Tag: organic

Sacramento Business Journal: Airport Hotel, Lincoln Solar Panels, Downtown Macy s, Organic Coup #business

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Sacramento Business Journal: Airport Hotel, Lincoln Solar Panels, Downtown Macy’s, Organic Coup

An artist’s rendering depicting a Hyatt Place hotel proposed for Sacramento International Airport. It could be open in 2018.

It looks like there are more delays in the effort to build a new hotel at Sacramento International Airport. The developer says he needs additional time to start work because of a shortage of sub-contractors. Sonya Sorich with the Sacramento Business Journal says the project has been in-the-works for a long time.

“A Los Angeles-based developer has been working for four years to bring this hotel to the airport, which would have the Hyatt Place brand,” says Sorich. “But the county has been seeking a hotel at the airport for more than a decade. Now if you remember, the previous host airport hotel was demolished when officials decided to expand the new terminal and the parking garage at the airport.”

The earliest estimate for when construction on the project could begin is now fall of 2018.

Sonya also tells us about: the Lincoln City Council’s vote this week to ban any new large solar arrays through the end of next May; and changes to the Macy’s in downtown Sacramento.


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Online Course: Chemistry 101 – Learn the Fundamentals #online #college #chemistry, #online #course #class

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Online Class: Chemistry 101

Course Description

At a minimum, a basic understanding of chemistry is needed for it offers a foundation for comprehending the inner workings of biology (how cells function and the behavior of organisms), as well as, the ecological relationships that exist between organisms and their environment.

In short, chemistry offers us a way of understanding the world in which we live.

Chemistry provides us with insights into how our bodies function; the ingredients that are contained within the foods we eat; the reason cars, planes and trains are able to run as efficiently as they do; the manner in which computers are built and operate; and the materials used to construct our homes and buildings within our communities.

Basically, chemistry is a part of almost everything we do for everything is comprised of chemical compounds. The claim that chemistry is everywhere is, thus, entirely accurate.

Chemistry encompasses a multitude of specialized sub-disciplines which have proven highly useful to chemistry as they have provided for the following: the production and testing of stronger materials, creation of pharmaceuticals to treat disease, and the study of life processes.

Lesson 1. Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

The ordination of who was the true “father” of modern chemistry is a disputed point.

  • Lesson 2. Chemical Foundations

    In chemistry the accepted measurement system for mass (m) or volume (v) is the metric system, also known as the System International (SI) system.

  • Lesson 3. Stoichiometry

    Stoichiometry is the field of chemistry used to determine the quantities both for the required reactants of a chemical reaction and the predicted product of said reactions.

  • Lesson 4. Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry

    Most chemical reactions require a catalyst, a certain condition external to the reactants themselves that facilitates or causes the molecules to react with one another.

  • Lesson 5. Gases

    Matter in gaseous form does not have an absolute density. In order to determine the density of any volume of gas, we must first determine the pressure under which the gas is being held.

  • Lesson 6. Thermochemistry

    There are two types of energy, potential (the amount of energy possible given a certain circumstance) and kinetic (the amount of energy being expended).

  • Lesson 7. Atomic Structure and Periodicity

    Electromagnetic radiation refers to the wavelengths on which energy travels through the Universe.

  • Lesson 8. Bonding. General Concepts

    Hydrogen bonds are the bonds established between hydrogen and elements with a high level of electronegativity.

  • Lesson 9. Valence Bond Theory

    Atoms form a bond when both of these two conditions occur 1) There is an “orbital overlap” between two atoms and 2) only two electrons, both of opposite spin, are present in the overlap.

  • Lesson 10. Properties and Solutions

    Solutions are a combination of solutes and solvents, which are not necessarily composed of the same forms of matter.

  • Lesson 11. Chemical Kinetics

    Chemical kinetics is concerned with the rates of chemical reactions.

  • Lesson 12. Chemical Equilibrium

    The first thing to understand about equilibrium in chemistry is that it is a dynamic state.

