Tag: Partner

Company Partners – find business angels, business angel investment, business partner, business funding and

#business partners

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Business Partners, Business Angels and great business opportunities

If you are looking for a Business Partner. Business Angel investment or a Mentor this is the place to come.

You can access our sophisticated database of business partners, Investors opportunities directly through our secure system.

  • Find funding from our Business Angels
  • Contact others to join you as a Business Partner
  • Great business opportunities for Investors

Register now to get started

Need a Business Partner to bring additional experience, or a Business Angel with investment available? Or a Mentor to bring guidance and boost your management team.

Join now and contact directly our Business Partners. Business Angel Investors and Mentors .
With one membership you can do all three:

  • Find a Business Angel Investor
  • Find a Business Partner
  • Find a Mentor / Non Exec

Register now to get started

Business Angel Investors are special in Company Partners. You get FREE membership and easy to use facilities that help you find that golden business opportunity. You can select your own criteria and choose either with or without hands-on involvement.

  • Quick secure on-line search for opportunities
  • Automatch for new businesses for investment
  • Easy to use, simple to contact directly
  • 1000s of rewarding equity investments

Register now to get started

Dynamic businesses are looking for Mentors and NonExec Directors to boost their management teams and to help them grow.

  • Use your skills experience
  • Opportunity for pay or equity
  • Build a portfolio of interests

Register now to get started

See examples of members

Who uses Company Partners

Start-ups looking for a like minded Business Partner or Business Angel investment with contacts and experience, growing companies looking for expansion funding, Mentors with years of experience and Investors seeking an exciting and rewarding business opportunity.

Find out what the press and our clients are saying.

Successfully found an Investor through your site and cannot thank you enough!

Andrew – Stockings Romance

I have now found a business partner, the response was amazing.

Karen – Little People By The Sea

Our property development project has now got our Angel Investor thanks to your web site.

Margaret – Suffolk Development





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What is business partner? definition and meaning #business #profile

#business partner

#

business partner

An individual or company who has some degree of involvement with another entity’s business dealings. The term ‘business partner’ can have a wide range of meanings, with one of the most frequent being a person who, along with another person, plays a significant role in owning, managing, or creating a company (two best friends who start a business together would consider themselves business partners). The term is also frequently used for two businesses that cooperate, to any degree, such as a computer manufacturer who works exclusively with another company who supplies them with parts.

  • I thought they were a really great business partner and would be with us for a long time to come and would work greatly next to us.
  • Since I am out of town this week I will call my business partner and let her know to be expecting a package to arrive at the bakery on Tuesday.
  • Having someone else to start a business with me will mean that as a business partner that I will not need to make major decisions alone.

The best of BusinessDictionary, delivered daily!





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5 Things to Do Before Saying I Do to a Business Partner #business #school

#business partner

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5 Things to Do Before Saying ‘I Do’ to a Business Partner

CEO Founder, Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

September 24, 2014

As an entrepreneur, you may at some point consider getting a business partner or co-founder. Maybe you miss working with a larger team that complements your skills, or perhaps you are trying to broaden your market or expand your clientele. Whatever your motive, you should know that business partnerships always start with excitement, but have the potential to end tumultuously. When forming a business partnership — just like a marriage — there are certain key steps to take at the beginning that will help in the transition if your professional relationship should end.

1. Perform due diligence. Yes, everyone is fun over cocktails, but when the time comes to sign contracts and do business, you d better be sober and confident you re shaking the right hand. Asking for referrals about a potential partner goes beyond contacting common friends and asking their opinions. Call former partners and business associates, inquire with clients, read comments on their social media pages and look them up on Google. (Keep reading way past page one of the search results.)

By the time you re done, you should be able to name anyone who dislikes them — from their first high-school enemy to their latest unhappy client. Only then will you be able to either take a calculated risk or a major step back.

