Tag: Interest

Business Loans – Check Business Loan Interest Rate – Eligibility Online at HDFC Bank

#business loan

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Business Loan

  • Features Benefits
  • Eligibility
  • Fees Charges
  • In – Principle loan eligibility in 1 Minute online and across all branches
  • Convenience of contacting us through SMS, Webchat, Click2Talk, PhoneBanking and across all Branches
  • Business Loan is also available on the basis of repayment of home loans, auto loans and credit cards.
  • Loan Amount up to Rs. 15 Lakhs (Up to Rs. 40 Lakhs in selected locations).
  • Flexible repayment options ranging from 12 – 36 Months.
  • Credit Protect Insurance Plan:
    We help you take care of your loved ones with a Credit Protect Plan to cover your loan at a nominal premium.*

In case of Natural / Accidental Death of the customer, the customer / nominee can avail of the Payment Protection Insurance (Credit Protect) which insures the principle outstanding on the loan up to a maximum of the loan amount.

We will charge a premium for this product, and the premium amount will be deducted from the loan amount at the time of disbursal. We will also charge service tax and applicable surcharge/cess at the rates notified by the government.

Secure your business loan with Credit Protect.

Key benefits of policy

  • Protects the family by paying off the loan amount in case of death of the customer
  • Life Coverage provides peace of Mind
  • No need to use other savings to repay the loan
  • Tax Benefits as per applicable laws
  • One convenient package – loan + insurance

* Premium will be charged for Credit Protect will be deducted from the loan amount at the time of disbursal.

(* terms and conditions of the Insurers shall apply, Above product is offered by HDFC Life Ins Co.ltd)

Already have a Business Loan?

Reduce your EMI, transfer your existing Business Loan to us. Business Loan balance transfer offers special and exclusive benefits.

  • Interest rate as low as 14.99* % on existing loan transfer.
  • Processing fees as low as 0.99%

Now reduce your EMI burden with our balance transfer programme

Get details on eligibility criteria documents required for HDFC Bank Business Loan

Self Employed including Individual Proprietors, Private Ltd. Co. and Partnership Firms involved in the Business of Manufacturing, Trading or Services.

  • Minimum Turnover of Rs. 40 Lakhs.
  • Years in business: Minimum of 3 years in current business and 5 years total business experience
  • Business must be profit making for the last 2 years
  • Minimum Annual Income (ITR): Rs. 1.5 Lakhs p.a.
  • Age of Applicant: Min 21 years Max. 65 years at the time of loan maturity.

Documents you will need to submit:

  • PAN Card For Company /Firm/ individual.
  • Proof of your identity: Copy of Aadhaar Card/Passport/Voter s ID card/driving license.
  • Proof of your address: Copy of Aadhaar Card/Telephone bill/Electricity bill/Passport.
  • Bank Statement (latest 6 months)
  • Latest ITR along with computation of income, Balance sheet and Profit Loss a/c for the last 2 years. Financial should be CA Certified /Audited.
  • Proof of continuation (ITR/Trade license /Establishment /Sales Tax certificate)
  • Other Mandatory Documents (Sole Prop. Declaration Or Certified Copy of Partnership Deed, Certified true copy of Memorandum Articles of Association (certified by Director) Board resolution (Original)

Loan at the sole discretion of HDFC Bank Ltd.

Enclosed below are HDFC Bank Business Loan Interest Rates Charges


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Term deposit account #term #deposit,high #rate,fixed #rate,interest #rate,savings,yorkshire #bank


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Term deposit account

Making your savings grow

Decide how long you’d like to save – from three months to five years – then once your term deposit is opened, sit back and watch your money earn a guaranteed rate. Our term deposit account is ideal if you want to put away a lump sum – as long as you don’t want to make any withdrawals or additional deposits.

Features
  • Guaranteed interest rates – up to 2.08% Gross*/2.00% AER +. This rate is available on the 5 year Term Deposit – Interest Capitalised at Maturity account.
  • Minimum deposit of £2,000 – Maximum deposit of £5,000,000.
  • Withdrawals or early closure are not permitted during the fixed term.
  • See interest rates tab for terms available, interest rates and how this is paid to you. Our summary box is a recap of our key product information
Withdrawals are not permitted

Please note withdrawals or early closure of the term deposit are not permitted under any circumstances during the fixed term except in the event of the death of the Account Holder (or one of them if joint account). See term deposit terms and conditions (PDF, opens in new window) clause 2.3 for further information, if there is anything that you don’t understand please contact us for clarification.

*Gross rate interest is the interest payable without taking account of any tax payable. From 6th April 2016 we no longer deduct tax from the interest earned on your savings, following the introduction of a Personal Savings Allowance. If you earn interest over your Personal Savings Allowance you will be required to pay any tax due yourself directly to HM Revenue and Customs. If you would like to read more about your Personal Savings Allowance, please visit the Government website www.gov.uk.

