Tag: Race

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty – Collins

#cincinnati business courier

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Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

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Franklin, Cooper – Marcus, PLLC, Chattanooga Area Attorneys and Counselors at Law #chattanooga #attorneys,

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PRACTICE AREAS:

Franklin, Cooper Marcus PLLC, Lawyers in Tennessee

Regardless of the type of legal issue you are facing, unfamiliarity with the legal system can leave you confused and anxious. You want an experienced attorney, one with a comprehensive understanding of the law, and who will keep you continually informed about the options and the likelihood of success.

At the law offices of Franklin, Cooper & Marcus, PLLC. all of our attorneys have many years of experience. One of our attorneys has represented clients for over 40 years, two have over 30 years and the forth over 20 years of practice experience.

Because we understand the stress that uncertainty can cause, we place a high priority on communication and responsiveness. We work hard to make ourselves available when you need questions answered and to keep you continually updated regarding the status of your legal issues.

We offer experienced and accessible legal counsel in matters involving civil litigation, including:
Insurance defense:
We represent insurance companies and their insureds in the areas of automobile, premises, commercial, construction, workers’ compensation and products liability claims.

Business disputes:
Our attorneys represent individuals and companies in business disputes, including contract and other issues.

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Whether you are a physician, a medical group, or a hospital or other medical care facility, we provide medical malpractice defense.

Mediation and arbitration:
All of our attorneys have years of experience with alternative dispute resolution. Three of our attorneys are Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 31 Listed General Civil Mediators.

Personal injury:
We protect the rights of individuals and companies under a variety of circumstances, from motor vehicle accidents and defective products to negligently maintained property.

Insurance law:
Whether you need a coverage opinion or are facing a first party claim, our experience allows us to guide you through insurance law issues, insurance claims and insurance related litigation.

General civil litigation:
Our attorneys are experienced with civil litigation covering a wide variety of subject areas and issues, insurance claims and insurance related litigation.

Our offices are open from 8:00 am until 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday.
Evening and weekend appointments are available upon request.

At the law offices of Franklin, Cooper Marcus, PLLC, in Chattanooga, we represent individuals throughout southeast Tennessee and northwest Georgia, including Cleveland, Charleston, Madisonville, Sweetwater, Benton, Tellico Plains, Athens, Decatur, Dayton, Pikeville, Dunlap, Jasper, Winchester, Tracy City, Manchester and Tullahoma.

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Micro RC Cars – Mini MicroSizers, Xmods, Tomy Bit Char-G, ZipZaps, Epoch Indoor Racers,

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Welcome to The Micro RC Resource Center

Choosing the best micro or mini remote control car.

When people ask me which car is best, there really isn’t a good answer because each micro remote controlled car has its own strengths and weaknesses.

With that said, I’m going to describe the cars in my radio control car collection and point out the stengths and weaknesses so you can decide which one is best for you.

Hobbico MicroSizers (1:64 Scale – Approx 2 in Length)
Also known as Tomy Bit Char-G in Japan.
Strengths
. Inexpensive, Durable, Lots of Mods, Small Size
Weaknesses. Limited Range, Short Driving Time, No Proporational Steering or Speed, Only 4 Available Frequencies

I think I’ll always have a soft spot for the Tomy Bit Char-G remote control car. There’s something about the MicroSizers cars that are just fun. The compact size (about 2 ) allows you to set up races in a very small area such as your kitchen floor. Its simplicity is also part of its charm. The car and controller can fit in the palm of your hand and with just a couple AA batteries and a smooth surface, you’re ready to go.