2. Make sure you lawyer up. If the legal fees in the beginning of a business relationship don t make you wince, then you re doing something wrong. When you partner with other people, every aspect of the business relationship should be put down in writing — including the goals for the company, duties and responsibilities of the partners and an exit strategy. Every sentence of a contract — no matter how innocuous — should be looked at by a lawyer. Since tax laws can be tricky, have your accounts receivable/payable arrangements scrutinized by an accountant.

3. Ensure you have exit strategy. Ending your business partnership is the last thing you want to think about when you are beginning one. It is similar to thinking about divorce on your wedding day, but you should have a plan. The business exit strategy should include several legal points including the division of the business assets and how the partner s portion of the business will be handled in case of death.

4. Protect yourself. One of the smartest moves you can make is to protect your personal assets in case of a lawsuit. Whether you choose to incorporate or become an LLC, the top benefit will be shielding your savings, home, car and even your favorite pair of Louboutins from any liabilities associated with the business.

5. Protect your brand. Joining forces with a partner takes a lot of energy, and chances are that somewhere down the line you will lose your focus. Working for a common goal within a new team is really exciting but merging forces does not necessarily mean merging identities. Don t lose sight of who you are. If part of the original business plan is to maintain your brand, make sure it doesn t suffer while you re giving all your time and energy to your new endeavor.

When you meet a potential partner, your personalities may click and your goals may be identical but to have a successful relationship, clarity is key. The more precautions you take in the beginning, the happier and more productive you will be later on. And the day you see that the team you ve tried to build has become nothing more that a group of people looking in different directions, then it s time to part ways and move on.





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How to Find the Right Business Partner for Your Startup #mobile #business #ideas

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How to Find the Right Business Partner for Your Startup

Starting a business is notoriously difficult, and going it alone can make those challenges even harder to overcome. That s why many entrepreneurs choose to launch their company with one or more business partners who can help lighten the load.

Finding good business partners is critical to success, said Sherry Fox, co-founder and chairman of LumiWave. There are many different types of partners, from someone who works with you side by side to build your business, to individuals or companies who contribute in specific areas, such as marketing, engineering, etc. Every person or entity that interacts with your business is a partner in some way and affects your ability to succeed.

I believe there is strength in numbers, added Carlo Ruggiero, co-founder of the U.S. branch of European pizza franchise Kono Pizza. When multiple partners share the same vision, the result is a stronger and more unified team.

But you can t just choose anyone to be your partner; you need to be able to work with that person day in, day out, and both of you must be able to focus on the business s objectives.

Sabrina Parsons, CEO of Palo Alto Software. likened a business partnership to a marriage. Your partner is such an important piece of [your] success, and many times, bad partnerships lead to bad business, she said.

If you need a partner but aren t sure where to start, here s how to find, evaluate and work with a prospective business partner. [See Related Story:Choosing a Business Partner? 4 Qualities to Look For]

Look to your network first

Our expert sources agreed that an entrepreneur s connections are the best candidates for potential business partners.

Reaching out to your professional network can provide a rich list, said Jon Weston, CEO of LumiWave and Fox s business partner. I ve received good information and direction from the diaspora of my [previous] companies. General networks or online community groups are too anonymous to find good feedback.

Referrals from trusted colleagues also can be helpful, Fox added. However, Weston cautioned that you should gauge the person making the referral before considering his or her recommendation.

Evaluating a business partner

Once you ve found someone who could be a great potential business partner, how do you evaluate whether that person is truly the right fit? One of your first considerations should be how your personalities, backgrounds, values and experiences complement each other.

While you want a partner that will work well with your culture and style, you don t want a clone, either you want a partner who can fill in the gaps, Weston said. That is the tension you need to look for.

Similarly, Ruggiero said he and his co-founders, David Ragosa and Greg Kinlaw, needed the right combination of personalities and skills to succeed.

[Our] differences allow us to approach each situation in multiple ways, he told Business News Daily. David and I are the go-getters. Greg provides a great balance he is an expert at taking our crazy ideas and making sure we have the numbers to back them. We are constantly learning from each other and are able to use these exchanges to positively influence our business.

