insurance through the Marketplace. However, it is required that you purchase some variation of health insurance for yourself and your employees. If purchasing insurance for your employees still seems to costly, check into the possible tax credits the ACA offers.

If you do not purchase coverage, you could be fined:

  • 2 percent of your yearly household income
  • $325 per person (and $162.50 per child) for the year

You can learn more about that on HealthCare.gov s Fees Exemptions page.

Are you a small business that offers health insurance?

Remember, health insurance law doesn’t require you to provide health insurance for your employees unless you have 50 or more full-time employees. But, as a business owner, providing insurance for your workers is a major plus because it gives you employees a perk and a reason to stay.

Without health insurance, they may be inclined to look for a new job with a large corporation that can afford to provide insurance for all it’s employees.


Tags : , , , , , , ,

6 Smart Budgeting Tips for Small Business Owners #business #plan #writer


#small business tips

#

6 Smart Budgeting Tips for Small Business Owners

If you run a small business, it s likely that you re operating on a relatively limited budget. Whether you bootstrapped your business or are trying to pay back loans you took out to cover your startup costs, it s in your best interest to conserve money wherever you can.

Without a thorough budget plan, however, it can be difficult to track and manage your finances. This is especially true for any unexpected business expenses that may come up, as they often do. A 2015 survey by small business credit provider Headway Capital found that although 57 percent of small business owners anticipated growth this year, nearly 19 percent were concerned about how unexpected expenses would impact their business.

If you want to keep your business operating in the black, you ll need to account for both fixed and unplanned costs, and then create and stick to a solid budget. Experts offered their advice for small business owners looking to keep their finances in order. [4 Tips for Reducing Startup Costs]

Define and understand your risks

Every business venture has a certain degree of risk involved, and all of those risks have the potential for a financial impact on your company. Paul Cho, managing director of Headway Capital, said that small business owners need to consider their long- and short-term risks to accurately plan for their financial future.

How will changes in minimum wage or health care requirements impact your workforce? Cho said. Do you operate in a geography at high risk of a natural disaster? Do you rely heavily on seasonal workers? Understanding the potential risks facing you on a short- and long-term basis is important for all small businesses. Once you ve mapped out the threats to productivity, a clearer picture can be built around emergency planning, insurance needs, etc.

Overestimate your expenses

If your business operates on a project-to-project basis, you know that every client is different and no two projects will turn out exactly the same. This means that often, you can t predict when something is going to go over budget.

Every project seems to have a one-time cost that was never anticipated, said James Ontra, CEO of presentation management company Shufflrr. It usually is that one unique extra item [that is] necessary to the job, but [was] not anticipated when bidding the job.

For this reason, Ontra advised budgeting slightly above your anticipated line-item costs, no matter what, so that if you do go over, you won t be fully unprepared.

I go by the cost-moon-stars theory, he said. If you think it will cost the moon, expect to pay the stars.

Pay attention to your sales cycle

Many businesses go through busy and slow periods over the course of the year. If your company has an off-season , you ll need to account for your expenses during that time. Cho also suggested using your slower periods to think of ways to plan ahead for your next sales boom.

There is much to be learned from your sales cycles, he said. Use your downtime to ramp up your marketing efforts while preventing profit generation from screeching to a halt. In order to keep your company thriving and the revenue coming in, you will have to identify how to market to your customers in new and creative ways.

Plan for large purchases carefully and early

Some large business expenses occur when you least expect them a piece of equipment breaks and needs to be replaced or your delivery van needs a costly repair, for instance. However, planned expenses like store renovations or a new software system should be carefully timed and budgeted to avoid a huge financial burden on your business.

Substantial business changes need to be timed carefully, balancing the risk with the reward and done with a full understanding of the financial landscape you re operating within, Cho told Business News Daily. An up-to-date budget and data-driven financial projections are important components that help guide when to make large investments in your business.

Remember that time is money, too

One of the biggest mistakes small businesses make is forgetting to incorporate their time into a budget plan. Ontra reminded business owners that time is money, especially when working with people who are paid for their time.

Timing underestimation directly increases costs, Ontra said. For us, the biggest underestimation is allotting time for client feedback. It is a Herculean effort sometimes to meet a deadline with lots of people focused on a single task. Then, the client needs to give feedback for us to proceed. If the client is distracted with other issues, feedback planned for a three-day turnaround, can become a week or longer. Not only do you start to lose time to the delivery schedule, your team also loses momentum as their collective thought shifts focus to another project.

