Tag: Idea

State Bankruptcy Option Is Sought, Quietly – The New York Times, new business idea.#New

A Path Is Sought for States to Escape Their Debt Burdens

Policymakers are working behind the scenes to come up with a way to let states declare bankruptcy and get out from under crushing debts, including the pensions they have promised to retired public workers.

Unlike cities, the states are barred from seeking protection in federal bankruptcy court. Any effort to change that status would have to clear high constitutional hurdles because the states are considered sovereign.

But proponents say some states are so burdened that the only feasible way out may be bankruptcy, giving Illinois , for example, the opportunity to do what General Motors did with the federal government’s aid.

Beyond their short-term budget gaps, some states have deep structural problems, like insolvent pension funds, that are diverting money from essential public services like education and health care. Some members of Congress fear that it is just a matter of time before a state seeks a bailout, say bankruptcy lawyers who have been consulted by Congressional aides.

Bankruptcy could permit a state to alter its contractual promises to retirees, which are often protected by state constitutions, and it could provide an alternative to a no-strings bailout. Along with retirees, however, investors in a state’s bonds could suffer, possibly ending up at the back of the line as unsecured creditors.

“All of a sudden, there’s a whole new risk factor,” said Paul S. Maco, a partner at the firm Vinson Elkins who was head of the Securities and Exchange Commission ’s Office of Municipal Securities during the Clinton administration.

For now, the fear of destabilizing the municipal bond market with the words “state bankruptcy” has proponents in Congress going about their work on tiptoe. No draft bill is in circulation yet, and no member of Congress has come forward as a sponsor, although Senator

, a Texas Republican, asked the Federal Reserve chairman,

, about the possiblity in a hearing this month.

House Republicans, and Senators from both parties, have taken an interest in the issue, with nudging from bankruptcy lawyers and a former House speaker,

, who could be a Republican presidential candidate. It would be difficult to get a bill through Congress, not only because of the constitutional questions and the complexities of bankruptcy law, but also because of fears that even talk of such a law could make the states’ problems worse.

Lawmakers might decide to stop short of a full-blown bankruptcy proposal and establish instead some sort of oversight panel for distressed states, akin to the Municipal Assistance Corporation, which helped New York City during its fiscal crisis of 1975.

Still, discussions about something as far-reaching as bankruptcy could give governors and others more leverage in bargaining with unionized public workers.

“They are readying a massive assault on us,” said Charles M. Loveless, legislative director of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees . “We’re taking this very seriously.”

Mr. Loveless said he was meeting with potential allies on Capitol Hill, making the point that certain states might indeed have financial problems, but public employees and their benefits were not the cause. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities released a report on Thursday warning against a tendency to confuse the states’ immediate budget gaps with their long-term structural deficits.

“States have adequate tools and means to meet their obligations,” the report stated.

No state is known to want to declare bankruptcy, and some question the wisdom of offering them the ability to do so now, given the jitters in the normally staid municipal bond market.

Slightly more than $25 billion has flowed out of mutual funds that invest in muni bonds in the last two months, according to the Investment Company Institute . Many analysts say they consider a bond default by any state extremely unlikely, but they also say that when politicians take an interest in the bond market, surprises are apt to follow.

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Mr. Maco said the mere introduction of a state bankruptcy bill could lead to “some kind of market penalty,” even if it never passed. That “penalty” might be higher borrowing costs for a state and downward pressure on the value of its bonds. Individual bondholders would not realize any losses unless they sold.

But institutional investors in municipal bonds, like insurance companies, are required to keep certain levels of capital. And they might retreat from additional investments . A deeply troubled state could eventually be priced out of the capital markets.

“The precipitating event at G.M. was they were out of cash and had no ability to raise the capital they needed,” said

, the lone Republican on

’s special auto task force, which led G.M. and Chrysler through an unusual restructuring in bankruptcy, financed by the federal government.

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Mr. Wilson, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for New York State comptroller last year, has said he believes that New York and some other states need some type of a financial restructuring.

He noted that G.M. was salvaged only through an administration-led effort that Congress initially resisted, with legislators voting against financial assistance to G.M. in late 2008.

“Now Congress is much more conservative,” he said. “A state shows up and wants cash, Congress says no, and it will probably be at the last minute and it’s a real problem. That’s what I’m concerned about.”

Discussion of a new bankruptcy option for the states appears to have taken off in November, after Mr. Gingrich gave a speech about the country’s big challenges, including government debt and an uncompetitive labor market.

“We just have to be honest and clear about this, and I also hope the House Republicans are going to move a bill in the first month or so of their tenure to create a venue for state bankruptcy,” he said.

