Tag: Salaries

Attorney I Salaries by education, experience, location and more #plumbers #gaithersburg #md, #attorney #i

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Attorney I Salaries

Alternate Job Titles: Entry Level Attorney, Attorney I, Lawyer I

  • What is the average annual salary for Attorney I?

      How much does a Attorney I make? The median annual Attorney I salary is $89,788. as of May 30, 2017, with a range usually between $77,993 – $103,131. however this can vary widely depending on a variety of factors. Our team of Certified Compensation Professionals has analyzed survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at companies of all sizes and industries to present this range of annual salaries for people with the job title Attorney I in the United States.

      This chart describes the expected percentage of people who perform the job of Attorney I in the United States that make less than that annual salary. For example the median expected annual pay for a typical Attorney I in the United States is $89,788, so 50% of the people who perform the job of Attorney I in the United States are expected to make less than $89,788.

      Source: HR Reported data as of May 30, 2017

      • About this chart

          This chart describes the expected percentage of people who perform the job of Attorney I that make less than that salary. For example 50% of the people who perform the job of Attorney I are expected to make less than the median.
          Source: HR Reported data as of June 2017

          Prepares and examines contracts involving leases, licenses, purchases, sales, insurance, etc. Provides legal advice to an organization, prepares resolutions and forms, and participates in major legal actions. Responsible for foreseeing and protecting company against legal risks. Must be a graduate of an accredited law school with 0-3 years of experience. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on limited experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Works under general supervision. A certain degree of creativity and latitude is required. View full job description





      Data Scientists in Demand: Salaries Rise as Talent Shortage Looms #business #plans #examples

      #business week

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      Help Wanted: Black Belts in Data

      A new species of techie is in demand these days—not only in Silicon Valley, but also in company headquarters around the world. “Data scientists are the new superheroes,” says Pascal Clement, the head of Amadeus Travel Intelligence in Madrid. The description isn’t exactly hyperbolic: The qualifications for the job include the strength to tunnel through mountains of information and the vision to discern patterns where others see none. Clement’s outfit is part of Amadeus IT Holding, the world’s largest manager of flight bookings for airlines, which has more than 40 data scientists on its payroll, including some with a background in astrophysics. The company recently launched Schedule Recovery, a product that tracks delays and automatically rebooks all affected passengers.

      A study by McKinsey projects that “by 2018, the U.S. alone may face a 50 percent to 60 percent gap between supply and requisite demand of deep analytic talent.” The shortage is already being felt across a broad spectrum of industries, including aerospace, insurance, pharmaceuticals, and finance. When the consulting firm Accenture surveyed its clients on their big-data strategies in April 2014, more than 90 percent said they planned to hire more employees with expertise in data science—most within a year. However, 41 percent of the more than 1,000 respondents cited a lack of talent as a chief obstacle. “It will get worse before it gets better,” says Narendra Mulani, senior managing director at Accenture Analytics.

      Many data scientists have Ph.D.s or postdoctorates and a background in academic research, says Marco Bressan, president for data and analytics at BBVA, a Spanish bank that operates in 31 countries and has a team of more than 20 data scientists. “We have nanotechnologists, physicists, mathematicians, specialists in robotics,” he says. “It’s people who can explore large volumes of data that aren’t structured.”

      So-called unstructured data can include e-mails, videos, photos, social media, and other user-generated content. Data scientists write algorithms to extract insights from these troves of information. But “true data scientists are rare,” says Ricard Benjamins, head of business intelligence and big data at Telefónica, Europe’s second-largest phone company, which employs more than 200 of them. Says Stan Humphries, chief economist at Zillow, the real estate listings site: “You can find a great developer and a great researcher who has a background in statistics, and maybe you can find a great problem solver, but to find that in the same person is hard.”

