Tag: Invest

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses #small #business #administration #loans

#small business investment

#

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses

When nonprofessional investors are able to put money into small businesses, everyone can benefit.

I met with Paul on Tuesday. He is the CFO of a business start-up. He s not sure if the next phase of his company s financing is going to go through. Although he believes in the business model and the mission of the company, some days he thinks he won t have a job in three weeks.

I met with David on Wednesday. While he s a great saver and earns a decent buck, he isn t wealthy. He wants to invest in small companies so much that we ve set up a fun money account, which is 10% of his otherwise well-diversified, passively managed portfolio. Fun money is specifically set aside so that he can make individual investments he believes in.

Because of the way small business investing is structured in this country, the likelihood of Paul and David connecting has been infinitesimally small.

This drives me mad.

It s not just these two who are missing out. Because small companies drive job and economic growth, the economy of the country loses when Paul and David don t connect. And because the current system of funding is biased, some small businesses are a lot less likely to get funding despite their worthy ideas.

Recent developments could change all this.

To raise their initial start up money, small business owners typically first use their savings, and then appeal to their friends and family. Next, they go to banks. If they get big enough and have certain ambitions and contacts, they can get venture capital funding or private equity funding, which is what Paul was waiting on.

These sources of capital are all enhanced if you are affluent and well connected. Do your friends and family have extra money to invest in your business? Do you know anyone you can talk to at a bank? What about impressing people in the venture capital world? A lot of people with good ideas are shut out.

Enter the Internet. Raising money got a lot easier.

The Power of Reward Sites

With reward sites, startups with good ideas raise money in exchange for rewards.

Sesame, which opens doors remotely from smartphones, raised over $1.4 million on Kickstarter.com. The reward here was a chance to order the device.

Then there is Lammily. Barbie s realistically proportioned cousin, whose designer raised almost $500,000 through Tilt.com. The reward for funding Lammily was the chance to pre-order the doll, and sticker packs with stretch marks, cellulite, freckles, and boo-boos.

The reward sites show that companies can raise large amounts of money through small contributions from a large number of people. Research suggests that Kickstarter.com reduces company funding gender bias by an order of magnitude and reduces geographic bias as well. Reward sites cater to consumers who love new products and want to support new ideas.

You may get first dibs on a cool new doll, but sending money to a reward site isn t investing.

The Risks of Private Equity

Traditionally, to get private equity funding, you have to sell to accredited investors the richest 1% of the population, roughly speaking.

Accredited investor regulations were set up in in the wake of the 1929 crash, when a lot of people got ripped off because they invested in dubious enterprises. The idea was that people with a high level of wealth are sophisticated enough to understand investment risk. Unfortunately, this leaves the Davids of the world investors who are sophisticated but wealthy shut out of these types of investments.

Private equity placements are not always a great deal. When I ve looked into them for clients, I ve concluded they are expensive, risky, and difficult to get out of, even if you die. The middlemen who offer these and the advisers who sell these seem to be the ones most likely to make money. The best deals I ve looked at weren t hawked by sales people or investment advisers, but came through clients friends and family.

The rise of Internet portals set up to connect small companies with accredited investors has the potential to cut down on intermediary costs. Still, the sector remains small.

In 2012, President Obama signed the JOBS act, which directed the Securities and Exchange Commission to devise rules opening up small business investing to non-accredited investors.

Some organizations didn t wait for the SEC to issue the rules. Instead, they dusted off exemptions in the securities legislation that most of us have ignored for 80 years.

States Get Into the Act

Some states have picked up on crowdfunding to boost their economies. Terms vary, but generally investors are subject to investment limits and companies are subject to a cap on raising money. Each individual, for example, might be limited to investing $10,000; each company might be limited to raising $1 million. Both investor and company are generally required to reside in the state.

This is music to ears of people who want to invest locally. The first successful offering using this type of exemption was in Georgia in 2013, where Bohemian Guitars raised approximately $130,000 through SparkMarket.com.