  • Lesson 13. Spontaneity, Entropy, and Free Energy

    Spontaneous processes occur without outside intervention. Some of these occur very quickly, such as combustion, whereas others like the formation of diamonds occur very slowly over millions if not billions of years.

  • Lesson 14. The Nucleus, A Chemist’s View

    The nucleus of an atom is not always stable.

  • Lesson 15. Transition Metals and Coordination Chemistry

    Many transition metals commonly form more than one form of oxidized compound depending on the conditions of formation.

  • Lesson 16. Organic Chemistry

    Organic chemistry is the study of carbon based chemistry in the realm of living things.

  • Additional Course Information

    • Document Your Lifelong Learning Achievements
    • Earn an Official Certificate Documenting Course Hours and CEUs
    • Verify Your Certificate with a Unique Serial Number Online
    • View and Share Your Certificate Online or Download/Print as PDF
    • Display Your Certificate on Your Resume and Promote Your Achievements Using Social Media

    Course Title: Chemistry 101

    Course Number: 8900109

    Learning Outcomes

    By successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Define atoms, molecules, and ions.
    • Describe chemical foundations and stoichiometry.
    • Identify gases and thermochemistry.
    • Describe atomic structure and periodicity.
    • Describe bonding and the Valence Bond Theory.
    • Know properties and solutions.
    • Describe chemical equilibrium.
    • Know spontaneity, entropy, and free energy.
    • Know the nucleus, a chemist’s view.
    • Know transition metals and coordination chemistry.
    • Know organic chemistry, and
    • Demonstrate mastery of lesson content at levels of 70% or higher.

    Student Testimonials

    • “I am satisfied with the course I want to continue on.” — Viera V.
    • “She was prompt with all grading and any questions I had. It was a 101 course and offered a well rounded experience. It gave me more background on how I was using chem. in my wastewater, water operations.” — Tim M.
    • “The instructor was very helpful and available. She is very knowledgeable. This was an EXCELLENT course.” — Donna N.

    Related Courses


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    Organic Bakery Sample Marketing Plan – Marketing Vision #sell #your #business


    #bakery business plan

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    Marketing Vision

    Orti’s Organic Bakery is built around the belief that eating a healthy, organic breakfast can have a significant impact on a person’s health and attitude, as well as the environment. Orti’s also believes that customers can have great tasting organic baked goods if the right attention is paid to sourcing, recipes, and consistency.

    Orti’s Organic Bakery will launch a first location at Union Station in, in Wilder, to serve commuters and build a local brand which can be leveraged into additional locations in the coming years. Orti’s will build a following through advertising, referral marketing, and a loyalty program.

    This marketing plan will allow Orti Franklin, the owner, to focus his marketing efforts by taking the long view, and looking for results on a daily and weekly basis to see that the chosen tactics are successful.

    Get practical ideas and good models with dozens of examples of successful

    marketing plans with Sales and Marketing Pro.

    1.1 Goals

    • Devote at least 40 hours per month specifically to marketing
    • Obtain at least one speaking engagement per month related to organic food and living
    • Set up operations so that it is possible to take two weeks vacation in second year of operation

    • Achieve total annual revenue of over $300,000 in year 2
    • Achieve an average monthly transactions per customer of 6 by end of year 4
    • Achieve average monthly spend per customer of $36 by end of year 3

    • Raise funding to expand or franchise in the fourth year of operation after the concept and brand has been proven
    • Achieve 99.5% customer satisfaction (199 in 200 customers leaves satisfied)
    • Achieve 15% market of Union Station breakfast customers by end of year 3

    • Reach 5,000 e-newsletter subscribers by end of year 3
    • Achieve Orti’s Organic Bakery club membership of 3,500 by end of year 3
    • Have 15 business referral partners by end of year 3

    1.2 Purpose

    Orti’s Organic Bakery’s marketing plan is designed to document the path the business plans to take to work towards its ultimate goal of becoming a serious player in the Wilder area organic movement and to make a difference in the community by being a vocal proponent of organic eating and living. We truly believe that organic food is not a gimmick – it is a path to a healthier and more sustainable life. We also believe that customers need not give up good taste in order to eat healthily, as the right recipes can bring the two together.