Ontra recommended treating your time like your money, and set external deadlines later than when you think the project will actually be done.

If you believe the project will finish on Friday, promise delivery on Monday, he said. So, if you finish on Friday, deliver the work early and become a star. If for some reason time runs over, deliver on Monday and you are still a success.

Constantly revisit your budget

Your budget will never be static or consistent it will change and evolve along with your business, and you ll need to keep adjusting it based on your growth and profit patterns. Cho suggested revising your monthly and annual budgets regularly to get a clearer, updated picture of your business finances.

Regularly revisiting your budget will help you better control financial decisions because you will know exactly what you can afford to spend versus how much you are projecting to make, Cho said. Take into account market trends from the previous year to help you determine what this year may look like. Once you have a clear understanding of your business s budgetary needs, you can accurately forecast what can be set aside for an emergency fund or unexpected costs.

Nicole Fallon Taylor

Nicole received her Bachelor s degree in Media, Culture and Communication from New York University. She began freelancing for Business News Daily in 2010 and joined the team as a staff writer three years later. She currently serves as the assistant editor. Reach her by email. or follow her on Twitter .

You May Also like

What is Zero-based Budgeting?

  • Organization is Key to Managing Business Finances

  • Don t Burn Through Your IT Budget: 5 Ways to Save Money


    Tags : , , , , , , ,
  • Chris Brogan says the Most Successful Small Businesses Do THIS #investor #business #daily


    #most successful small businesses

    #

    Chris Brogan says the Most Successful Small Businesses Do THIS

    Many people work 9-to-5 jobs for 30 years — praying only for the day they can retire.

    And they complain the whole time on Facebook about how much they hate their jobs.

    Yuck! I can’t fathom that.

    I love working for successful small businesses. And luckily, I don’t have a regular job.

    But what does it take to REALLY succeed as an entrepreneur?

    Chris Brogan says the Most Successful Small Businesses Do This

    And during a recent interview with MSNBC, Chris dropped some serious knowledge about staying weird making your customers feel like they belong to your tribe.

    Pay attention here:

    One of Brogan’s best small business tips is that you’ll attract opportunities by standing out being different.

    Follow outgoing examples from free-spirited entrepreneurs like Richard Branson, he says.

    Here are 4 other juicy nuggets from this stellar interview:

    1. Business is About Belonging

    People want to be part of a tribe or community.

    2. Share the Passion Not Just the Product

    Passion drives folks to do what they love. How can you leverage that passion for your business?

    3. Make Your Buyer the Hero

    Discuss how your product or service makes your customers heroes — not too promotional, though.

    4. Tell Their Story, Not Yours

    Our product helped Johnny make $100k this year.


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    Small Business Resources #business #advice


    #small business resources

    #

    Small Business Resources

    Whether you are starting out or already running a small business. you will need to comply with numerous federal and state small business regulations and requirements. Below are links to the federal and state resources that can help ensure that you comply with those obligations.

    The 50-State Resources section provides links to each state’s and the District of Columbia’s official website for everything from the Secretary of State’s office to the state tax agency to state license and permit information. There are also links to your state’s SBA and other state offices that have valuable free information and resources for small business owners. The Federal Resource section has information and resources on federal small business requirements, including IRS, OSHA, EPA, and others.

    For more help with your small business, see Nolo’s Small Business articles. or our full list of Small Business products .

    Get Informed Articles Information

    50-State Resources for Small Businesses

    50-State Resources for Small Businesses

    Links to the Secretary of State’s office or business filing office for every state.

    Links to the state tax agency website for every state with information on tax filing requirements, tax rates, forms and other state tax resources.

    Links to the sales and use tax divisions or seller’s permit agencies.

    Links to information on each state’s business license or permit requirements.

    Links to the state agencies with information and forms for complying with state securities laws requirements or exemptions from registration.

    Links to each state’s agency that handles employer payroll tax, unemployment, and other employment matters.

    Links to each state’s local SBA office with Information on small business loans and other resources for small businesses.

    Links to local SBDCs that provide free information and other resources for small businesses.


    Tags : , ,