Tag: practices

Data Center Rack Cooling Solutions, data center operations best practices.#Data #center #operations #best #practices

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Data Center Rack Cooling Solutions

Cooling infrastructure is a significant part of a data center. The complex connection of chillers, compressors and air handlers create the optimal computing environment, ensuring the longevity of the servers, and the vitality of the organization they support.

Yet, the current data center cooling ecosystem has come at a price. The EPA s oft-cited 2007 report predicted that data center energy consumption, if left unchecked, would reach 100 billion kWh by 2011 with a corresponding energy bill of $7.4 billion. This conclusion, however, isn t strictly based on Moore s Law or the need for greater bandwidth. Their estimate envisions tomorrow s processing power will be addressed with yesterday s cooling strategies. The shortcomings of these designs, coupled with demand for more processing power, would require (10) new power plants to provide the juice for it all, according to that report.

According to a more recent study commissioned by the NY Times from Jonathan Koomey Ph.D. Stanford entitled, Growth in Data center electricity use 2005 to 2010, the rapid rates of growth in data center electricity use that prevailed from 2000 to 2005 slowed significantly from 2005 to 2010, yielding total electricity use by data centers in 2010 of about 1.3% of all electricity use for the world, and 2% of all electricity use for the US. Assuming the base line figures are correct, Koomey states that instead of doubling as predicted by the EPA study, energy consumption by data centers increased by 56% worldwide and only 36% in the US.

According to Koomey, the reduced growth rates over earlier estimates were, driven mainly by a lower server installed base than was earlier predicted rather than the efficiency improvements anticipated in the report to Congress. In the NY Times article, Koomey goes on say, Mostly because of the recession, but also because of a few changes in the way these facilities are designed and operated, data center electricity consumption is clearly much lower than what was expected

However, this reduction in growth is likely temporary, as our appetite continues to increase for internet access, streaming and cloud based services. Data centers will continue to consume growing amounts of electricity, more and more data centers will come on line, and data center managers will increasingly look to newer technologies to reduce their ever growing electricity bills. Additionally, when you consider that the estimated energy consumption of the US in 2010 was around 3,889 Billion kWh, 2% still represents close to 78 billion kWh. Clearly the trend is increased data consumption and with it increased energy consumption.

In light of these trends and despite the lower growth rates, many industry insiders are continuing to turn a critical eye toward cooling, recognizing both the inefficiencies of current approaches and the improvements possible through new technologies. The information contained herein is designed to assist the data center professional who, while keeping uptime and redundancy inviolate, must also balance growing demand for computing power with pressure to reduce energy consumption.

Issue: Understanding the Efficiency Metrics Best Practice: Adoption and use of PUE/DCiE

In furtherance of its mission, The Green Grid is focused on the following: defining meaningful, user-centric models and metrics; developing standards, measurement methods, processes and new technologies to improve data center performance against the defined metrics.

Measurements like watts per square foot, kilowatts per rack, and cubic feet per minute (CFM) are ingrained in data center dialogue. Until recently, no standard measurement existed for data center efficiency. Enter the Green Grid, a consortium promoting responsible energy use within critical facilities. The group has successfully introduced two new terms to the data center lexicon: Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) and Data Center Infrastructure Efficiency (DCiE).

Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE)

PUE is derived by dividing the total incoming power by the IT equipment load. The total incoming power includes, in addition to the IT load, the data center s electrical and mechanical support systems such as chillers, air conditioners, fans, and power delivery equipment. Lower results are better, as they indicate more incoming power is consumed by IT equipment instead of the intermediary, support equipment.

While it s not the only consideration, cooling can be a major player in PUE measurement. Consider the following diagram, where the combination of the chiller, humidifier, and CRAC consume 45% of the total energy coming into the facility.

Data center operations best practices Where does the money go? (Source: The Green Grid)

The Uptime Institute approximates an industry average PUE of 2.5. Though there are no tiers or rankings associated with the values, PUE allows facilities to benchmark, measure, and improve their efficiency over time. Companies with large-scale data center operations, like Google and Microsoft, have published their PUE. In 2008, Google had an average PUE of 1.21 across their six company data centers. Microsoft s new Chicago facility, packed with data center containers, calculated an average annual PUE of 1.22.