However, getting along well isn t enough to ensure a successful partnership. No matter how well you know your potential partner, you re still running a business and thus need to take the appropriate precautions to ensure that any partnership is a smart decision. Weston noted that thoroughly researching your partner is an important part of this process.

Do your due diligence, Weston said. You can do a lot [by] just Googling. Most people and organizations leave a digital trail. Dive into the legal databases. Ask for references, but also research any clients they have worked with or been associated with, and contact them.

Fox agreed, noting that you should vet a partner carefully with all sources available, such as LinkedIn, company websites and former partners. Parsons also advised formally interviewing a prospective partner to better understand his or her skill set.

Finally, before you sign any legal agreements, you must understand how you and your partner will handle a variety of business situations. This is something to discuss at length during your evaluation phase.

Make very clear [written] agreements that take into consideration what happens when things go well and when things go poorly, Parsons said.

Talk openly and frankly about who you are and what you want, Fox added. Spend significant time exchanging ideas and concepts, [and] understand their. short-term and long-term [goals]. Do you agree on the end game?

Making a partnership work

Think you ve found the perfect business partner? Based on their experiences, our sources offered a few pieces of advice for a fruitful and productive partnership.

Define your respective roles. Clearly defining your roles within the company ensures that each partner s time is spent effectively, Ruggiero said. This will prevent partners from stepping on each other s toes and will ultimately save the company money.

Measure your success. Fox recommended that potential business partners work together on a trial basis to test out how well the partnership might work.Set up some parameters and milestones, and make sure what you thought about the potential partner is reality, she said. From there, conduct frequent reviews to make sure you are still on the same page.

Communication is key. Constant honest and open communication is a must. When problems arise, they need to be solved by both (or all) business partners. Ruggiero reminded entrepreneurs that at some point, each partner will make a mistake, and you cannot be afraid to bring it up. Each partner needs to do what s best for the business, he said, and part of doing this is eliminating any negative emotions to avoid a dispute if someone points out a mistake.

Trust your gut. If something doesn t feel right, it probably isn t. Weston recalled little red flags that popped up in conversations with potential partners.

Some things don t quite mesh or add up in the back of your mind. Trust this, he said. It is easier to walk away and be picky than pick up the pieces later.

Some source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article.

Nicole Fallon Taylor

Nicole received her Bachelor s degree in Media, Culture and Communication from New York University. She began freelancing for Business News Daily in 2010 and joined the team as a staff writer three years later. She currently serves as the managing editor. Reach her by email. or follow her on Twitter .

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  • 5 Things to Do Before Saying I Do to a Business Partner #government #business

    #business partner

    #

    5 Things to Do Before Saying ‘I Do’ to a Business Partner

    CEO Founder, Deborah Mitchell Media Associates

    September 24, 2014

    As an entrepreneur, you may at some point consider getting a business partner or co-founder. Maybe you miss working with a larger team that complements your skills, or perhaps you are trying to broaden your market or expand your clientele. Whatever your motive, you should know that business partnerships always start with excitement, but have the potential to end tumultuously. When forming a business partnership — just like a marriage — there are certain key steps to take at the beginning that will help in the transition if your professional relationship should end.

    1. Perform due diligence. Yes, everyone is fun over cocktails, but when the time comes to sign contracts and do business, you d better be sober and confident you re shaking the right hand. Asking for referrals about a potential partner goes beyond contacting common friends and asking their opinions. Call former partners and business associates, inquire with clients, read comments on their social media pages and look them up on Google. (Keep reading way past page one of the search results.)

    By the time you re done, you should be able to name anyone who dislikes them — from their first high-school enemy to their latest unhappy client. Only then will you be able to either take a calculated risk or a major step back.

    2. Make sure you lawyer up. If the legal fees in the beginning of a business relationship don t make you wince, then you re doing something wrong. When you partner with other people, every aspect of the business relationship should be put down in writing — including the goals for the company, duties and responsibilities of the partners and an exit strategy. Every sentence of a contract — no matter how innocuous — should be looked at by a lawyer. Since tax laws can be tricky, have your accounts receivable/payable arrangements scrutinized by an accountant.

