Tag: Harvard

Human Development and Psychology #harvard #university, #graduate #school #of #education, #programs, #education, #innovation, #teaching,

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Human Development and Psychology

In Human Development and Psychology, you will learn how to support healthy development across cultures and across the lifespan, and how to apply this knowledge in schools and other education-related settings.

Knowledge of human development is highly gratifying and valuable in itself; it can also greatly enhance your ability to make a meaningful difference in children’s lives. To run an effective afterschool program for adolescent urban youth, for example, teachers and mentors need to understand the specific challenges of adolescent development as well as cultural variations in child-adult relationships. To operate a successful business or organization, a good manager must work with employees to identify and break down psychological obstacles to change. And what about raising kids? Does our societal emphasis on “happiness” prevent parents and teachers from raising caring, courageous, and ethical children?

In the Human Development and Psychology (HDP) master’s program, you will work closely with an extraordinary faculty comprised of prominent voices in early childhood development, organizational psychology, emotional, cognitive and moral development, trauma and child advocacy, and much more. Students also have opportunities to do internships and research that will enable them to better integrate theory and practice and to become more effective teachers, leaders, researchers, and advocates.

Child Advocacy Strand

In addition to the general HDP Program, we offer a separate Child Advocacy strand that includes a year-long child advocacy internship. This strand is designed not only for students who want to work with individual children and families, but also those who want to influence systemic change on the institutional and policy levels. Interested students should apply directly to the Child Advocacy strand.

Faculty Director Rick Weissbourd on the HDP Program:

Message from the Director

The program in Human Development and Psychology has a long history at Harvard and is one of the core programs at the Graduate School of Education. We are passionate about understanding how people develop over time and what that means for schools and other educational settings. We also have a strong interest in the wide variety of contexts in which development occurs.

Researchers in HDP cover a wide range of ages and topics; from early language development, emotional, social and moral development, to the dramatic changes in cognitive skills in early elementary school, to studies of adolescent and adult development. Research focuses on schools in diverse locations and settings in the U.S. as well as development in international contexts. The program offers a variety of perspectives on the complicated nature of developmental change. We think you will find lots of challenging ideas, and we are always open to new perspectives that will challenge us to continue to develop our own thinking.

You will also find in the HDP program a strong commitment to research that is often applied and practical in its aims. We are proud of the ways in which HDP researchers have contributed to advances in understanding how children learn and grow, and we are proud of the courses we offer that help students acquire strong research skills and apply them to practice. Whether you hope to be able to produce research, wish to be a more informed consumer of educational research, or want to apply research and theory effectively to your practice settings, we think you will find HDP to be a richly gratifying program that helps you take the next step in your career.

We hope you will share in our excitement about the study of human development and psychology.

Richard Weissbourd
Director of Human Development and Psychology Program
Senior Lecturer

HDP is a one-year, full-time master s program that immerses future practitioners and researchers in the latest theories and discoveries related to child, adolescent, and adult development. Here are some of our program s greatest strengths:

Applied Research Effective research doesn t occur in a vacuum. As an HDP student, you will continually consider how research can strengthen practice.

Thought Leaders HDP is one of the longest-running programs at HGSE, recognized globally for the influential research and writing of our faculty, which includes Guggenheim Fellows, MacArthur Prize recipients, and award-winning authors. Our faculty member s expertise is matched only by their accessibility as student mentors and advocates.

Cohort Community In the HDP program, you will join an extraordinary cohort of students representing a rich diversity of personal and professional backgrounds. The energy, curiosity, and compassion of HDP students, and their common commitment to understanding the deepest puzzles of development, create an exhilarating learning environment that forms the basis of lifelong friendships and professional relationships.

The HDP curriculum balances structure and flexibility. Over two semesters, you are required to complete courses for a total of 32 credits. HDP courses cover subjects as varied as language and literacy development, educational neuroscience, prevention science and practice, early childhood education policy, assessment, gender and relationships, moral and civic development, and development across cultures.

General HDP Program Requirements

You will complete eight courses or 32 credits in the following categories:

One developmental psychology course, to be chosen from the following:

(May be used as additional HDP courses but cannot count twice.)