+ AER. Annual Equivalent Rate illustrates what the interest rate would be if interest was paid and compounded once each year.

For new Term Deposits – The rate in force on the day your Term Deposit is opened will be the rate applied to your new account for the fixed term.

For existing Term Deposits that are due to mature – The rate in force on the day your Term Deposit is reinvested will be the rate applied to your account for the fixed term. For more information on your options please refer to the letter sent out 35 days prior to your maturity date.

Interest capitalised and paid at maturity – interest will be credited to the account on the maturity date.

Apply in Branch

A Yorkshire Bank current or savings account must remain open in order for the monthly or annual interest to be paid in to.

The terms and rates offered for Term Deposits are constantly reviewed. As a result the length of the terms offered may vary.

*Gross rate interest is the interest payable without taking account of any tax payable. From 6th April 2016 we will no longer deduct tax from the interest earned on your savings, following the introduction of a Personal Savings Allowance. If you earn interest over your Personal Savings Allowance you will be required to pay any tax due yourself directly to HM Revenue and Customs. If you would like to read more about your Personal Savings Allowance, please visit the Government website www.gov.uk .

+ AER. Annual Equivalent Rate illustrates what the interest rate would be if interest was paid and compounded once each year.

How to apply

Use the online application process to complete and print an application form and fill it out with exception of the 3, 6 and 60 month term deposit. Send on to the following address – no postcode required – but please note that it is important to ensure the FREEPOST address is written on one line as:

FREEPOST YORKSHIRE BANK TERM DEPOSIT ADMINISTRATION

Along with your application, you should send a cheque for the amount of your deposit. The cheque must be written from an account in the applicant’s name and made payable to the person named on the application form. For joint applications, you can send a separate cheque for each applicant if you wish.

When we receive your signed application, we will process it as quickly as possible.

  • After your cheque has cleared, we will open your account
  • Within 14 working days we will send you a certificate and covering letter confirming your new term deposit details
Apply by phone

Call 0800 587 5000 (Monday to Friday 8.00am – 8.00pm, Saturday 9.00am – 5.00pm, Sunday 10.00am – 4.00pm)

Apply at a branch

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How do savings accounts work? #savings #acct #interest #rates


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How do savings accounts work?

­The most common type of bank account, and probably the first account you’ll ever have (after a checking account), is a savings account. Savings accounts allow you to keep your money in a safe place while it earns a small amount of interest each month. These accounts usually require either a low minimum balance, like $25, or may require no minimum balance at all. This depends on the bank and the type of account.

Besides the fact that you will be less likely to spend it, putting your money in a savings account is safer because it is insured. If your home is robbed or burns down, your money may be lost forever. Banks and credit unions. on the other hand, keep your money in a locked and fireproof safe. Banks insure your money (up to $100,000) through the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). This means that even if the bank goes out of business (which is very rare!) your money will still be there. (The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) insures credit union accounts up to $250,000.) The FDIC is an independent agency of the federal government that was created in 1933 because thousands of banks had failed in the 1920s and early 1930s. Not a single person has lost money in a bank or credit union that was insured by the FDIC since it began. When you put your money into a savings account, it earns interest. Interest is money the bank pays you so that they can use your money to fund loans for other people. That doesn’t mean you can’t have your money whenever you want it, though. That’s just how banks make money — by selling money! Basically, it works like this:

  • You open a savings account at the bank.
  • The bank pays you interest on the money that you deposit and leave in that account.
  • The bank then loans that money out to other people, only they charge a slightly higher interest rate on the loan than what they pay you for your account.

The difference in interest they pay you verses the interest they charge others is part of how they stay in business.

­Interest on savings accounts is usually compounded daily and paid monthly. The cool thing about compounded interest is that the bank is paying you interest on the money they’ve paid you in interest! That means that if your account earns one percent interest, then each day 1/365th of that one percent of the amount of money you have in your savings account is then added to your total. Here is the calculation:

Daily compounding = Principal (1 + interest rate/365)365 = (daily compounded amount)

On the next page, we’ll explore how banks and credit unions manage savings accounts and explain what happens when you open your new account.

Print |
How do savings accounts work 14 April 2008. br HowStuffWorks.com. lt http money.howstuffworks.com personal-finance budgeting savings-accounts.htm gt 24 June 2017″ href=”#”>Citation Date


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Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online #get #a #credit #cards,

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Compare partner credit card offers from our most
popular categories

How to choose a credit card

When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.
One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

“It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.
“I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”
You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

“The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

“A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

“It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”

Bankrate’s best credit cards


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Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online #which #business #credit #card

#

Compare partner credit card offers from our most
popular categories

How to choose a credit card

When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.
One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

“It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.
“I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”
You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

“The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

“A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

“It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”

Bankrate’s best credit cards


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What is a balance transfer? 9 things you should know #credit #cards, #credit #card,

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What is a balance transfer? 9 things you should know

1. Transferring isn’t the same as repaying. When you use a balance transfer card, you are, in essence, paying off credit card “A” with new credit card “B.” For example, if you’ve been paying 13 percent interest on a $2,000 debt, you’d have to make a $347 monthly payment for six months to pay off the debt. Transfer that $2,000 to a 0 percent card and your payments will be $334, saving $77 in interest in the process. “The only real, solid, definable benefit from a balance transfer is you can save money over the long haul if you pay back the previous amount you owed and you pay it at a lower interest rate, including all your costs,” says Mike Sullivan, director of education for Take Charge America, a Phoenix-based nonprofit consumer credit counseling company.