Village Power is another example of raising money using an exemption. This intermediary helps organizations set up and fund solar power projects. Village Power coaches their community partners to use an exemption in the SEC rules, which allows for up to 35 local, non-accredited investors.

New Rules Open Doors

New rules issued March 25 by the SEC removed a lot of the barriers for companies raising money and for non-accredited investors.

Companies will be able to raise up to $50 million. Non-accredited investors are welcome to invest, sometimes with limits 10% of their net worth, say, or 10% of their net income.

Although Kickstarter has said that it won t sell securities, other fundraising portals, such as Indiegogo. are looking into it.

And if all goes well, Paul, David, and I can start looking for the new opportunities in June of 2015.

Bridget Sullivan Mermel helps clients throughout the country with her comprehensive fee-only financial planning firm based in Chicago. She s the author of the upcoming book More Money, More Meaning. Both a certified public accountant and a certified financial planner, she specializes in helping clients lower their tax burden with tax-smart investing.

Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Interactive Data. ETF and Mutual Fund data provided by Morningstar, Inc. Dow Jones Terms Conditions: http://www.djindexes.com/mdsidx/html/tandc/indexestandcs.html. S P Index data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Terms Conditions. Powered and implemented by Interactive Data Managed Solutions

2016 Time Inc. All rights reserved. Part of the Fortune.com Sites. Powered by WordPress.com VIP

YOU BROKE MONEY.COM!

Dear MONEY Reader,

As a regular visitor to MONEY.com, we are sure you enjoy all the great journalism created by our editors and reporters. Great journalism has great value, and it costs money to make it. One of the main ways we cover our costs is through advertising.

The use of software that blocks ads limits our ability to provide you with the journalism you enjoy. Consider turning your Ad Blocker off so that we can continue to provide the world class journalism you have become accustomed to.





Tags : , , , , , ,

How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 #carpet #cleaning #business

#investing in stocks

#

How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 – TheStreet

Stocks are an equity investment that represents part ownership in a corporation and entitles you to part of that corporation’s earnings and assets.

Common stock gives shareholders voting rights but no guarantee of dividend payments. Preferred stocks provides no voting rights but usually guarantees a dividend payment.

In the past, shareholders received a paper stock certificate — called a security — verifying the number of shares they owned. Today, share ownership is usually recorded electronically, and the shares are held in street name by your brokerage firm.

Investing in stocks can be tricky business. In fact, it’s best to treat all of your investment pursuits as a business. Heck, that’s what Benjamin Graham (Warren Buffett’s stock market mentor) recommended.

Before you buy your first stock, you should master the basics of stock investing. This won’t make you a great investor overnight, but only when you understand the fundamentals of investing can you learn how to invest in stocks with confidence.

If you found this content useful, please share it. This will help us create more educational guides for investors.

RESOURCES FOR INVESTORS:

Jim Cramer and 30+ Wall Street professionals provide actionable guidance ranging from technical analysis to momentum trading and fundamental stock picking. Every trading day, Real Money offers a wealth of insight, analysis and strategies for all styles of investing.

  • Access to Jim Cramer’s daily blog
  • Intraday commentary and news
  • Real-time trading forums




Tags : , , , , , , , ,

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses #home #business #ideas #for #women

#small business investment

#

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses

When nonprofessional investors are able to put money into small businesses, everyone can benefit.

I met with Paul on Tuesday. He is the CFO of a business start-up. He s not sure if the next phase of his company s financing is going to go through. Although he believes in the business model and the mission of the company, some days he thinks he won t have a job in three weeks.

I met with David on Wednesday. While he s a great saver and earns a decent buck, he isn t wealthy. He wants to invest in small companies so much that we ve set up a fun money account, which is 10% of his otherwise well-diversified, passively managed portfolio. Fun money is specifically set aside so that he can make individual investments he believes in.

