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Incorporating Your Business, The U, incorporating a business.#Incorporating #a #business


Incorporating Your Business

When you rsquo;re starting a business, one of the first decisions you have to make is the type of business you want to create. A sole proprietorship? A corporation? A limited liability company? This decision is important, because the type of business you create determines the types of applications you rsquo;ll need to submit. You should also research liability implications for personal investments you make into your business, as well as the taxes you will need to pay. It rsquo;s important to understand each business type and select the one that is best suited for your situation and objectives. Keep in mind that you may need to contact several federal agencies, as well as your state business entity registration office. /p

Here is a list of the most common ways to structure a business. /p

An S corporation (also referred to as an S corp) is a special type of corporation created through an IRS tax election. An eligible domestic corporation can avoid double taxation (once to the corporation and again to the shareholders) by electing to be treated as an S corporation.

A partnership is a single business where two or more people share ownership.

Each partner contributes to all aspects of the business, including money, property, labor or skill. In return, each partner shares in the profits and losses of the business.

A limited liability company (LLC) is a hybrid type of legal structure that provides the limited liability features of a corporation and the tax efficiencies and operational flexibility of a partnership.

The “owners” of an LLC are referred to as “members.” Depending on the state, the members can consist of a single individual (one owner), two or more individuals, corporations or other LLCs.

A corporation (sometimes referred to as a C corporation) is an independent legal entity owned by shareholders. This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs.

Corporations are more complex than other business structures because they tend to have costly administrative fees and complex tax and legal requirements. Because of these issues, corporations are generally suggested for established, larger companies with multiple employees.

A cooperative is a business or organization owned by and operated for the benefit of those using its services. Profits and earnings generated by the cooperative are distributed among the members, also known as user-owners.

Typically, an elected board of directors and officers run the cooperative while regular members have voting power to control the direction of the cooperative. Members can become part of the cooperative by purchasing shares, though the amount of shares they hold does not affect the weight of their vote.


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How to Incorporate a Business, incorporating a business.#Incorporating #a #business


How to Incorporate a Business

As you plan how your business will grow, there are a number of business structures to consider. While the process can be detailed and state-specific, this article outlines the general steps and considerations for incorporation.

Choosing a Name for Your Corporation

When you go about choosing a name for your corporation, you should be aware of the rules that your state follows when it comes to corporate names. Contact your state’s office that deals with corporations to find out these rules if you are not already familiar with them. However, the following rules are found in many states:

  • The name of your corporation cannot be the same as any other corporation that is on file.
  • The name must end with some designation that shows the corporate status of your business, such as Corporation, Incorporated, or Limited. In addition, many states allow abbreviations of these words (such as Corp., Inc., or Ltd.).
  • The name cannot include any words that imply an association with the federal government or restricted types of businesses. Such restricted words include Bank, Cooperative, Federal, National, United States, or Reserve.

Generally, you can submit a proposed name to your state’s corporation office to see if the name would be an appropriate and allowable one. However, keep in mind that if you plan on operating your business under a name that is not the name of your corporation, you must file a fictitious or assumed name statement with the state or county in which your business is headquartered.

Directors are generally responsible for making major financial and policy decisions for the corporation, such as authorizing the sale of stock for the corporation. Although many owners simply appoint themselves as directors of the company, there is nothing that requires directors to be owners of the corporation.

A majority of states allow a corporation to have one director no matter how many owners there are of the corporation. However, there are other states that require the number of directors to equal or exceed the number of owners.

Filing the Articles of Incorporation

The articles of incorporation are sometimes referred to as the certificate of incorporation or a charter depending upon the state that you are in.

In many situations, getting your articles of incorporation prepared is just a matter of filing out a form that is provided by the secretary of state’s office. However, most articles of incorporation require that you provide the name and contact information for at least one person. This person will serve as the registered agent for the corporation. This is the person that the members of the public will contact if they want to sue the corporation or involve the corporation in an ongoing lawsuit.