A few weeks later, David A. Skeel, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania , published an article, “Give States a Way to Go Bankrupt,” in The Weekly Standard. It said thorny constitutional questions were “easily addressed” by making sure states could not be forced into bankruptcy or that federal judges could usurp states’ lawmaking powers.

“I have never had anything I’ve written get as much attention as that piece,” said Mr. Skeel, who said he had since been contacted by Republicans and Democrats whom he declined to name.

Mr. Skeel said it was possible to envision how bankruptcy for states might work by looking at the existing law for local governments. Called Chapter 9, it gives distressed municipalities a period of debt-collection relief, which they can use to restructure their obligations with the help of a bankruptcy judge.

Unfunded pensions become unsecured debts in municipal bankruptcy and may be reduced. And the law makes it easier for a bankrupt city to tear up its labor contracts than for a bankrupt company, said James E. Spiotto, head of the bankruptcy practice at Chapman Cutler in Chicago .

The biggest surprise may await the holders of a state’s general obligation bonds. Though widely considered the strongest credit of any government, they can be treated as unsecured credits, subject to reduction, under Chapter 9.

Mr. Spiotto said he thought bankruptcy court was not a good avenue for troubled states, and he has designed an alternative called the Public Pension Funding Authority. It would have mandatory jurisdiction over states that failed to provide sufficient funding to their workers’ pensions or that were diverting money from essential public services.

“I’ve talked to some people from Congress, and I’m going to talk to some more,” he said. “This effort to talk about Chapter 9, I’m worried about it. I don’t want the states to have to pay higher borrowing costs because of a panic that they might go bankrupt. I don’t think it’s the right thing at all. But it’s the beginning of a dialog.”

A version of this article appears in print on January 21, 2011, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: A Path Is Sought for States To Escape Debt Burdens. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

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IDEA Health & Fitness Association, business idea.#Business #idea


business idea

Access over 8,500 professional articles and 500 full length training videos from the industry’s top educators.

Conferences

Experience world class education by attending one of our three live conferences.

CEC Courses

Take an online CEC/CEU course anytime, anywhere.

IDEA FitnessConnect

Join the largest fitness professional directory, with more than 250,000 fitness professionals and 8 million searches.

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IDEA PERSONAL TRAINER INSTITUTE

Personal trainers, fitness professionals, owners and managers: Learn what it takes to truly take your business and training skills to the new heights with cutting-edge information on topics including fitness assessment, program design, social media marketing and staff management.

March 1-4, 2018, Alexandria, VA

April 4-8, Dallas, TX New Location!

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Choose from an array of insightful lectures, hands-on workshops and challenging workshops!

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Learn from the industry’s best and brightest to stay ahead of the competition and build a financially rewarding, world-class business.

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20+ CECs

Recertify in just 1 weekend. Plus, earn up to 6 additional CECs with preconference sessions.

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MARKETPLACE

Check out the newest trends and products from industry-leading brands offered at special conference pricing.

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Who We Are

The IDEA team is filled with happy and healthy people accomplishing amazing things, so we make sure that the company culture reflects those awesome personalities and is centered around exercise, good nutrition and mindfulness. With daily fitness classes at the office, healthy snacks, standup workstations, massages and more, our wellness community is all about fun, fitness, support and positivity. Come visit us and check it out. We love to share!


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IDEA Health & Fitness Association, business idea.#Business #idea


business idea

Access over 8,500 professional articles and 500 full length training videos from the industry’s top educators.

Conferences

Experience world class education by attending one of our three live conferences.

CEC Courses

Take an online CEC/CEU course anytime, anywhere.

IDEA FitnessConnect

Join the largest fitness professional directory, with more than 250,000 fitness professionals and 8 million searches.

Business idea

IDEA PERSONAL TRAINER INSTITUTE

Personal trainers, fitness professionals, owners and managers: Learn what it takes to truly take your business and training skills to the new heights with cutting-edge information on topics including fitness assessment, program design, social media marketing and staff management.

March 1-4, 2018, Alexandria, VA

April 4-8, Dallas, TX New Location!

Business idea

100+ Sessions

Choose from an array of insightful lectures, hands-on workshops and challenging workshops!

Business idea

50+ Experts

Learn from the industry’s best and brightest to stay ahead of the competition and build a financially rewarding, world-class business.

Business idea

20+ CECs

Recertify in just 1 weekend. Plus, earn up to 6 additional CECs with preconference sessions.

Business idea

MARKETPLACE

Check out the newest trends and products from industry-leading brands offered at special conference pricing.

