Tag: Selling

Websites for Buying and Selling Used Baby Items #selling #and #buying #a #house

#

Websites for Buying and Selling Used Baby Items

With every spring comes spring cleaning, and with every spring cleaning comes an opportunity to de-clutter and rid your home of things you simply don’t use anymore. For many of us, a lot of these “things” are baby-related, whether they’re adorable onesies, baby toys or that Exersaucer that entertained your baby so nicely when you just needed 20 minutes to get something done.

There are a several websites geared towards parents who want to get rid of their stuff, but don’t want to deal with eBay and don’t trust selling on Craigslist. These sites are more intimate and are parent-friendly services that cater specifically to this niche audience.

If you are looking to sell (or buy) used baby gear, clothes, accessories and more, here are some good sites to start with:

This site just launched last month, and is a place for parents to used baby equipment and clothes. In addition to being an online marketplace, it’s touting itself as a community for parents to gather and discuss anything and everything related to parenting. There is a “Learn: How to Grow as a Parent” section which features blog posts and insights on subjects like child safety and raising children on a budget.

As for the commerce part of the site, you can immediately begin buying and selling gear after you register for a free account. Selling requires uploading a picture, description of the item and price. There are several categories to choose from including Learning, Health Hygiene, Clothing and more, but since it just recently launched, there aren’t many products featured in each. As the site continues to gain more visibility and members, I’m sure more inventory will be added.

thredUP is a site geared primarily for kids clothing and is designed to essentially be an online clothing swap. When selling, members build “boxes” of used gear, which means stuffing as many items of clothing as possible into a medium flat-rate USPS box as possible (15, give or take, according to the founder) and then describing the contents of the box on the site. If you want to buy, you simply look through the descriptions of the boxes on the site and select whichever fits your particular needs. You simply pay a $5 service fee and $10.95 shipping fee to have it sent to you, and in exchange, are asked to post a box of your own stuff on the site.

thredUP provides 10 prepaid USPS boxes with every new account, so that the process is easier for you. No pictures are included of the items, which makes it a little more difficult to make a decision, but thredUP upholds a high quality of standard for its process and requires members to follow the golden rule to “send only what you’d be willing to receive.” Basic membership is free, but they also offer a PRO membership for $29.99/year which includes features like first dibs on boxes and access to boxes of new, boutique clothing.

SwapBabyGoods is a site that lets you trade in used baby clothes and gear or simply sell it online. You have to register for a free account and then you can list clothes, gear, equipment, bedding, etc. that you want to swap for items in similar value, or simply want to sell. If you are looking to buy, you can peruse the numerous categories on the site and see if the seller would rather take payment for the item or swap it with something else that you’re willing to part with.

Since spring has officially sprung, maybe it’s time to give that basement a good cleanout.





Tags : , , , ,

Selling a business #business #cards #online

#selling business

#

smallbusiness.wa.gov.au

Selling a business

Selling a business will require planning to make sure you receive the best possible price.

You will need to understand your obligations before selling or closing your business .

Generally, selling a business involves the following steps:

Determining whether selling is the right option

Before deciding to sell check whether you:

  • really want to sell or if you just need a break from your business
  • have considered options such as bringing in outside management
  • have the support of family and friends
  • have considered if the market conditions are right for selling
  • will make enough money from the sale to support yourself until a new income source is secured
  • will be restricted from trading in a similar business once you have sold
  • fully understand the implications of selling, by consulting your financial adviser, accountant or lawyer.

Preparing your business for sale

Ideally, you will begin preparing for sale well before you put your business on the market.

This could include:

  • Making sure you document processes and policies, making it easier for the new buyer to operate the business.
  • Ensuring employees have documented job descriptions.
  • Obtaining written agreements from suppliers and review contracts to make sure they don’t expire during the sale.
  • Selling obsolete or slow moving stock.
  • Reviewing plant and equipment and selling anything not required.
  • Making sure premises are well presented.
  • Reviewing your lease agreement to ensure it doesn’t expire during the sale and includes provision to transfer the lease to a new owner.
  • Collecting outstanding debts and paying your creditors.
  • Obtaining audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years.
  • Reducing employee leave liabilities by encouraging them to take leave, if possible.

Potential buyers will want to undertake their own due diligence into your business. However, it is a good idea to prepare a buyer’s information pack outlining key information about the business and what is included in the sale.