      Universities are taking note. MIT, where graduate students in physics, astronomy, and biology are fielding offers from outside their chosen fields, is in the process of setting up a dedicated data-science institute. Marilyn Wilson, the university’s associate director for career development, says the center will begin enrolling graduate degree candidates in 2016.

      In the U.K. the University of Warwick introduced a three-year undergraduate data-science program last year, which David Firth, the program’s mastermind, says may well be the first of its kind. “Big Business was complaining about the lack of people,” he says. “Finance is a major employer, but also large-scale insurers, large online commercial retailers, high-tech startups, and government, which has huge data sets.”

      Accenture’s Mulani says he’s tallied some 30 new data-science programs in North America, either up and running or in the works. The University of Virginia began offering a master’s in 2014, as did Stanford. Many of those students may be tempted to drop out before collecting their degree. “Companies are scrambling,” says Margot Gerritsen, director of Stanford’s Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering. “We have second- and third-year students getting offered salaries much higher than what I get.” Starting pay for some full-time jobs is above $200,000, she reports. Summer internships, meanwhile, pay anywhere from $6,000 to $10,000 a month. To make these stints memorable, many employers offer perks such as free meals, complimentary gym memberships, and occasionally temporary housing. “Sometimes you read about students getting abused in internships and working like slaves,” Gerritsen says. “We don’t see that.”

      The bottom line: McKinsey projects that by 2018 demand for data scientists may be as much as 60 percent greater than the supply.

      Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE





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      Data Scientists in Demand: Salaries Rise as Talent Shortage Looms #business #websites

      #business week

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      Help Wanted: Black Belts in Data

      A new species of techie is in demand these days—not only in Silicon Valley, but also in company headquarters around the world. “Data scientists are the new superheroes,” says Pascal Clement, the head of Amadeus Travel Intelligence in Madrid. The description isn’t exactly hyperbolic: The qualifications for the job include the strength to tunnel through mountains of information and the vision to discern patterns where others see none. Clement’s outfit is part of Amadeus IT Holding, the world’s largest manager of flight bookings for airlines, which has more than 40 data scientists on its payroll, including some with a background in astrophysics. The company recently launched Schedule Recovery, a product that tracks delays and automatically rebooks all affected passengers.

      A study by McKinsey projects that “by 2018, the U.S. alone may face a 50 percent to 60 percent gap between supply and requisite demand of deep analytic talent.” The shortage is already being felt across a broad spectrum of industries, including aerospace, insurance, pharmaceuticals, and finance. When the consulting firm Accenture surveyed its clients on their big-data strategies in April 2014, more than 90 percent said they planned to hire more employees with expertise in data science—most within a year. However, 41 percent of the more than 1,000 respondents cited a lack of talent as a chief obstacle. “It will get worse before it gets better,” says Narendra Mulani, senior managing director at Accenture Analytics.

      Many data scientists have Ph.D.s or postdoctorates and a background in academic research, says Marco Bressan, president for data and analytics at BBVA, a Spanish bank that operates in 31 countries and has a team of more than 20 data scientists. “We have nanotechnologists, physicists, mathematicians, specialists in robotics,” he says. “It’s people who can explore large volumes of data that aren’t structured.”

      So-called unstructured data can include e-mails, videos, photos, social media, and other user-generated content. Data scientists write algorithms to extract insights from these troves of information. But “true data scientists are rare,” says Ricard Benjamins, head of business intelligence and big data at Telefónica, Europe’s second-largest phone company, which employs more than 200 of them. Says Stan Humphries, chief economist at Zillow, the real estate listings site: “You can find a great developer and a great researcher who has a background in statistics, and maybe you can find a great problem solver, but to find that in the same person is hard.”

      Universities are taking note. MIT, where graduate students in physics, astronomy, and biology are fielding offers from outside their chosen fields, is in the process of setting up a dedicated data-science institute. Marilyn Wilson, the university’s associate director for career development, says the center will begin enrolling graduate degree candidates in 2016.