Featured On

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Business idea

Who We Are

The IDEA team is filled with happy and healthy people accomplishing amazing things, so we make sure that the company culture reflects those awesome personalities and is centered around exercise, good nutrition and mindfulness. With daily fitness classes at the office, healthy snacks, standup workstations, massages and more, our wellness community is all about fun, fitness, support and positivity. Come visit us and check it out. We love to share!


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The Open-Office Trap, The New Yorker, new business idea.#New #business #idea


The Open-Office Trap

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In 1973, my high school, Acton-Boxborough Regional, in Acton, Massachusetts, moved to a sprawling brick building at the foot of a hill. Inspired by architectural trends of the preceding decade, the classrooms in one of its wings didn’t have doors. The rooms opened up directly onto the hallway, and tidbits about the French Revolution, say, or Benjamin Franklin’s breakfast, would drift from one classroom to another. Distracting at best and frustrating at worst, wide-open classrooms went, for the most part, the way of other ill-considered architectural fads of the time, like concrete domes. (Following an eighty-million-dollar renovation and expansion, in 2005, none of the new wings at A.B.R.H.S. have open classrooms.) Yet the workplace counterpart of the open classroom, the open office, flourishes: some seventy per cent of all offices now have an open floor plan.

The open office was originally conceived by a team from Hamburg, Germany, in the nineteen-fifties, to facilitate communication and idea flow. But a growing body of evidence suggests that the open office undermines the very things that it was designed to achieve. In June, 1997, a large oil and gas company in western Canada asked a group of psychologists at the University of Calgary to monitor workers as they transitioned from a traditional office arrangement to an open one. The psychologists assessed the employees’ satisfaction with their surroundings, as well as their stress level, job performance, and interpersonal relationships before the transition, four weeks after the transition, and, finally, six months afterward. The employees suffered according to every measure: the new space was disruptive, stressful, and cumbersome, and, instead of feeling closer, coworkers felt distant, dissatisfied, and resentful. Productivity fell.

In 2011, the organizational psychologist Matthew Davis reviewed more than a hundred studies about office environments. He found that, though open offices often fostered a symbolic sense of organizational mission , making employees feel like part of a more laid-back, innovative enterprise , they were damaging to the workers’ attention spans, productivity, creative thinking, and satisfaction. Compared with standard offices, employees experienced more uncontrolled interactions, higher levels of stress, and lower levels of concentration and motivation. When David Craig surveyed some thirty-eight thousand workers, he found that interruptions by colleagues were detrimental to productivity, and that the more senior the employee, the worse she fared .

Psychologically, the repercussions of open offices are relatively straightforward. Physical barriers have been closely linked to psychological privacy, and a sense of privacy boosts job performance . Open offices also remove an element of control, which can lead to feelings of helplessness. In a 2005 study that looked at organizations ranging from a Midwest auto supplier to a Southwest telecom firm, researchers found that the ability to control the environment had a significant effect on team cohesion and satisfaction. When workers couldn’t change the way that things looked, adjust the lighting and temperature, or choose how to conduct meetings, spirits plummeted.

An open environment may even have a negative impact on our health. In a recent study of more than twenty-four hundred employees in Denmark, Jan Pejtersen and his colleagues found that as the number of people working in a single room went up, the number of employees who took sick leave increased apace. Workers in two-person offices took an average of fifty per cent more sick leave than those in single offices, while those who worked in fully open offices were out an average of sixty-two per cent more.

But the most problematic aspect of the open office may be physical rather than psychological: simple noise. In laboratory settings, noise has been repeatedly tied to reduced cognitive performance. The psychologist Nick Perham, who studies the effect of sound on how we think, has found that office commotion impairs workers’ ability to recall information, and even to do basic arithmetic. Listening to music to block out the office intrusion doesn’t help: even that, Perham found, impairs our mental acuity. Exposure to noise in an office may also take a toll on the health of employees. In a study by the Cornell University psychologists Gary Evans and Dana Johnson, clerical workers who were exposed to open-office noise for three hours had increased levels of epinephrine—a hormone that we often call adrenaline, associated with the so-called fight-or-flight response. What’s more, Evans and Johnson discovered that people in noisy environments made fewer ergonomic adjustments than they would in private, causing increased physical strain. The subjects subsequently attempted to solve fewer puzzles than they had after working in a quiet environment; in other words, they became less motivated and less creative.

