Tag: Selling

Business: News, comments – analysis, selling a business.#Selling #a #business


Business

Amazon delivery scandal Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Petrofac beefs up defences amid threat of takeover

Selling a business

Selling a business

Comment: Rolet s departure from the London Stock Exchange is going to end badly

Selling a business

Follow Telegraph Business

Be bold but don’t be naive about the money drying up

The sweet smell of success: how a small business grew into a high-end brand

Business Desk

EU closes in on Google as it prepares second antitrust fine

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Fox control of sky is bad news for UK, warns Neil

Old media braced for showdown with tech giants in the battle for scale

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

Emirates set to throw Airbus s A380 a lifeline with major order

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Selling a business

The power struggle behind the Saudi night of the long knives

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

For unlimited access to expert opinion and unrivalled insight from The Telegraph, join Premium today. Free for 30 days.

Economy

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

EU predicts eurozone boom but UK gloom in pessimistic forecasts

Markets

Market report: Burberry fall softened by activist investor upping stake

Industrial production smashes expectations but construction sector slips deep into recession

Market report: Takeover talk lifts Tesla supplier Telit Communcations

In charts: the FTSE keeps rising – can it last?

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Market report: OneSavings Bank benefits from dinner party landlord clampdown

Marks Spencer shares yo-yo as CFO quits and food expansion slows

Small Business Connect

Culture, staff and brand are key for scaling firms

There’s no such thing as being too small to export

Web chat: Small businesses and online learning

Should your business open a second location?

Opinion

Comment: To Netflix the spoils as the old guard is eclipsed

Selling a business

Comment: Bear as I am, the case is there for this bull market to charge on

Selling a business

Comment: The economy is growing faster than we think

Selling a business

Banks and Finance

David Davis says City is very much in my mind as Brexit talks resume

Top LSE investor ramps up revolt to oust chairman and keep CEO

Janus Henderson raises savings target after trimming workforce

Media and Telecoms

Vodafone backs ultrafast broadband for five million in threat to BT

21st Century Fox gets revenue boost from higher advertising sales

AT T told to sell CNN by US regulators

Retail and Consumer

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Selling a business

Watch John Lewis s Christmas advert with Moz the monster under the bed

Energy

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

National Grid pours investment into US as UK political threat looms

UK hands world s largest oil company Saudi Aramco $2bn loan to secure IPO

Transport

EasyJet hires new chief from rival Tui weeks ahead of McCall s exit

Flybe slims down fleet in effort to address overcapacity

Heathrow chairman hopes expansion scheme s regional hubs could mark a step-change for construction industry

Construction

New Zealand looks to woo thousands of British brickies in lead-up to Brexit

Construction sector returns to growth, but optimism is in short supply

Morgan Sindall bucks construction slowdown to increase forecasts

Utilities

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

DCC enters US fuel market with £152m acquisition

G4S downgrades revenue forecast amid slow trading in the Middle East and India

Questor

Questor: Compass sticks to the recipe for succession and serves up steady growth

Questor: National Grid is in politically choppy waters, but its index-linked income is precious

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Questor: there’s plenty of scope for this aviation firm’s undervalued shares to soar

Money

Latest bank transfer fraud victims: We ve lost £113,665 and are now homeless with eight pets

How the Government s inflation trick makes pensioners, commuters and students poorer

Biotech stocks are up 560pc in a decade – and this is how to play the sector for more

BT, Virgin and the biggest broadband firms to provide automatic compensation for poor service

Sponsored

Selling a business

The best place to start a business – four alternatives to London

Selling a business

Is your business really as secure as you think?

Selling a business

How can on-site generation help energy users profit from efficiency?

Selling a business

Follow Telegraph Business

Telegraph Media Group Limited 2017

Selling a business

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Business: News, comments – analysis, selling business.#Selling #business


Business

Amazon delivery scandal Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Petrofac beefs up defences amid threat of takeover

Selling business

Selling business

Comment: Rolet s departure from the London Stock Exchange is going to end badly

Selling business

Follow Telegraph Business

Be bold but don’t be naive about the money drying up

The sweet smell of success: how a small business grew into a high-end brand

Business Desk

Emirates set to throw Airbus s A380 a lifeline with major order

EU closes in on Google as it prepares second antitrust fine

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Fox control of sky is bad news for UK, warns Neil

Old media braced for showdown with tech giants in the battle for scale

Emirates set to throw Airbus s A380 a lifeline with major order

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Selling business

The power struggle behind the Saudi night of the long knives

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

For unlimited access to expert opinion and unrivalled insight from The Telegraph, join Premium today. Free for 30 days.