    1.3 Picture

    If Orti’s Organic Bakery achieves its mission, the path will be paved for the business to open locations throughout the Wilder area. Not just organic devotees, but Wilder locals in general will come to know Orti’s Organic Bakery is synonymous with great tasting baked goods. In this future, the organic living market will grow and be a market force to be reckoned with and no longer a niche. Orti’s products will appeal to this organic living market as well as anyone seeking high quality baked goods.

    Customer will seek out an Orti’s Organic Bakery location and find comfort in the consistent service and taste, and the transparency with which the business describes its ingredients and their sources. The customer won’t mind waiting a few minutes in line in order to purchase, and will enjoy sitting with a paper at the counter to enjoy their fresh scone, croissant, or bagel.

    1.4 Gap Dashboard

    The Gap Dashboard will be reviewed on a monthly basis and includes many key marketing metrics which are reviewed on a weekly basis:

    • Personal goal results are tracked by Orti Franklin directly to see that he is achieving recognition as an expert in the field, devoting ample time to marketing work, and achieving a sustainable work-life balance
    • Business goal result are tracked in the accounting system
    • Tactical goal results are tracked in the CRM system where all information related to these tactics is entered
    • Strategic goal results are tracked by Orti Franklin on a monthly basis, based on customer complaints (to determine satisfaction level) and financial reports from Union Station (to determine market share achieved)

    Gap Dashboard


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    Reflective Practice in Social Work #social #worker, #social #work, #clinical, #medical, #social #services, #addiction,

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    Eye on Ethics

    Reflective Practice in Social Work — The Ethical Dimension
    By Frederic G. Reamer, PhD
    April 2013

    Recently, I received an urgent voicemail message from a hospital social worker: “Please get back to me as soon as possible. I have a meeting tomorrow morning with our head of human resources, and I’m very nervous about it.”

    Later in the day, I connected with the social worker and learned the following: He had been employed by the hospital for seven years and had never been disciplined. His current predicament began when his immediate supervisor called him in to discuss concerns about possible boundary violations and an alleged inappropriate dual relationship with a hospital patient. The social worker explained to me that in his personal life he is actively involved in a community-based group of parents who adopted children from China. The group sponsors a wide range of activities to support and enhance the children’s ethnic identity. Through this involvement, the social worker said, he and his wife had become very friendly with several other adoptive parents.

    About three weeks earlier, one of the parents who had become a good friend was admitted to the social worker’s hospital for treatment of a chronic, debilitating infection. The friend did not receive social work services. During the friend’s hospital stay, the social worker occasionally stopped by his room to say hello and inquire about the friend’s health. The patient’s attending physician had collaborated professionally with the social worker in other hospital cases and was well aware of the patient’s friendship with the social worker.

    One afternoon during the patient’s hospital stay, the physician contacted the social worker and explained that the patient was distraught after having just learned that he was diagnosed with bone cancer. According to the social worker, the physician asked the social worker to visit the patient and offer emotional support. The social worker visited the patient in his room and spent about an hour helping his friend process the distressing medical news.

    The social worker documented this patient encounter in the hospital chart. During a random quality-control review of social workers’ chart entries, the hospital’s social work supervisor read the note and became concerned because the social worker had not been assigned to provide social work services to this patient. The supervisor learned of the social worker and patient’s friendship and notified the director of human resources, who documented this “incident” in the social worker’s personnel record and asked to meet with the social worker.

    The Nature of Reflective Practice
    In 1983, the late scholar Donald Schon published his influential and groundbreaking book The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action . Schon’s thesis, based on his extensive empirical research, was that the most skilled and effective professionals have the ability to pay critical attention to the way they conduct their work at the same time that they do their work. Schon coined the terms “knowing-in-action” and “reflection-in-action,” which suggest that some professionals can take a step back and think hard about what they are doing while they are doing it. The concepts are akin to the widely used social work concept “use of self.”