Many people that have gone through the steps spelled out above often overlook and miss this very important step. The bylaws of a corporation spell out how the corporation will be run with respect to important decisions and voting rights. Corporate bylaws need to address when and how often shareholder meetings will be held as well as spell out various other important rules. The bylaws will generally be adopted for the corporation at the first meeting of the directors.

Another important document that is often overlooked is a shareholder’s agreement. This agreement should be agreed upon by all shareholders and will spell out various issues related to shareholders, such as how ownership will be transferred in the event that a shareholder dies, becomes disabled or wishes to leave the corporation.

The First Meeting of the Board of Directors

After all the above steps have been followed, it is time for the board of directors to hold their first meeting. At this first meeting, a number of corporate formalities must be taken care of, including:

  • Setting the corporation’s fiscal accounting year,
  • Choosing and appointing corporate officers,
  • Setting and adopting the corporate bylaws,
  • Authorizing and issuing the shares of stock, and
  • Settling on the official stock certificate form and adopting the corporate seal.

In addition, if the corporation is to be an S-type corporation, the directors should vote on and approve the election of an S-type corporation.

Issuing Stock and Registering Securities

A corporation should not open its doors for business until the shares of stock have been issued. When shares of stock are issued, the ownership of the corporation is formally divided amongst all the owners. In addition, issuing stock is a requirement that must be met before the corporation can do business.

When you issue stock, you are entering the world of securities laws. Generally speaking, large corporations that issue stock must register all of their stock offerings with the SEC (Securities Exchange Commission) and any state securities agencies. This can take time and cost a bit of money.

Exemptions to Securities Registration (Small Corporations)

Most small corporations that do not make a private offering of stock to more than 35 people may be exempt from having to register their stock offerings with the SEC. In addition, if a corporation only makes a private offering to those who can reasonably be expected to take care of themselves because of their personal financial situation, that private offering may also be exempt from the SEC registration rules. Additionally, many states have adopted exemption rules that mirror or are very similar to the SEC rules.

When your corporation is ready to issue the actual shares, you will have to keep detailed documents of:

  • The names of all of the initial shareholders,
  • The numbers of shares that each shareholder will buy, and
  • How each shareholder is going to pay for his or her shares.

You will then issue the stock certificates to each shareholder that bought into the corporation. You may also have to file a notice of stock transaction if your state’s laws require it.

Getting Ready for Business Licenses and Permits

If you plan on your corporation entering into a business that requires a license or a permit, be sure to get those soon. In addition, you will most likely need a tax registration certificate for both federal and state taxes. Keep in mind other licenses and permits as well, such as an employer ID from the IRS, a seller’s permit, a liquor license (if needed), a zoning permit, etc.

Need Help Incorporating? Get a Free Initial Legal Review of Your Situation

Corporations are the most complex business legal structures to form and typically require some degree of professional legal assistance. A lawyer can help verify that you have chosen the right business structure for your purposes and ensure that it is properly established. Contact a local attorney for a free initial legal review of your situation to get started.


Tags : , ,

How to Incorporate Your Business in Canada, incorporating a business.#Incorporating #a #business


How to Incorporate Your Business in Canada

Incorporating a business

Incorporating a business

This article outlines the general steps for incorporating in Canada, from choosing where to incorporate through reserving a corporate name and filing your documents. Note that the specifics of each step may differ from province to province.

1. Decide whether you’re going to incorporate federally or provincially.

When you incorporate your business federally, the two advantages are:

  • and your corporation will be able to use the same name in each province or territory, even if another company is already doing business under a similar name.

The disadvantages are:

  • Federal incorporation costs more to set up;
  • There’s a lot more annual paperwork, as you must keep up to date with not only the filings required by the federal Director of Corporations Branch but all filings required by the provinces.

If you incorporate provincially, your corporation only has the right to carry on business in the province or territory where your business is incorporated.

