Tag: Kids

Young Entrepreneurs: 14 Small Business Ideas for Teens and Kids #business #computers

#business ideas for kids

#

14 Fun Business Ideas for Kids and Teens to Encourage Entrepreneurship

Should you encourage your children to start a business? Are there good business ideas for teens and kids? With police routinely shutting down kids lemonade stands for being unlicensed businesses, you might wonder if they should just put their entrepreneurial urges on hold until they get older.

But there are good reasons to let young people make some money on their own, and to let them start early. Billionaire CEO of Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett says :

There was a study many years ago questioning how to predict business success later in life. The answer to the study wasthe age you started your first business impacted how successful you were later in life.Teaching kids sound financial habits at an early age gives all kids the opportunity to be successful when they are an adult. [emphasis added]

Buffett s own childhood was full of investments and businesses. At age 11, he bought his first stock. By the age of 14, he used $1,200 he earned from paper routes to purchase 40 acres of land, which he then leased out to farmers. In high school, he and a friend bought a used pinball machine for $25 and set it up in a barber shop. They later put machines in other locations and eventually sold the business.

Of course, your child doesn t have to be the next Warren Buffett to benefit from a small venture or two. Here are some of the best business ideas for kids.

1. Dog Walking

Busy people need help keeping their dogs fit, and this is a job most kids can handle and enjoy. Dog walkers charge either for a set fee or an hourly rate, and the kids can even expand their business to include dog washing and pet sitting .

Kids can approach neighbors to offer their services (you may want to tag along if they’re young) or advertise their business online. Care.comsays their dog walkers average almost $10 per hour, and it s free to open a basic account. Care.com’s policy for teens requires adult-supervised accounts (parents receive email notifications of all activity), and the kids have to be at least 14 to sign up.

2. Websites

Many kids are more Internet savvy than their parents, so it makes sense to consider online businesses, including various types of websites. It costs very little to register a domain name and buy web hosting, and by relying on easy advertising revenue (like Google AdSense), kids don t even have to sell anything.

For example, Forbes reports that Ashley Qualls started Whateverlife.com at age 14 as a personal portfolio with pictures and graphics she created. Later, she added tutorials on creating graphics and other content for teens. Before long she needed a dedicated server, and she added Google AdSense to the site to monetize the traffic.

Now, her website brings in as much as $70,000 a month, according to Fast Company. Qualls bought a $250,000 home with her profits while still a teenager, and turned down a $1.5 million offer for her business.

3. Paper Routes

Paper routes helped Warren Buffett get his start in business, and although most newspapers now rely on adults with cars for delivery, there are still a few places where kids deliver papers on foot or by bicycle. In Carroll, Iowa, for example, The Daily Times Herald still has 80% of its papers delivered by kids aged 9 to 17, according to NPR .

One of the best things about modern paper delivery is that the kids no longer have to knock on doors to collect for subscriptions that s all done by credit card billing.

4. Crafts and Jewelry

If your kids are creatively inclined, they can make crafts and jewelry to sell online. There s no need to set up a website for this. Platforms like Etsy provide a great way to keep it simple. Vendors pay 20 cents to list a product and then a commission of 3.5% on each sale. The policy for kids is that the Etsy Shop must be managed by a parent or legal guardian.

How much could your child earn on Etsy? By the time he was 11 years old, Mo Bridges had brought in more than $30,000 selling bow ties through his Etsy shop.

Other Businesses for Kids

Don t underestimate the potential for big success from small starts. Fraser Doherty started making and selling jam from home at age 14 and before long had over $1 million in annual sales. At age 10, Juliette Brindak drew pictures of Cool Girls, and, at age 16, used those characters to launch a social networking site called Miss O and Friends . The site is valued at $15 million today.

The types of businesses started by some kids might surprise you too. Who would have thought that BizChair.com. started by Sean Belnicks at age 14, would be selling $24 million in office chairs by the time its founder was 20? Or that 17-year-old Nick D’Aloisio would sell his news-aggregator app, called Summly, for $30 million?

Any kind of business activity teaches kids valuable lessons. As a child, Tyler Dikman had lemonade stands, mowed lawns and did magic shows. He parlayed that business experience into launching CoolTronics. a comprehensive computer sales and service solution, when he was just 15. The company went on to make millions of dollars.