Although the Tomy Bit CharG cars don’t have proportional steering or speed, I’ve always been happy with how the Bit Char-G cars handle. I wish the Bit Char-G cars would drive for longer than 4 minutes, but that’s still enough time for a good race. The standard controllers aren’t as sophisticated as the ones for the DigiQ or Epoch Indoor Racer, but they’re adequete. The special booster controllers that can be purchased separtely aren’t that much more sophisticated and the range is even worse than the regular controller. However, they do have a booster button that allows you to drive at a faster speed along with a switch that allows you to drive any of the four available frequencies from the same controller. Anyone that has fun with a Hobbico MicroSizer, will want to look into the faster motors that can be purchased (available motors: 1.0, 2.0, 2.2, 2.6, 3.0 and 3.8).

Radio Shack also sells a version of this car called a ZipZap. You can read more about Zip Zaps at the forum.

MysticKnight’s Buying Advice:
Everyone should own at least one Bit Char-G remote control car (MicroSizer) with a 2.2 motor or higher. For around $30, you can’t go wrong. If you enjoy using the car and decide to buy others, the special controller is worth looking into especially if you’re going to be racing other people.

Epoch Indoor Racers (1:43 Scale – Approx 4 in Length)
Strengths. Proportional Steering and Speed, Realistic Body Designs

Weaknesses. Needs A Relatively Large Area for Racing, More Expensive, Poorly Designed Controller, Limited Mods and After Market Parts

The Epoch Indoor Racer is a bit larger (about 4 ) than most other micro remote controlled cars. The speed and responsiveness of this car makes it very fun to drivefor racers that don’t mind paying a little more for a micro remote controlled car.

At the moment there two types of Epoch Indoor Racers, the spec 1 and the spec 2. The controllers for both are exactly the same but the spec 2 car has smaller, more realistic wheel wells, modified suspension and improved electronics.

The Epoch Indoor Racer controller is not made very well and there’s not much of an after-market selection of parts and supplies. In contrast, the controller that comes with the Mini Z is outstanding, there are many after-market products and it’s much faster than an Epoch Indoor Racer.

MysticKnight’s Buying Advice:
Buy the Hobbico MicroSizer first and if you think it’s a blast and you’re ready to move up to real micro RC racing, consider the Mini Z (described below) instead of the Epoch Indoor Racer.

Kyosho Mini Z Street Racers (1:28 Scale – Approx 6 in Length)
More like a real racecar than the smaller cars, Mini Z bodies have amazing detail and cool parts are extremely easy to find. The Mini Z is probably the most popular of the small R/C cars because all electronics are pre-installed and there are many clubs world-wide.

Kyosho Mini Z Formula 1 (1:28 Scale – Approx 6 in Length)
Formula 1 cars are now available with the same attention to detail as the original Kyosho Mini Z Street Racers.

HPI Micro RS4 (1:18 Scale – Approx 9 in Length)
This car is bigger and similar to the real 1:10 electric cars. Radio and electronics have to be purchased separately and this car tends to be more expensive but it’s the best small R/C car out there in my opinion.

PITZON’s Buying Advice:
I can speak for those of us who took the step from racing bigger 1:10 electric cars quite seriously and spending insane amounts of money on the larger cars. Once we bought the Mini-Z and HPI Micro RS4 cars, all of us sold our big cars and race nothing but small R/C cars now.

Takara Digi Q (1:66 Scale – Just Under 2 in Length)
Strengths. Durable, Very Small, Good Quality Controller, Proportional Steering, Long Driving Time
Weaknesses. Doesn’t Handle Well, Slow in Corners, Cartoon Looking Bodies

Although the Takara Digi-Q is smaller, faster and drives longer on a charge (15 minutes) than the Bit Char-G and the controller is the best quality out of all the controllers (including the more expensive Epoch Indoor Racers), I’ve never really liked the DigiQ cars.

The Digi Q uses 2 motors to control speed AND steering. When you want to go right, the right motor slows down to make the car go right which means it goes slower in corners. The car is less than 2 long and I think that contributes to how squirly it feels. Instead of using a frequency to transmit to the car, the Digi Q controllers send their signals via Infrared. You can switch the controller to one of 4 settings to match the car you’re racing, but the car itself can’t be switched.