      In the U.K. the University of Warwick introduced a three-year undergraduate data-science program last year, which David Firth, the program’s mastermind, says may well be the first of its kind. “Big Business was complaining about the lack of people,” he says. “Finance is a major employer, but also large-scale insurers, large online commercial retailers, high-tech startups, and government, which has huge data sets.”

      Accenture’s Mulani says he’s tallied some 30 new data-science programs in North America, either up and running or in the works. The University of Virginia began offering a master’s in 2014, as did Stanford. Many of those students may be tempted to drop out before collecting their degree. “Companies are scrambling,” says Margot Gerritsen, director of Stanford’s Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering. “We have second- and third-year students getting offered salaries much higher than what I get.” Starting pay for some full-time jobs is above $200,000, she reports. Summer internships, meanwhile, pay anywhere from $6,000 to $10,000 a month. To make these stints memorable, many employers offer perks such as free meals, complimentary gym memberships, and occasionally temporary housing. “Sometimes you read about students getting abused in internships and working like slaves,” Gerritsen says. “We don’t see that.”

      The bottom line: McKinsey projects that by 2018 demand for data scientists may be as much as 60 percent greater than the supply.

      Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE





      Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

      Fast Track PHD on #phd,phds,masters,mba,courses,studentships,help,support,msc,post #docs,professional #doctorates, #mba #admissions, #mba #application, #mba #career #change,

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      Fast Track PHD

      posted about 2 years ago

      Depending on the country it might also mean without doing the master first (?) Otherwise it would be a bit strange to have just 3 years of bachelor followed by a fast track Phd. That would mean only 5 years compared to the 8-9 years it takes in every other country. Can t believe that this is possible. Would be a bit too easy in my opinion 😉

      posted about 2 years ago

      In Australia you can go straight from a BA Honours to a PhD without having to do any postgrad stuff in between.

      When I went to Australia for my Masters by Research Only (no coursework) in 2011, the first day I met my supervisor he advised me to upgrade to a PhD and to treat the project as a PhD project, which I did. I submitted in 3.5 years and have been finished since December 2014 (now graduated and officially a Dr yay!)

      I m originally from Canada, so had applied for a masters thinking that I had to do one first, but this wasn t the case in Australia.

      It s not a fast-track per say but the option to skip the MA if you have the capacity. However, there are upsides and downsides. The upside was a quicker finish for the PhD, but some downsides included feeling a bit behind (even though I did very well) because I didn t have the MA experience coming straight out from a BA honours, and feeling behind in some areas such as knowing about grants, getting published and conference attending. It was also a whole new subject area for me as well.

      So to fast track, the options need to be weighed. It hasn t impacted my career as I managed to land a T R position at my uni and am beginning to collaborate with other researchers on projects, but it also hasn t been easy.

      So one thing to keep in mind is that fast tracking can be a disadvantage for you when considering all the other not-so-directly related aspects of the PhD/Academic life. I had full funding from the university in the form of an international scholarship, so grants were not things I was thinking about (but now wish I had to beef up the CV).

      I had 4 years BA and then the PhD took an additional 3.5 years, so a total of 7.5 years.

      posted
      04-Jun-15, 22:35

      edited about 3 seconds later

      posted about 2 years ago

      Quote From awsoci:
      However, there are upsides and downsides. The upside was a quicker finish for the PhD, but some downsides included feeling a bit behind (even though I did very well) because I didn t have the MA experience coming straight out from a BA honours, and feeling behind in some areas such as knowing about grants, getting published and conference attending. It was also a whole new subject area for me as well.

      I definitely agree. I think even though it takes longer, there are big advantages to doing an MSc before a PhD.

      posted
      05-Jun-15, 07:18

      edited about 2 minutes later

      posted about 2 years ago

      I think it depends on your long-term goals. If you go for a position in academia such as lecturer, assistant professor etc. it is probably an advantage. It is hard to compare PhD students among each other but I have a hard time believing that someone with only the bachelors degree has the same routine and performs as well as someone with a master degree. I definitely would not. We have 2 year master programms and that is often more than 1 year practical lab research + the course work combined. That is just a lot of experience.