What else can kids or teens do to make money? Here are a few more possibilities:

  1. Help companies with social media marketing
  2. Babysit
  3. Help seniors set up and use computers
  4. Wash cars
  5. Do garden maintenance
  6. Have garage sales
  7. Make greeting cards
  8. Recycle soda cans
  9. Tutor younger kids
  10. Shovel snow

Your Turn: Do you encourage your children s entrepreneurial plans? What good business ideas could you add to the list?

by Steve Gillman
Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

Top Articles

Want a Free $20 in Cash?

How to Earn $60/Hour Working From Home as a Bookkeeper

Work From Home

29 Smart Ways

The 12 Best Ways

100 Places Will Give You

Get Free Money

10 Ways You Can Make Money

Top 5 Mystery Shopping

Easy $750 Per Month

32 Legitimate Ways

Have a Costco or Sam’s Club Membership?

12 Mobile Apps

The Krazy Coupon Lady

9 Best Survey Sites





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

5 Summer Business Ideas for Kids: PowerHomeBiz Blog #current #stock #prices

#business ideas for kids

#

It is summer time and the kids are out of school. One way to preoccupy them during the warm summer months is to introduce them to the joys of entrepreneurship.

One way to make this summer memorable for them is to help them start a business – one that they enjoy and are passionate about. A summer business venture can teach them the basics of business. They get to have a taste of becoming a business owner. It will be a great exercise to expose them to the value of hard work and dedication. They’ll also start learning about money, even the concept of cash flow. Plus, it will help them take pride in their creations and work.

Here are some summer business ideas for kids:

With your help, your child can create an online store and start selling on the Web. The key is choosing the right items to sell, preferably products that resonate with them. One option is to choose items that they think will resonate with other kids in their age group. Read the story of Hannah Altman: A 10-Year Old CEO’s Success with Pencil Toppers .

An easier way will be to become an affiliate for other companies. This will allow the kid to earn commission from the sale, without spending money for inventory. This is the business model followed by the 15-year old entrepreneur Lachy Groom with his iPadCaseFinder.com website.

Cool Zips products from 10-year old entrepreneur Hannah Altman

The neighborhood lemonade stand is the most common business for kids in the summer. It is a fun, easy business for kids.

Easy to setup, your child needs to make a refreshing pitcher of lemonade (may need the help of adults) and sell it by the cup. The key is to find a high traffic area to set up the stand. The stand can be a simple table with chairs for the kids (umbrella preferred) or more complex with a wooden stand. The price of a lemonade cup can be anywhere from $0.25 to even a dollar, depending on how hot is it that day. However, check with your local county if there are any restrictions or tax implications for a seemingly simple business like a kid’s lemonade stand (the last thing you want is for your kid to be slapped with a fine for operating a business without a license.)

3. Pet sitting business.

During summer, some people go off on vacations but choose to leave their pets behind. If your kid loves pets and is capable of taking care of pets, one option is to start a pet sitting business. Your kid can take the dog for a walk, feed the cat or birds, and just make sure that the pets are being taken care of. For ideas, read the article “How to Develop a Pet Sitting Brand” .

If your kid is adept in creating and editing videos, your child can use the skill to make money. Your kid can make short videos and upload them to the massively popular Youtube. If the videos are able to attract a sizeable audience, your kid can join the Youtube Partner Program http://www.youtube.com/partners and start earning from the videos through advertising. Read the article “8 Ways to Earn Money from Online Videos” .

5. T-Shirt Design Business.

If your kid is pretty crafty and artistic, one option is to start designing t-shirts. Your kid can make it as colorful as he/she wants, even full of wacky design ideas. The key is to highlight that these are unique and one-of-a-kind t-shirts. You can then sell them online such as eBay or the handmade auction site Etsy.com. Another way is to approach a small boutique owner in your area and check if they would be interested in selling your kid’s t-shirts.

For any of the above business ideas, parental guidance is important (even necessary). Think of this time as a way you can bond even more with your kids. And have fun while doing it!





Tags : , , , , , , ,

Fun For Kids – What is the Stock Market? #business #banners

#the stock market

#

What is the Stock Market?

The stock market is an everyday term we use to talk about a place where stocks and bonds are traded meaning bought and sold. For many people, that is the first thing that comes to mind for investing. The goal is to buy the stock, hold it for a time, and then sell the stock for more than you paid for it.

How long do you hang on to stock? Investors who hold stock for 15 years or more usually succeed in the market. Stocks are long-term investments. But there are no guarantees.

What are stocks?

Stocks are units of ownership in a company.

Companies sell stock to get money to

  • Research better ways to make things
  • Create new products
  • Improve the products they have
  • Hire more employees
  • Enlarge or modernize their buildings

So just as the federal government sells bonds to raise money, businesses raise money by selling stock.