Open offices may seem better suited to younger workers, many of whom have been multitasking for the majority of their short careers. When, in 2012 , Heidi Rasila and Peggie Rothe looked at how employees of a Finnish telecommunications company born after 1982 reacted to the negative effects of open-office plans, they noted that young employees found certain types of noises, such as conversations and laughter, just as distracting as their older counterparts did. The younger workers also disparaged their lack of privacy and an inability to control their environment. But they believed that the trade-offs were ultimately worth it, because the open space resulted in a sense of camaraderie; they valued the time spent socializing with coworkers, whom they often saw as friends.

That increased satisfaction, however, may merely mask the fact that younger workers also suffer in open offices. In a 2005 study , the psychologists Alena Maher and Courtney von Hippel found that the better you are at screening out distractions, the more effectively you work in an open office. Unfortunately, it seems that the more frantically you multitask, the worse you become at blocking out distractions. Moreover, according to the Stanford University cognitive neuroscientist Anthony Wagner, heavy multitaskers are not only “more susceptible to interference from irrelevant environmental stimuli” but also worse at switching between unrelated tasks. In other words, if habitual multitaskers are interrupted by a colleague, it takes them longer to settle back into what they were doing. Regardless of age, when we’re exposed to too many inputs at once—a computer screen, music, a colleague’s conversation, the ping of an instant message—our senses become overloaded, and it requires more work to achieve a given result .

Though multitasking millennials seem to be more open to distraction as a workplace norm, the wholehearted embrace of open offices may be ingraining a cycle of underperformance in their generation: they enjoy, build, and proselytize for open offices, but may also suffer the most from them in the long run.

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Business – definition of business by The Free Dictionary, business idea.#Business #idea


business

These nouns apply to forms of activity that have the objective of supplying products or services for a fee. Business pertains broadly to commercial, financial, and industrial activity, and more narrowly to specific fields or firms engaging in this activity: a company that does business over the internet; went into the software consulting business; owns a dry-cleaning business. Industry entails the production and manufacture of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale: the computer industry. Commerce and trade refer to the exchange and distribution of goods or commodities: laws regulating interstate commerce; involved in the domestic fur trade. Traffic pertains in particular to businesses engaged in the transportation of goods or passengers: renovated the docks to attract shipping traffic. The word may also suggest illegal trade: discovered a brisk traffic in stolen goods.

busi ness

Business

  1. As oxygen is the disintegrating principle of life, working night and day to dissolve, separate, pull apart and dissipate, so there is something in business that continually tends to scatter, destroy and shift possession from this man to that. A million mice nibble eternally at every business venture Elbert Hubbard
  2. Business is like a man rowing a boat upstream. He has no choice; he must go ahead or he will go back Lewis E. Pierson
  3. Business is like oil. It won t mix with anything but business J. Grahame
  4. Business is very much like religion: it is founded on faith William McFee
  5. Business policy flows downhill from the mountain, like water Anon
  6. A business without customers is like a computer without bytes Anon

As the entries that follow show, this concept lends itself to many additional twists.

Playwrights Ernst and Lindley wrote this simile to be spoken by a judge in their 1930 s play Hold Your Tongue.

The first two words are transposed from Computer companies to generalize the comparison.

business

Business is the work of making, buying, and selling goods or services.

When you use business in this sense, don’t say ‘a business’. Don’t say, for example, ‘ We’ve got a business to do ‘. You say ‘We’ve got some business to do’.

You can talk about a particular area of business using the followed by a noun followed by business.

A business is a company, shop, or organization that makes and sells goods or provides a service.


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Business – definition of business by The Free Dictionary, small business idea.#Small #business #idea


business

These nouns apply to forms of activity that have the objective of supplying products or services for a fee. Business pertains broadly to commercial, financial, and industrial activity, and more narrowly to specific fields or firms engaging in this activity: a company that does business over the internet; went into the software consulting business; owns a dry-cleaning business. Industry entails the production and manufacture of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale: the computer industry. Commerce and trade refer to the exchange and distribution of goods or commodities: laws regulating interstate commerce; involved in the domestic fur trade. Traffic pertains in particular to businesses engaged in the transportation of goods or passengers: renovated the docks to attract shipping traffic. The word may also suggest illegal trade: discovered a brisk traffic in stolen goods.

busi ness

Business

  1. As oxygen is the disintegrating principle of life, working night and day to dissolve, separate, pull apart and dissipate, so there is something in business that continually tends to scatter, destroy and shift possession from this man to that. A million mice nibble eternally at every business venture Elbert Hubbard
  2. Business is like a man rowing a boat upstream. He has no choice; he must go ahead or he will go back Lewis E. Pierson
  3. Business is like oil. It won t mix with anything but business J. Grahame
  4. Business is very much like religion: it is founded on faith William McFee
  5. Business policy flows downhill from the mountain, like water Anon
  6. A business without customers is like a computer without bytes Anon

As the entries that follow show, this concept lends itself to many additional twists.