      However, if you don t want to continue in academia, I would consider it a huge advantage to skip the master. Companies often appreciate younger applicants, as they are more shapeable and you also have the advantage of getting a real salary two years earlier. Not so bad. It is definitely one of the down sides that you are often 30 years + until you enter the job market.

      posted
      05-Jun-15, 08:24

      edited about 16 minutes later

      posted about 2 years ago

      Quote From Dunham:
      . It is hard to compare PhD students among each other but I have a hard time believing that someone with only the bachelors degree has the same routine and performs as well as someone with a master degree.

      I find this a little insulting. However, it s also not clear if you are referring to hard science degrees only, because I am in the social sciences and do mixed methods (quant/qual) as well as both content analysis and interviews as my major research methodologies.

      If the former, I may have had just bachelors with honours, but I also graduated with an exceptionally high average (over 90%), had two RAs under my belt by my undergraduate graduation, one completed for a not-for-profit while the other for my university, 2 scholarships and 1 grant, a publication and fieldwork experience.

      I performed exceptionally well during my PhD despite the set backs I mentioned earlier. I was fully funded, had a very strong result with my PhD examination (pass with minor and I mean took 2 days minor changes), continued to gain RA experience, completed social research tenders (i.e. outside the university research for not-for-profits/governments), conference presentations, had published from my PhD prior to submission and am currently publishing more works, and a heap of teaching experience that included complete unit coordination and lecturing as well as tutoring and guest lecturing. None of this includes any of the community outreach or professional service that I engage in on top of all of this.

      But this wasn t easy and I worked very, and I mean very hard. I knew I had a disadvantage coming in straight from a BA Honours, but to suggest that someone like me wouldn t perform as well as someone with a masters degree is a bit pretentious. I know a number of masters to PhDs doing absolutely poorly, and ones doing very well.

      It s highly individual and on that note, no PhD student will have the same routine that works for them.

      posted
      05-Jun-15, 09:16

      edited about 12 minutes later

      posted about 2 years ago

      You would have exactly the same CV if you did a 2-year master before your PhD project. I am not saying that people who start a PhD after their bachelor degree are generally incompetent, but that 2 years more experience are 2 years more experience (for the individual researcher !). No need to justify yourself. It is just a completely objective fact. Of course you also find incompetent master graduates but that is completely individual. Those people would not have performed better if they started the PhD right away after the bachelor.I may relate it to natural sciences, but that does not change the point. More experience is more experience. I don t really believe that someone does 2 years of masters and does not develop at all.

      I did not mean that offensive but I truly believe that e.g. a physicist needs much more supervision and guidance if he starts a PhD after the bachelor compared to the same physicist with a master degree. If you just compare a master thesis to a bachelor thesis and the amount of time you spent for the research. That is a huge difference. I can t believe that this makes no difference for the individual. That you worked hard doesn t change that fact or would you ve worked less hard during a master degree? 😉





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      2015 Hedge Fund Compensation Report: Salaries Up, Bonuses Up #pimco #salaries

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      Jan 9 2015 | 11:35am ET

      Anyone who says the American Dream is dead doesn’t work at a hedge fund.

      Last year, hedge fund employees earned more money for lower performance.

      The 2015 Hedge Fund Compensation report indicates that hedge fund professionals’ bonuses and salaries increased this year, and that funds plan to boost hiring in the near future. However, according to the report, bonuses were not necessarily tied to fund performance.

      The eighth annual report, released by Benchmark Compensation, indicates that average base salaries increased by 7% this year, while average bonuses jumped by 16%. Average cash compensation registered at $368,000, a 12% increase over last year. The average hedge fund employee reported their base pay was about $167,000 and that bonuses would comprise 54% of their total cash compensation.