How it works

When you buy stock, you become a shareholder. which means you now own a part of the company. If the company’s profits go up, you share in those profits. If the company’s profits fall, so does the price of your stock. If you sold your stock on a day when the price of that stock falls below the price you paid for it, you would lose money.

Stock prices can rise and fall

In the stock market, prices rise and fall every day. When you invest in the stock market, you are hoping that over the years, the stock will become much more valuable than the price you paid for it.

Copyright 2016 Northwestern Mutual
720 East Wisconsin Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53202 | Privacy Statement | Contact Us





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Kids can pitch business ideas to Warren Buffett #online #business #systems

#business ideas for kids

#

Kids can pitch business ideas to Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett voices his own cartoon character for the Secret Millionaire’s Club. (Photo: The Hub)

Story Highlights

  • Contest lets winners pitch business ideas to billionaire Warren Buffett
  • Eligible ages are 7 through 16
  • Grand prize winners get $5,000

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — An online contest is again offering a few young entrepreneurs the chance to present their business ideas to billionaire Warren Buffett.

Students age 7 through 16 can submit their ideas until Feb. 15. Four individuals and two teams will be flown to Omaha to present the ideas to Buffett in person next May.

Berkshire Hathaway’s chairman and CEO says he was impressed with the ideas last year’s finalists presented.

The single prize winner’s idea was Shine So Bright, a kit for creating light-up designs on clothing; the team winner’s idea was Deals on Wheels, a portable school store that could sell school supplies and healthy snacks.

The contest, which is sponsored by the Fairholme Foundation, is affiliated with the “Secret Millionaire’s Club” cartoon that teaches kids financial principles. Buffett voices the animated version of himself that offers advice in the cartoon.

Grand prize individual and team winners will each receive $5,000 after the ideas are judged. Details are available online at smckids.com .

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Read or Share this story: http://usat.ly/120PzMP





Tags : , , , , , , ,

Crossroads in the Boston Business Journal – Giving Kids the Tools to Succeed #business

#boston business journal

#

Crossroads in the Boston Business Journal – Giving Kids the Tools to Succeed

On Friday, April 24, the Boston Business Journal featured some thoughts from Crossroads President Deb Samuels about what young people truly need to succeed. Thank you to the BBJ for helping us spread the word and ensure all young people have what they need to succeed and thrive.

Premium Content

ViewPoint: Giving underprivileged kids the tools to succeed

Apr 24, 2015, 6:00am EDT

A recent story on NPR s This American Life described the disparities that often derail the dreams of students from underserved communities. As reported, exposure to new places, ideas and experiences can often inspire low-income kids to think of secondary education as an opportunity within their grasp. But it takes much more than standard campus tours to help these students get to and flourish at college.

The ability to perform in an academically rigorous environment, while important, does not guarantee success. To help get and keep students with limited resources on the college track requires communication, social and critical thinking skills. Engaged, motivated students feel connected. These kids must believe that they belong at college, that they deserve to be there, and that they possess the tools to thrive, not just survive.

In order to succeed at college, at-risk kids, who may have faced homelessness, financial instability, physical abuse or emotional upheaval in their young lives, must experience trusting relationships with both peers and adults outside of their families. Here in Massachusetts, there are a number of agencies that help guide, motivate and encourage at-risk urban youth to pursue a college degree. My organization, Crossroads for Kids, and those we partner with such as Bottom Line and uAspire, offer a wide range of essential services, from tutoring and leadership development to help managing looming deadlines and navigating mountains of paperwork including applications and financial aid forms which can be overwhelming, especially for the uninitiated. We simply help demystify the often complex selection and admissions process for first generation college students and their families. With much needed support and exposure to the world of possibilities within and beyond their communities, kids get the encouragement they need, one-on-one and in small group settings, that can help level the playing field.

Deb Samuels is executive director for Crossroads for Kids.





Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

Kids can pitch business ideas to Warren Buffett #business #acquisition #loans

#business ideas for kids

#

Kids can pitch business ideas to Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett voices his own cartoon character for the Secret Millionaire’s Club. (Photo: The Hub)

Story Highlights

  • Contest lets winners pitch business ideas to billionaire Warren Buffett
  • Eligible ages are 7 through 16
  • Grand prize winners get $5,000

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — An online contest is again offering a few young entrepreneurs the chance to present their business ideas to billionaire Warren Buffett.

Students age 7 through 16 can submit their ideas until Feb. 15. Four individuals and two teams will be flown to Omaha to present the ideas to Buffett in person next May.