Playwrights Ernst and Lindley wrote this simile to be spoken by a judge in their 1930 s play Hold Your Tongue.

The first two words are transposed from Computer companies to generalize the comparison.

business

Business is the work of making, buying, and selling goods or services.

When you use business in this sense, don’t say ‘a business’. Don’t say, for example, ‘ We’ve got a business to do ‘. You say ‘We’ve got some business to do’.

You can talk about a particular area of business using the followed by a noun followed by business.

A business is a company, shop, or organization that makes and sells goods or provides a service.


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The Telegraph Festival of Business, small business idea.#Small #business #idea


Festival of Business

Small business idea Small business idea

Small business idea Small business idea Small business idea Small business idea

The Telegraph Festival of Business 2017

The seventh Festival of Business will take place in London on Tuesday 7 November, 2017. This one day conference, regularly attracting an audience of 600 senior executives from UK businesses, will bring together some of the best-known names in British business, along with leading politicians and thought leaders, in a bid to ensure the continued growth of Britain’s small businesses. A combination of keynote addresses, live interviews, case studies, expert panels, quick-fire talks, and masterclasses will ensure attendees leave the conference having found inspiration, heard pioneering examples of business development and cemented valuable relationships with their peers.

Agenda

Registration and Breakfast

Welcome Address from the Chairman

Jeremy Warner, Associate Editor, The Telegraph

Lady Michelle Mone, Baroness of Mayfair OBE

Panel Session: Talent: attracting, recruiting and retaining your most valuable asset

Understand how important your company’s values are for recruitment and learn how to encourage millennials through to Gen X to join and then get them to stay. Gain insights into competing with larger companies when it comes to salary, culture and apprenticeships and delve further into the complexities of employment regulation.

Craig Donaldson, Chief Executive Officer, Metro Bank

Karen Blackett, OBE Chairwoman, MediaCom UK

Kiera Lawlor, Head of Happiness, Social Chain

Kirstin Furber, People Director, BBC Worldwide

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Panel Session: Leading your business to success

Hear first hand on how to lead through change and how to successfully delegate. Gain insights into day-to-day management tips and understand the key lessons learnt by overcoming failure.

James Daunt, Chief Executive Officer, Waterstones

Chris Morling, Founder and Managing Director, money.co.uk

Helena Morrissey, Head of Personal Investing, Legal General Investment Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

Networking and Refreshment Break

Quick-fire Talk: Cyber security – how to prevent the worst from happening

Senior Representative, National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

Q A: Late Payments: can common ground be found?

A discussion that speaks to both sides, is honest about what the issues are at both ends and is constructive in terms of solutions.

Richard Gilkes, Managing Director, Stort Chemical

Philip King, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Credit Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

The importance of growth and international trade for SMEs

The Rt Hon Dr. Liam Fox MP, Secretary of State for International Trade

Plotting the future of tech innovation in your business

The new tech landscape; identify fads vs genuinely useful future tech and investing wisely to make the best tech choices. Gain insights into the importance of company-wide adoption and understanding and recruiting the relevant talent to deal with changing tech and transformation.

Chief Digital Officer

Digital Marketing Lead, UK

Pfizer Innovative Health

Moderator: Robert Bridge

Chief Customer Officer

Scaling Up Your Business Operations

Gain insights and advice on whether it’s best to scale through partnerships or organically. Understand how to ensure optimal staffing when growing and how to know when to step back.

Head of Enterprise

Business Banking NatWest/RBS

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive and Co-founder

Moderator: Matt Caines

Editor, Telegraph Connect

Supporting UK business to export and grow

Which will be the new frontiers? Identifying the changes to consider following Brexit and understand cross cultural business differences. Examine the steps to take when starting to export.

Emma Jones, Founder, Enterprise Nation

Joshua Stevens, Chief Executive Officer, One Retail Group

Dr Adam Marshall, Director General, British Chambers of Commerce

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Securing your business against cyber threats

Cyber security; an issue not to be taken lightly and potentially one of the the biggest threats facing SMEs today. Understand how to achieve a cyber security 101 strategy and the preventative measures you can take and what to do when disaster strikes.

Sam Nixon, Product Owner, Decoded

Phil Lander, Director of Mobile and IT, B2B, Samsung Europe

Rowan Davies, Head of Policy and Campaigns, Mumsnet

Moderator: Stephan Freeman, Chief Information Security Officer, The Telegraph


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What Should Be On A Business Card For Small Businesses, Small Business Marketing Blog,

What Should Be On A Business Card For Small Businesses

Small business idea

Should you put anything on the back of a business card? Is it important to list your website url?