Because of the way small business investing is structured in this country, the likelihood of Paul and David connecting has been infinitesimally small.

This drives me mad.

It s not just these two who are missing out. Because small companies drive job and economic growth, the economy of the country loses when Paul and David don t connect. And because the current system of funding is biased, some small businesses are a lot less likely to get funding despite their worthy ideas.

Recent developments could change all this.

To raise their initial start up money, small business owners typically first use their savings, and then appeal to their friends and family. Next, they go to banks. If they get big enough and have certain ambitions and contacts, they can get venture capital funding or private equity funding, which is what Paul was waiting on.

These sources of capital are all enhanced if you are affluent and well connected. Do your friends and family have extra money to invest in your business? Do you know anyone you can talk to at a bank? What about impressing people in the venture capital world? A lot of people with good ideas are shut out.

Enter the Internet. Raising money got a lot easier.

The Power of Reward Sites

With reward sites, startups with good ideas raise money in exchange for rewards.

Sesame, which opens doors remotely from smartphones, raised over $1.4 million on Kickstarter.com. The reward here was a chance to order the device.

Then there is Lammily. Barbie s realistically proportioned cousin, whose designer raised almost $500,000 through Tilt.com. The reward for funding Lammily was the chance to pre-order the doll, and sticker packs with stretch marks, cellulite, freckles, and boo-boos.

The reward sites show that companies can raise large amounts of money through small contributions from a large number of people. Research suggests that Kickstarter.com reduces company funding gender bias by an order of magnitude and reduces geographic bias as well. Reward sites cater to consumers who love new products and want to support new ideas.

You may get first dibs on a cool new doll, but sending money to a reward site isn t investing.

The Risks of Private Equity

Traditionally, to get private equity funding, you have to sell to accredited investors the richest 1% of the population, roughly speaking.

Accredited investor regulations were set up in in the wake of the 1929 crash, when a lot of people got ripped off because they invested in dubious enterprises. The idea was that people with a high level of wealth are sophisticated enough to understand investment risk. Unfortunately, this leaves the Davids of the world investors who are sophisticated but wealthy shut out of these types of investments.

Private equity placements are not always a great deal. When I ve looked into them for clients, I ve concluded they are expensive, risky, and difficult to get out of, even if you die. The middlemen who offer these and the advisers who sell these seem to be the ones most likely to make money. The best deals I ve looked at weren t hawked by sales people or investment advisers, but came through clients friends and family.

The rise of Internet portals set up to connect small companies with accredited investors has the potential to cut down on intermediary costs. Still, the sector remains small.

In 2012, President Obama signed the JOBS act, which directed the Securities and Exchange Commission to devise rules opening up small business investing to non-accredited investors.

Some organizations didn t wait for the SEC to issue the rules. Instead, they dusted off exemptions in the securities legislation that most of us have ignored for 80 years.

States Get Into the Act

Some states have picked up on crowdfunding to boost their economies. Terms vary, but generally investors are subject to investment limits and companies are subject to a cap on raising money. Each individual, for example, might be limited to investing $10,000; each company might be limited to raising $1 million. Both investor and company are generally required to reside in the state.

This is music to ears of people who want to invest locally. The first successful offering using this type of exemption was in Georgia in 2013, where Bohemian Guitars raised approximately $130,000 through SparkMarket.com.

Village Power is another example of raising money using an exemption. This intermediary helps organizations set up and fund solar power projects. Village Power coaches their community partners to use an exemption in the SEC rules, which allows for up to 35 local, non-accredited investors.

New Rules Open Doors

New rules issued March 25 by the SEC removed a lot of the barriers for companies raising money and for non-accredited investors.

Companies will be able to raise up to $50 million. Non-accredited investors are welcome to invest, sometimes with limits 10% of their net worth, say, or 10% of their net income.

Although Kickstarter has said that it won t sell securities, other fundraising portals, such as Indiegogo. are looking into it.