The decision to incorporate federally or provincially depends more on the scope of your company than anything else. If you are setting up a one person or small non-reporting corporation, planning to do business in one province for now, and maybe another one or two later, there s probably no need to incorporate federally. You can always incorporate your business in another province (called extra-provincial incorporation) as your business expands.

2. Choose a corporate name.

Selecting a corporate name is more difficult than choosing a name for a sole proprietorship or partnership, because there are more stringent name requirements when you incorporate your business. Generally, a corporate name is composed of three elements;

  • a distinctive portion that identifies the particular corporation;
  • a descriptive portion that identifies the particular activities of the corporation;
  • and a legal element, identifying the company as a corporation, such as Limited, Incorporated, or Corporation.

A corporate name cannot include a misrepresentation of your business. For example, it cannot imply that you are a branch of government, or that your business is aviation when you sell shoes. Nor can the name contain obscenities or imply that the business is conducting illegal activities.

Note that corporate names in Canada can be in English or French, in both English and French, or in a combined English French version.

But the procedure is complicated by the fact that the Registrar (of the provincial Registry or federal Corporations Directorate) will demand a corporate name that is not identical to or similar to any other existing company names.

3. Have your corporate name searched and reserved.

No matter where you incorporate your business in Canada, you will need to have a name search done to determine the suitability of the corporate name you have chosen.

If you are incorporating federally, or in provinces such as Ontario, you will need to have a NUANS search done (and then submit the resulting NUANS report with your Articles of Incorporation).

In other provinces, such as British Columbia and Nova Scotia, you must have a name search done once you’ve submitted a Name Approval Request or Name Reservation Request Form. If the results of the search are acceptable, and your name is accepted, it is then reserved for a set number of days – during which you must complete the incorporation process for your business or restart the procedure all over again.

For details of the name search and name reservation process in different provinces, see my Incorporation in Canada library.

4. Prepare your documents, such as the Articles of Incorporation.

Generally, to incorporate your business, you will need to prepare the following documents:

  • The Memorandum – sets out the rules for the conduct of the company.
  • The Articles of Incorporation – the rules and regulations that will govern the conduct of the company members and directors.
  • The Notice of Offices – states the location of the two required offices for your corporation, the registered office and the records office.

If you are incorporating federally, you will also need to prepare a Notice of Directors (and submit a federally-biased NUANS report). If you are filing provincially, be sure you check the document requirements for your specific province before you proceed to the next step.

5. File your documents and apply for incorporation.

The federal Corporations Directorate and the provincial registries have websites where you can incorporate your business online. You may also submit your application for incorporation the old-fashioned way by mailing the forms and fees to the appropriate registrar.

For information on what to do once you have successfully registered your new corporation and have received your certificate of incorporation, see Getting Your New Corporation Up and Running.


Tags : , ,

How to Incorporate a Business, incorporating a business.#Incorporating #a #business


How to Incorporate a Business

As you plan how your business will grow, there are a number of business structures to consider. While the process can be detailed and state-specific, this article outlines the general steps and considerations for incorporation.

Choosing a Name for Your Corporation

When you go about choosing a name for your corporation, you should be aware of the rules that your state follows when it comes to corporate names. Contact your state’s office that deals with corporations to find out these rules if you are not already familiar with them. However, the following rules are found in many states:

  • The name of your corporation cannot be the same as any other corporation that is on file.
  • The name must end with some designation that shows the corporate status of your business, such as Corporation, Incorporated, or Limited. In addition, many states allow abbreviations of these words (such as Corp., Inc., or Ltd.).
  • The name cannot include any words that imply an association with the federal government or restricted types of businesses. Such restricted words include Bank, Cooperative, Federal, National, United States, or Reserve.

Generally, you can submit a proposed name to your state’s corporation office to see if the name would be an appropriate and allowable one. However, keep in mind that if you plan on operating your business under a name that is not the name of your corporation, you must file a fictitious or assumed name statement with the state or county in which your business is headquartered.