Just because you only have a few inches of real estate to work with doesn t mean you still can t get your message across and do it in a way that doesn t require packing every possible bit of information about your business.

Your business card is often the first place prospective customers look when they re searching for contact information for your small business. Having a professional looking business card forms a first impression that can mean the difference between them picking up the phone or throwing your business card in the trash.

Here s what to include (and not include) on a business card:

1. Logo and Tagline

If you want your business card (and your business) to really get noticed, it all starts with great design and quality printing. Your brand should be immediately recognizable. That means should always include the name of your business AND your logo somewhere on your card.

And this is one area where a lot of small businesses start to really junk things up.

Take full advantage of the back side of your business card.

One of the questions I see the most frequently from small business owners is whether to list a title on their business card and, if so, what exactly to include.

There are a lot (and I mean a lot) of opinions and discussions around the topic of what job title to use on a business card when you own a small business.

Typically, job titles fall into 3 categories–no title, organizational role (ex. CEO or President), or function (ex, Director of Sales and Marketing).

  • For small businesses with only 1 or 2 employees, referring to yourself as President seems a bit blowhardy.
  • If you want people to have a clearer understanding of your day-to-day responsibilities, then something more functionally specific makes more sense (ex. Business Development Manager).
  • If you re trying to establish credibility with prospective contacts who prefer to deal directly with the owner, then go that route

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3. Contact Information

Back in the day, businesses had one (or at most two) telephone numbers. Now you ll often see business cards that include an 800 number, a direct line, a cellphone, and possibly even a home number. Totally ridiculous! Your customers shouldn t have to play a game of telephone roulette.

Why not keep it simple? Include the one or two numbers where your customers will be able to reach you. That s all, that s it!

Along with your phone number, always be sure to include your email address. Notice I said your email address and not some generic [email protected] Nothing says Please don t contact me I really don t care about you more than pointing people to an anonymous inbox.

Do you need to include a physical address?

That depends on your business. If you have an ecommerce store with no brick and mortar storefront, operate out of your home, or there s no reason customers would need to visit you, leave it off. Otherwise, it s entirely up to you. However, I have spoken with a number of folks over the years who feel a physical address helps validate the legitimacy of a business.

On the front you ll typically want to include 1) a contact name 2) email 3) phone number 4) address and 5) website –all the information prospective customers will need if they want to get in touch.

Of course I can t talk about business card content without mentioning the fax. Of all the superfluous information you could possibly include, this has to be at the top of the heap. With the ability to scan and email documents, listing a fax number generally isn t necessary (unless you know your customers are going to use it).

Let s just nip this one in the bud right now. Including a QR code on your business card isn t going to make you look hip or cool.

The fact of the matter is most people aren t actually going to do anything with your business card until they get in front of a computer or tablet. At that point, it s going to take just as much time for them to pull out their phone, waste time scanning a QR code, connect to the web, and check it out as it would for them to just type in your url.

5. Links to Social Media Profiles

If your small business is on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Google+, it doesn t take long before you wind up with a proliferation of social media profiles on your business card. Instead of giving people different ways to connect, you end up overwhelming them with a sea of social media icons and links.

Focus on the 1-2 primary social media channels your customers actually use and leave all of the other links for your website.

6. Services (Sparingly)

If you have the room including a short list of services can definitely help reinforce your offerings with current and prospective customers.

Notice I said short. Trying to list everything under the sun will only junk things up. I know when I get business cards that have a massive laundry list of services my eyes usually just glaze over.

7. Multiple Websites (Never!)

If you have a business website, an ecommerce site, a blog, and three social media profiles you re much better off pointing prospective customers to one url where they can then access all of your other information. In other words, don t junk it up.

Business Card Best Practices

Don t be afraid to use both sides of your business card. Doing so gives you more space so you allow your content to breath and also make it easier to digest for current and prospective customers. For starters, add your small business logo and tagline to the back side of your card. Then use the front side for your name and title, physical address (if you have a brick-and-mortar storefront), your phone number (one is almost always enough), and your email address and website.

From there, you can look at ready-made business card designs or design your own.

Have additional questions about what to include on a business card for your small business? Leave a comment below or send them to me directly.

As a disclaimer, I use affiliate links for some of the products listed. They are all products I absolutely love and trust and would recommend regardless of whether they have an affiliate program.


