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5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business #low #cost #business #ideas

#running a small business

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5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business

January 12, 2016

I ve been a creative entrepreneur since 2005. My first design company was a partnership with my significant other. It was largely a freestyle experiment in running a business, conducted live over the course of five years. As a business, it was marginally successful. As a learning experience, it was my equivalent of a masters of business administration.

So, by the time I had started my second and current company, I had a pretty good blueprint of don t s for running a small business. I had been fortunate enough to make the mistakes that have yielded five valuable lessons learned — lessons that have truly paid off the second time around.

1. Don t rush into partnerships.

It was only after my original partner and I parted ways did I recognize that we should never have had a professional partnership in the first place. Just because someone is your best friend, long-time coworker and / or significant other hardly qualifies them as the perfect candidate for maintaining a business. I say maintaining because it s far easier to get excited about the prospect starting a company than being able to handle the day-to-day reality of running it efficiently.

The best partner is typically someone whose skills and approach are the polar opposite of yours. The first ensures the you are able to cover a lot more ground without additional employees. The second may create conflict, but it ll force you both to defend your business instincts and weed out lesser ideas before you waste resources.

2. Don t get discouraged.

Running a company isn t a goal — it s a long, winding road. Enjoy the process! Unless your goal is to cash out, and you ve got some built-in exit strategy, chances are you want a long-term entrepreneurial career. You will have ups, and you will have downs — possibly in the same week or even day. You will gain amazing clients and lose others for reasons fair and unfair. That s all part of having a business.

I ve yet to encounter a single business owner who s reached some grand, stable plateau beyond failure, disappointment and doubt. We all experience it. Instead of discouragement, focus on becoming more resilient, on learning how to handle stress productively.

3. Don t forget why you wanted to start a business in the first place.

Whether it s following a passion or having more control over your time to devote to family, always remember why you started down this road in the first place. It s easy to get carried away and forget what it was you wanted from your own business. I, for example, was driven by quality-of-life factors, especially time off for my other passion — travel. At times, temporary sacrifice may be truly necessary, but it pays to be conscious of when you re in danger of permanently shelving the very thing you wanted most.

4. Don t try to do everything yourself.

I started my first company with $500 — barely enough to cover the costs of incorporation. So, right away, I developed an addiction to doing everything myself. My partner was only capable, willing and able to do so much, and I found myself doing a lot of admin tasks I never anticipated. Those tasks came with learning curves, and they took up valuable time and energy — energy that could have been directed at helping the business grow.

I didn t make this mistake twice. With my second, far more successful attempt, I contracted my business half just a couple of months in. Although my expenses grew, now I could focus on doing better work as well as devote time to business development. Both actions helped to grow the company far quicker than my former money-saving attempts at being my own bookkeeper.

So, resist the urge to cover all the ground alone. Saving financial resources is important, but don t let your task list undermine your big goals.

5. Don t stop evolving.

Your strategy, your marketing plan, your target market — nothing is set in stone. The world is changing more and more rapidly each day. Your industry will likely experience a shift, whether slight or monumental, at some point. As a small business, you are at a disadvantage, because your resources are a lot more limited. But you have a priceless advantage in ability to change course and adapt far quicker than a larger organization.

The best way to remain relevant is keeping your eyes open for changing tides, your mind open to new ideas and staying flexible.

And, of course, don t be too afraid of making your own mistakes!





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A Soy Candle Making Business is Not Easy #government #grants

#candle making business

#

A Soy Candle Making Business is Not Easy

Psssst My Facebook Business Page E-Course is 60% all through August!

Want to get your candle business out there on social media and grow your following? FB is an excellent, and free place to start!

You love candles. You love them so much that you think you want to start a business making them. They are fun to make, it s true! And it s so lovely to have your house constantly be filled with those wonderful, delightful fragrances!