      “Again this year, solid fund performance results in significant bonuses,” said David Kochanek, publisher of the report. “The difference this year is we saw a reduction in the correlation between fund performance and bonus levels.”

      According to the report, 79% of survey respondents reported gains at their respective hedge fund for the year, down from 90% of respondents in 2013. And big gains (over 25%) were all the rarer. In 2013, 18% of responding funds said that their performance was 25% or higher. This year, just 3% of funds reached this figure.

      For the third-straight year, three in 10 hedge fund employees expected a 16% to 100% bump in cash compensation. But expectations for a decline in compensation are on the rise.

      “The change we saw was in the big percentage increase in the number of hedge fund professionals that expected their compensation to decrease,” Kochanek said. “Last year, only 10% expected a decrease. This year that number jumped to 18%.”

      A few additional highlights of the report include the follow data points:

      • The Chief Operating Officer was the highest-paid role on average, earning a take-home median cash compensation of $550,000.
      • Managing Directors reported the largest increase of compensation at 35%. This bump was fueled by significant bonus compensation.
      • Total weekly work hours slowed this year. Nearly eight out of ten hedge fund professionals work between 40 and 60 hours per week. This is an average decline of roughly 10 hours from last year.
      • Although 68% of hedge fund employees have at least 10 years of total work experience, a little more than two-thirds have worked fewer than five years at their current firms.

      The annual report primarily focuses on the North American market, but does include data and responses from funds in the United Kingdom and around the globe. Its conclusions are based on answers provided by hedge fund managers and employees at hundreds of investment firms.





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      Crime Scene Investigator Careers – CSI Salary – Job Outlook #crime #scene #investigator #salaries

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      Crime Scene Investigator Career Salary Outlook

      CSI is more than merely the title of a very popular, long running television show with spinoffs galore; it also happens to be a very viable and very popular career field. Many of those who have an interest in the field have that interest because of things read in books or seen on television or in the movies. The actual career of a CSI technician is not exactly the same as those portrayed on television, but it is still a very exciting career that calls to many, and the crime scene investigatory salary is quite healthy.

      The crime scene investigator has a number of responsibilities at the crime scene. They will walk through the crime scene, look for evidence, and collect it. They can take photos of the scene and make sketches. Some of the types of evidence that they are likely to have to collect at crime scenes include fingerprints, bodily fluids, and weapons. When the investigator collects the evidence, he or she is also going to catalog it when transferring it to the lab. Investigators will also have to present their findings to others on their team, to attorneys, and in trials in many cases. The work schedule of an investigator can vary. Crime never sleeps, so it is common to have to work in the evenings and on holidays.

      What is the Career Outlook for Crime Scene Investigators?

      The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the need for crime scene investigators is growing at the same rate as the need for those who are in other jobs – a rate of 19 percent. They predict that between 2010 and 2020, the number of jobs in the field will likely rise from 13,000 to 15,400. This is an addition of 2,400 jobs.

      Because of the popularity of the field, it is possible that those who enter it will find stiff competition for jobs. Those who have more education, such as a bachelor’s degree in forensic science or a similar field, or those who have experience working with law enforcement in another capacity, may have an advantage when it comes to looking for and finding work.

      At the site for the ICSIA. International Crime Scene Investigators Association, it states there are approximately 450 police agencies in the country that hire full-time CSIs right now, although this is changing and growing. Other, smaller agencies may have a need for specialists, and often officers take care of many of the duties a specialist would in other locales. This means that the competition could be fierce for these jobs, so more education is always a benefit.

      Crime Scene Investigator Salary

      One of the things that most have to consider when they are looking for a new career is the salary and the potential to make a good living. The CSI salary is good. with the median being $51,570 annually in 2010, according to the BLS. Of course, this is the median wage; half will make more and half will make less. Those who are in the lowest 10 percent earned as little as $32,900, while those in the top 10 percent earned more than $82,990.