    3. Ensure you have exit strategy. Ending your business partnership is the last thing you want to think about when you are beginning one. It is similar to thinking about divorce on your wedding day, but you should have a plan. The business exit strategy should include several legal points including the division of the business assets and how the partner s portion of the business will be handled in case of death.

    4. Protect yourself. One of the smartest moves you can make is to protect your personal assets in case of a lawsuit. Whether you choose to incorporate or become an LLC, the top benefit will be shielding your savings, home, car and even your favorite pair of Louboutins from any liabilities associated with the business.

    5. Protect your brand. Joining forces with a partner takes a lot of energy, and chances are that somewhere down the line you will lose your focus. Working for a common goal within a new team is really exciting but merging forces does not necessarily mean merging identities. Don t lose sight of who you are. If part of the original business plan is to maintain your brand, make sure it doesn t suffer while you re giving all your time and energy to your new endeavor.

    When you meet a potential partner, your personalities may click and your goals may be identical but to have a successful relationship, clarity is key. The more precautions you take in the beginning, the happier and more productive you will be later on. And the day you see that the team you ve tried to build has become nothing more that a group of people looking in different directions, then it s time to part ways and move on.





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    10 Questions to Ask Before Committing to a Business Partner #business #address

    #business partner

    #

    10 Questions to Ask Before Committing to a Business Partner

    Like a marriage, a business partnership often begins with enthusiasm and high expectations — only to end in acrimony and legal proceedings. It s important to know as much as possible about a potential partner, including how his or her finances and family life may affect the business, before signing on the dotted line.

    Here are some questions to ask before deciding if partnering is a good idea:

    1. What do I need from a business partner?
    You should look for a business partner who brings something different to the table than you do. If you re creative, maybe you need a more detail-oriented partner. If you have money to invest in the business, you may want to look for a partner with access to a market, or with great connections. Or if you re shy, you might need a good people person to balance the equation. If they re similar to you, it might be more comfortable, but it may not be what you need, says William M. Moore, founder of the Moore Firm in San Diego, a law firm that serves entrepreneurs. You need someone who complements your skills and personality.

    2. What is your potential partner s financial situation?
    It is important to have an understanding of someone s financial status and commitments before getting into a venture together. It is tough to ask what they are currently spending on a house or in payments to an ex-spouse, but someone s prior financial commitments shape the decisions they will make in the short term, says Gregory Kratofil, an attorney and shareholder with the law firm Polsinelli Shughart in Kansas City, Mo. who specializes in small business interests. If he has large outstanding obligations, but says he can get by on $35,000 salary, it is a red flag.

    3. What are the potential partner s expectations on the time involved?
    Partners don t have to spend the same amount of time, but it is important that they are on the same page as to each other s expected time commitments. How many hours a day does your partner expect to put into the venture, and do his expectations meet yours? It is equally important to level set your partner s expectations on your time commitments, Kratofil says. The age old adage that it s better to under-promise and over-deliver applies here.

    4. Is your potential partner s commitment to the business as strong as yours?
    I don t care if it s a coffee house or a design firm, the business partner s commitment has to equal yours, says Bob Phibbs, consultant and CEO of The Retail Doctor. a site that provides information to small and medium-sized businesses. A partnership — especially one between friends — can start off with fun and excitement, but within a short time, the slog of every day catches up with you. If they re not as committed to the business as you, they may lose their enthusiasm and may actually be damaging the brand every time you open your doors.

    5. Is there something in your potential partner s family life that might make the business a secondary interest?
    If your potential partner has a pregnant wife or is taking care of an elderly parent, he may be distracted from the business. That s why you have to be brutally honest when thinking of forming a partnership. The partner can say, My wife is behind me 100 percent. But I want to talk to the wife, Phibbs says. If they re too distracted by a family issue or their family isn t behind them, the business may be doomed from the start.