I myself, did not realize all the work that goes into a soy candle business, or any candle business for that matter, because you soon realize that it is not just about making the candles. I don t want to discourage you. No. Because a soy candle making business can be a nice profitable home business for you! But I want to make sure you realize all that goes into it, because if you are just starting out, or just thinking about starting, then you don t know all the work that goes into candle making and marketing and selling.

This is the reason I decided to close my business after 4 years. If I didn t have kids I may have stuck with it, but the fact that I have 3 boys (I only had 2 when I first started my soy candle business) and was working my business and trying to homeschool, and on top of that, living in a small home, I had to make a choice on what my priorities were and I decided I wasn t enjoying the whole candle business all that much anymore even though business kept growing, so I closed the doors. In fact it was because of the growing customers that I decided to call it quits. The more customers the more busy it got and I didn t have anyone to help me with it all!

That does not mean that you can t do it, and enjoy it though! Everyone is different and this business can work for you!

Below is a rundown of all the things involved with making, marketing, and selling soy candles. If you can outsource a few of these things, it will make your business so much less stressful and you can focus more on your candle making!

  • Making soy candles from scratch (melting wax, preparing containers, placing wicks, cooling time, thinking up new fragrances, testing, testing,testing, cleaning up your mess, cleaning your tools)
  • Ordering supplies
  • Putting on tags and warning labels and any other decorations
  • Packaging your soy candles (mainly votives, tarts and tealights)
  • Packaging for shipping
  • Printing shipping labels
  • Creating and maintaining a website
  • Answering questions
  • Marketing your business whether online or offline
  • Preparing for and traveling to craft shows
  • Did I mention maintaining your website.
  • Doing taxes
  • Thinking and thinking and thinking about this, that and everything to do with soy candles!

Now, like I said, if you can afford to pay someone to do some of those things above, or you have a partner to help, a good size kitchen(better yet a separate area to work), then you will probably have a much easier time of it!

I know I might have caused some doubt in your mind of whether you want to even try this business, but really, you won t know until you try. I loved it the first 2 years, it s just that I had so many other things I was trying to do too, so the candle business just didn t end up fitting with the lifestyle I wanted.

But I hope I ve made you seriously consider some things and if you think you want to give it a go, then go for it! Procrastinating will get you nowhere, and, like I said, you won t know until you try!

Until next time,

What if you had a tool that could help you get started making soy candles for your business right now?

Would you like to save a ton of time that you could be using to work on starting your business instead of searching all over trying to find how to make this kind of soy candle, or that kind, or how to find the best wick, what supplier to use and so on, etc etc ?

That is exactly why I created my new eBook The Soy Candle Making Book You can download the book and have everything you need to make amazing soy candles that your customers will love!

No need to go searching around the net for every piece of information because it s all right here!

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How to Truly Say “I Love You” to Your Family #term #life #insurance, #affordable

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How to Truly Say “I Love You” to Your Family

February 09, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Chocolate and roses are classic Valentine’s Day gifts. But I am dead serious when I tell you that the most caring and loving gift you can ever give your loved ones is to protect them with life insurance.

I know, I know. Not exactly romantic. But in terms of material things that we can buy for others, you can’t tell me there is anything that will bestow more protection and peace of mind. Yet a recent survey finds that many parents with children don’t have life insurance. And a significant portion of families that do have insurance, have $100,000 or less of coverage, which I can tell you is way too little.

So are you ready to show your family the love? Here’s how:

  • Think about whether anyone is dependent on your income. Kids. Siblings. Elderly parents. If anyone relies on your for all or some of their support, the next question I have for you is whether your savings and investments could support them if you were to pass tomorrow. If the answer is “no” then you need to say yes to life insurance pronto.
  • Aim for a death benefit that is at least 20 times your loved one’s income needs. Let me be clear, if you are relying on life insurance through work, you do not have anywhere near enough protection. Most employers provide just one year’s income. It sounds like a lot, but it’s not really enough to take care of your loved ones. One year’s salary isn’t going to help pay the mortgage for very long, or help send a five year old to college.