As a general guide the pack should include:

  • confidentiality agreement
  • description of your business
  • customer or client profile
  • industry information including how your business performs against industry benchmarks
  • detailed list of business assets and their value – these may include documented procedures and systems, plant and equipment, stock, intellectual property, client list, lease information, employees’ skills and qualifications, key business relationships and contracts.
  • testimonials from suppliers and customers
  • audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years
  • offer and acceptance form
  • contract of sale.

Setting the right sale price

Determining the value of your business can be very difficult. You may want to obtain advice from your financial adviser, accountant or a registered business broker with experience in selling similar businesses.

TIP: Only a business broker licensed under the Real Estate and Business Agents Act 1978 is permitted to act as an agent for a business owner in the sale of their business in Western Australia.Generally businesses are valued using one of the following methods.

Return on investment (ROI)

This is the most common method for valuing a business. The following formula is used to calculate the selling price:

Sale price = (net annual profit x 100) ÷ ROI percentage

TIP: To find the ROI percentage for your industry talk to your accountant or contact us

Asset value

This method adds all the assets of the business together to determine its value. Assets may include stock, plant and equipment, property, vehicles, furniture, intellectual property, established client list and goodwill. The following formula is used to determine the asset value:

Sale price = assets of the business + goodwill

TIP: Valuing goodwill can be difficult, seek advice from your financial adviser or accountant.

Market value

This is most commonly used to value professional practices such as legal, veterinarian or insurance brokers. It is rarely used to value retail businesses.

The following formula is used to determine the market value:

Sale price = turnover x industry multiple

TIP: Make sure you have a good understanding of the current market and are aware of industry standards. Research the market for businesses similar to yours, compare prices and set a price that is competitive.

Making the sale

Selling your own business requires specific skills and resources; a licensed business broker or commercial real estate agent can assist you.

If you decide to sell your own business, here a few matters to consider:

Marketing

Use your immediate networks of competitors, clients, employees, friends and family to promote the sale of your business; you never know who could be interested.

Your accountant may have clients looking to buy an established business.

Advertise the sale of your business using:

  • websites dedicated to the sale of businesses
  • local, state or national newspapers
  • industry publications, trade journals, or specialist publications.

TIP: Use general terms to advertise your business and don’t disclose the business name.

Ensure potential buyers sign a confidentiality agreement

When selling a business it is common to receive applications from non genuine buyers. They could be competitors, suppliers, employees or clients trying to find out who is selling. Before giving your business information pack to potential buyers make sure they sign a confidentiality agreement first.

Negotiate the sale

Once a potential buyer has conducted due diligence, they may want to discuss terms before making a formal written offer. Prepare yourself for negotiation by considering:

  • What conditions do you want from the sale?
  • What are you prepared to compromise on?
  • At what point would you stop negotiating and walk away from the sale?

Finalise the sale

It is a good idea to involve a professional business broker, settlement agent or lawyer in the sale of your business. This will prevent problems and make sure the sale is valid.

A contract for sale of a business as a going concern should include all the details, and terms and conditions, negotiated and agreed with the buyer.

More information





Tags : , ,

Homeseller – s Checklist: Expenses to Expect When Selling Your Home #selling #your #own

#

Homeseller s Checklist: Expenses to Expect When Selling Your Home

Strategize for a quick and successful home sale with this all-in-one guide

In fact, if you start planning ahead of time, you may find ways to reduce some of the costs, perhaps by handling some tasks yourself or getting lots of competing bids for work.

Before the Sale: Expenses to Expect

Here are the typical upfront expenses. Some are a matter of choice, yet may be important investments in making sure your house sells for the highest amount possible — or sells at all.