    6. How would he or she handle a tough situation?
    It s important to know what your potential business partner will do if he has his back up against the wall — and it will happen, Phibbs says. The best way to discover this is to look at what he s done in past business ventures. If he couldn t meet payroll, for example: Did he do the right thing and dip into savings or borrow from a credit card or a friend? Or did he pay employees late, or not at all? Or worse, did he skip paying payroll taxes? It all comes down to character issue, Phibbs says, adding, Payroll taxes are a federal obligation. If that s negotiable, you can bet your partnership is also negotiable.

    7. What questions do they have for me?
    If a potential employee doesn t ask any questions in a job interview, you might be less likely to hire him because of a perceived lack of interest. The same applies to a potential business partner, who should want to know about your character, reliability and expectations. I want them to ask me the same tough questions I ask them. If they say it doesn t really matter, it could mean two things: their expectations are too high or they might be kind of flighty, Phibbs says. Things may be fine now, but in a month or two, they may want to change things or even get out of the deal.

    8. What is the potential partner s standing in the community?
    A lot of people seem good at first, but that may be their skill — seeming good at first, Moore says. Once they get their foot in the door, it may be difficult to get them out. Talk to former employees to see what they were like to work with, or for. If you re looking for someone with money connections, verify that they have money. If they say they have great connections, see if those connections go beyond just being recognized and given a slap on the back. A business partnership is not a marriage, but there should be some sort of courtship process that you can verify that they are who they say they are, Moore says.

    9. Are they willing to put everything in writing?
    Many partnerships are cemented with a handshake, but this can be a recipe for disaster. It s crucial to put it on paper — not only what is expected of each partner, but the consequences if expectations aren t met. There s something about actually putting it in writing that exposes the potential problem areas in the partnership, Moore says. If someone has a family emergency and disappears the first six months of the business — even though it may not be through any fault of his own — are you still expected to give that person a certain percentage of the business? If someone simply isn t pulling his or her weight, you need to be able to get them out without destroying the business, he adds. And if it s in writing, there s no arguing it.

    10. Do I really need a partner?
    If you can get someone to do something without giving them a stake in your business, it s always better, Moore says. People get wrapped up in the idea of needing to work with someone, but it s not always a good idea. Sometimes you need somebody to show up from 9-5, work hard and go home, he says, adding. If you re cash poor, or it s a startup and you don t expect to make money right away, taking on a partner might be the better option. But if you can just pay somebody to show up and work, it s generally a better option than giving them a stake in the company.

    And now a bonus question.

    What happens if we can t work it out?
    Most people don t envision the rough times ahead for a new venture, so this question is probably the hardest to remember to ask and the beginning. Yet, the best time to address potential problems with your partner is at the beginning before emotions run high. You can t predict every potential problem, but a good startup lawyer can help you work through some of the common problems and put a framework in place to help address unforeseen circumstances, Kratofil says.





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    USA Business Partner Wanted classifieds #financing #for #business

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    US Business Partner Wanted Free Ads – US Free Classifieds – USA Classified Ads to Buy Sell Advertise Business Partner Wanted

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    Company Partners – find business angels, business angel investment, business partner, business funding and

    #business partners

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    Business Partners, Business Angels and great business opportunities

    If you are looking for a Business Partner. Business Angel investment or a Mentor this is the place to come.

    You can access our sophisticated database of business partners, Investors opportunities directly through our secure system.

    • Find funding from our Business Angels
    • Contact others to join you as a Business Partner
    • Great business opportunities for Investors

    Register now to get started

    Need a Business Partner to bring additional experience, or a Business Angel with investment available? Or a Mentor to bring guidance and boost your management team.

    Join now and contact directly our Business Partners. Business Angel Investors and Mentors .
    With one membership you can do all three:

    • Find a Business Angel Investor
    • Find a Business Partner
    • Find a Mentor / Non Exec

    Register now to get started

    Business Angel Investors are special in Company Partners. You get FREE membership and easy to use facilities that help you find that golden business opportunity. You can select your own criteria and choose either with or without hands-on involvement.

    • Quick secure on-line search for opportunities
    • Automatch for new businesses for investment
    • Easy to use, simple to contact directly
    • 1000s of rewarding equity investments

    Register now to get started

    Dynamic businesses are looking for Mentors and NonExec Directors to boost their management teams and to help them grow.