To make sure your loved ones will be okay, I recommend you buy life insurance with a death benefit that is 20 to 25 times the annual income you want to replace. So for example, if you wanted to replace $50,000 in annual income you would buy a policy with a $1 million to $1.25 million death benefit. Why so much? Because your beneficiaries could invest the money conservatively-in municipal bonds for example-and live off of the income for a very long time.

Now I know that sounds expensive, but trust, me I bet you can afford it. Just keep reading.

Buy a term life insurance policy. Most of us only need a life insurance policy for a set period of time. Until the toddlers are adults and supporting themselves. Or until we have time to build up our own assets. Or maybe to insure your elderly parents would be okay if something were to happen to you. In that case, term insurance is the right fit for your needs. Term means that it is good for a set term. That can be one year, or 10 years or 20 years. If you die during the term, your beneficiaries receive the death benefit. After the term, your insurance expires. Because the insurance is not permanent, the cost can very affordable. For example, a 45 year old woman in good health could buy a $1 million level term policy (level means the annual premium never changes) for an annual premium of less than $1,000. That’s less than $85 a month for incredible peace of mind! You can shop online for a term policy at Selectquote.com and Accuqoute.com

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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #small #business #plans

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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #businesses #to #start

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8 Reasons Not to Get a Business Degree – CBS News #business #stationary

#business degree

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8 Reasons Not to Get a Business Degree

Last Updated Jan 24, 2011 5:46 PM EST

Business degrees are hot, but you might want to reconsider your decision. Here are eight reasons why you should not major in business :

1. Business majors don’t learn much in business school.

That’s one of the bombshell conclusions of Academically Adrift . a new blockbuster bestseller that suggests that 45% of college students don’t learn much of anything in their first two years of college, while more than one out of three students graduate with no improvement in writing and analytical skills.

Among the students who learn the least in college are social work, education and business majors . In contrast, the researchers found that students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, hard sciences and math do relatively well.

2. You won’t make as much money as you think.

When PayScale looked at starting and mid-career salaries of college graduates in dozens of college majors . business came in as the 56th best-paying college degree. It fared worse than such “impractical” college degrees as philosophy . history and American studies .

3. The job market is crawling with business majors.

It’s hard to stand out from the crowd when more than one out of every five new college grads is a business major . What you’re telegraphing when you major in business is that you want to make money, but do you have what it takes to some day earn that corner office?

4. Your quality of life could suck.

Prominent labor economists examined what Harvard Business School grads were doing 15 years after graduating and certain business majors were having a difficult time juggling career and home life. Here’s a post that I wrote about the study: The Perils of Majoring in Business .

5. Majoring in business could hurt your MBA chances.

Not having an undergrad business degree can actually help when applying to MBA programs . At some MBA programs less than 25% of their students possess undergrad business degrees. One study documented that business undergrads actually performed worse in MBA programs than non-business majors.

6. You don’t need a business degree to work in business.

You’re kidding yourself if you think a business degree gives you the skills to work in the corporate world.

A employer survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers indicates that workplaces most value these three skills that you are usually more likely to find with a liberal arts eduction:

  • Communication skills.
  • Analytic skills.
  • Teamwork skills.

What’s more, a survey by the Association of American Colleges and Universities found that 89% of surveyed employees said they want college students to pursue a liberal arts education.

7. You can make more money with an economics degree.

On PayScale’s list of the highest paying college majors, economics came in No. 10. Engineering majors dominated the rest of the top-paying degrees. Economics is one of the liberal arts so you are more likely to learn how to write and think in college, which is what employers covet in their workers.

Illustrious econ majors include Warren Buffettt, Steve Ballmer, Ted Turner, Steve Fossett, Henry Kravis, Diane von Furstenberg, Esther Dyson, Bill Belichick and Mick Jagger

8. Your parents want you to major in business.

Don’t be a wuss and major in business because your parents are nagging you. If you’re pressured into majoring in business or any other major, studies show that you’ll be less likely to succeed professionally AND financially.