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Business News, The Kansas City Star, new business idea.#New #business #idea


Business News | The Kansas City Star

Business

New business idea

Business

Kansas City s Harley-Davidson plant makes newest model to hit the market

Assembly of the Harley-Davidson Sport Glide motorcycle began this summer at the company’s assembly plant east of Kansas City International Airport.

New business idea

Kale smoothies, avocado toast among the offerings at this new Troost restaurant

New Overland Park restaurant serves Indian barbecue kebabs (and sides)

Updates: Veterans Day free meals, deals discounts in the Kansas City area

It s like darts, but with axes: Ax throwing club hits West Bottoms

Thrillist picks Plaza area steakhouse as one of the 31 best in the nation

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TV News & Reviews

KCTV and KSMO replace general manager with former business manager

Meredith Corp., which owns the two stations, did not say why its own vice president of finance has succeeded Kansas City general manager Mike Cukyne.

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Health Care

Kansas City area medical practice falls into bankruptcy

Kansas City Internal Medicine filed for bankruptcy on Wednesday. Some of its doctors are joining the HCA Midwest Physicians network.

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Government & Politics

How about another election? KC council plans to ask for key vote in April

The City Council set in motion plans for an April election to extend the one-cent sales tax for capital improvements. The city collects about $70 million a year from the tax, first approved by voters in 2007 and which is up for renewal next year.

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Cityscape

Updates: Veterans Day free meals, deals discounts in the Kansas City area

Discounts for veterans and active duty military run through Nov. 13. They include free or discounted meals, free haircuts and discounts on merchandise.

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Government & Politics

Poll showed new KCI had big lead but supporters kept it under wraps

As Election Day loomed, “cautiously optimistic” was the mantra chanted by advocates for a transformed Kansas City International Airport. They expected a win, but said it would be close.

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Government & Politics

With KCI votes counted, when will we see the wrecking ball?

Kansas City voters strongly approved a new terminal at KCI, but don’t expect to see construction at the airport just yet.

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Cityscape

It s like darts, but with axes: Ax throwing club hits West Bottoms

Blade & Timber is now open at 1101 Mulberry St. in the West Bottoms. Players enter a lane to throw an ax at a target, much like in darts.

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Government & Politics

KC voters give overwhelming approval to KCI single terminal

Everywhere in the Kansas City, voters handed City Hall huge support for a new terminal at KCI. It had been a difficult climb from a period of opposition and distrust to the idea, but in the end, Kansas Citians wanted to see the three-terminal design replaced with a modern structure.

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Entertainment

The Latest: Warner Bros. suspends Supergirl showrunner

“Supergrirl’ and “Arrow” executive producer Andrew Kreisberg has been suspended amid sexual harassment, misconduct accusations by 19 former and current employees.

National & International

Baltimore losing thousands in parking fines

Baltimore is losing out on collecting hundreds of thousands of dollars in parking fines because city officials have not implemented a new law for more than two months.

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Cityscape

Kale smoothies, avocado toast among the offerings at this new Troost restaurant

Ruby Jean’s Juicery plans a Nov. 11 opening at 3000 Troost. A new convenience store gas station plans to open later this year at 5901 Troost.

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Entertainment

George Takei, Richard Dreyfuss respond in harassment scandal

George Takei, Richard Dreyfuss latest celebrities swept up in Hollywood sexual harassment, assault scandal.

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National & International

Trump calls Putin sincere, ex-US intelligence heads ‘hacks’

President Donald Trump is back on the defensive over Russian election meddling, saying he considers President Vladimir Putin’s denials sincere, dismissing former U.S. intelligence officials as “hacks” and accusing Democrats of trying to sabotage relations.

National & International

Hawaii judge dismisses lawsuit against seed company, board

A judge in Hawaii dismissed a lawsuit that sought an environmental review of the actions by a seed company operating on the island of Kauai.

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National & International

The Latest: Trump back on defensive over Russia meddling

President Donald Trump is back on the defensive over Russian election meddling and accusing Democrats of trying to sabotage U.S.-Russia relations.

National & International

Lawmakers seek review of Eversource’s response to wind storm

Two Connecticut senators want General Assembly to hold public forum on Eversource Energy’s response to October wind storm.

National & International

Report: Inspection found 13 defects on CSX track last year

A federal inspection in June of last year reportedly found 13 defects on CSX track in Bergen County, a route that has become a corridor for shipping crude oil and ethanol to refineries.

National & International

US Senate passes Veteran’s Administration bill by Oklahomans

A bill by Republican Sens. James Lankford and Jim Inhofe intended to address the care of military veterans in Veteran’s Administration hospitals has passed the U.S. Senate.