      The actual salary is going to vary based on a number of factors. The education that a person has, the agency where he or she works, and the amount of experience can have an effect, as mentioned on the ICSIA site.

      What Education and Experience Do CSI Candidates Need?

      For this career, the educational requirements will often depend upon the agency that is doing the hiring. Some law enforcement agencies will require only a high school diploma and time on the force as a police officer. However, more and more employers today are looking for those who have degrees. While an associate’s degree might be acceptable in some cases, most employees working in the field as full-time CSIs today will have at least a bachelor s of science or a bachelor s of arts degree. The American Academy of Forensic Sciences has a number of resources for those who have an interest in the field and who are considering it as a career.

      One of the skills that will be helpful to those who pursue a career as a CSI include the ability to stay calm and composed at a crime scene. Often, those who are in the field will find that they are at crime scenes that can be disturbing, and the ability to maintain professionalism is important. Attention to detail, as well as problem solving skills, are vital tools to have as well. Great communications skills – written and verbal – are important as well for writing reports and for speaking with others on the team, and testifying in court.

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      Licensed Clinical Social Worker Salaries by education, experience, location and more #clinical #social #work

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      Licensed Clinical Social Worker Salaries

      Alternate Job Titles: LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

      • What is the average annual salary for Licensed Clinical Social Worker?

          How much does a Licensed Clinical Social Worker make? The median annual Licensed Clinical Social Worker salary is $65,727. as of May 30, 2017, with a range usually between $60,578 – $71,035. however this can vary widely depending on a variety of factors. Our team of Certified Compensation Professionals has analyzed survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at companies of all sizes and industries to present this range of annual salaries for people with the job title Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the United States.

          This chart describes the expected percentage of people who perform the job of Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the United States that make less than that annual salary. For example the median expected annual pay for a typical Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the United States is $65,727, so 50% of the people who perform the job of Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the United States are expected to make less than $65,727.

          Source: HR Reported data as of May 30, 2017

          • About this chart

              This chart describes the expected percentage of people who perform the job of Licensed Clinical Social Worker that make less than that salary. For example 50% of the people who perform the job of Licensed Clinical Social Worker are expected to make less than the median.
              Source: HR Reported data as of June 2017

              Interviews clients and their families and coordinates and plans programs and activities to meet their social and emotional needs. Provides psychotherapy or counseling to individuals, groups, couples, or families. Requires a master s degree in social work, 2-4 years of experience in the field or in a related area, and a state license to practice clinical social work. Familiar with a variety of the field s concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Leads and directs the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is required. Typically reports to the head of a unit/department. View full job description





          Data Scientists in Demand: Salaries Rise as Talent Shortage Looms #business #logos

          #business week

          #

          Help Wanted: Black Belts in Data

          A new species of techie is in demand these days—not only in Silicon Valley, but also in company headquarters around the world. “Data scientists are the new superheroes,” says Pascal Clement, the head of Amadeus Travel Intelligence in Madrid. The description isn’t exactly hyperbolic: The qualifications for the job include the strength to tunnel through mountains of information and the vision to discern patterns where others see none. Clement’s outfit is part of Amadeus IT Holding, the world’s largest manager of flight bookings for airlines, which has more than 40 data scientists on its payroll, including some with a background in astrophysics. The company recently launched Schedule Recovery, a product that tracks delays and automatically rebooks all affected passengers.

          A study by McKinsey projects that “by 2018, the U.S. alone may face a 50 percent to 60 percent gap between supply and requisite demand of deep analytic talent.” The shortage is already being felt across a broad spectrum of industries, including aerospace, insurance, pharmaceuticals, and finance. When the consulting firm Accenture surveyed its clients on their big-data strategies in April 2014, more than 90 percent said they planned to hire more employees with expertise in data science—most within a year. However, 41 percent of the more than 1,000 respondents cited a lack of talent as a chief obstacle. “It will get worse before it gets better,” says Narendra Mulani, senior managing director at Accenture Analytics.

