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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #businesses #to #start

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8 Reasons Not to Get a Business Degree – CBS News #business #stationary

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8 Reasons Not to Get a Business Degree

Last Updated Jan 24, 2011 5:46 PM EST

Business degrees are hot, but you might want to reconsider your decision. Here are eight reasons why you should not major in business :

1. Business majors don’t learn much in business school.

That’s one of the bombshell conclusions of Academically Adrift . a new blockbuster bestseller that suggests that 45% of college students don’t learn much of anything in their first two years of college, while more than one out of three students graduate with no improvement in writing and analytical skills.

Among the students who learn the least in college are social work, education and business majors . In contrast, the researchers found that students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, hard sciences and math do relatively well.

2. You won’t make as much money as you think.

When PayScale looked at starting and mid-career salaries of college graduates in dozens of college majors . business came in as the 56th best-paying college degree. It fared worse than such “impractical” college degrees as philosophy . history and American studies .

3. The job market is crawling with business majors.

It’s hard to stand out from the crowd when more than one out of every five new college grads is a business major . What you’re telegraphing when you major in business is that you want to make money, but do you have what it takes to some day earn that corner office?

4. Your quality of life could suck.

Prominent labor economists examined what Harvard Business School grads were doing 15 years after graduating and certain business majors were having a difficult time juggling career and home life. Here’s a post that I wrote about the study: The Perils of Majoring in Business .

5. Majoring in business could hurt your MBA chances.

Not having an undergrad business degree can actually help when applying to MBA programs . At some MBA programs less than 25% of their students possess undergrad business degrees. One study documented that business undergrads actually performed worse in MBA programs than non-business majors.

6. You don’t need a business degree to work in business.

You’re kidding yourself if you think a business degree gives you the skills to work in the corporate world.

A employer survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers indicates that workplaces most value these three skills that you are usually more likely to find with a liberal arts eduction:

  • Communication skills.
  • Analytic skills.
  • Teamwork skills.

What’s more, a survey by the Association of American Colleges and Universities found that 89% of surveyed employees said they want college students to pursue a liberal arts education.

7. You can make more money with an economics degree.

On PayScale’s list of the highest paying college majors, economics came in No. 10. Engineering majors dominated the rest of the top-paying degrees. Economics is one of the liberal arts so you are more likely to learn how to write and think in college, which is what employers covet in their workers.

Illustrious econ majors include Warren Buffettt, Steve Ballmer, Ted Turner, Steve Fossett, Henry Kravis, Diane von Furstenberg, Esther Dyson, Bill Belichick and Mick Jagger

8. Your parents want you to major in business.

Don’t be a wuss and major in business because your parents are nagging you. If you’re pressured into majoring in business or any other major, studies show that you’ll be less likely to succeed professionally AND financially.

More on CBS MoneyWatch:

2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

View all articles by Lynn O’Shaughnessy on CBS MoneyWatch
Lynn O’Shaughnessy is a best-selling author, consultant and speaker on issues that parents with college-bound teenagers face. She explains how families can make college more affordable through her website TheCollegeSolution.com ; her financial workbook, Shrinking the Cost of College ; and the new second edition of her Amazon best-selling book, The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price .





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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #music #business

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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #business #plans

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5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business #business #plans

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5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business

January 12, 2016

I ve been a creative entrepreneur since 2005. My first design company was a partnership with my significant other. It was largely a freestyle experiment in running a business, conducted live over the course of five years. As a business, it was marginally successful. As a learning experience, it was my equivalent of a masters of business administration.

So, by the time I had started my second and current company, I had a pretty good blueprint of don t s for running a small business. I had been fortunate enough to make the mistakes that have yielded five valuable lessons learned — lessons that have truly paid off the second time around.

1. Don t rush into partnerships.

It was only after my original partner and I parted ways did I recognize that we should never have had a professional partnership in the first place. Just because someone is your best friend, long-time coworker and / or significant other hardly qualifies them as the perfect candidate for maintaining a business. I say maintaining because it s far easier to get excited about the prospect starting a company than being able to handle the day-to-day reality of running it efficiently.

The best partner is typically someone whose skills and approach are the polar opposite of yours. The first ensures the you are able to cover a lot more ground without additional employees. The second may create conflict, but it ll force you both to defend your business instincts and weed out lesser ideas before you waste resources.

2. Don t get discouraged.

Running a company isn t a goal — it s a long, winding road. Enjoy the process! Unless your goal is to cash out, and you ve got some built-in exit strategy, chances are you want a long-term entrepreneurial career. You will have ups, and you will have downs — possibly in the same week or even day. You will gain amazing clients and lose others for reasons fair and unfair. That s all part of having a business.

I ve yet to encounter a single business owner who s reached some grand, stable plateau beyond failure, disappointment and doubt. We all experience it. Instead of discouragement, focus on becoming more resilient, on learning how to handle stress productively.

3. Don t forget why you wanted to start a business in the first place.

Whether it s following a passion or having more control over your time to devote to family, always remember why you started down this road in the first place. It s easy to get carried away and forget what it was you wanted from your own business. I, for example, was driven by quality-of-life factors, especially time off for my other passion — travel. At times, temporary sacrifice may be truly necessary, but it pays to be conscious of when you re in danger of permanently shelving the very thing you wanted most.

4. Don t try to do everything yourself.

I started my first company with $500 — barely enough to cover the costs of incorporation. So, right away, I developed an addiction to doing everything myself. My partner was only capable, willing and able to do so much, and I found myself doing a lot of admin tasks I never anticipated. Those tasks came with learning curves, and they took up valuable time and energy — energy that could have been directed at helping the business grow.

I didn t make this mistake twice. With my second, far more successful attempt, I contracted my business half just a couple of months in. Although my expenses grew, now I could focus on doing better work as well as devote time to business development. Both actions helped to grow the company far quicker than my former money-saving attempts at being my own bookkeeper.

So, resist the urge to cover all the ground alone. Saving financial resources is important, but don t let your task list undermine your big goals.

5. Don t stop evolving.

Your strategy, your marketing plan, your target market — nothing is set in stone. The world is changing more and more rapidly each day. Your industry will likely experience a shift, whether slight or monumental, at some point. As a small business, you are at a disadvantage, because your resources are a lot more limited. But you have a priceless advantage in ability to change course and adapt far quicker than a larger organization.

The best way to remain relevant is keeping your eyes open for changing tides, your mind open to new ideas and staying flexible.

And, of course, don t be too afraid of making your own mistakes!





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