Directors are generally responsible for making major financial and policy decisions for the corporation, such as authorizing the sale of stock for the corporation. Although many owners simply appoint themselves as directors of the company, there is nothing that requires directors to be owners of the corporation.

A majority of states allow a corporation to have one director no matter how many owners there are of the corporation. However, there are other states that require the number of directors to equal or exceed the number of owners.

Filing the Articles of Incorporation

The articles of incorporation are sometimes referred to as the certificate of incorporation or a charter depending upon the state that you are in.

In many situations, getting your articles of incorporation prepared is just a matter of filing out a form that is provided by the secretary of state’s office. However, most articles of incorporation require that you provide the name and contact information for at least one person. This person will serve as the registered agent for the corporation. This is the person that the members of the public will contact if they want to sue the corporation or involve the corporation in an ongoing lawsuit.

Many people that have gone through the steps spelled out above often overlook and miss this very important step. The bylaws of a corporation spell out how the corporation will be run with respect to important decisions and voting rights. Corporate bylaws need to address when and how often shareholder meetings will be held as well as spell out various other important rules. The bylaws will generally be adopted for the corporation at the first meeting of the directors.

Another important document that is often overlooked is a shareholder’s agreement. This agreement should be agreed upon by all shareholders and will spell out various issues related to shareholders, such as how ownership will be transferred in the event that a shareholder dies, becomes disabled or wishes to leave the corporation.

The First Meeting of the Board of Directors

After all the above steps have been followed, it is time for the board of directors to hold their first meeting. At this first meeting, a number of corporate formalities must be taken care of, including:

  • Setting the corporation’s fiscal accounting year,
  • Choosing and appointing corporate officers,
  • Setting and adopting the corporate bylaws,
  • Authorizing and issuing the shares of stock, and
  • Settling on the official stock certificate form and adopting the corporate seal.

In addition, if the corporation is to be an S-type corporation, the directors should vote on and approve the election of an S-type corporation.

Issuing Stock and Registering Securities

A corporation should not open its doors for business until the shares of stock have been issued. When shares of stock are issued, the ownership of the corporation is formally divided amongst all the owners. In addition, issuing stock is a requirement that must be met before the corporation can do business.

When you issue stock, you are entering the world of securities laws. Generally speaking, large corporations that issue stock must register all of their stock offerings with the SEC (Securities Exchange Commission) and any state securities agencies. This can take time and cost a bit of money.

Exemptions to Securities Registration (Small Corporations)

Most small corporations that do not make a private offering of stock to more than 35 people may be exempt from having to register their stock offerings with the SEC. In addition, if a corporation only makes a private offering to those who can reasonably be expected to take care of themselves because of their personal financial situation, that private offering may also be exempt from the SEC registration rules. Additionally, many states have adopted exemption rules that mirror or are very similar to the SEC rules.

When your corporation is ready to issue the actual shares, you will have to keep detailed documents of:

  • The names of all of the initial shareholders,
  • The numbers of shares that each shareholder will buy, and
  • How each shareholder is going to pay for his or her shares.

You will then issue the stock certificates to each shareholder that bought into the corporation. You may also have to file a notice of stock transaction if your state’s laws require it.

Getting Ready for Business Licenses and Permits

If you plan on your corporation entering into a business that requires a license or a permit, be sure to get those soon. In addition, you will most likely need a tax registration certificate for both federal and state taxes. Keep in mind other licenses and permits as well, such as an employer ID from the IRS, a seller’s permit, a liquor license (if needed), a zoning permit, etc.

Need Help Incorporating? Get a Free Initial Legal Review of Your Situation

Corporations are the most complex business legal structures to form and typically require some degree of professional legal assistance. A lawyer can help verify that you have chosen the right business structure for your purposes and ensure that it is properly established. Contact a local attorney for a free initial legal review of your situation to get started.