The widespread adoption of PUE, left in the hands of marketing departments, leaves the door open for manipulation. Though the equation seems simple, there are many variables to consider, and users should always consider the context of these broadcasted measurements. At its core, however, the measurement encourages the benchmarking and improvement at the site level-the actions individual professionals can take to improve the efficiency of their facilities.

Data Center Infrastructure Efficiency (DCiE)

DCiE is simply the inverse of PUE-Total IT Power/Total Facility Power x 100%. DCiE presents a quick snapshot into the amount of energy consumed by the IT equipment. To examine the relationship between PUE and DCiE, A DCiE value of 33% (equivalent to a PUE of 3.0) suggests that the IT equipment consumes 33% of the power in the data center.

ASHRAE temperature and humidity recommendations:

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) is an international technical society organized and a leading authority providing recommendations for data center cooling and humidity ranges. ASHRAE TC 9.9 recently released their 2008 ASHRAE Environmental Guidelines for Datacom Equipment which expanded their recommended environmental envelope as follows:





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Evidence-based practice: Educating nurses about fall prevention – 2017 #data #collection, #program #analysis, #staff

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Evidence-based practice: Educating nurses about fall prevention

Editor s note: This is the third installment of an ongoing series highlighting the progress of North Adams (MA) Regional Hospital as it works through its first evidence-based practice project. This month s article focuses on education implementation.

After identifying an increase in patient falls, Debbie Durant, RN, BSN, director of the medical-surgical unit at North Adams (MA) Regional Hospital, and Peg Daly, RN, BS, education specialist at the 120-bed hospital, joined forces to develop an evidence-based initiative to:

  • Decrease falls by 10% within 12 months of plan implementation
  • Review and revise falls policy and procedures based on evidence-based data
  • Recommend necessary education for staff members
  • Develop ongoing performance improvement monitoring

The second and third objectives were achieved by mid-April and education is being implemented.

During the next 12 months, nursing assessments and documentation will be closely monitored in terms of risk assessment and implementation of the new fall prevention program. Data will be collected to determine whether the primary objective, decreasing falls by 10% within 12 months of plan implementation, has been achieved.

Daly credits the staff nurses who are members of the falls subcommittee for the program s success thus far. This effort has really been nurse driven, she says.

In addition to Daly and Durant, the other members of the committee are:

  • Stacy Gentile, an RN on the critical care unit
  • Lou Ann Quinn, RN, MS, director of surgical services
  • Sue Vareschi, an LPN on the medical-surgical unit

Hospital staff members received training in May. Non-nursing personnel were trained by their managers with support from Daly and Durant, who provided visual aids, talking points, and in-person clarification as requested. Emphasis was placed on reinforcing the fact that fall prevention is the responsibility of all employees, not just nurses or other patient care providers.

Implementation of nursing education

It will come as no surprise to staff development specialists that it was a challenge to educate all members of the nursing department. Time is always a problem with educational initiatives, so Daly and her team combined fall prevention training with other education.

There was no way to pull nurses off their units for separate education programs, so we combined several critical, mandatory programs into one major education event, Daly says.

Because computer access was necessary for the initial two hours of training, class size was limited to 10 nurses. One benefit of the small class size was that it facilitated effective role-play and discussion.

During the first two hours, the class reviewed the new bedside delivery medication system, the medication reconciliation process, and an allergy conversion process. A review of the eHealth portal process that allows nurses to access health information from physicians offices was provided.

The final two hours of class were devoted to the fall prevention plan, which included:

  • Demographics on the incidence and costs of falls. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls cost the healthcare industry $20 billion annually. It is estimated that by 2020, the cost of falls will reach $32.4 billion.
  • Specific criteria for fall assessments.
  • Role-play using life-size puppets affectionately referred to as Fred Faller and Penelope Pill Pusher. Fall assessment scenarios were enacted, and nurses had to score the fall risk and document their findings.
  • A demonstration of fall assessment electronic documentation.
  • Specific fall prevention interventions.
  • Introduction of the pediatric fall assessment program.

The pediatric fall assessment program was a new initiative at North Adams Regional Hospital. Our pediatric unit is small, only six beds. But the more we learn about falls, the more we realize that every patient, regardless of age, needs to be formally assessed for fall risk and appropriate interventions taken, Daly says.

How were fall prevention criteria determined? We used reliable sources from the literature. For example, we found two books from HCPro on fall assessment and prevention especially helpful. They are well-worn copies, she says.