          Many data scientists have Ph.D.s or postdoctorates and a background in academic research, says Marco Bressan, president for data and analytics at BBVA, a Spanish bank that operates in 31 countries and has a team of more than 20 data scientists. “We have nanotechnologists, physicists, mathematicians, specialists in robotics,” he says. “It’s people who can explore large volumes of data that aren’t structured.”

          So-called unstructured data can include e-mails, videos, photos, social media, and other user-generated content. Data scientists write algorithms to extract insights from these troves of information. But “true data scientists are rare,” says Ricard Benjamins, head of business intelligence and big data at Telefónica, Europe’s second-largest phone company, which employs more than 200 of them. Says Stan Humphries, chief economist at Zillow, the real estate listings site: “You can find a great developer and a great researcher who has a background in statistics, and maybe you can find a great problem solver, but to find that in the same person is hard.”

          Universities are taking note. MIT, where graduate students in physics, astronomy, and biology are fielding offers from outside their chosen fields, is in the process of setting up a dedicated data-science institute. Marilyn Wilson, the university’s associate director for career development, says the center will begin enrolling graduate degree candidates in 2016.

          In the U.K. the University of Warwick introduced a three-year undergraduate data-science program last year, which David Firth, the program’s mastermind, says may well be the first of its kind. “Big Business was complaining about the lack of people,” he says. “Finance is a major employer, but also large-scale insurers, large online commercial retailers, high-tech startups, and government, which has huge data sets.”

          Accenture’s Mulani says he’s tallied some 30 new data-science programs in North America, either up and running or in the works. The University of Virginia began offering a master’s in 2014, as did Stanford. Many of those students may be tempted to drop out before collecting their degree. “Companies are scrambling,” says Margot Gerritsen, director of Stanford’s Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering. “We have second- and third-year students getting offered salaries much higher than what I get.” Starting pay for some full-time jobs is above $200,000, she reports. Summer internships, meanwhile, pay anywhere from $6,000 to $10,000 a month. To make these stints memorable, many employers offer perks such as free meals, complimentary gym memberships, and occasionally temporary housing. “Sometimes you read about students getting abused in internships and working like slaves,” Gerritsen says. “We don’t see that.”

          The bottom line: McKinsey projects that by 2018 demand for data scientists may be as much as 60 percent greater than the supply.

          Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE





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          Business Analytics Director Salaries by education, experience, location and more #director #of #business #analytics,

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          Business Analytics Director Salaries

          Alternate Job Titles: Business Analytics Director, Business Data Analysis Director

          • What is the average annual salary for Business Analytics Director?

              How much does a Business Analytics Director make? The median annual Business Analytics Director salary is $148,764. as of May 30, 2017, with a range usually between $130,901 – $167,214. however this can vary widely depending on a variety of factors. Our team of Certified Compensation Professionals has analyzed survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at companies of all sizes and industries to present this range of annual salaries for people with the job title Business Analytics Director in the United States.

              This chart describes the expected percentage of people who perform the job of Business Analytics Director in the United States that make less than that annual salary. For example the median expected annual pay for a typical Business Analytics Director in the United States is $148,764, so 50% of the people who perform the job of Business Analytics Director in the United States are expected to make less than $148,764.