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Incorporating a business Incorporating a business Incorporating a business


Incorporating Your Business, The U, incorporating a business.#Incorporating #a #business


Incorporating Your Business

When you rsquo;re starting a business, one of the first decisions you have to make is the type of business you want to create. A sole proprietorship? A corporation? A limited liability company? This decision is important, because the type of business you create determines the types of applications you rsquo;ll need to submit. You should also research liability implications for personal investments you make into your business, as well as the taxes you will need to pay. It rsquo;s important to understand each business type and select the one that is best suited for your situation and objectives. Keep in mind that you may need to contact several federal agencies, as well as your state business entity registration office. /p

Here is a list of the most common ways to structure a business. /p

An S corporation (also referred to as an S corp) is a special type of corporation created through an IRS tax election. An eligible domestic corporation can avoid double taxation (once to the corporation and again to the shareholders) by electing to be treated as an S corporation.

A partnership is a single business where two or more people share ownership.

Each partner contributes to all aspects of the business, including money, property, labor or skill. In return, each partner shares in the profits and losses of the business.

A limited liability company (LLC) is a hybrid type of legal structure that provides the limited liability features of a corporation and the tax efficiencies and operational flexibility of a partnership.

The “owners” of an LLC are referred to as “members.” Depending on the state, the members can consist of a single individual (one owner), two or more individuals, corporations or other LLCs.

A corporation (sometimes referred to as a C corporation) is an independent legal entity owned by shareholders. This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs.

Corporations are more complex than other business structures because they tend to have costly administrative fees and complex tax and legal requirements. Because of these issues, corporations are generally suggested for established, larger companies with multiple employees.

A cooperative is a business or organization owned by and operated for the benefit of those using its services. Profits and earnings generated by the cooperative are distributed among the members, also known as user-owners.

Typically, an elected board of directors and officers run the cooperative while regular members have voting power to control the direction of the cooperative. Members can become part of the cooperative by purchasing shares, though the amount of shares they hold does not affect the weight of their vote.


Tags : , ,

How to Incorporate a Business, incorporating a business.#Incorporating #a #business


How to Incorporate a Business

As you plan how your business will grow, there are a number of business structures to consider. While the process can be detailed and state-specific, this article outlines the general steps and considerations for incorporation.

Choosing a Name for Your Corporation

When you go about choosing a name for your corporation, you should be aware of the rules that your state follows when it comes to corporate names. Contact your state’s office that deals with corporations to find out these rules if you are not already familiar with them. However, the following rules are found in many states:

  • The name of your corporation cannot be the same as any other corporation that is on file.
  • The name must end with some designation that shows the corporate status of your business, such as Corporation, Incorporated, or Limited. In addition, many states allow abbreviations of these words (such as Corp., Inc., or Ltd.).
  • The name cannot include any words that imply an association with the federal government or restricted types of businesses. Such restricted words include Bank, Cooperative, Federal, National, United States, or Reserve.

Generally, you can submit a proposed name to your state’s corporation office to see if the name would be an appropriate and allowable one. However, keep in mind that if you plan on operating your business under a name that is not the name of your corporation, you must file a fictitious or assumed name statement with the state or county in which your business is headquartered.

Directors are generally responsible for making major financial and policy decisions for the corporation, such as authorizing the sale of stock for the corporation. Although many owners simply appoint themselves as directors of the company, there is nothing that requires directors to be owners of the corporation.

A majority of states allow a corporation to have one director no matter how many owners there are of the corporation. However, there are other states that require the number of directors to equal or exceed the number of owners.

Filing the Articles of Incorporation

The articles of incorporation are sometimes referred to as the certificate of incorporation or a charter depending upon the state that you are in.

In many situations, getting your articles of incorporation prepared is just a matter of filing out a form that is provided by the secretary of state’s office. However, most articles of incorporation require that you provide the name and contact information for at least one person. This person will serve as the registered agent for the corporation. This is the person that the members of the public will contact if they want to sue the corporation or involve the corporation in an ongoing lawsuit.