    • Use your skills experience
    • Opportunity for pay or equity
    • Build a portfolio of interests

    Register now to get started

    See examples of members

    Who uses Company Partners

    Start-ups looking for a like minded Business Partner or Business Angel investment with contacts and experience, growing companies looking for expansion funding, Mentors with years of experience and Investors seeking an exciting and rewarding business opportunity.

    Find out what the press and our clients are saying.

    Successfully found an Investor through your site and cannot thank you enough!

    Andrew – Stockings Romance

    I have now found a business partner, the response was amazing.

    Karen – Little People By The Sea

    Our property development project has now got our Angel Investor thanks to your web site.

    Margaret – Suffolk Development





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    Business Partner – World Trade Center Kentucky #business #icons

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    A Partnership with the WTC-KY at the Business Partner Level provides the following benefits and services:
    International Trade Assessment All WTC-KY Partners can receive a free annual International Trade Assessment that will provide you with a roadmap to successful importing and exporting, and suggest improvements to procedures and operations.

    Trade Advisory Services (TAS) Team Our TAS Team can also create customized consulting, training and research solutions at special preferred partner rates. Let us help with your next international trade project.

    WTC-KY Seminars Events WTC-KY Partners have the opportunity to participate in high-quality trade education seminars, workshops, trade missions and business events; conducted by leading topic experts with real-world experience in their respective fields.

    Preferred Partner Rates – World Trade Center Kentucky Partners receive preferred rates for all WTC-KY events and educational programs. Also, through our WTC-KY Affinity Program, enjoy savings of up to 50% on business and international trade services through referrals to our trusted service providers.

    International Trade Certification Program – Access to Kentucky s only International Trade Certification Program. After successful completion of this intensive 3-day training course, participants will receive a WTC-KY certification as an International Commerce Specialist. (Preferred rates only for WTC-KY Partners)

    World Trade Center Kentucky Newsletter – Stay current and capitalize on international trade business developments in Kentucky, our region and the world with our electronic newsletter, News to Know .

    To become a member and receive these benefits, click here.
    To return to partnership levels information, click here.

    Visionary Partners





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    Regional Business Partner Network #stock #prices

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    Regional Business Partner Network

    If you are a business owner and you want your business to grow and innovate, the Regional Business Partner (RBP) Network can help. The RBP Network has specialist business advisors available to provide you with advice, information and connections to support your business.

    We can help you:

    — gain outside perspective from an independent, experienced business advisor in a confidential environment

    — identify the next steps for your business

    — connect you with the local business community, industry networks and clusters.

    — match you with a mentor from Business Mentors NZ

    — provide access to Capability Development vouchers

    — provide access to research and development (R D) funding.

    Note: a small matching fee applies to Business Mentors NZ services and eligibility criteria apply for vouchers and R D funding.

    The first step is to register as a business and your local Regional Business Partner will be in touch shortly to set up a meeting.

    WHAT IS THE REGIONAL BUSINESS PARTNER NETWORK?

    The Regional Business Partner Network helps New Zealand businesses innovate and grow by making it easier to access early stage business support. The network is made up of 14 Regional Business Partners throughout New Zealand and is supported by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE) and Callaghan Innovation.

    — NZTE is the Government’s international business development agency. Its purpose is to help New Zealand businesses grow bigger, better, faster in international markets.

    — Callaghan Innovation is a government agency that helps businesses succeed through technology and works with businesses of all sizes who share the ambition of challenging what is possible. It has a wide range of services to make the path from research and development to market success easier, faster and less risky. Learn more about Callaghan Innovation’s R D funding .

    The Regional Business Partner Network has also partnered with Business Mentors NZ from 1 January 2016 to help businesses access mentoring services.

    DO YOU PROVIDE MANAGEMENT TRAINING SERVICES?

    Do you provide management training to business? Would like to see if your services are eligible to be registered for the Capability Development Voucher programme? Find out more here.





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