Fall prevention guidelines mandate that every patient is assessed and findings documented on admission, every eight hours, and with every change in patient condition.

We ll be looking critically at every fall that takes place and also looking at our fall assessment tool. Did we ask critical questions? Are we doing everything we can do to prevent falls? Daly says.

Additionally, falls are categorized as accidental, anticipated, and unanticipated. For example, an anticipated fall is used to describe the possibility of falling for patients who are at high risk, such as those with impaired mobility or cognition or who take a variety of medications. In fact, we believe the revision of our falls assessment tool will actually score more of our patients at high risk for fall, says Daly. Did you know that research shows that one out of every three persons 65 years of age or older fall every year? And we have an elderly patient population.

Primary interventions will be in place for all hospital patients, regardless of the fall assessment score. Back to basics might describe some of the strategies to prevent falls, says Daly. We want patients and staff to be aware of the safety of the patient environment. Staff are reminded to introduce themselves, to make sure that call lights are within patients reach, as well as canes or walkers, if needed, and that bedroom slippers are non-skid. We ve even put signs in all patient rooms and bathrooms that remind patients to Call, Don t Fall.

Daly and her team developed a one-page teaching tool for patients titled, Let s work together to keep you safe. It includes basic tips on fall prevention with illustration and is written at basic literacy levels. We re committed to keeping our patients safe, Daly says, and to reducing the number of falls.

Editor s note: In the coming months, Daly will share the effect of education on fall reduction.

Eldridge, C. (2007). Evidence-Based Falls Prevention. Marblehead, MA: HCPro, Inc.

Payson, C., and Haviley, C. (2005). Patient Fall Assessment and Prevention. Marblehead, MA: HCPro, Inc.





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SQL SERVER – 15 Best Practices for Better Database Performance – Journey to SQL

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SQL SERVER 15 Best Practices for Better Database Performance

In this blog post we will see 15 best practices for better Database Performance.

I have written 14 best practices here, read them all and let me know what is as per your opinion should be the 15th best practice.

1. Store relevant and necessary information in the database instead of application structure or array.

2. Use normalized tables in the database. Small multiple tables are usually better than one large table.

3. If you use any enumerated field to create look up for it in the database itself to maintain database integrity.

4. Keep primary key of lesser chars or integer. It is easier to process small width keys.

5. Store image paths or URLs in database instead of images. It has less overhead.

6. Use proper database types for the fields. If StartDate is database filed use date time as datatypes instead of VARCHAR (20).

7. Specify column names instead of using * in SELECT statement.

8. Use LIKE clause properly. If you are looking for exact match use “=” instead.

9. Write SQL keyword in capital letters for readability purpose.

10. Using JOIN is better for performance than using sub queries or nested queries.

11. Use stored procedures. They are faster and help in maintainability as well security of the database.

12. User comments for readability as well as guidelines for the next developer who comes to modify the same code. Proper documentation of application will also aid help too.

13. Proper indexing will improve the speed of operations in the database.

14. Make sure to test it any of the database programming as well administrative changes.

Let me know what should be the 15th best practice.

15th best practice might be

Avoid using Triggers to ignore deadlock or recursive trigger situation that loads server free space and crashes.
Better to use trigger related logic in a function or SP and to be called from application codes at times for data stability and safety.

16th best practice might be

Avoid using cursor for simple / single table update. instead use merge query for faster query execution time and more compact SQL query.

Nupur Dave is a social media enthusiast and and an independent consultant.

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10 things anyone dealing with a debt collector should know – ABC News #debt

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10 things anyone dealing with a debt collector should know

If you are having trouble with debt collectors, here are some tips to help.

Getting a debt collection call is never fun. Even in a best-case scenario — it’s your debt and you can pay — that outstanding account can cause a headache or two. And if the debt’s contentious, not yours or just too darn high, the situation can become (or at least feel) a lot more dire. But knowledge is a superpower when it comes to dealing with a debt collector in any shape or form.

Here are 10 things anyone who’s gotten a debt collection call should know.

1. You Have Rights Yes, a debt collector has every right to collect on a debt you legitimately owe, but there are rules and restrictions — formally known as the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) — that govern how they can go about their business.

2. Old Debts Expire Each state also has laws specifying how long collectors have to sue you over a debt. In most states, these time limits last for four to six years after the last payment made on the account. You can consult this chart to determine your state’s statutes of limitations (SOL) — and if you get a call about a very old debt, you should really consult this chart, because.