Many people that have gone through the steps spelled out above often overlook and miss this very important step. The bylaws of a corporation spell out how the corporation will be run with respect to important decisions and voting rights. Corporate bylaws need to address when and how often shareholder meetings will be held as well as spell out various other important rules. The bylaws will generally be adopted for the corporation at the first meeting of the directors.

Another important document that is often overlooked is a shareholder’s agreement. This agreement should be agreed upon by all shareholders and will spell out various issues related to shareholders, such as how ownership will be transferred in the event that a shareholder dies, becomes disabled or wishes to leave the corporation.

The First Meeting of the Board of Directors

After all the above steps have been followed, it is time for the board of directors to hold their first meeting. At this first meeting, a number of corporate formalities must be taken care of, including:

  • Setting the corporation’s fiscal accounting year,
  • Choosing and appointing corporate officers,
  • Setting and adopting the corporate bylaws,
  • Authorizing and issuing the shares of stock, and
  • Settling on the official stock certificate form and adopting the corporate seal.

In addition, if the corporation is to be an S-type corporation, the directors should vote on and approve the election of an S-type corporation.

Issuing Stock and Registering Securities

A corporation should not open its doors for business until the shares of stock have been issued. When shares of stock are issued, the ownership of the corporation is formally divided amongst all the owners. In addition, issuing stock is a requirement that must be met before the corporation can do business.

When you issue stock, you are entering the world of securities laws. Generally speaking, large corporations that issue stock must register all of their stock offerings with the SEC (Securities Exchange Commission) and any state securities agencies. This can take time and cost a bit of money.

Exemptions to Securities Registration (Small Corporations)

Most small corporations that do not make a private offering of stock to more than 35 people may be exempt from having to register their stock offerings with the SEC. In addition, if a corporation only makes a private offering to those who can reasonably be expected to take care of themselves because of their personal financial situation, that private offering may also be exempt from the SEC registration rules. Additionally, many states have adopted exemption rules that mirror or are very similar to the SEC rules.

When your corporation is ready to issue the actual shares, you will have to keep detailed documents of:

  • The names of all of the initial shareholders,
  • The numbers of shares that each shareholder will buy, and
  • How each shareholder is going to pay for his or her shares.

You will then issue the stock certificates to each shareholder that bought into the corporation. You may also have to file a notice of stock transaction if your state’s laws require it.

Getting Ready for Business Licenses and Permits

If you plan on your corporation entering into a business that requires a license or a permit, be sure to get those soon. In addition, you will most likely need a tax registration certificate for both federal and state taxes. Keep in mind other licenses and permits as well, such as an employer ID from the IRS, a seller’s permit, a liquor license (if needed), a zoning permit, etc.

Need Help Incorporating? Get a Free Initial Legal Review of Your Situation

Corporations are the most complex business legal structures to form and typically require some degree of professional legal assistance. A lawyer can help verify that you have chosen the right business structure for your purposes and ensure that it is properly established. Contact a local attorney for a free initial legal review of your situation to get started.


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Incorporating a Company #business #card #template


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Incorporating a Company

Articles of Incorporation

The Name

The articles of incorporation must set out the name of the corporation. Unless one wishes a numbered corporate name, a name should be approved prior to incorporation. All names must end with “Limited,” “Corporation,” “Inc.”, etc. See Corporate Name Approval .

The Registered Office

The location of the registered office must be stated in the articles. The street address need only to be stated in the Notice of Registered Office Form 3. (40 KB)

Class and Maximum Number of Shares

The principal function of authorized capital is to restrict the directors’ discretion to issue shares. While it is not necessary to place an upward limit on the number of shares that the directors of a corporation can issue, it is still possible to place a maximum number on them. The shares are to be without nominal or par value.

  • Common shares: this class of shares is usually free from conditions.
  • Preferred shares: this class bears special rights or restrictions with respect to voting, dividends and distributions on liquidation. This may include issuing dividends to preferred shareholders before issuing them to common shareholders.