More on CBS MoneyWatch:

2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

View all articles by Lynn O’Shaughnessy on CBS MoneyWatch
Lynn O’Shaughnessy is a best-selling author, consultant and speaker on issues that parents with college-bound teenagers face. She explains how families can make college more affordable through her website TheCollegeSolution.com ; her financial workbook, Shrinking the Cost of College ; and the new second edition of her Amazon best-selling book, The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price .





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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #music #business

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Page not found – London Stock Exchange #business #plans

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5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business #business #plans

#running a small business

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5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business

January 12, 2016

I ve been a creative entrepreneur since 2005. My first design company was a partnership with my significant other. It was largely a freestyle experiment in running a business, conducted live over the course of five years. As a business, it was marginally successful. As a learning experience, it was my equivalent of a masters of business administration.

So, by the time I had started my second and current company, I had a pretty good blueprint of don t s for running a small business. I had been fortunate enough to make the mistakes that have yielded five valuable lessons learned — lessons that have truly paid off the second time around.

1. Don t rush into partnerships.

It was only after my original partner and I parted ways did I recognize that we should never have had a professional partnership in the first place. Just because someone is your best friend, long-time coworker and / or significant other hardly qualifies them as the perfect candidate for maintaining a business. I say maintaining because it s far easier to get excited about the prospect starting a company than being able to handle the day-to-day reality of running it efficiently.

The best partner is typically someone whose skills and approach are the polar opposite of yours. The first ensures the you are able to cover a lot more ground without additional employees. The second may create conflict, but it ll force you both to defend your business instincts and weed out lesser ideas before you waste resources.

2. Don t get discouraged.

Running a company isn t a goal — it s a long, winding road. Enjoy the process! Unless your goal is to cash out, and you ve got some built-in exit strategy, chances are you want a long-term entrepreneurial career. You will have ups, and you will have downs — possibly in the same week or even day. You will gain amazing clients and lose others for reasons fair and unfair. That s all part of having a business.

I ve yet to encounter a single business owner who s reached some grand, stable plateau beyond failure, disappointment and doubt. We all experience it. Instead of discouragement, focus on becoming more resilient, on learning how to handle stress productively.

3. Don t forget why you wanted to start a business in the first place.

Whether it s following a passion or having more control over your time to devote to family, always remember why you started down this road in the first place. It s easy to get carried away and forget what it was you wanted from your own business. I, for example, was driven by quality-of-life factors, especially time off for my other passion — travel. At times, temporary sacrifice may be truly necessary, but it pays to be conscious of when you re in danger of permanently shelving the very thing you wanted most.

4. Don t try to do everything yourself.

I started my first company with $500 — barely enough to cover the costs of incorporation. So, right away, I developed an addiction to doing everything myself. My partner was only capable, willing and able to do so much, and I found myself doing a lot of admin tasks I never anticipated. Those tasks came with learning curves, and they took up valuable time and energy — energy that could have been directed at helping the business grow.

I didn t make this mistake twice. With my second, far more successful attempt, I contracted my business half just a couple of months in. Although my expenses grew, now I could focus on doing better work as well as devote time to business development. Both actions helped to grow the company far quicker than my former money-saving attempts at being my own bookkeeper.

So, resist the urge to cover all the ground alone. Saving financial resources is important, but don t let your task list undermine your big goals.

5. Don t stop evolving.

Your strategy, your marketing plan, your target market — nothing is set in stone. The world is changing more and more rapidly each day. Your industry will likely experience a shift, whether slight or monumental, at some point. As a small business, you are at a disadvantage, because your resources are a lot more limited. But you have a priceless advantage in ability to change course and adapt far quicker than a larger organization.

The best way to remain relevant is keeping your eyes open for changing tides, your mind open to new ideas and staying flexible.

And, of course, don t be too afraid of making your own mistakes!





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