The controller feels solid in your hand and you can electronically switch between high and low speeds. An optional infrared booster is available to get better range (although the range seems pretty good without it). The DigiQ car and controller costs about $55.

MysticKnight’s Buying Advice:
Personally, I would buy the Tomy Bit Char-G instead of the Takara Digi Q. Even though the Bit Char-G is slower, it’s more fun to drive because of how it handles.

There are several other brands of micro remote control cars that are inexpensive copies of the Tomy Bit Char-G and Takara DigiQ cars. Those cars are called clones and some of them are worth looking into. More information about all the mini radio controlled cars mentioned here and other vehicles such as micro remote control helicopters, mini RC planes, miniature R/C boats, micro remote control tanks and more can be found at the mini RC cars forum. Topics include:


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Employment Discrimination Attorney, Wrongful Termination, Harassment, Disability and Overtime Lawyer #employment #discrimination, #discrimination, #race

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Employment Discrimination and Overtime Pay Attorneys
Call 440-543-0670 now to learn if we can help

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Our law office handles employment law, discrimination law, wrongful termination, overtime, minimum wage, and other types of cases in Cleveland, Akron, Warren, Youngstown, Chagrin Falls, Northeast Ohio, Geauga County, Cuyahoga County, Ashtabula County, Portage County, Summit County, Trumbull County, Lake County, Mahoning County, Bainbridge Township, and Auburn Township.

Employment discrimination attorneys whose employment law, overtime pay and discrimination law practice areas and cases include: Wrongful Termination Lawsuits; Failure to Hire Cases; Employment Discrimination Suits; Race Discrimination; National Origin Discrimination; Age Discrimination; Religious Discrimination; Disability Discrimination; Handicap Discrimination; Sex Discrimination; Sexual Harassment; Retaliation; Family and Medical Leave Act; Fair Labor Standards Act; Employment Litigation; Wage and Hour Litigation; Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; Ohio Civil Rights Commission; Whistle-blowing; Overtime Pay; Minimum Wage; Unpaid Tips; Unemployment Compensation; Severance Agreements; ERISA; Family Leave; Medical Leave; ADA; ADEA; FMLA; FLSA; Equal Pay Act; Title VII Claims; Section 1981 Claims; Whistleblowing; Disability Claims; EEOC Claims; EEOC Charges; EEOC Mediation; OCRC Charges; OCRC Mediation; NLRB Charges; Arbitration; Collective Actions; and Class Actions.

The materials on this website and any information provided to you by phone, email, or in-person are for informational purposes only and are not legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is formed until a fee agreement is executed.


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Big Bucks Bracket Racing #big #bucks #bracket #racing, #million #dollar #bracket #race, #spring #fling

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Click on the banner for more information about the race.

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Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty – Collins

#cincinnati business courier

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Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News


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Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth – Race Project Back on Track – Flaherty – Collins

#cincinnati business courier

#

Cincinnati Business Courier: Fourth Race Project Back on Track

by Chris Wetterich | Cincinnati Business Courier

A three-year-old plan to build a new apartment complex and garage in a key corner of downtown Cincinnati is back on track after years of delays, political saber-rattling, review and revision.

Later this summer, the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. will demolish Pogue’s Garage at Fourth and Race streets and begin building a new garage, the podium for a $106 million, 225-apartment luxury tower to be built and owned by Indianapolis-based Flaherty Collins Properties. Demolition will take three to five months with construction of the 14-story building expected to begin by the end of the year.

The project will activate a sector of downtown that has some residential presence already with apartment and condo buildings on the west side of Fourth and Fifth streets, and, just as important, add much-needed supply to a Cincinnati housing market with pent-up demand.