3. Zombie Debts Are Real. Collection accounts get resold all the time, and it’s not uncommon for someone to get a call about a debt that’s outside the SOL or no longer owed. The latter is illegal, but the former may not be: The SOL applies to how long a collector has to sue you over a debt, but, in many cases, they can still try to get you to pay.

4. And You Can Wind Up Reanimating Them If the old account is legit, you can unwittingly restart the clock on the SOL by paying part of the debt or even agreeing over the phone that it’s yours. If you get a call about a debt, be sure to get all the details before saying you owe. That due diligence is doubly important because.

5. There Are a Lot of Scammers Out There That’s not to say you’re talking to one, but you’ll want to stay on guard. “Ask the caller for their name, company, street address, telephone number and if your state licenses debt collectors, a professional license number,” according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which has more tips for spotting a debt-collection scam on its website.

6. You’re Entitled to Written Verification In fact, FDCPA requires a collector to send a statement outlining the specifics of the debt within five days of contacting you. That notice — which is basically step one in determining whether a debt’s legit — must include the amount of money you owe, the name of the original creditor and what actions to take if you believe the information is wrong.

7. You Can Dispute the Debt Debt collectors must investigate a debt so long as you file a dispute in writing within 30 days of their initial contact — and they’re to cease contact until they verify (again in writing) that you owe the amount in question.

8. Collectors Can’t Just Inflate What You Owe Regarding that amount: A debt collector can charge interest, but only up to the amount stipulated in your contract with the original creditor. Most states also cap the amount of interest and fees a debt collector can charge.

9. You Can Ask Them to Stop Calling Per FDCPA, a collector must cease contact if you send a letter requesting they do so. That letter won’t absolve you of a legitimate debt, but it can curb incessant and heated phones calls, which is important because.

10. Too Many Calls Are Illegal Another facet of FDCPA: Collectors can’t call you too early in the morning (before 8 a.m.), too late at night (after 9 p.m.), too many times a day or at work once you tell them not to. They’re also not allowed to use abusive language — no cuss words or name-calling.

Want to know more ways to effectively handle debt collectors? You can see the full list of 50 things anyone dealing with a debt collector should know on Credit.com.

Jeanine Skowronski is the executive editor of Credit.com.

Any opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author.





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Best practices for social media monitoring – Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice #marketing #email

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Best practices for social media monitoring

Social Media Monitoring offers opportunities for a more strategic approach

Are you still one of those businesses that are using social media monitoring (SMM) tools and services tactically or maybe not sure if you are using the right social media tool(s) for your business needs? By tactical SMM I mean the common use of social media tools for simply analyzing daily activities across specific social media to track online conversations around your brand, responding to negative or positive comments, or evaluating your marketing campaigns.

If so, you should be aware that SMM also offers opportunities for a more strategic approach.

In order to realize a long term value from SMM you need to integrate SMM with other business processes. This may include measuring the strategic business impact of social media marketing, strengthening initiatives for social customer engagement, expanding strategies for increasing retention and revenue from current customers, implementing social media campaigns to acquire new customers, and so forth.

Businesses across all industries continue to invest into social media programs such as employee advocacy, social selling, social recruiting, social advertising, etc. and employing various Social Media Monitoring (SMM) technologies and services to monitor and solicit public opinions about their brand and products, shape their online presence and develop strategies to efficiently engage and harness the social paradigm.

To measure the value of their social media activities, they should look at the overall results they are generating, and carefully examine how social media was engaged in increasing their bottom lines through growing revenue and increasing efficiency. The chart below illustrates some of the key ways the social media can affect your business performance.

For instance, you can shorten your company’s sales cycle and accelerate revenue by generating multiple impressions for your online content across the vast social media channels and build and leverage the credibility, trust and relationships to win a prospect’s business. This can be significantly augmented by successfully integrating your social media and traditional marketing strategies at every stage of the buying process. Similarly, in terms of customer services, you can use SMM and management tools with strong workflow management to improve customer services and customer satisfaction by increasing resolution rate and lowering resolution time outside call center, as well as increase brand loyalty and awareness by actively engaging with customers and addressing their questions and concerns. Your relationship with customers and their experience with your brand should be of the utmost importance.

If used right, social intelligence offered by SMM tools can create true business value for your business by supporting every area of your business: from understanding consumers’ needs and behaviours, competitive landscape, creating risk management plans, increasing customer experience and satisfaction, to executing product development and campaigns, and building long term and profitable relationships with your customers.