Directors

There is no limit on the maximum number of directors permitted. Not-for-profit entities must have a minimum of three directors. Directors must be the age of majority which is 19. Form 6. (232 KB)

Restrictions if Any on Transfer Shares

Substantial advantages may be available to private companies by indicating in the articles that the corporation shall not have more than 50 shareholders subscribe for shares. This provision is a Securities Act requirement. Other provisions may include pre-emptive rights, restrictions on transfer of shares, etc.

Restrictions if Any on Business the Corporation May Carry On

This provision in the articles is optional, with the exception of corporations without share capital, which must file a Schedule A (8 KB) and a Schedule B. (4 KB)

Other Provisions, if Any

This section in the articles is optional with the exception of corporations without share capital who must file Schedule “B” which is referenced in this section.

Incorporators

The articles of incorporation can be submitted by a person known as the incorporator. If a body corporate is acting as an incorporator that company must be in good standing before the new entity can be incorporated.

By-laws

By-laws are not required to be submitted with the articles of incorporation.

Business Taxation

Newfoundland and Labrador has one of the most favourable business tax climates in Canada. Our Corporate Income Tax rates are amongst the lowest in the country. Refer to the Department of Finance for more information.

Fees

Schedule of fees (70 KB) Prescribed by the Minister of Service NL for the Registry of Companies.

Adobe® Acrobat® Reader software can be used for viewing PDF documents. Download Acrobat® Reader for free.

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How to Form a Corporation or LLC – Start Incorporating a Company #business #stationery


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How to Incorporate or Form an LLC

incorporate.com makes it easy for you to form a corporation or Limited Liability Company (LLC ) in any state. Most small business owners decide to incorporate to protect personal assets, gain credibility, and save on taxes.

How Do I Incorporate?

To get started incorporating a company, follow these simple steps below:

  1. Decide to incorporate. Before you set up a corporation, it’s important to understand the benefits of incorporating or forming an LLC. Knowing just what incorporating entails for you as a business owner – including financial and administrative expectations which may need to be reported periodically – can help you decide if incorporating is the right move for your company right now.
  • Select incorporate.com. It’s simple to form a corporation online. Rather than sift through endless piles of complicated paperwork and confusing terminology, we have helped countless businesses through the process of incorporation. Our thorough understanding of incorporation practices nationwide can assist you with making the process of forming a corporation as painless as possible.Learn why we think you will benefit from our services.
  • Choose a business structure. If you’re wondering, “Just how do I incorporate my business,” we will help guide you through the process and let you know what sort of business structure may best suit your needs of your corporation start up. C Corps, S Corps, and LLCs all provide different benefits. We can describe the differences which may help you choose the best structure for your company’s current needs and anything that arises in the future. Need more information about the differences between business structures? Check out our Business Comparison Chart .
  • Choose a state. Once you’ve decided that it’s time to start your own corporation, depending upon your company’s needs, you may want to incorporate in a state other than the one where your business currently resides. Additionally, some states have strict guidelines around unique names for corporations. When registering your corporation, we can help with naming that follows state guidelines. Get more information about choosing a state in which to start a corporation.
  • Choose a package. With a firm grasp of the options various company structures and states provide when forming or setting up a corporation, you’re well on your way to carving out a well-planned future for your new business. View our package options and begin incorporating a business online today.
  • Place your order. You can incorporate or form an LLC online or by phone with a Business Specialist at 800-818-6082 (toll-free) or 302-636-5440.
  • What Happens After You Place an Incorporation Order?

    Once you submit an order to start a corporation, we take care of the paperwork for you:

    • We assign your order to a Business Specialist, who will contact you if there are any problems with the preliminary name search.
    • We complete Articles of Incorporation (for a corporation) or Articles of Organization (for an LLC) on your behalf. A few states require us to get your signature on the completed documents before submission. Normally, we submit documents directly to the state.
    • We file your documents with the state in which you wish to start a corporation or an LLC.
    • We forward the state approval notice to you (generally within 5-10 business days, although turnaround times vary by state).

    Ready to Incorporate or Form an LLC? Check Pricing


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