And if all goes well, Paul, David, and I can start looking for the new opportunities in June of 2015.

Bridget Sullivan Mermel helps clients throughout the country with her comprehensive fee-only financial planning firm based in Chicago. She s the author of the upcoming book More Money, More Meaning. Both a certified public accountant and a certified financial planner, she specializes in helping clients lower their tax burden with tax-smart investing.

Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Interactive Data. ETF and Mutual Fund data provided by Morningstar, Inc. Dow Jones Terms Conditions: http://www.djindexes.com/mdsidx/html/tandc/indexestandcs.html. S P Index data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Terms Conditions. Powered and implemented by Interactive Data Managed Solutions

2016 Time Inc. All rights reserved. Part of the Fortune.com Sites. Powered by WordPress.com VIP

YOU BROKE MONEY.COM!

Dear MONEY Reader,

As a regular visitor to MONEY.com, we are sure you enjoy all the great journalism created by our editors and reporters. Great journalism has great value, and it costs money to make it. One of the main ways we cover our costs is through advertising.

The use of software that blocks ads limits our ability to provide you with the journalism you enjoy. Consider turning your Ad Blocker off so that we can continue to provide the world class journalism you have become accustomed to.





Tags : , , , , , ,

How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 #music #business

#investing in stocks

#

How to Invest in Stocks – Stock Investing 101 – TheStreet

Stocks are an equity investment that represents part ownership in a corporation and entitles you to part of that corporation’s earnings and assets.

Common stock gives shareholders voting rights but no guarantee of dividend payments. Preferred stocks provides no voting rights but usually guarantees a dividend payment.

In the past, shareholders received a paper stock certificate — called a security — verifying the number of shares they owned. Today, share ownership is usually recorded electronically, and the shares are held in street name by your brokerage firm.

Investing in stocks can be tricky business. In fact, it’s best to treat all of your investment pursuits as a business. Heck, that’s what Benjamin Graham (Warren Buffett’s stock market mentor) recommended.

Before you buy your first stock, you should master the basics of stock investing. This won’t make you a great investor overnight, but only when you understand the fundamentals of investing can you learn how to invest in stocks with confidence.

If you found this content useful, please share it. This will help us create more educational guides for investors.

RESOURCES FOR INVESTORS:

Jim Cramer and 30+ Wall Street professionals provide actionable guidance ranging from technical analysis to momentum trading and fundamental stock picking. Every trading day, Real Money offers a wealth of insight, analysis and strategies for all styles of investing.

  • Access to Jim Cramer’s daily blog
  • Intraday commentary and news
  • Real-time trading forums




Tags : , , , , , , , ,

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses #small #business #magazine

#small business investment

#

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses

When nonprofessional investors are able to put money into small businesses, everyone can benefit.

I met with Paul on Tuesday. He is the CFO of a business start-up. He s not sure if the next phase of his company s financing is going to go through. Although he believes in the business model and the mission of the company, some days he thinks he won t have a job in three weeks.

I met with David on Wednesday. While he s a great saver and earns a decent buck, he isn t wealthy. He wants to invest in small companies so much that we ve set up a fun money account, which is 10% of his otherwise well-diversified, passively managed portfolio. Fun money is specifically set aside so that he can make individual investments he believes in.

Because of the way small business investing is structured in this country, the likelihood of Paul and David connecting has been infinitesimally small.

This drives me mad.

It s not just these two who are missing out. Because small companies drive job and economic growth, the economy of the country loses when Paul and David don t connect. And because the current system of funding is biased, some small businesses are a lot less likely to get funding despite their worthy ideas.

Recent developments could change all this.

To raise their initial start up money, small business owners typically first use their savings, and then appeal to their friends and family. Next, they go to banks. If they get big enough and have certain ambitions and contacts, they can get venture capital funding or private equity funding, which is what Paul was waiting on.