Economy

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

EU predicts eurozone boom but UK gloom in pessimistic forecasts

Markets

Market report: Burberry fall softened by activist investor upping stake

Industrial production smashes expectations but construction sector slips deep into recession

Market report: Takeover talk lifts Tesla supplier Telit Communcations

In charts: the FTSE keeps rising – can it last?

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Market report: OneSavings Bank benefits from dinner party landlord clampdown

Marks Spencer shares yo-yo as CFO quits and food expansion slows

Small Business Connect

Culture, staff and brand are key for scaling firms

There’s no such thing as being too small to export

Web chat: Small businesses and online learning

Should your business open a second location?

Opinion

Comment: To Netflix the spoils as the old guard is eclipsed

Selling business

Comment: Bear as I am, the case is there for this bull market to charge on

Selling business

Comment: The economy is growing faster than we think

Selling business

Banks and Finance

David Davis says City is very much in my mind as Brexit talks resume

Top LSE investor ramps up revolt to oust chairman and keep CEO

Janus Henderson raises savings target after trimming workforce

Media and Telecoms

Vodafone backs ultrafast broadband for five million in threat to BT

21st Century Fox gets revenue boost from higher advertising sales

AT T told to sell CNN by US regulators

Retail and Consumer

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Selling business

Watch John Lewis s Christmas advert with Moz the monster under the bed

Energy

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

National Grid pours investment into US as UK political threat looms

UK hands world s largest oil company Saudi Aramco $2bn loan to secure IPO

Transport

EasyJet hires new chief from rival Tui weeks ahead of McCall s exit

Flybe slims down fleet in effort to address overcapacity

Heathrow chairman hopes expansion scheme s regional hubs could mark a step-change for construction industry

Construction

New Zealand looks to woo thousands of British brickies in lead-up to Brexit

Construction sector returns to growth, but optimism is in short supply

Morgan Sindall bucks construction slowdown to increase forecasts

Utilities

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

DCC enters US fuel market with £152m acquisition

G4S downgrades revenue forecast amid slow trading in the Middle East and India

Questor

Questor: Compass sticks to the recipe for succession and serves up steady growth

Questor: National Grid is in politically choppy waters, but its index-linked income is precious

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Questor: there’s plenty of scope for this aviation firm’s undervalued shares to soar

Money

Latest bank transfer fraud victims: We ve lost £113,665 and are now homeless with eight pets

How the Government s inflation trick makes pensioners, commuters and students poorer

Biotech stocks are up 560pc in a decade – and this is how to play the sector for more

BT, Virgin and the biggest broadband firms to provide automatic compensation for poor service

Sponsored

Selling business

The best place to start a business – four alternatives to London

Selling business

Is your business really as secure as you think?

Selling business

How can on-site generation help energy users profit from efficiency?

Selling business

Follow Telegraph Business

Telegraph Media Group Limited 2017

Selling business

We’ve noticed you’re adblocking.

We rely on advertising to help fund our award-winning journalism.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.


Tags : ,

Business: News, comments – analysis, selling a business.#Selling #a #business


Business

Amazon delivery scandal Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Petrofac beefs up defences amid threat of takeover

Selling a business

Selling a business

Comment: Rolet s departure from the London Stock Exchange is going to end badly

Selling a business

Follow Telegraph Business

Be bold but don’t be naive about the money drying up

The sweet smell of success: how a small business grew into a high-end brand

Business Desk

EU closes in on Google as it prepares second antitrust fine

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Fox control of sky is bad news for UK, warns Neil

Old media braced for showdown with tech giants in the battle for scale

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

Emirates set to throw Airbus s A380 a lifeline with major order

Olympus whistleblower lands TV deal as Japan faces wave of fresh scandals

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Van Elle faces boardroom battle as founder seeks return

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Selling a business

The power struggle behind the Saudi night of the long knives

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

For unlimited access to expert opinion and unrivalled insight from The Telegraph, join Premium today. Free for 30 days.

Economy

Liam Fox: I m not a Little Englander, I m a free marketeer

Retail sales fall for first time in four years as inflation hits Britons in the pocket

Trump s $1 trillion challenge: how to rebuild the crumbling land of the free

EU predicts eurozone boom but UK gloom in pessimistic forecasts

Markets

Market report: Burberry fall softened by activist investor upping stake

Industrial production smashes expectations but construction sector slips deep into recession

Market report: Takeover talk lifts Tesla supplier Telit Communcations

In charts: the FTSE keeps rising – can it last?