One research methods and data analysis course, to be chosen from the following:

Two Human Development and Psychology courses. These include any courses listed with an H in the course number (including AH or HT courses) or T440, T543, and T560:

One Human Development and Psycholgy course with a strong focus on diversity and equity. The following courses would meet this requirement:

Three elective courses either at HGSE or at Harvard or MIT through cross-registration .

Child Advocacy Strand Requirements

Students in the child advocacy strand work closely with strand director, Betsy Groves, to craft a study plan that reflects their individual backgrounds and goals.

You will complete eight courses (32 credits) in the following categories:

  • H387Y and H388Y. Fall Child Advocacy Seminar and Spring Internship
  • One research methods and data analysis course
  • One overview course related to child development/risk and protection
  • Two courses related to systems that impact children and families
  • Elective courses either at HGSE or through cross-registration

HDP Internships

The Cambridge/Boston area is a hub for innovative organizations doing important work in child development and advocacy. Recent HDP internship sites include:

Cross-Registration

The study of human development and psychology is interdisciplinary by nature and many HDP faculty members hold joint positions with other Harvard graduate schools. Like all HGSE students, you are free to cross-register at all Harvard graduate schools and even nearby MIT.

It s undeniable that many HDP students come to HGSE expressly for the chance to work closely with our remarkable faculty. Professor Howard Gardner is the father of the multiple intelligences theory and leads a research project into the nature and impact of good work. Program director Richard Weissbourd s book The Parents We Mean to Be was selected as one of The New Yorker s best nonfiction books of 2009. Professor Robert Kegan and his colleague Lisa Laskow Lahey revolutionized organizational psychology and personal development through their immunity to change approach. Learn more about the extraordinary wealth of knowledge and experience that s available to HDP students through our faculty.

The HDP program attracts accomplished and service-minded students from a broad range of backgrounds and professional interests. Many of our students have undergraduate degrees in psychology and are interested in pursuing clinical practice or research. Other HDP students come from the nonprofit sector, looking to deepen their impact as providers and advocates for children and adults. Still others are working in the education sector as teachers, administrators, and policy researchers. The diversity of student backgrounds is reflected in their research interests, which include the development of compassion and gratitude in children, the challenges faced by immigrant children and corporate leadership coaching.

HDP graduates are putting their Harvard degree and experience to work at all levels of the education sector — public and independent schools, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies — as well as pursuing careers in public health, social services, child advocacy, and social policy. HDP alumni are in a range of roles including kindergarten teachers, doctoral students in clinical psychology, public television producers, admissions directors, school-based child advocates, and education policy analysts.

Visit HGSE admissions to learn more about application requirements and deadlines, and to get important information about financial aid. Applications are due in January of the academic year you plan to enroll. Note that the Child Advocacy strand has its own application.

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The lowdown on glycemic index and glycemic load – Harvard Health #health, #information, #medical,

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The lowdown on glycemic index and glycemic load

If you have diabetes, you probably know you need to monitor your carbohydrate intake. But different carbohydrate-containing foods affect blood sugar differently, and these effects can be quantified by measures known as the glycemic index and glycemic load. You might even have been advised to use these numbers to help plan your diet. But what do these numbers really mean — and just how useful are they?

What these numbers measure

The glycemic index (GI) assigns a numeric score to a food based on how drastically it makes your blood sugar rise. Foods are ranked on a scale of 0 to 100, with pure glucose (sugar) given a value of 100. The lower a food’s glycemic index, the slower blood sugar rises after eating that food. In general, the more cooked or processed a food is, the higher its GI, and the more fiber or fat in a food, the lower its GI.

But the glycemic index tells just part of the story. What it doesn’t tell you is how high your blood sugar could go when you actually eat the food. To understand a food’s complete effect on blood sugar, you need to know both how quickly it makes glucose enter the bloodstream and how much glucose it can deliver. A separate measure called the glycemic load does both — which gives you a more accurate picture of a food’s real-life impact on your blood sugar. Watermelon, for example, has a high glycemic index (80). But a serving of watermelon has so little carbohydrate that its glycemic load is only 5.

Should you eat a low-GI diet?

Some nutrition experts believe that people with diabetes should pay attention to both the glycemic index and glycemic load to avoid sudden spikes in blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association, on the other hand, says that the total amount of carbohydrate in a food, rather than its glycemic index or load, is a stronger predictor of what will happen to blood sugar. And some dietitians also feel that focusing on the glycemic index and load adds an unneeded layer of complexity to choosing what to eat.