Choosing the Right Social Media Monitoring Tools for Strategic Evaluation

There are many social media monitoring, intelligence, analytics, marketing and management tools on the market and making an educated choice about which tool(s) can best address your specific business needs and justify your social media investment has become a complex and multifaceted process.

The number and quality of SMM tools available in the market has increased, with the SMM technology industry maturing rapidly through innovation and acquisitions by large technology companies and the emergence of new tools, delivering unique and more sophisticated analytical capabilities and more personalized engagement. This has created a highly complex and diverse landscape of SMM technologies with the top vendors developing features beyond monitoring, listening, or social media management, and converging gradually with other types of platforms such as content management, customer experience or social relationship platforms.

According to Ideya’s Report on Social Media Monitoring Tools and Services. there is no single SMM tool or service provider that can effectively measure and address all aspects of social media. For that reason, most businesses are currently using multiple social media tools across different functional areas, geographies, as they require a slightly different approach and view of the social media space in order to address their specific analysis, engagement and business needs.

SMM technology providers aim at delivering unique SMM solutions in terms of technologies they apply, key product features and pricing they offer. This often presents challenges to businesses that are just embarking on SMM or upgrading their existing SMM activities and it is difficult to make an informed decision without having an overview of the current options and new trends. For that reason, Ideya has compiled information about key product features of 200 tools and services including:

  • Data management features such as data coverage (media, language, geographic and industry coverage), data latency, alerts (standard or threshold alerts), data export capabilities, Application Programming Interface (API) integration options, and data archiving,
  • Data analysis and visualization features, including key metrics, sentiment analysis (metrics and language coverage), influencer profiling and analysis, viral content tracking and analysis, trend analysis, topic and theme analysis, word/tag cloud, competitive monitoring and analysis, predictive analytics, campaign management and measurements,
  • Process management and user interface. including dashboard (standard or customizable), workflow management, engagement function, publishing function (e.g. content creation and/or curation, editorial calendar, time optimization for post scheduling, etc.), Client Relationship Management (CRM), and
  • Factors influencing purchasing decisions, including pricing, key clients, product applications, industry focus, client support, company size and year when the tool or service was made publicly available.

We expect that these aspects are important for outlining the SMM strategy and selecting specific providers.

The Tool Key Features and Factors Impacting Selection Process

As discussed in the Report, understanding the data management, data analysis and visualization features as well as process management and user interface of a specific tool is of the utmost importance, as well as understanding what differentiates it from its competitors.

Nevertheless, you should also understand key social media monitoring functions and product applications, as well as take into consideration other factors influencing purchasing decisions such as

pricing, product and service availability, vendor’s industry focus, its ability to innovate and quickly adapt as social media landscape changes, and possibly review SMM vendor’s reference client listing, which demonstrate vendor’s professional experience and credibility.

A summary of some key findings from the SMM Tools and Services Report can be found in our most recent Presentation (included below) and SMM Tools and Services Report Excerpts that have been recently published on the SlideShare.net platform. Enjoy reading and do leave a comment or questions if you want to know more about how to better use social media monitoring tools for your business!

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The importance of ethics in business – Ethical business practices – Cadbury Schweppes #daily

#ethics in business

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Ethical business practices
A Cadbury Schweppes case study

Page 1: The importance of ethics in business

Ethics concern an individual’s moral judgements about right and wrong. Decisions taken within an organisation may be made by individuals or groups, but whoever makes them will be influenced by the culture of the company. The decision to behave ethically is a moral one; employees must decide what they think is the right course of action. This may involve rejecting the route that would lead to the biggest short-term profit.

Ethical behaviour and corporate social responsibility can bring significant benefits to a business. For example, they may:

  • attract customers to the firm’s products, thereby boosting sales and profits
  • make employees want to stay with the business, reduce labour turnover and therefore increase productivity
  • attract more employees wanting to work for the business, reduce recruitment costs and enable the company to get the most talented employees
  • attract investors and keep the company’s share price high, thereby protecting the business from takeover.

Unethical behaviour or a lack of corporate social responsibility, by comparison, may damage a firm’s reputation and make it less appealing to stakeholders. Profits could fall as a result.