  1. Painting. A new paint job is one of most cost-effective ways of freshening your house up, inside and out. If you’ve recently painted, this is less important — though if your color choices were bold or unique, you might want to tone them down with some crowd-pleasing neutrals. Your stager, if you hire one (see below) can help advise on the best colors. You can save some money by doing some of the painting yourself — hiring someone will quickly run into the thousands of dollars.
  2. Window washing. When did you last wash them — especially on the outside panes of upper floors? Sparkling windows make a surprisingly large difference to buyer perceptions. Hiring someone will cost a few hundred dollars, depending on the size and height of your home.
  3. Fixups. Which fixups are necessary (such as replacing cracked windows or stained carpeting) and which (such as major remodels) should be left for the buyer to handle is a separate discussion in itself. But there’s practically no house that couldn’t use some quick maintenance to make sure it looks well-cared for and leaves fewer items for a home inspector to comment on.
  4. Staging. It’s de rigeur in some parts of the United States, and less known in others — but staging your home, or having a decorator help declutter, reorganize, and in some cases refurnish it after you’ve moved your stuff out, can help impress buyers in a big way. In fact, studies show that buyers pay more for staged homes. Expect to pay a professional stager a few thousand dollars for their services (a bit less if some of your own furniture is usable.) For more on this topic, see Nolo’s article Is Hiring a Home Stager Worth the Cost? .
  5. Adding decorative or new items to your home (if you’re not hiring a stager). Even if you decide to save money by staging your own home, you’re almost guaranteed to have to buy things like a new doormat, new plush towels for the bathroom, flowers for the showings, and more, depending on what your house needs. Other likely possibilities include new couch cushions, area rugs, a nice table runner, and artwork to replace your wall of kids’ photos.
  6. Landscaping. Buyers are increasingly interested in the state of your garden. If it’s already fully planted, you’ll want to hire someone (or put in some sweat equity) to get it raked, pruned, and otherwise tidied up. If the area hasn’t already been landscaped, plan to add some new greenery and flowering plants. (By the way, if you plant in containers, you can take the containers with you when you move — unless they’re so big or incorporated into the property as to be considered “fixtures.”) Many sellers simply put in new sod — but do the buyers a favor and don’t leave the plastic mesh backing on it, in case the buyers want to replace it with something more interesting and environmentally friendly.
  7. Pre-inspection reports. Having a professional inspect your house for either termite/pest damage or other structural matters isn’t required. nor expected in most parts of the United States. Buyers expect to pay for their own inspectors, and in fact will probably want to hire ones they know and trust regardless of whether you’ve had the property inspected first. Yet there are situations where you might want to have the house inspected before letting buyers in — for example, if you’ve owned the property for many years and wonder whether any problems have arisen “below the hood” that you’re oblivious to, and would perhaps prefer to fix before buyers have a chance to get upset about them. Inspections will run you upwards of $200.
  8. Lights and heat while the house sits empty. If you’ll be moving out before putting your house on the market, expect to pay double utilities for a while. You’ll want to leave the lights and heat on in the house for sale, or program them to stay on during any hours that potential buyers and their agents may be stopping by the place. No one likes to enter a cold, dark house and fumble around for the light switches. Check your current bills for approximately what to expect.
  9. Extra homeowners’ insurance for the vacancy period. Check with your homeowners’ carrier. Your insurance may not apply when the home is “vacant,” which term will be defined in your policy. You can ask for a rider to cover any period of vacancy.

At Closing: More Expenses to Expect

The good news is, most of what you’ll be paying out at closing will come out of the sale proceeds. The bad news is, you’ll be saying goodbye to some big dollars.

  1. Real estate agent commissions. You, as the seller, will likely be paying the entire 5% – 6% commission, to be split between the buyer’s agent and yours. For ways to reduce this figure, see Nolo’s article Negotiate the Agent’s Commission When Selling Your House .
  2. Other closing costs or credits to the buyer. You might have agreed — based on local tradition or buyer negotiation — to pay various of the standard costs associated with closing the deal, such as fees for the escrow company; the mortgage and home appraisal; recording and transfer of the property; homeowners’ and title insurance; and more. If your local real estate market is sluggish, buyers may also ask you to pay all or a hefty portion of the closing costs, which typically add up to 2% to 4% of the selling price.
  3. Transfer tax. Your city or state may require you to pay transfer taxes, as a small percentage of the sale price.
  4. Home warranty for the buyer. Whether because the buyer requests it or to make the buyer feel secure about the home purchase, many sellers buy a home warranty on the buyer’s behalf. This is a service contract that covers repairs to appliances and certain systems within the house for the first year of ownership. It will cost about $500.
  5. Capital gains tax. If you earn less than $250,000 on your home sale (or $500,000 if you’re married and filing jointly), don’t worry — you won’t owe a thing in the way of capital gains taxes. But if you earn more than that, you’ll want to look further into the matter. Once you’ve subtracted things like the costs of preparing the property for sale from the supposed gains, you may not owe the tax. For more information, see Nolo’s article Avoiding Capital Gains Tax When Selling Your Home: Read the Fine Print .
  6. Moving costs. Asking your friends with pickup trucks to help can save you some dough — but will take a lot more time. Sometimes it’s worth paying for the deluxe treatment, where the company packs your boxes for you, transports them to the new location, and unpacks at the other end.