The bottom line? Following the principles of low-glycemic-index eating is likely to be beneficial for people with diabetes. But reaching and staying at a healthy weight is more important for your blood sugar and your overall health.

If you’d like to give low-glycemic-index eating a try, click here to see our table of the glycemic index and load for over 100 common foods.

And for more information on how to live well — and eat well — with type 2 diabetes, buy Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes. a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.

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Doctoral Programs #harvard #university, #graduate #school #of #education, #education, #innovation, #teaching, #learning

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Doctoral Programs

Join a world-class community of scholars and education leaders exploring new frontiers in learning and teaching.

Doctoral study at Harvard means full immersion in one of the world’s most dynamic and influential intellectual communities. At the Harvard Graduate School of Education, two distinct doctoral programs leverage the extraordinary interdisciplinary strengths of the entire University. The Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) prepares experienced educators for system-level leadership roles in school districts, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and beyond; and the Doctor of Philosophy in Education (Ph.D.) empowers cutting-edge interdisciplinary research informed by the cognitive sciences, economics, medicine, the humanities, and more.

Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.)

The Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed.L.D) is a three-year, practice-based program designed to produce system-level leaders in American pre-K-12 education. The Ed.L.D. curriculum mines the vast intellectual and professional resources of HGSE, the Harvard Business School. and the Harvard Kennedy School. and includes a 10-month residency in the third year.

Doctor of Philosophy in Education (Ph.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy in Education (Ph.D.). offered jointly with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. provides unrestricted access to faculty and resources at all Harvard graduate and professional schools. This five-year Ph.D. is ideal for conducting groundbreaking interdisciplinary research that directly informs and impacts education practice and policy.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Please note: The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) enrolled its final cohort in Fall 2013 but continues to equip graduates with the knowledge and skills to have a broad impact in the worlds of policy and practice.

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree prepares education scholars and leaders for the 21st century. The program provides rigorous research training that equips graduates with the knowledge and skills to have broad impact in the worlds of policy and practice. Working with premier faculty in the field, students conduct cutting-edge research that addresses the most pressing problems in education. Graduates often assume roles as university faculty, senior-level educational leaders, policymakers, and researchers.

Research-Based Doctoral Degrees at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

In the fall of 2014, HGSE transitioned from conferring a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) to conferring a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Education. The Ph.D. in Education, a joint degree offered in collaboration with Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, replaced the Ed.D. degree to better signal the research emphasis that has characterized the program since its inception in 1921, and to strengthen ties with academic departments across Harvard University.

Graduates of the Ed.D. and Ph.D. in Education programs receive equally rigorous scholarly training. The requirements for both degrees include coursework that develops both knowledge that reflects the interdisciplinary nature of education and expertise in the range of quantitative and qualitative methods needed to conduct high-quality research. Guided by the goal of having a transformative impact on education research, policy, and practice, our graduates focus their independent research in various domains, including human development, learning and teaching, policy analysis and evaluation, institutions and society, and instructional practice. Graduates of both programs have and will assume roles as university faculty, researchers, senior-level education leaders, and policymakers.





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Harvard Business Publishing’s Success Story #business #name #generator

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SalesForce

Harvard Business Publishing

Harvard Business Publishing personalizes client relationships with Salesforce

Today s organizations want more than just one-size-fits-all training products. They want innovative, customized solutions that address their unique needs and help drive results. To meet client demands in this changing world, Harvard Business Publishing, which creates leadership development solutions for global companies, re-envisioned its entire model for engaging with clients. With help from Salesforce, the company is partnering more closely with customers so they can work together to develop the most effective leadership solutions.

A non-profit subsidiary of Harvard University, Harvard Business Publishing leverages the management insight, thought leadership, and expertise of Harvard Business School faculty and Harvard Business Review authors to provide solutions that are relevant to today s most pressing business challenges. Harvard Business Publishing Corporate Learning works extensively with Global 2000 companies to help them design and deliver learning solutions to build their global leadership capabilities.