Along with good corporate governance, ethical behaviour is an integral part of everything that Cadbury Schweppes does. Treating stakeholders fairly is seen as an essential part of the company’s success, as described here: ‘A creative and well managed corporate and social responsibility programme is in the best interests of all our stakeholders – not just our consumers – but also our shareowners, employees, customers, suppliers and other business partners who work together with us. *’

Ensuring that employees understand the company’s corporate values is achieved by the statement of ‘Our Business Principles’ which makes clear the behaviour it seeks from employees.

Cadbury Schweppes’ good practice was recognised when it was voted one of the ‘most admired companies for community and environmental responsibility’ by Management Today magazine in 2003. It was also ranked second in the Food and Drink sector in the Business in the Community ‘Per Cent Club’ Index of corporate giving for 2003, with an investment in the community of around 3of its UK pre tax profits.

* Cadbury Schweppes Corporate and Social Responsibility Report 2002

Cadbury Schweppes | Ethical business practices





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Bankruptcy lawyers in charlotte nc #clawson #and #staubes #practices #in #a #wide #variety #of

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All of our attorneys at Clawson and Staubes bring talent and experience to the team. We all share a common goal: to provide unsurpassed service to our clients. Our attorneys are experienced in a wide range of practice areas, including litigation, insurance defense, construction, real estate, probate and estate, premises liability, personal injury, product liability, municipal law, workers compensation, commercial law, bankruptcy, corporate law, immigration, family and criminal defense. In each area of practice, we work hard to achieve positive results for our clients.

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Green Business Practices #government #business #grants

#green business

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From changing a light bulb and using recyclable products to installing energy efficient equipment and systems, every business can make simple changes that save energy costs and natural resources.

The following resources will help you Green Your Business!

Become Energy Efficient

The Small Business Guide to Energy Efficiency includes tips, advice, and resources to help you save on energy costs: from energy saving tips to information on grants, loans and incentives available for making energy efficient upgrades to your facilities.

Adopt Environmentally Sound Business Practices

Improve Your Waste Management System

  • Learn how to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle within your business
  • Follow the Environmental Protection Agency’s Guide for Industrial Waste Management
  • Identify whether your business produces Hazardous Waste
  • Recycle Used Electronics
  • Implement Sustainable Materials Management within your business
  • Check your municipal and state waste management websites for more information
  • Consider servicizing your business

Invest in Renewable Energy

In addition, the following Small Business Guides include special highlights to help you green your business:

Self-Employment – Run an Eco-Friendly Business





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Green Business Practices #best #business #banking

#green business

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From changing a light bulb and using recyclable products to installing energy efficient equipment and systems, every business can make simple changes that save energy costs and natural resources.

The following resources will help you Green Your Business!

Become Energy Efficient

The Small Business Guide to Energy Efficiency includes tips, advice, and resources to help you save on energy costs: from energy saving tips to information on grants, loans and incentives available for making energy efficient upgrades to your facilities.

Adopt Environmentally Sound Business Practices

Improve Your Waste Management System

  • Learn how to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle within your business
  • Follow the Environmental Protection Agency’s Guide for Industrial Waste Management
  • Identify whether your business produces Hazardous Waste
  • Recycle Used Electronics
  • Implement Sustainable Materials Management within your business
  • Check your municipal and state waste management websites for more information
  • Consider servicizing your business

Invest in Renewable Energy

In addition, the following Small Business Guides include special highlights to help you green your business:

Self-Employment – Run an Eco-Friendly Business





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Green Business Practices #business #supply

#green business

#

From changing a light bulb and using recyclable products to installing energy efficient equipment and systems, every business can make simple changes that save energy costs and natural resources.

The following resources will help you Green Your Business!

Become Energy Efficient

The Small Business Guide to Energy Efficiency includes tips, advice, and resources to help you save on energy costs: from energy saving tips to information on grants, loans and incentives available for making energy efficient upgrades to your facilities.

Adopt Environmentally Sound Business Practices

Improve Your Waste Management System

  • Learn how to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle within your business
  • Follow the Environmental Protection Agency’s Guide for Industrial Waste Management
  • Identify whether your business produces Hazardous Waste
  • Recycle Used Electronics
  • Implement Sustainable Materials Management within your business
  • Check your municipal and state waste management websites for more information
  • Consider servicizing your business

Invest in Renewable Energy

In addition, the following Small Business Guides include special highlights to help you green your business:

Self-Employment – Run an Eco-Friendly Business





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