Berkshire Hathaway’s chairman and CEO says he was impressed with the ideas last year’s finalists presented.

The single prize winner’s idea was Shine So Bright, a kit for creating light-up designs on clothing; the team winner’s idea was Deals on Wheels, a portable school store that could sell school supplies and healthy snacks.

The contest, which is sponsored by the Fairholme Foundation, is affiliated with the “Secret Millionaire’s Club” cartoon that teaches kids financial principles. Buffett voices the animated version of himself that offers advice in the cartoon.

Grand prize individual and team winners will each receive $5,000 after the ideas are judged. Details are available online at smckids.com .

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Read or Share this story: http://usat.ly/120PzMP





Tags : , , , , , , ,

Fun For Kids – What is the Stock Market? #what #is #the #stock #market

#the stock market

#

What is the Stock Market?

The stock market is an everyday term we use to talk about a place where stocks and bonds are traded meaning bought and sold. For many people, that is the first thing that comes to mind for investing. The goal is to buy the stock, hold it for a time, and then sell the stock for more than you paid for it.

How long do you hang on to stock? Investors who hold stock for 15 years or more usually succeed in the market. Stocks are long-term investments. But there are no guarantees.

What are stocks?

Stocks are units of ownership in a company.

Companies sell stock to get money to

  • Research better ways to make things
  • Create new products
  • Improve the products they have
  • Hire more employees
  • Enlarge or modernize their buildings

So just as the federal government sells bonds to raise money, businesses raise money by selling stock.

How it works

When you buy stock, you become a shareholder. which means you now own a part of the company. If the company’s profits go up, you share in those profits. If the company’s profits fall, so does the price of your stock. If you sold your stock on a day when the price of that stock falls below the price you paid for it, you would lose money.

Stock prices can rise and fall

In the stock market, prices rise and fall every day. When you invest in the stock market, you are hoping that over the years, the stock will become much more valuable than the price you paid for it.

Copyright 2016 Northwestern Mutual
720 East Wisconsin Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53202 | Privacy Statement | Contact Us





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Crossroads in the Boston Business Journal – Giving Kids the Tools to Succeed #current

#boston business journal

#

Crossroads in the Boston Business Journal – Giving Kids the Tools to Succeed

On Friday, April 24, the Boston Business Journal featured some thoughts from Crossroads President Deb Samuels about what young people truly need to succeed. Thank you to the BBJ for helping us spread the word and ensure all young people have what they need to succeed and thrive.

Premium Content

ViewPoint: Giving underprivileged kids the tools to succeed

Apr 24, 2015, 6:00am EDT

A recent story on NPR s This American Life described the disparities that often derail the dreams of students from underserved communities. As reported, exposure to new places, ideas and experiences can often inspire low-income kids to think of secondary education as an opportunity within their grasp. But it takes much more than standard campus tours to help these students get to and flourish at college.

The ability to perform in an academically rigorous environment, while important, does not guarantee success. To help get and keep students with limited resources on the college track requires communication, social and critical thinking skills. Engaged, motivated students feel connected. These kids must believe that they belong at college, that they deserve to be there, and that they possess the tools to thrive, not just survive.

In order to succeed at college, at-risk kids, who may have faced homelessness, financial instability, physical abuse or emotional upheaval in their young lives, must experience trusting relationships with both peers and adults outside of their families. Here in Massachusetts, there are a number of agencies that help guide, motivate and encourage at-risk urban youth to pursue a college degree. My organization, Crossroads for Kids, and those we partner with such as Bottom Line and uAspire, offer a wide range of essential services, from tutoring and leadership development to help managing looming deadlines and navigating mountains of paperwork including applications and financial aid forms which can be overwhelming, especially for the uninitiated. We simply help demystify the often complex selection and admissions process for first generation college students and their families. With much needed support and exposure to the world of possibilities within and beyond their communities, kids get the encouragement they need, one-on-one and in small group settings, that can help level the playing field.

Deb Samuels is executive director for Crossroads for Kids.





Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

5 Summer Business Ideas for Kids: PowerHomeBiz Blog #owning #your #own #business

#business ideas for kids

#

It is summer time and the kids are out of school. One way to preoccupy them during the warm summer months is to introduce them to the joys of entrepreneurship.

One way to make this summer memorable for them is to help them start a business – one that they enjoy and are passionate about. A summer business venture can teach them the basics of business. They get to have a taste of becoming a business owner. It will be a great exercise to expose them to the value of hard work and dedication. They’ll also start learning about money, even the concept of cash flow. Plus, it will help them take pride in their creations and work.