For more information on all aspects of marketing and selling your home, see Selling Your House: Nolo’s Essential Guide .

Talk to a Real Estate attorney.





Tags : , , , ,

Own Your Own Direct Selling Company With K – B Small Business Opportunities and

#small business ideas for women

#

Explore one of the best business ideas for women

In Kaeser & Blair, I not only found a lifelong business partner, but I discovered one of the best small business ideas around!

I looked at a lot of business ideas for women, but none of them were appealing to me. Kaeser & Blair offers you the ability to make a substantial income while owning your own business and selling awesome products. What could be better than that?

The best small business ideas can be found with Kaeser & Blair

Many companies – direct sale companies in particular – promote themselves as being good business ideas for women. They may offer the ability to sell products that women typically enjoy selling, or offer flexibility and freedom that allow women to work around a hectic schedule or diverse set of priorities. Many of these small business ideas sound great, but just don’t deliver on their promises.

Kaeser & Blair business owners
discuss how to make extra money.

Kaeser & Blair is different. K
/* 728×90, создано 05.02.11 */
google_ad_slot = “6127977750”;
google_ad_width = 670;
google_ad_height = 90;
//–>

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Selling Your Business #business #partnership

#selling a business

#

If you decide that selling your business is the right exit strategy for you, be sure that you cover all your bases. In order to sell your business officially, you will need to prepare a sales agreement. This is the key document in buying the business assets or stock of a corporation. It is important to make sure the agreement is accurate and contains all the terms of the purchase. It would be a good idea to have an attorney review this document. It is in this agreement that you should define everything that you intend to purchase of the business, assets, customer lists, intellectual property and goodwill.

The following is a checklist of items that should be addressed in the agreement:

Names of seller, buyer, and business

Assets being sold

Purchase price and Allocation of Assets

Covenant Not to Compete

Any adjustments to be made

The Terms of the Agreement and payment terms

List of inventory included in the sale

Any representation and warranties of the seller and buyer

Determination as to the access to any business information

Determination as to the running of the business prior to closing

Fees, including brokers fees

Date of closing

For additional guidance and to view a sample sales agreement, visit Agreement to Sell a Business .





Tags : , ,

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business #business #presentation

#selling a business

#

7 Steps To Selling Your Small Business

Loading the player.

Selling a small business is a complex venture that involves several considerations. It can require that you enlist a broker. accountant and an attorney as you proceed. Whether you profit will depend on the reason for the sale, the timing of the sale, the strength of the business’s operation and its structure. The business sale will also require much of your time and, once the business is sold, you’ll need to determine some smart ways to handle the profit. Reviewing these seven considerations can help you build a solid plan and make negotiations a success.

1.Reasons for the Sale
You’ve decided to sell your business. Why? That’s one of the first questions a potential buyer will ask. Owners commonly sell their businesses for any of the following reasons:

  • Retirement
  • Partnership disputes
  • Illness and death
  • Becoming overworked
  • Boredom

Some owners consider selling the business when it is not profitable, but this can make it harder to attract buyers. Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

2.Timing of the Sale
Prepare for the sale as early as possible, preferably a year or two ahead of time. The preparation will help you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make the business more profitable. These improvements will also ease the transition for the buyer and keep the business running smoothly. (Make sure the business you built continues to thrive long after you’ve left the helm by reading How To Create A Business Succession Plan .)

3.Business Valuation
Next, you’ll want to determine the worth of your business to make sure you don’t price it too high or too low. Locate a business appraiser to get a valuation. The appraiser will draw up a detailed explanation of the business’s worth. The document will bring credibility to the asking price and can serve as a gauge for your listing price.