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Market report: OneSavings Bank benefits from dinner party landlord clampdown

Marks Spencer shares yo-yo as CFO quits and food expansion slows

Small Business Connect

Culture, staff and brand are key for scaling firms

There’s no such thing as being too small to export

Web chat: Small businesses and online learning

Should your business open a second location?

Opinion

Comment: To Netflix the spoils as the old guard is eclipsed

Selling a business

Comment: Bear as I am, the case is there for this bull market to charge on

Selling a business

Comment: The economy is growing faster than we think

Selling a business

Banks and Finance

David Davis says City is very much in my mind as Brexit talks resume

Top LSE investor ramps up revolt to oust chairman and keep CEO

Janus Henderson raises savings target after trimming workforce

Media and Telecoms

Vodafone backs ultrafast broadband for five million in threat to BT

21st Century Fox gets revenue boost from higher advertising sales

AT T told to sell CNN by US regulators

Retail and Consumer

Unilever s work council threatens strike action over margarine sale

Amazon delivery scandal: Telegraph investigation forces online giant to overhaul treatment of drivers

Selling a business

Watch John Lewis s Christmas advert with Moz the monster under the bed

Energy

Have the lights gone out on the Big Six?

National Grid pours investment into US as UK political threat looms

UK hands world s largest oil company Saudi Aramco $2bn loan to secure IPO

Transport

EasyJet hires new chief from rival Tui weeks ahead of McCall s exit

Flybe slims down fleet in effort to address overcapacity

Heathrow chairman hopes expansion scheme s regional hubs could mark a step-change for construction industry

Construction

New Zealand looks to woo thousands of British brickies in lead-up to Brexit

Construction sector returns to growth, but optimism is in short supply

Morgan Sindall bucks construction slowdown to increase forecasts

Utilities

Landlords tendering for £300m of fire safety contracts – the biggest of their kind in eight years

DCC enters US fuel market with £152m acquisition

G4S downgrades revenue forecast amid slow trading in the Middle East and India

Questor

Questor: Compass sticks to the recipe for succession and serves up steady growth

Questor: National Grid is in politically choppy waters, but its index-linked income is precious

Questor: this is the trust to buy if you are worried that markets have become complacent

Questor: there’s plenty of scope for this aviation firm’s undervalued shares to soar

Money

Latest bank transfer fraud victims: We ve lost £113,665 and are now homeless with eight pets

How the Government s inflation trick makes pensioners, commuters and students poorer

Biotech stocks are up 560pc in a decade – and this is how to play the sector for more

BT, Virgin and the biggest broadband firms to provide automatic compensation for poor service

Sponsored

Selling a business

The best place to start a business – four alternatives to London

Selling a business

Is your business really as secure as you think?

Selling a business

How can on-site generation help energy users profit from efficiency?

Selling a business

Follow Telegraph Business

Telegraph Media Group Limited 2017

Selling a business

We’ve noticed you’re adblocking.

We rely on advertising to help fund our award-winning journalism.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.


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GE shifts strategy, financial targets for digital business after missteps, Reuters, selling business.#Selling #business


GE shifts strategy, financial targets for digital business after missteps

NEW YORK (Reuters) – General Electric Co wants its industrial software business to cut costs and lift profits next year under new chief executive John Flannery, and is considering expanded partnerships and the possible sale of some equity in the unit, according to people familiar with the business.

Former chief executive Jeffrey Immelt spent six years and more than $4 billion transforming 125-year-old GE into a digital industrial company. But GE has had technical problems and delays with its software platform, known as Predix, which connects equipment like turbines and elevators to computers that can predict failures and reduce operating costs.

This spring, GE called an unusual, two month time-out to tackle the Predix problems, which have not been previously reported. With fixes in place, GE will now emphasize sales to existing customers in its energy, aviation and oil-and-gas businesses, and scale back efforts to sell to new customers in other sectors, three senior GE executives told Reuters.

Our resources will go to our fastest-selling markets, GE Digital Chief Executive Officer Bill Ruh said in an interview.

To help investors better understand Predix, GE also has redefined digital revenue to exclude $3 billion in hardware related to its gas-fueled power plants, providing a clearer picture of the pure software business and avoiding double-counting, Chief Financial Officer Jeff Bornstein said.

The company now expects $12 billion in digital revenue in 2020, compared with $15 billion under the old definition. GE s total revenue hit nearly $124 billion last year.