Until four years ago, the company used a traditional product-sales oriented model, where two or three people from the company engaged with each client, and typically focused on selling one product. Individual teams operated independently and stored their data in multiple Excel spreadsheets, which usually weren t shared with other employees. The company s relationships with its clients were primarily transactional.

Managers realized that the value their clients expected the organization to provide went beyond the company s products. Harvard Business Publishing envisioned a new client-engagement model it would partner with customers to help them diagnose business challenges and craft leadership development solutions tailored to their specific needs. This required a cultural and behavioral shift across the entire organization. Everyone needed fast and transparent access to client data and the ability to work collaboratively with other employees.

According to Nick Clayton, Senior Director of Global Sales, We chose Salesforce because it was very flexible and easy to customize. That was very important to us to ensure that this became our CRM, and had our language and processes.

A collaborative approach

The company integrated client information, knowledge, tools, and engagement processes in Salesforce. It s easier for the field team to share information and collaborate, and approach clients consistently. And, the company can bring more pertinent information to the table faster, with greater confidence. Holly Fasano, Senior Strategic Relationship Manager, says, Salesforce lets us best represent our brand, and gives clients a sense of comfort and trust that we understand their business well.

Ian Fanton, VP Global Sales at Harvard Business Publishing, says, We need to be innovating faster and faster to provide more impactful solutions to our clients. One way we can do that is through the broadening use of this tool. Salesforce lets Harvard Business Publishing instantly share information across globally distributed client teams, making sure everyone has the latest information and accelerating time to impact with customers.





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Harvard Business School – s bricks-and-clicks spending spree #business #card #designer

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Harvard Business School s bricks-and-clicks spending spree

The inventor of the MBA is investing heavily to track changes to the global economy

Champion of the two-year course: Harvard Business School dean Nitin Nohria

As dean of Harvard Business School, part of Nitin Nohria’s job is to mythologise its vast campus. The inauguration last month of yet another new building offered a perfect marketing opportunity.

“One way in which one can understand the evolution of business is to just walk through HBS and see the names of the buildings,” Prof Nohria declared in a video to mark the occasion, alluding to facilities named after the likes of bankers John Pierpont Morgan, Andrew Mellon and George Fisher Baker, a father of Citigroup.

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IN Business Education

The new building, a base for executive-level courses named the Ruth Mulan Chu Chao Center, does indeed constitute a milestone for HBS by commemorating the rise of China. It was funded with $40m from James Si-Cheng Chao, a Chinese-American businessman, and named after his late wife. It is the first building at HBS to bear the name of a woman — appropriately, as four of Mr Chao’s six daughters went to HBS — or that of an Asian-American.

Tellingly, the temporary structure that housed the dining hall for visiting executives during construction was so plush and solid that it would not have looked out of place as a permanent fixture on less-endowed campuses.

The Chao Center is just one of the more visible manifestations of the heavy spending currently under way at HBS — some arising from donations, some from its own resources — as it tries to adjust to the changing global economy.

The outlay can be tracked in the un­usually detailed annual accounts that the school produces. Its 2015 fiscal year report showed its costs had on average increased faster than sales over the previous five years, dragging down its operating profit margin from 9.6 per cent to 6.6 per cent.

Although reversing this trend is a long-term priority for HBS, margins were expected to come under further pressure this decade as strategic spending continues to ramp up.

Investment in the MBA course that Harvard created more than a century ago accounts for part of the spending increase. While other business schools have diverted resources into one-year courses, such as the Masters in Management qualification aimed at recent graduates, HBS has remained wedded to the two-year MBA course catering for those with a few years of career experience.

The “core and soul of the school”, is how Prof Nohria describes the MBA in an interview with the Financial Times. “In the last five years we have been very determined to double down in some ways on the MBA,” he says.

Business Education

Global MBA ranking 2016

Insead’s MBA becomes the first one-year programme to reach the number one spot

“Many of the investments we have made, they have been investments to strengthen and make even more compelling why you should spend two years in an MBA programme.”

One of those investments has been into a curriculum innovation it calls “Field Immersion Experiences for Leadership Development”, or “Field”, to use the inevitable acronym. This is designed to complement the more abstract discussion of case studies in the classroom. A typical project might involve travelling to China to research the market for personal computers on behalf of Intel.