4.Selling on Your Own vs. Using a Broker
Selling the business yourself allows you to save money and avoid paying a broker’s commission. It’s also the best route when the sale is to a trusted family member or current employee. In other circumstances, a broker can help free up time for you to keep the business up and running, keep the sale quiet and get the highest price (because the broker will want to maximize his or her commission). Discuss expectations and advertisements with the broker and maintain constant communication. (For more insight, read Do Your Need A Real Estate Agent? )

5.Preparing Documents
Gather your financial statements and tax returns dating back three to four years and review them with an accountant. In addition, develop a list of equipment that’s being sold with the business. Also, create a list of contacts related to sales transactions and supplies, and dig up any relevant paperwork such as your current lease. Create copies of these documents to distribute to financially qualified potential buyers.

Your information packet should also provide a summary describing how the business is conducted and/or an up-to-date operating manual. You’ll also want to make sure the business is presentable. Any areas of the business or equipment that are broken or run down should be fixed or replaced prior to the sale. (For related reading, see Prepare To Sell Your Business .)

6.Finding a Buyer
A business sale may take between six months and two years according to SCORE, a nonprofit association for entrepreneurs and partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Finding the right buyer can be a challenge. Try not to limit your advertising, and you’ll attract more potential buyers. (To learn more, read Finding The Best Buyer For Your Small Business .)

Once you have prospective buyers, keep the process moving along:

  • Get two to three potential buyers just in case the initial deal falters.
  • Stay in contact with the potential buyers.
  • Find out whether the potential buyer prequalifies for financing before giving out information about your business. If you plan to finance the sale, work out the details with an accountant or lawyer so you can reach an agreement with the buyer.
  • Allow some room to negotiate, but stand firm on the price that is reasonable and considers the company’s future worth.
  • Put any agreements in writing. The potential buyers should sign a nondisclosure/confidentiality agreement to protect your information.
  • Try to get the signed purchase agreement into escrow. (For related reading, check out Understanding The Escrow Process .)

You may encounter the following documents after the sale:

In addition, the buyer may have you sign a noncompete agreement, in which you would agree to not start a new, competing business and woo away customers.

7.Handling the Profits
Take some time, at least few months, before spending the profits from the sale. Create a plan outlining your financial goals, and learn about any tax consequences associated with the sudden wealth. Speak with a financial professional to determine how you want to invest the money and focus on long-term benefits, such as getting out of debt and saving for retirement. (There are several areas you should research when seeking professional financial help. Learn more in Advice For Finding The Best Advisor .)

Conclusion
Selling a business is time-consuming and for many, an emotional venture. A good reason to sell or the existence of a “hot” market can ease the burden, as can the help of professionals. It may also be possible to receive free counseling from organizations such as SCORE, and your local chamber of commerce may offer relevant seminars and workshops. When all is said and done, the large sum of money in your bank account and your newfound free time will make the grueling process seem worthwhile.





Tags : , , , , , ,

Best Direct Selling Companies – Direct Selling Business for Women #work #from #home #business

#home party businesses

#

9 Best Direct Selling Companies

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

If you’d like to make some extra money by being a hostess extraordinaire, starting your own direct selling business can be a fun way to do it. Working for a direct selling company allows you to create a flexible schedule by hosting parties, shows or workshops, and take home a percentage of your sales or a percentage of the sales of people you sign up to be representatives. Keep in mind that to make a lot of money, you need to sell a lot, but if you’re looking to supplement a steady income, direct selling could be just what you’re looking for. And if it turns out direct selling isn’t for you, most companies including the nine listed here offer reimbursement or exchange programs to buy back unused materials at full price or part of the full price, depending on how long you have had the products. Read on to discover nine companies that might be worth your while.

The Pampered Chef
If you have a passion for cooking and kitchen essentials, The Pampered Chef helps you make money by hosting “cooking shows” where your guests can buy an array of kitchen products sold by the company. There are two available starter kits: the New Consultant Kit ($155), which includes 25 products as well as training, marketing and business materials; and the New Consultant Mini Kit ($80), which includes a smaller selection of products, in addition to training, marketing and business materials. As a consultant, you can earn 20 to 25 percent of your total sales for each “show,” and, by recruiting a team of consultants, you can earn an additional 1 percent of your sales and 1 percent of their total sales. Also, once a consultant has reached $15,000 in sales in their career, their commission rate is automatically increased by 2 percent on all levels.