The changes mark an important course correction for GE Digital, which so far has not delivered the revenue investors wanted and is partly responsible for a 25 percent decline in GE s share price this year to a near two-year low.

GE estimates the industrial internet market will be worth $225 billion a year by 2020, and Flannery, who became CEO on Aug. 1, appears committed to Immelt s vision of being a major player, according to two people familiar with his thinking.

But the 55-year-old leader, known for finance skills and making tough decisions, is likely to press GE Digital to reduce costs and lift profits next year. He also may restructure how GE Digital operates, bring in more partners and possibly sell a minority stake in the unit, they told Reuters.

There was a lot of money spent on Predix, said a former senior financial executive at GE who worked with Flannery. They are going to tighten the grip and ensure there s a return.

GE declined to comment on Flannery s plans.

Immelt was among the first executives to spot the industrial internet wave nearly a decade ago, and positioning the company to catch it became one of his signature strategic moves in his 16 year term as chief executive.

This is an all-encompassing change, Immelt said last year, as GE increased its digital investment.

Analysts and investors see potential for Predix to deliver substantial sales and profits. It already has attracted some large customers, including power utility Exelon Corp and elevator maker Schindler Holding AG, and orders rose 24 percent to $2.3 billion in the first half of 2017.

But some analysts and investors say the business has taken longer than expected to mature, and its current growth rate is too slow to hit GE s $12 billion target by 2020. Spending also soared under Immelt, which weighed on profits.

He gave Bill Ruh an endless checkbook, Nick Heymann, an analyst at William Blair Co., said of Immelt.

Case in point: GE has budgeted $700 million more in digital spending this year – to a total of $2.1 billion – to further develop Predix and its applications, and to boost sales efforts. GE executives noted this is likely to mark the peak for digital investment.

GE Digital Chief Financial Officer Khozema Shipchandler said the 2020 revenue target is within reach since recurring Predix subscriptions pile on significant revenue as time goes on.

FIXING PREDIX

Immelt pushed GE to go digital sooner than other companies. But some early missteps cost time and money as GE s strategy evolved. Engineers initially advised building data centers that would house the Predix Cloud. But after Amazon.com Inc and Microsoft Corp spent tens of billions of dollars on data centers for their cloud services, AWS and Azure, GE changed course.

That is not an investment we can compete with, Ruh said.

GE abandoned its go-it-alone cloud strategy a year ago. It now relies on AWS and expects to be using Azure by late October, four months behind schedule, the executives said.

As GE pivoted away from building data centers, its engineers focused on applications, which executives now saw as more useful for winning business and more profitable than the platform alone.

That is probably the biggest lesson we ve learned, Ruh said.

GE also faced legacy challenges in adapting to Predix software. GE has many algorithms for monitoring its machines, but they mostly were written in different coding languages and reside on other systems in GE businesses. This makes transferring them to Predix more time consuming, people familiar with the system told Reuters.

The acquisition of Meridium and ServiceMax over the past 10 months gave GE well-known applications and added about $150 million to annual digital revenue, GE said. But the new products also brought more code that had to be converted to run on Predix, people familiar with the systems said.

The result: software installation sometimes took much longer than GE anticipated, the code had bugs and applications sometimes lacked features that customers wanted, these people said.

GE executives acknowledged Predix had experienced technical problems and was behind schedule in hitting some goals. During the time out in May and June, GE Digital s programmers made Predix more stable, they said.

The changes in strategy have come with a change in leadership. Predix chief Harel Kodesh and GE Digital Chief Commercial Officer Kate Johnson both left this year. Patrick Franklin, who succeeded Kodesh, called the time out to fix Predix.

Ruh said the leadership evolved with the business and that GE has the right people to keep Predix growing.

RIVALS TAKE AIM

The competition is not standing still. Large rivals such as Siemens AG and a crop of nimble startups are pressing to gain market share in GE s main areas of energy, aviation, locomotives, health care and oil and gas.

Chicago-based startup Uptake signed a deal in March with subsidiaries of Berkshire Hathaway Energy to provide analytics on thousands of wind turbines, including those made by GE. C3 IoT, based in Redwood City, California, won a deal last year with French utility Engie SA, a GE customer. Engie later signed a digital partnership agreement with GE.

Stewart Stevenson, a maker of fracking pumps and other equipment, met with GE about Predix in 2015 but quickly decided against it.

They didn t seem to be able to customize to meet the needs of our customers, said Chris Harvell, the firm s chief technology officer. And if they did do any development, we d probably end up paying quite a bit of money.