Not all are convinced that it equates to real experience, however. Henry Mintzberg, a McGill University management professor, is a long-time critic of MBAs and the case method, which he sees as too theoretical. He characterises the Field innovation as “young know-nothings shooting off their mouths about things they don’t understand”.

The stubborn focus on a two-year course has its risks in a world where workers often struggle to make time for even short courses. But the Harvard MBA, which each year sucks in 900 students and levies a $64,000 annual tuition fee, is still an attractive calling card for those seeking to run the world’s biggest companies. In the past month alone, Nestlé and US industrial conglomerate Honeywell have opted to be led by HBS alumni, for instance.

In spite of its huge resources the venerable institution has not yet been able to develop a reputation for fostering entrepreneurship that is equal to its lustre in the traditional corridors of corporate power.

A round-up of free online business and management courses currently offered on Mooc platforms

An FT 2016 ranking of the best MBA programmes for entrepreneurship placed HBS in 13th position, for instance, whereas Stanford Graduate School of Business — with its strong links to Silicon Valley — came top.

Overall, HBS has this year’s second-highest FT-ranked MBA in the world, having come top in 2015 and 2014.

Harvard still has an entrepreneurial ace to play. This spring, the broader university won final approval to construct a new building next to the business school that will house the bulk of its school of engineering and applied sciences — a clear sign of desire to foster more partnerships between techies and MBAs.

Amid all the physical construction work and architects’ plans, there is another destination for HBS spending that could prove to be more significant than yet another building.

It has also been pouring money — the sum is confidential — into an online learning platform called HBX that targets different markets from its usual MBA and executive education offerings.

Launched a year ago, the product is very different from the Moocs — or massive open online courses — produced in vast quantities, often for free, by educational providers in recent years, with variable success.

There is the cost, for a start: a hefty $1,800 for HBX’s 12-week primer on the fundamentals of business thinking. say. There is an element of social learning, with students incentivised to answer each other’s questions. And the platform also contains a digital version of one of the scariest conventions of the Harvard MBA classroom — the “cold call”, where a professor randomly chooses a student to start the debate.

“HBX is a huge bet that we are making what will end up being a deeply important strand of our education,” says Prof Nohria. But HBS expects it will take time for the project to practise what it preaches — and make a profit.

Nitin Nohria: A political pragmatist

Born in India, Nitin Nohria is the first Harvard Business School dean from outside North America. After his appointment in 2010, he also became the first head of the school since the 1970s to live in the dean’s house on campus, giving him a prime view of all the building work.

His links to the world beyond the Charles River include a non-executive directorship at Tata Sons, the Indian holding company. Ratan Tata. its former chairman, attended the HBS Advanced Management Program in 1975, and bankrolled a glass-and-brick building at the school for other executive education clients four decades later.

Prof Nohria describes himself as a pragmatist about politics, saying that he has not been tempted to take a high-profile stance against the economic populism and hostility to globalisation that has characterised much of the US election campaign so far.

On the controversial issue of Donald Trump. a graduate of rival business school Wharton, Prof Nohria says it is important to differentiate between what a candidate says on the campaign trail and what they might do if elected president. “Campaigns make you recognise that there are checks and balances in our political system that will be an important counterweight to the rhetoric of any political candidate.”

And he feels that the mood is not in danger of creating the kind of backlash against leading business schools seen after the financial crisis, although he acknowledges that inequality is a serious issue for capitalism to confront.

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Harvard Business School Press Restrictions #business #emails

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Important Restrictions to the Use of Harvard Business School and Harvard Business Publishing in Courses

Harvard Business School, and Harvard Business Publishing, including Harvard Business Review materials (articles, cases, chapters, etc.) can no longer be assigned as course material. Students will need to purchase articles through MBS Direct.

Due to publisher’s restrictions, faculty/directors cannot assign articles from Harvard Business Review, Harvard Management Update and Harvard Management Communication (found in the Business Source Complete database), as well as anything published by Harvard Business School or Harvard Business Publishing, to students as course material. Faculty cannot request articles from these publications via eReserves. Faculty/directors can sign up for a free Harvard Business Publishing for Educators account to review ways to make materials available for the students to purchase.

As of August 1, 2013, Harvard Business Review became “read only” for 500 of the most popular Harvard Business Review articles. These articles may not be saved (downloaded) or printed due to the publisher’s restrictions.