These sources of capital are all enhanced if you are affluent and well connected. Do your friends and family have extra money to invest in your business? Do you know anyone you can talk to at a bank? What about impressing people in the venture capital world? A lot of people with good ideas are shut out.

Enter the Internet. Raising money got a lot easier.

The Power of Reward Sites

With reward sites, startups with good ideas raise money in exchange for rewards.

Sesame, which opens doors remotely from smartphones, raised over $1.4 million on Kickstarter.com. The reward here was a chance to order the device.

Then there is Lammily. Barbie s realistically proportioned cousin, whose designer raised almost $500,000 through Tilt.com. The reward for funding Lammily was the chance to pre-order the doll, and sticker packs with stretch marks, cellulite, freckles, and boo-boos.

The reward sites show that companies can raise large amounts of money through small contributions from a large number of people. Research suggests that Kickstarter.com reduces company funding gender bias by an order of magnitude and reduces geographic bias as well. Reward sites cater to consumers who love new products and want to support new ideas.

You may get first dibs on a cool new doll, but sending money to a reward site isn t investing.

The Risks of Private Equity

Traditionally, to get private equity funding, you have to sell to accredited investors the richest 1% of the population, roughly speaking.

Accredited investor regulations were set up in in the wake of the 1929 crash, when a lot of people got ripped off because they invested in dubious enterprises. The idea was that people with a high level of wealth are sophisticated enough to understand investment risk. Unfortunately, this leaves the Davids of the world investors who are sophisticated but wealthy shut out of these types of investments.

Private equity placements are not always a great deal. When I ve looked into them for clients, I ve concluded they are expensive, risky, and difficult to get out of, even if you die. The middlemen who offer these and the advisers who sell these seem to be the ones most likely to make money. The best deals I ve looked at weren t hawked by sales people or investment advisers, but came through clients friends and family.

The rise of Internet portals set up to connect small companies with accredited investors has the potential to cut down on intermediary costs. Still, the sector remains small.

In 2012, President Obama signed the JOBS act, which directed the Securities and Exchange Commission to devise rules opening up small business investing to non-accredited investors.

Some organizations didn t wait for the SEC to issue the rules. Instead, they dusted off exemptions in the securities legislation that most of us have ignored for 80 years.

States Get Into the Act

Some states have picked up on crowdfunding to boost their economies. Terms vary, but generally investors are subject to investment limits and companies are subject to a cap on raising money. Each individual, for example, might be limited to investing $10,000; each company might be limited to raising $1 million. Both investor and company are generally required to reside in the state.

This is music to ears of people who want to invest locally. The first successful offering using this type of exemption was in Georgia in 2013, where Bohemian Guitars raised approximately $130,000 through SparkMarket.com.

Village Power is another example of raising money using an exemption. This intermediary helps organizations set up and fund solar power projects. Village Power coaches their community partners to use an exemption in the SEC rules, which allows for up to 35 local, non-accredited investors.

New Rules Open Doors

New rules issued March 25 by the SEC removed a lot of the barriers for companies raising money and for non-accredited investors.

Companies will be able to raise up to $50 million. Non-accredited investors are welcome to invest, sometimes with limits 10% of their net worth, say, or 10% of their net income.

Although Kickstarter has said that it won t sell securities, other fundraising portals, such as Indiegogo. are looking into it.

And if all goes well, Paul, David, and I can start looking for the new opportunities in June of 2015.

Bridget Sullivan Mermel helps clients throughout the country with her comprehensive fee-only financial planning firm based in Chicago. She s the author of the upcoming book More Money, More Meaning. Both a certified public accountant and a certified financial planner, she specializes in helping clients lower their tax burden with tax-smart investing.

Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Interactive Data. ETF and Mutual Fund data provided by Morningstar, Inc. Dow Jones Terms Conditions: http://www.djindexes.com/mdsidx/html/tandc/indexestandcs.html. S P Index data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Terms Conditions. Powered and implemented by Interactive Data Managed Solutions

2016 Time Inc. All rights reserved. Part of the Fortune.com Sites. Powered by WordPress.com VIP

YOU BROKE MONEY.COM!

Dear MONEY Reader,

As a regular visitor to MONEY.com, we are sure you enjoy all the great journalism created by our editors and reporters. Great journalism has great value, and it costs money to make it. One of the main ways we cover our costs is through advertising.

The use of software that blocks ads limits our ability to provide you with the journalism you enjoy. Consider turning your Ad Blocker off so that we can continue to provide the world class journalism you have become accustomed to.





Tags : , , , , , ,

How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #business #profiles

#investment ideas

#

Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

How to Invest in Stocks

So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

Swing Trader

A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

Value Investing

A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

Growth Investing

Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

Deciding What to Invest In

You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

Research ETFs

Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

Choose Sectors

Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

Stay Informed

Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

Types of Investments


Bonds

Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

Small-Cap Stocks

Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

Large-Cap Stocks

Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

Penny Stocks

Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

Finding Good Stocks to Buy

Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


Liquidity

It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

Price

Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

Investment Ideas

Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

Warren Buffet

Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

Peter Lynch

Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

Good research pays off

Shut out market noise

Invest for the long term

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

Here are some best performing stocks of 2015:





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #business #books

#investment ideas

#

Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

How to Invest in Stocks

So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

Swing Trader

A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

Value Investing

A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

Growth Investing

Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

Deciding What to Invest In

You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

Research ETFs

Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

Choose Sectors

Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

Stay Informed

Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

Types of Investments


Bonds

Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

Small-Cap Stocks

Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

Large-Cap Stocks

Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

Penny Stocks

Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

Finding Good Stocks to Buy

Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


Liquidity

It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

Price

Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

Investment Ideas

Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

Warren Buffet

Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

Peter Lynch

Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

Good research pays off

Shut out market noise

Invest for the long term

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

Here are some best performing stocks of 2015:





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #business #news

#investment ideas

#

Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

How to Invest in Stocks

So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

Swing Trader

A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

Value Investing

A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

Growth Investing

Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

Deciding What to Invest In

You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

Research ETFs

Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

Choose Sectors

Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

Stay Informed

Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

Types of Investments


Bonds

Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

Small-Cap Stocks

Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

Large-Cap Stocks

Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

Penny Stocks

Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

Finding Good Stocks to Buy

Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


Liquidity

It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

Price

Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

Investment Ideas

Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

Warren Buffet

Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

Peter Lynch

Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

Good research pays off

Shut out market noise

Invest for the long term

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

Here are some best performing stocks of 2015:





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #start #business

#investment ideas

#

Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

How to Invest in Stocks

So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

Swing Trader

A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

Value Investing

A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

Growth Investing

Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

Deciding What to Invest In

You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

Research ETFs

Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

Choose Sectors

Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

Stay Informed

Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

Types of Investments


Bonds

Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

Small-Cap Stocks

Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

Large-Cap Stocks

Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

Penny Stocks

Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

Finding Good Stocks to Buy

Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


Liquidity

It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

Price

Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

Investment Ideas

Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

Warren Buffet

Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

Peter Lynch

Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

Good research pays off

Shut out market noise

Invest for the long term

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

Here are some best performing stocks of 2015:





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #drop #shipping #business

#investment ideas

#

Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

How to Invest in Stocks

So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

Swing Trader

A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

Value Investing

A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

Growth Investing

Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

Deciding What to Invest In

You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

Research ETFs

Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

Choose Sectors

Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

Stay Informed

Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

Types of Investments


Bonds

Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

Small-Cap Stocks

Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

Large-Cap Stocks

Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

Penny Stocks

Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

Finding Good Stocks to Buy

Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


Liquidity

It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

Price

Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

Investment Ideas

Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

Warren Buffet

Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

Peter Lynch

Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

Good research pays off

Shut out market noise

Invest for the long term

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

Here are some best performing stocks of 2015:





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,