Technology

The Latest: Outside firm to look into harassment allegations

Minnesota’s House speaker says an outside firm will investigate allegations of sexual harassment by a lawmaker.


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Free Parking Comes at a Price, new business idea.#New #business #idea


The New York Times

Why Free Parking Comes at a Price

IN our society, cars receive considerable attention and study — whether the subject is buying and selling them, the traffic congestion they cause or the dangerous things we do in them, like texting and talking on cellphones while driving. But we haven’t devoted nearly enough thought to how cars are usually deployed — namely, by sitting in parking spaces.

Is this a serious economic issue? In fact, it’s a classic tale of how subsidies, use restrictions, and price controls can steer an economy in wrong directions. Car owners may not want to hear this, but we have way too much free parking.

Higher charges for parking spaces would limit our trips by car. That would cut emissions, alleviate congestion and, as a side effect, improve land use. Donald C. Shoup, professor of urban planning at the University of California, Los Angeles, has made this idea a cause, as presented in his 733-page book, “The High Cost of Free Parking.”

Many suburbanites take free parking for granted, whether it’s in the lot of a big-box store or at home in the driveway. Yet the presence of so many parking spaces is an artifact of regulation and serves as a powerful subsidy to cars and car trips. Legally mandated parking lowers the market price of parking spaces, often to zero. Zoning and development restrictions often require a large number of parking spaces attached to a store or a smaller number of spaces attached to a house or apartment block.

If developers were allowed to face directly the high land costs of providing so much parking, the number of spaces would be a result of a careful economic calculation rather than a matter of satisfying a legal requirement. Parking would be scarcer, and more likely to have a price — or a higher one than it does now — and people would be more careful about when and where they drove.

The subsidies are largely invisible to drivers who park their cars — and thus free or cheap parking spaces feel like natural outcomes of the market, or perhaps even an entitlement. Yet the law is allocating this land rather than letting market prices adjudicate whether we need more parking, and whether that parking should be free. We end up overusing land for cars — and overusing cars too. You don’t have to hate sprawl, or automobiles, to want to stop subsidizing that way of life.

As Professor Shoup wrote, “Minimum parking requirements act like a fertility drug for cars.”

Under a more sensible policy, a parking space that is currently free could cost at least $100 a month — and maybe much more — in many American cities and suburbs. At the bottom end of that estimate, if a commuter drives to work 20 days a month, current parking policy offers a subsidy of $5 a day — which is more than the gas and wear-and-tear costs of many round-trip commutes. In essence, the parking subsidy outweighs many of the other costs of driving, including the gasoline tax.

In densely populated cities like New York, people are accustomed to paying high prices for parking, which has helped to encourage a relatively efficient, high-density use of space. Yet even New York is reluctant to enact the full social cost of the automobile into policy. Proposals to impose congestion fees have failed politically, and on-street parking is priced artificially low.

Manhattan streets are full of cars cruising around, looking for cheaper on-street parking, rather than pulling into a lot. The waste includes drivers’ lost time and the costs of running those engines. By contrast, San Francisco has just instituted a pioneering program to connect parking meter prices to supply and demand, with prices being adjusted, over time, within a general range of 25 cents to $6 an hour.

Another common practice in many cities is to restrict on-street parking to residents or to short-term parkers by imposing a limit of, say, two hours for transients. That makes parking artificially easy for residents and for people who are running quick errands. Higher fees and permit prices would help shore up the ailing budgets of local governments.

Many parking spaces are extremely valuable, even if that’s not reflected in current market prices. In fact, Professor Shoup estimates that many American parking spaces have a higher economic value than the cars sitting in them. For instance, after including construction and land costs, he measures the value of a Los Angeles parking space at over $31,000 — much more than the worth of many cars, especially when considering their rapid depreciation. If we don’t give away cars, why give away parking spaces?

Yet 99 percent of all automobile trips in the United States end in a free parking space, rather than a parking space with a market price. In his book, Professor Shoup estimated that the value of the free-parking subsidy to cars was at least $127 billion in 2002, and possibly much more.

PERHAPS most important, if we’re going to wean ourselves away from excess use of fossil fuels, we need to remove current subsidies to energy-unfriendly ways of life. Imposing a cap-and-trade system or a direct carbon tax doesn’t seem politically acceptable right now. But we can start on alternative paths that may take us far.

Imposing higher fees for parking may make further changes more palatable by helping to promote higher residential density and support for mass transit.

As Professor Shoup puts it: “Who pays for free parking? Everyone but the motorist.”

Tyler Cowen is a professor of economics at George Mason University.


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