This does not apply to the Harvard Business School Faculty Seminar Series videos found in the Business Source Complete database.

Visit Ask a Librarian for assistance locating similar materials from alternate publications.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can students still use Harvard Business School Press articles in their own research and cite them in their papers and coursework?
Yes. This use of Harvard Business School Press articles in Business Source Complete is allowed by the publisher. However, 500 of the articles may not be saved (downloaded) or printed due to the publisher’s restrictions. There is not a list of which 500 articles are affected and the only way to determine this is to access the article via the database.

Can I direct students to find an assigned Harvard Business School Press article themselves in Business Source Complete? Isn’t this ok if I am not making a link to the article?
No. Even though Harvard Business School Press articles may remain available in Business Source Complete, they can no longer be used as course reading in any way per the publisher’s restrictions, regardless of how students are directed to the material.

Can I request a Harvard Business School Press article to be placed in eReserves?
No. You may sign up for a free Harvard Business Publishing for Educators account to review ways to make materials available for the students to purchase. You might consider alternative articles and publications that can be placed in eReserves. UMUC librarians are glad to assist you with locating similar materials from other publications that can be assigned to students as required readings; visit Ask a Librarian .

Does this change affect Harvard Business School Cases?
No. Harvard Business School Cases can still be requested for students to purchase through MBS by making a request through your academic director or program director.

Note: There is a section of Harvard Business Review called “HBR Case Study,” which features a fictional scenario followed by commentary from industry experts. Because these articles are part of the publication Harvard Business Review, they cannot be assigned as course material per the publisher’s restrictions.

Are there other options?
UMUC librarians will be glad to assist you with the process of searching for and choosing similar materials from other publications that can be assigned to students as required readings; visit Ask a Librarian .

Note: We can assist you with the search process. However as the instructor and subject expert, it is up to you to choose which resources are best for your courses and particular instructional needs.

Are any other journals affected?
No. At this time, Harvard Business School Press journals are the only journals restricted by the publisher in this way.

Other questions?
If you have additional questions, please contact Information and Library services via Ask a Librarian .





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30 Can – t miss Harvard Business Review articles on Data Science, Big Data

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KDnuggets

30 Can t miss Harvard Business Review articles on Data Science, Big Data and Analytics

Here are 30 Harvard Business Review (HBR) articles on big data, data science and analytics that provide insights about the latest technology and happenings in the world of data.

There are dozens of HBR articles that are worth recommending, but here are our picks on big data, data science and analytics collected using most popular and next recommended article filters based on search term.


Full Disclosure. You can view 5 articles per month without the need to sign up and upto 15 articles can be accessed after sign up. KDnuggets derives no form of benefit if you subscribe to HBR.

On Data Science

  1. Data Scientist: the sexiest job of the 21st centuryby Thomas H. Davenport and D.J. Patil (Oct 2012)
    How the idea of LinkedIn’s People You May Know feature really clicked! The key player involved was a “Data Scientist”, a title coined by the two authors.
  2. The Sexiest Job of the 21st Century is Tedious, and that Needs to Changeby Sean Kandel (Apr 2014)
    Which phase does a data scientist spend more time on? Data Discovery, data structuring and creating context. Should they shift their focus?
  3. What Every Manager Should Know About Machine Learningby Mike Yeomans (July 2015)
    With the right mix of technical skill human judgment, machine learning could be a new tool for decision makers. Learn what mistakes to avoid.
  4. Data Scientists Don’t Scaleby Stuart Frankel (May 2015)
    We are at a new phase of big data. Is Data capture and storage now less relevant than making it more useful impactful?
  5. Get the Right Data Scientists Asking the “Wrong” Questionsby Josh Sullivan (Mar 2014)
    What makes an exceptional data scientist? Data by itself is meaningless. The skill curiosity is what makes the difference.
  6. A Data Scientist’s Real Job: Storytellingby Jeff Bladt and Bob Filbin (Mar 2013)
    How to derive insights intuitions from data? We “humanize” the data by turning raw numbers into a story about our performance.
  7. What Separates a Good Data Scientist from a Great Oneby Thomas C. Redman (Jan 2013)
    Better than the Best! Great data scientists bring four mutually reinforcing traits to bear that even the good ones can’t.
  8. Still the Sexiest Profession Aliveby DJ Patil (Nov 2013)
    Data scientist jobs are very much in demand as companies grapple with the challenge of making valuable discoveries from Big Data. Is a huge crowd just joining the bandwagon?
  9. 10 Kinds of Stories to Tell with Databy Tom Davenport (Nov 2013)
    Narrative is—along with visual analytics—an important way to communicate analytical results to non-analytical people. Explore the 10 types.
  10. How to Start Thinking Like a Data Scientistby Thomas C. Redman (Nov 2013)
    You don’t have to be a data scientist or a Bayesian statistician to tease useful insights from data. The author demonstrates how to think with a small exercise.
  11. Stop Searching for That Elusive Data Scientistby Michael Schrage(Sep 2014)
    Stop hunting for that data science unicorn and/or silver bullet. What to do instead?
  12. How to Explore Cause and Effect Like a Data Scientistby Thomas C. Redman (Feb 2014)
    While we can use data to understand correlation, the more fundamental understanding of cause and effect requires more.