Silpada Designs
Silpada Designs offers sterling silver jewelry, belts and watches that you sell as a hostess of an at-home “jewelry party.” The starter kit ($199) includes personalized business cards, a representative ID stamp, 50 Silpada Designs catalogs, a polishing cloth, a ring- and belt-sizer, and one of three jewelry packages to choose from. Each package includes three pieces of jewelry to display at your parties (a necklace, bracelet and earrings). In addition, hostesses receive a 50 percent discount off any jewelry you choose to buy for yourself, to wear or display. The kit includes information on how to become a successful representative, training CDs, monthly newsletters, a personalized MySilpada website, a home-show DVD and unlimited one-on-one training from a Silpada sales coach. Consultants earn 30 percent commission on every piece of jewelry sold, and if you recruit other consultants, you earn anywhere between 4 and 16 percent of their sales, based on your team’s total sales. As a bonus, during the first 100 days, consultants can earn up to $3,000 in free jewelry based on sales and recruiting activity.

Heritage Makers
Through Heritage Makers. hosts hold “home workshops” or “virtual workshops,” selling professionally bound cards, canvases, storybooks, posters, digital scrapbooks and photo gifts. Hosts can also schedule “Studio Demos,” in which clients are taught how to use the Heritage online software and can buy memberships to Club HM, the company’s publishing club, which consultants are encouraged to join. Club HM has three levels of monthly membership: $30, $50 and $100. As a member of the club, hosts receive free “publishing points,” which can be used to buy Heritage Makers products, with each point equaling $1. The $30 membership equals 40 points, $50 is 70 points and $100 is 120 points. You are also allowed to purchase “publishing points” at a wholesale discount of up to 34 percent off. The Consultant Signup Kit ($50) includes a starting guide, card sampler, order forms, brochures, catalogs, training DVD, personal website and virtual office, and an 8 x 8 storybook sample. Hosts can also sign up for an add-on Business Builder Kit for an additional $100, which includes additional workshop materials and supplies. Consultants make 10 to 30 percent of their total sales, 20 to 30 percent of the sales of those you’ve recruited and 1 to 5 percent of sales of the representatives recruited by your team, depending on individual and team sales.

Jordan Essentials
Consultants for Jordan Essentials sell bath and body products by throwing at-home Girls-Night-In parties featuring spa products and mineral makeup. Three starter kits are available: $89 for the Basic Kit, $125 for the Deluxe Kit and $150 for the Deluxe Plus Minerals Kit. Based on the price, the kits come with a varying range of products including items such as exfoliant, moisturizers, powder and lipcolor in addition to a training DVD, catalogs, flip charts, order forms, invitations and a free three-month website to promote your new business. Consultants make 25 to 35 percent of total sales and 5 to 8 percent of the sales of the consultants they have recruited, all based on your team’s overall sales. Jordan Essentials also offers Fast Start Rewards during the first 90 days, in which consultants receive $50 to $100 cash bonuses for recruiting other new consultants. The company also offers continual cash incentives, product bonuses, trips and prizes for those who exceed their sales goals.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below





Tags : , , , , , , ,

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress #business #laptop

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

MLM News – Direct Selling Facts, Figures and News #free #business #listings

#best home business

#

The average Top Earner in Direct Selling is earning approxiately $20,000 per month / $240,000 per year based on 8,000+ ranks and 500+ distributors are making $1+ million a year.

Below distributor earnings are based on our Confidential Top Earner Form . public sources, conventions, up and downline information and are estimated due to the dynamics in pay plans.

Business For Home collects top earners data since year 2007 and we publish on a daily basis important Direct Selling News .

Active distributors are using this website to introduce prospects into the world of Direct Selling and to show what is possible.

The ranks are updating every 30 minutes in real time. Below are the first 1,000 top earners,

If you want access to all 8,000 top earners please log a support ticket .

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose.

Search This Website (Fast)





Tags : , , , , , , ,

Selling a business #stock #markets

#selling business

#

smallbusiness.wa.gov.au

Selling a business

Selling a business will require planning to make sure you receive the best possible price.

You will need to understand your obligations before selling or closing your business .