Here are some summer business ideas for kids:

With your help, your child can create an online store and start selling on the Web. The key is choosing the right items to sell, preferably products that resonate with them. One option is to choose items that they think will resonate with other kids in their age group. Read the story of Hannah Altman: A 10-Year Old CEO’s Success with Pencil Toppers .

An easier way will be to become an affiliate for other companies. This will allow the kid to earn commission from the sale, without spending money for inventory. This is the business model followed by the 15-year old entrepreneur Lachy Groom with his iPadCaseFinder.com website.

Cool Zips products from 10-year old entrepreneur Hannah Altman

The neighborhood lemonade stand is the most common business for kids in the summer. It is a fun, easy business for kids.

Easy to setup, your child needs to make a refreshing pitcher of lemonade (may need the help of adults) and sell it by the cup. The key is to find a high traffic area to set up the stand. The stand can be a simple table with chairs for the kids (umbrella preferred) or more complex with a wooden stand. The price of a lemonade cup can be anywhere from $0.25 to even a dollar, depending on how hot is it that day. However, check with your local county if there are any restrictions or tax implications for a seemingly simple business like a kid’s lemonade stand (the last thing you want is for your kid to be slapped with a fine for operating a business without a license.)

3. Pet sitting business.

During summer, some people go off on vacations but choose to leave their pets behind. If your kid loves pets and is capable of taking care of pets, one option is to start a pet sitting business. Your kid can take the dog for a walk, feed the cat or birds, and just make sure that the pets are being taken care of. For ideas, read the article “How to Develop a Pet Sitting Brand” .

If your kid is adept in creating and editing videos, your child can use the skill to make money. Your kid can make short videos and upload them to the massively popular Youtube. If the videos are able to attract a sizeable audience, your kid can join the Youtube Partner Program http://www.youtube.com/partners and start earning from the videos through advertising. Read the article “8 Ways to Earn Money from Online Videos” .

5. T-Shirt Design Business.

If your kid is pretty crafty and artistic, one option is to start designing t-shirts. Your kid can make it as colorful as he/she wants, even full of wacky design ideas. The key is to highlight that these are unique and one-of-a-kind t-shirts. You can then sell them online such as eBay or the handmade auction site Etsy.com. Another way is to approach a small boutique owner in your area and check if they would be interested in selling your kid’s t-shirts.

For any of the above business ideas, parental guidance is important (even necessary). Think of this time as a way you can bond even more with your kids. And have fun while doing it!





Tags : , , , , , , ,

Crossroads in the Boston Business Journal – Giving Kids the Tools to Succeed #best

#boston business journal

#

Crossroads in the Boston Business Journal – Giving Kids the Tools to Succeed

On Friday, April 24, the Boston Business Journal featured some thoughts from Crossroads President Deb Samuels about what young people truly need to succeed. Thank you to the BBJ for helping us spread the word and ensure all young people have what they need to succeed and thrive.

Premium Content

ViewPoint: Giving underprivileged kids the tools to succeed

Apr 24, 2015, 6:00am EDT

A recent story on NPR s This American Life described the disparities that often derail the dreams of students from underserved communities. As reported, exposure to new places, ideas and experiences can often inspire low-income kids to think of secondary education as an opportunity within their grasp. But it takes much more than standard campus tours to help these students get to and flourish at college.

The ability to perform in an academically rigorous environment, while important, does not guarantee success. To help get and keep students with limited resources on the college track requires communication, social and critical thinking skills. Engaged, motivated students feel connected. These kids must believe that they belong at college, that they deserve to be there, and that they possess the tools to thrive, not just survive.

In order to succeed at college, at-risk kids, who may have faced homelessness, financial instability, physical abuse or emotional upheaval in their young lives, must experience trusting relationships with both peers and adults outside of their families. Here in Massachusetts, there are a number of agencies that help guide, motivate and encourage at-risk urban youth to pursue a college degree. My organization, Crossroads for Kids, and those we partner with such as Bottom Line and uAspire, offer a wide range of essential services, from tutoring and leadership development to help managing looming deadlines and navigating mountains of paperwork including applications and financial aid forms which can be overwhelming, especially for the uninitiated. We simply help demystify the often complex selection and admissions process for first generation college students and their families. With much needed support and exposure to the world of possibilities within and beyond their communities, kids get the encouragement they need, one-on-one and in small group settings, that can help level the playing field.

Deb Samuels is executive director for Crossroads for Kids.





Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,