              Source: HR Reported data as of May 30, 2017

              • About this chart

                  This chart describes the expected percentage of people who perform the job of Business Analytics Director that make less than that salary. For example 50% of the people who perform the job of Business Analytics Director are expected to make less than the median.
                  Source: HR Reported data as of June 2017

                  Directs a team of business analysts that use business data and statistical methods to provide insight into business performance and suggest area for and methods of improving operations. Implements analytical approaches and methodologies and assists in the interpretation of results. May collect and analyze external market data to provide benchmarks for comparison purposes. Presents reports to management for use in decision making and strategic planning. Requires a bachelor s degree with at least 10 years of experience in the field. Demonstrates expertise in a variety of the field s concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of complicated tasks. Leads and directs the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. Typically reports to top management. View full job description





              Data Scientists in Demand: Salaries Rise as Talent Shortage Looms #canadian #business

              #business week

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              Help Wanted: Black Belts in Data

              A new species of techie is in demand these days—not only in Silicon Valley, but also in company headquarters around the world. “Data scientists are the new superheroes,” says Pascal Clement, the head of Amadeus Travel Intelligence in Madrid. The description isn’t exactly hyperbolic: The qualifications for the job include the strength to tunnel through mountains of information and the vision to discern patterns where others see none. Clement’s outfit is part of Amadeus IT Holding, the world’s largest manager of flight bookings for airlines, which has more than 40 data scientists on its payroll, including some with a background in astrophysics. The company recently launched Schedule Recovery, a product that tracks delays and automatically rebooks all affected passengers.

              A study by McKinsey projects that “by 2018, the U.S. alone may face a 50 percent to 60 percent gap between supply and requisite demand of deep analytic talent.” The shortage is already being felt across a broad spectrum of industries, including aerospace, insurance, pharmaceuticals, and finance. When the consulting firm Accenture surveyed its clients on their big-data strategies in April 2014, more than 90 percent said they planned to hire more employees with expertise in data science—most within a year. However, 41 percent of the more than 1,000 respondents cited a lack of talent as a chief obstacle. “It will get worse before it gets better,” says Narendra Mulani, senior managing director at Accenture Analytics.

              Many data scientists have Ph.D.s or postdoctorates and a background in academic research, says Marco Bressan, president for data and analytics at BBVA, a Spanish bank that operates in 31 countries and has a team of more than 20 data scientists. “We have nanotechnologists, physicists, mathematicians, specialists in robotics,” he says. “It’s people who can explore large volumes of data that aren’t structured.”

              So-called unstructured data can include e-mails, videos, photos, social media, and other user-generated content. Data scientists write algorithms to extract insights from these troves of information. But “true data scientists are rare,” says Ricard Benjamins, head of business intelligence and big data at Telefónica, Europe’s second-largest phone company, which employs more than 200 of them. Says Stan Humphries, chief economist at Zillow, the real estate listings site: “You can find a great developer and a great researcher who has a background in statistics, and maybe you can find a great problem solver, but to find that in the same person is hard.”

              Universities are taking note. MIT, where graduate students in physics, astronomy, and biology are fielding offers from outside their chosen fields, is in the process of setting up a dedicated data-science institute. Marilyn Wilson, the university’s associate director for career development, says the center will begin enrolling graduate degree candidates in 2016.

              In the U.K. the University of Warwick introduced a three-year undergraduate data-science program last year, which David Firth, the program’s mastermind, says may well be the first of its kind. “Big Business was complaining about the lack of people,” he says. “Finance is a major employer, but also large-scale insurers, large online commercial retailers, high-tech startups, and government, which has huge data sets.”

              Accenture’s Mulani says he’s tallied some 30 new data-science programs in North America, either up and running or in the works. The University of Virginia began offering a master’s in 2014, as did Stanford. Many of those students may be tempted to drop out before collecting their degree. “Companies are scrambling,” says Margot Gerritsen, director of Stanford’s Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering. “We have second- and third-year students getting offered salaries much higher than what I get.” Starting pay for some full-time jobs is above $200,000, she reports. Summer internships, meanwhile, pay anywhere from $6,000 to $10,000 a month. To make these stints memorable, many employers offer perks such as free meals, complimentary gym memberships, and occasionally temporary housing. “Sometimes you read about students getting abused in internships and working like slaves,” Gerritsen says. “We don’t see that.”

              The bottom line: McKinsey projects that by 2018 demand for data scientists may be as much as 60 percent greater than the supply.

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