Generally, selling a business involves the following steps:

Determining whether selling is the right option

Before deciding to sell check whether you:

  • really want to sell or if you just need a break from your business
  • have considered options such as bringing in outside management
  • have the support of family and friends
  • have considered if the market conditions are right for selling
  • will make enough money from the sale to support yourself until a new income source is secured
  • will be restricted from trading in a similar business once you have sold
  • fully understand the implications of selling, by consulting your financial adviser, accountant or lawyer.

Preparing your business for sale

Ideally, you will begin preparing for sale well before you put your business on the market.

This could include:

  • Making sure you document processes and policies, making it easier for the new buyer to operate the business.
  • Ensuring employees have documented job descriptions.
  • Obtaining written agreements from suppliers and review contracts to make sure they don’t expire during the sale.
  • Selling obsolete or slow moving stock.
  • Reviewing plant and equipment and selling anything not required.
  • Making sure premises are well presented.
  • Reviewing your lease agreement to ensure it doesn’t expire during the sale and includes provision to transfer the lease to a new owner.
  • Collecting outstanding debts and paying your creditors.
  • Obtaining audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years.
  • Reducing employee leave liabilities by encouraging them to take leave, if possible.

Potential buyers will want to undertake their own due diligence into your business. However, it is a good idea to prepare a buyer’s information pack outlining key information about the business and what is included in the sale.

As a general guide the pack should include:

  • confidentiality agreement
  • description of your business
  • customer or client profile
  • industry information including how your business performs against industry benchmarks
  • detailed list of business assets and their value – these may include documented procedures and systems, plant and equipment, stock, intellectual property, client list, lease information, employees’ skills and qualifications, key business relationships and contracts.
  • testimonials from suppliers and customers
  • audited financial statements for at least the previous three financial years
  • offer and acceptance form
  • contract of sale.

Setting the right sale price

Determining the value of your business can be very difficult. You may want to obtain advice from your financial adviser, accountant or a registered business broker with experience in selling similar businesses.

TIP: Only a business broker licensed under the Real Estate and Business Agents Act 1978 is permitted to act as an agent for a business owner in the sale of their business in Western Australia.Generally businesses are valued using one of the following methods.

Return on investment (ROI)

This is the most common method for valuing a business. The following formula is used to calculate the selling price:

Sale price = (net annual profit x 100) ÷ ROI percentage

TIP: To find the ROI percentage for your industry talk to your accountant or contact us

Asset value

This method adds all the assets of the business together to determine its value. Assets may include stock, plant and equipment, property, vehicles, furniture, intellectual property, established client list and goodwill. The following formula is used to determine the asset value:

Sale price = assets of the business + goodwill

TIP: Valuing goodwill can be difficult, seek advice from your financial adviser or accountant.

Market value

This is most commonly used to value professional practices such as legal, veterinarian or insurance brokers. It is rarely used to value retail businesses.

The following formula is used to determine the market value:

Sale price = turnover x industry multiple

TIP: Make sure you have a good understanding of the current market and are aware of industry standards. Research the market for businesses similar to yours, compare prices and set a price that is competitive.

Making the sale

Selling your own business requires specific skills and resources; a licensed business broker or commercial real estate agent can assist you.

If you decide to sell your own business, here a few matters to consider:

Marketing

Use your immediate networks of competitors, clients, employees, friends and family to promote the sale of your business; you never know who could be interested.

Your accountant may have clients looking to buy an established business.

Advertise the sale of your business using:

  • websites dedicated to the sale of businesses
  • local, state or national newspapers
  • industry publications, trade journals, or specialist publications.

TIP: Use general terms to advertise your business and don’t disclose the business name.

Ensure potential buyers sign a confidentiality agreement

When selling a business it is common to receive applications from non genuine buyers. They could be competitors, suppliers, employees or clients trying to find out who is selling. Before giving your business information pack to potential buyers make sure they sign a confidentiality agreement first.

Negotiate the sale

Once a potential buyer has conducted due diligence, they may want to discuss terms before making a formal written offer. Prepare yourself for negotiation by considering:

  • What conditions do you want from the sale?
  • What are you prepared to compromise on?
  • At what point would you stop negotiating and walk away from the sale?

Finalise the sale

It is a good idea to involve a professional business broker, settlement agent or lawyer in the sale of your business. This will prevent problems and make sure the sale is valid.

A contract for sale of a business as a going concern should include all the details, and terms and conditions, negotiated and agreed with the buyer.

More information





Tags : , ,