“That’s a lot of bodies introduced to a part of town that straddles between Fountain Square and (west) Fourth Street where there is residential. There’s sort of a gap there, and this fills it in pretty well,” said Adam Gelter, 3CDC’s executive vice president for development. “Fourth Street in general, especially as you come east, is one of the better streets in town from an urban feel, but it isn’t tremendously active, particularly at night. The tenants on the first floor and the people above will bring a little bit more life to the street.”

Jim Crossin . Flaherty Collins Properties vice president for development, said the company is happy with how plans for Fourth and Race turned out.

“We think the project will be a great success,” Crossin said. “3CDC — they operate a lot of parking facilities. They’ll also take care of the loan and lease of the ground-floor retail, which is in their area of expertise. Our business is multifamily development. It works out great that they’re doing those two portions of the project.”

The company was not fazed by the long process of dealing with a change in city administration and shifting priorities.

“Almost everything we do is a public-private partnership. The public side of most of our deals usually involves the local municipality,’’ Crossin said. “We like them because in the end, it’s usually an opportunity to develop a special project downtown where projects aren’t easy to get done. It takes often working through the political process to get it done.”

Like other recent, brand-new downtown apartment projects, nearly half of the building will be a parking garage. 3CDC will build seven stories – first-floor commercial space, plus six floors containing 700 parking spaces – and Flaherty Collins Properties will build seven stories of apartments on top of that. Some parking will be reserved for residents while other spaces will replace those lost in the demolition of Pogue’s Garage.

The apartment tower will be C-shaped with an amenity deck on the eighth floor that includes a grilling area and resort-style outdoor pool.

Crossin said hiding the parking garage is an important architectural feature of the building. Atlanta-based Preston Partnerships, which designed the second phase of the Banks, will design the building, while Turner Construction will manage the construction.

“There’s screening on the garage to mask that it’s a parking garage,” Crossin said. “We wanted it to not look like a residential building sitting on top of a garage. We wanted a cohesive design that fits into the context of downtown.”

Flaherty Collins Properties aimed for a ratio of 1.1 to 1.2 parking spaces per unit. Asked whether he believes additional downtown apartment towers will need as much parking in the future, Crossin said that while the streetcar could reduce parking needs, “We’re still in the Midwest where you may need to use your car less, but everybody needs a car.”

If residents become less dependent on their cars, Crossin said, the parking spaces could be used by others.

“If you add more jobs downtown, which definitely seems to be going in a positive direction, those people will need places to park.”

The project is “addition by subtraction,” Gelter said. It gets rid of a hideous parking garage that empties via ramps on city streets. 3CDC expects to open the new garage before the overall project is complete, as it did with the 84.51 center at Sixth and Race streets.

“If nothing went back, it would be better than it is today,” Gelter said.

First-floor retail also was key.

“As we build around the country doing urban mixed-use, our residents – the No. 1 thing they want is a walkable, urban environment,” Crossin said. We wanted to have street-level retail space that serves as an amenity to residents.”

Flaherty Collins Properties has developed 50 properties and 8,000 units, with many of their projects in Indiana.

The project will inject several hundred new residents in an area of downtown with a lot of longtime retailers, such as Koch Sporting Goods and Bromwell’s. Both developers and government leaders view downtown as having more demand than supply, with Downtown Cincinnati Inc. reporting an occupancy rate of 97 percent for residential units in 2015.

Even as Flaherty Collins Properties worked through the Fourth and Race deal, it considered other Cincinnati projects. It has talked to some downtown parking lot owners who other developers have reported have been reluctant to sell or join developments as equity partners.

“We’re getting a subsidy from the city. The land is being contributed also,” Crossin said. “If it were Joe Smith with a parking lot that’s very valuable land worth several million bucks, it doesn’t work. If rents can continue to rise, we’ll reach a point where those deals do work without any help. I think the city’s hope is that they’re priming the pump.”

Flaherty Collins Properties plans to keep looking for other projects.

“We think Cincinnati’s a fantastic market downtown,” Crossin said. “We think there’s more demand (downtown) than there are new high-end projects currently.”

Other Recent News


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