Tag: Selling

Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business Opportunities and

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
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MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #business #acumen

#best home business

#

The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

Search This Website (Fast)





Tags : , , , , , , ,

MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #business #acumen

#best home business

#

The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

Search This Website (Fast)





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Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress #internet #business

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress #current #stock

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #business #attire

#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





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10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #small #business #development #center

#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





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Selling Your Business #ethics #in #business

#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .





Tags : , ,

MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #start #your #own #business #ideas

#best home business

#

The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

Search This Website (Fast)





Tags : , , , , , , ,

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #business #research

#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?





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