2. Consolidating simplifies payments. Another reason to transfer balances to a single low-interest credit card is to simplify your financial life. If you’ve maxed out multiple credit cards, can’t keep payment dates and minimum payments straight and often accrue late fees, putting all your credit card debt on one card may be a good move. You’ll have just one card to keep track of and one payment to make each month.

3. You may transfer other debts, not just credit cards. It’s not just balances from other credit cards that can be transferred. You may be able to move loans for cars, appliances, furniture and other monthly installment payments to a no-interest balance transfer credit card, using checks from the bank that issues the credit card.

4. Fees are inevitable. It isn’t quite as simple as making a swap from a high interest rate to a low interest rate anymore. You will almost always be charged a balance transfer fee. which is determined as a percentage of the total amount you’re transferring. In the past, transfer fees were capped. Today, on most balance transfer cards, there is no cap, so the more you transfer, the bigger the fee. A typical fee in 2017 is 3 percent, so if you transfer a $10,000 debt from another card, you’ll pay a $300 fee right away. Even if you have the cash to do so, it might or might not be worth it, depending on how much money you’ll save on interest over the life of your debt. See if it makes sense for you by using a balance transfer calculator .

5. Transfer rates expire. A balance transfer card woos you with an extra-low annual percentage rate (APR) between 0 percent and 5 percent. That teaser rate, however, doesn’t last forever. After a set period — often a six months to a year, occasionally more, the interest rate will increase, probably to somewhere in the range of 12 percent to 18 percent — perhaps even worse than the interest rate you were trying to get away from. Make a misstep, such as letting payments lag, and your great rate will disappear and in its place will appear the higher “go-to” rate.

6. Careful with new purchases. Just because the balance you transferred to the new card gets a free pass with perhaps a 0 percent interest rate right now doesn’t mean new purchases on the card will be interest-free too. Some balance transfer credit cards’ rules specify that only transferred balances qualify for the lower rate, while new purchases collect interest at the regular, higher APR. Some cards do apply the introductory interest rate to new purchases too, but often only for the first six months.

7. Learn how payments are allocated. To make matters more complicated, you can’t tell your card issuer how to apply your payments if you have both a 0 percent balance transfer balance and a new purchase balance at a higher rate on the same card. According to the Credit CARD Act of 2009, issuers are required to apply any amount in excess of the minimum payment to the debt with the highest interest first. Most issuers will apply your total minimum amount payment to the lowest interest debt first, which will draw out the repayment time (and interest charges) on the higher interest debt. Because of this, it may be best to avoid using a balance transfer card for any new purchases to avoid dual-interest-rate balances.

8. Repeat transfer? Don’t bet on it. You may think applying for a new balance transfer card when your teaser rate expires is the perfect solution to avoid ever paying interest on your credit card debt. Moves like that can damage your overall credit score. When you continue to open new low-interest accounts, but maintain high debt levels, lenders may see you as a risk, which will make it hard for you to borrow money for big-ticket items such as a home or car.

9. Good credit required to qualify. Zero interest balance transfer cards were widely available before the recession, but became rarer and less generous during it. They’re now common again, but the best terms are available only to those with good or excellent credit. If you can qualify, and if it’ll save you significant cash or help you pay off your debt sooner, it might be the way to go.

Updated: Mar. 23, 2017


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Business interest rates, fees – charges #types #of #business


#business loan rates

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Interest rates, fees and charges

Customer Margin may apply.

**These interest rates are indicative and are subject to change on a daily basis. Rates are linked to the “bid rate” quoted on the “BBSY” page of the Reuters Monitor System at or about 10.15am 26 August 2016 Sydney time. Different rates apply to different Pricing Periods. Details of current rates available on request. These rates are current as of 26 August 2016. For details of rates that apply on any other date please contact NAB.

***These rates are current as at the 1st of every month for that month. For full pricing details, please consult your foreign currency invoice finance facility agreement.

* Rates apply whilst qualifying criteria met otherwise Base Rate/Term Base Rate is the applicable indicator rate.

® Registered Trade Mark of American Express Company.

All rates and underwriting fees are effective, 2 September 2016 and are subject to change at any time.

To find out more, visit nab.com.au, call into a NAB branch, or call 13 10 12. Fees and charges apply.

Full details of these and relevant terms and conditions are available on application.


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