The company chose Flutura, a 100-person, Houston firm started in 2012, for a pilot. Flutura lacked GE s scale, but could easily produce custom code, he said.

Ruh said that while GE faces competitors in every deal, many startups are not true competitors because Predix includes unique applications and is available globally.

No other competitor has these capabilities on their platforms, he said.

Inside GE, executives remain bullish. Predix will pay off handsomely if GE stays focused on building it and winning customers, said Joshua Bloom, co-founder and chief technology officer of Wise.io, an artificial intelligence firm GE bought last year.

But, he said, “doing that right and at scale is a massive challenge.

Selling business


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Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business Opportunities and

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

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10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business #business #books


#sell my business

#

10 Questions to Ask Before Selling Your Business

If you re thinking about selling your business, think twice. Selling a business should never be a spur-of-the-moment decision, says Curtis Kroeker, group general manager for San Francisco-based BizBuySell.com and BizQuest.com. business-for-sale marketplaces that have an inventory of about 40,000 businesses. You need to figure out things like if you should sell, when is the best time to sell, and what you need to consider before selling, among many other considerations.

So, should you sell your business? Here are 10 key questions to help you figure it out.

Is my business ready to sell? Kroeker recommends at least two years of preparation before putting your business on the market. Make sure you can produce two to three years of tax returns that are accurate and show maximum profitability to get the best price for your business, he says. You can t start putting things together the month before you sell.

How is a buyer going to value my business? Particularly with family ownership, companies sometimes run everything through the business, such as country club dues and car allowances, says Robert Kibby, section head of the corporate and securities group at Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf Harr Attorneys and Counselors. Loading the business with tax write-offs can make you appear less profitable and cause a buyer to undervalue your business.

Who should be on my team when I sell? It s important for entrepreneurs to figure out whose services will bring them through the sales process and help them get the best price for their business. Do you need an accountant? How about an appraiser, attorney, consultant and business broker? The buyer is typically going to have a good team to go over your business, so you should, too, Kibby says.

Is it the right time to sell? Many people wait till their business is on the decline to sell. That s the exact opposite of what you should do, says Debbie Allen. a Phoenix-based business and brand strategist and consultant. You want to sell when you are at the top of your game peaked out, she says. Some will say, I m making good money now. Why should I sell? That s thinking like a business owner, not an entrepreneur.

Is the market right? Before selling, look at current market conditions for your industry. Selling a home improvement business in 2006 showed a pretty good return. Fast forward a couple of years and many roofing, siding, home financing and other housing-related companies had lost a big chunk of their value. I saw companies who turned down an offer in 2005 who couldn t get three-quarters of that price a few years later, says Allan Siposs, a managing director of FMV Capital Markets in Irvine, Calif. which offers services for mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Wait until market conditions are better to sell.

Can I cope with the changes on the horizon? Rapidly changing technology, increasing globalization and other business trends can prove too much for some business owners. Keep your eyes trained three or four years down the road, and if you don t believe you can keep up, sell before your failure to adapt catches up with you. Some people find it hard to leave, but if you wait too long, the industry may pass you by, Allen says.

Can my business thrive without me or without a key customer? If a buyer is concerned that a business is too dependent on the owner or a single customer, he may take his offer elsewhere. A good business can operate when the owner is on vacation and has good revenue diversification, where no one customer represents more than five percent of the business, Siposs says.

Would I be willing to stay on if the buyer wants me to? Sometimes you can seal a deal by agreeing to stay on in a consulting role for a period of six months. But first, you need to determine whether it s really worth it to you. If you re willing to stay on, it might reduce the risk to the buyer and increase the value of the company, Siposs says.

What are the potential deal breakers? Unresolved issues can rear their ugly head and interfere with a sale, particularly in areas such as company ownership, accounting and intellectual property rights. For example, an owner may have used a contractor to write software for the company without requiring him to assign his rights to the company. This can create questions about who possesses critical rights, which can scuttle the deal, Kibby says. So, consider what your potential deal breakers are and try to resolve them before you re near to closing a deal.

Would I consider alternatives to an outright sale? If an outright sale isn t right for you, a CPA or investment banker can help evaluate other options. How about structuring a deal to pass on the ownership to employees through an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)? Would you consider selling a percentage of the company to a private equity fund? Or would you do a leveraged recapitalization, which is a loan that puts a portion of the proceeds in your pocket?


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7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #license


#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

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Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.


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Selling Your Business #business #information


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If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .


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MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #cottage #industry #ideas


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The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

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Selling Your Business #business #contract


#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .


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