    Ordinarily the concepts of knowing-in-action and reflection-in-action are applied to practitioners’ cultivation and use of technical skill, whether in surgery, architecture, town planning, engineering, dentistry, or psychotherapy. In my view, and as the above case demonstrates, social workers would do well to extend the application of these compelling concepts to their identification and management of ethical issues in the profession. Ideally, effective practitioners would have the ability to recognize and address ethical issues and challenges as they arise in the immediate context of their work, not later when someone else points them out. Put another way, social workers would have a refined “ethics radar” that increases their ability to detect and respond to ethical issues.

    Of course, the most important benefit is client protection. However, an important by-product is self-protection, that is, the increased likelihood that social workers will protect themselves from ethics-related complaints.

    Implementing Reflective Ethics Practice
    Certainly the hospital social worker who called me with panic in his voice would have benefited from reflective ethics practice and highly sensitive ethics radar. Had he reflected on the ethical dimensions of the boundary challenges that emerged when he interacted with his friend and hospital patient, it is likely that this well-meaning practitioner would have avoided his unpleasant encounter with the human resources department. The social worker’s decision to visit his friend was not the error; that was a humane and compassionate gesture. The error, rather, was not reflecting on his role in that moment and managing the boundaries carefully, including discussing them with his friend and his supervisor.

    In my experience, ethics-related reflection-in-action entails three key elements.

    Knowledge: Skillful management of many ethical dilemmas requires knowledge of core concepts and prevailing standards. Ethics concepts are addressed in professional literature and standards exist in several forms, including relevant codes of ethics, agency policies, statutes, and regulations. For example, the National Association of Social Workers’ Codeof Ethics includes explicit standards pertaining to boundaries, dual relationships, and conflicts of interest (especially section 1.06). It would have been best for the hospital-based social worker to consult relevant literature and standards with regard to conflicts that can arise when a social worker encounters a friend or social acquaintance in the work setting. The hospital’s personnel policies also prohibit dual relationships that involve conflicts of interest.

    In some cases, although not all, statutes and regulations address ethical issues. In the United States, both federal and state laws address various ethical issues, such as confidentiality, privileged communication, informed consent, and social workers’ ethical conduct. Such laws would not have been particularly helpful in the hospital social worker’s case, but often they are helpful and critically important, for example, when social workers must decide whether to disclose confidential information without clients’ consent to protect a third party from harm or whether parental consent is necessary to provide services to minors who seek help with substance abuse but insist that this information be withheld from their parents.

    Transparency: Reflective social workers who sense an ethical issue share their concern with supervisors, colleagues, and appropriate administrators. An effective way to protect clients and practitioners alike is to avoid any suggestion that the ethical issue is being handled “in the dark.” Such clarity demonstrates social workers’ good faith efforts to manage ethical dilemmas responsibly. When appropriate, clients should be included in the conversation.

    Process: Although some ethical decisions are clear-cut, many are not. The hospital social worker who contacted me was unsure about the best way to manage his involvement with a good friend who had become a patient. Unfortunately, the social worker did not notify his supervisor about the dilemma or seek consultation. He documented his lengthy hospital-room encounter with the patient, but doing so in the client’s hospital chart created the impression that the social worker was functioning in his professional capacity, not as a friend. My hunch is that had the social worker notified his supervisor of his friendship with the patient and made clear that any contact with the patient occurred as a friend, the social worker may have avoided any adverse personnel issues. What I have learned is that many ethical decisions are not simple events; they require a considerable, often painstaking, process.

    During the course of the profession’s history, social workers have refined the art of reflective practice. Historically, these skills have been applied primarily to clinical, policy, advocacy, and administrative functions. Clearly, reflective practice should extend to ethics as well.

    — Frederic G. Reamer, PhD, is a professor in the graduate program of the School of Social Work, Rhode Island College. He is the author of many books and articles, and his research has addressed mental health, healthcare, criminal justice, and professional ethics.


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