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  7. Data Science for Beginners: Fantastic Introductory Video Series from Microsoft
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Harvard Business Publishing Company Overview #start #a #business

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Harvard Business Publishing Company Overview

Harvard Business Publishing (HBP) was founded in 1994 as a not-for-profit, wholly-owned subsidiary of Harvard University, reporting into Harvard Business School. Our mission is to improve the practice of management in a changing world. This mission influences how we approach what we do here and what we believe is important.

With approximately 350 employees, primarily based in Boston, with offices in New York City, India, and the United Kingdom, Harvard Business Publishing serves as a bridge between academia and enterprises around the globe through its publications and multiple platforms for content delivery, and its reach into three markets: academic, corporate, and individual managers. Harvard Business Publishing has a conventional governance structure comprising a Board of Directors. an internal Executive Committee. and Business Unit Directors.

The three market groups: Higher Education, Corporate Learning, and Harvard Business Review Group, produce a variety of media including print and digital (Harvard Business Review, Harvard Business Review Press Books, Harvard Business School Cases, Brief Cases, blogs), events (Participant-Centered Learning Seminars, Custom Events, Webinars), and online learning (Harvard ManageMentor, Leadership Direct, Online Courses, Simulations). Through these publishing platforms, Harvard Business Publishing is able to influence real-world change by maximizing the reach and impact of its essential offering—ideas. Read our corporate brochure to learn more about our business.

Higher Education
Business educators worldwide use course materials from the Higher Education group to add dynamic, real-life perspectives to undergraduate, MBA, and executive education programs. We also offer resources and seminars that support participant-centered learning, the cornerstone of a teaching practice that stimulates students’ thinking and prepares them for future managerial decision-making. The Higher Education web site expedites course planning and direct delivery of materials to students — including cases, articles, online simulations and courses.

Corporate Learning
Harvard Business Publishing Corporate Learning partners with clients to create world-class leadership development solutions for managers at all levels in global organizations and governments. We leverage the management insight, thought leadership, and expertise of Harvard Business School faculty and Harvard Business Review authors to provide solutions that are relevant to today’s most pressing business challenges. For more than 20 years, we have developed and delivered innovative, technology-enabled solutions that drive meaningful business results.

Harvard Business Review Group
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Harvard Business School – s bricks-and-clicks spending spree #what #business #to #start

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Harvard Business School s bricks-and-clicks spending spree

The inventor of the MBA is investing heavily to track changes to the global economy

Champion of the two-year course: Harvard Business School dean Nitin Nohria

As dean of Harvard Business School, part of Nitin Nohria’s job is to mythologise its vast campus. The inauguration last month of yet another new building offered a perfect marketing opportunity.

“One way in which one can understand the evolution of business is to just walk through HBS and see the names of the buildings,” Prof Nohria declared in a video to mark the occasion, alluding to facilities named after the likes of bankers John Pierpont Morgan, Andrew Mellon and George Fisher Baker, a father of Citigroup.

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The new building, a base for executive-level courses named the Ruth Mulan Chu Chao Center, does indeed constitute a milestone for HBS by commemorating the rise of China. It was funded with $40m from James Si-Cheng Chao, a Chinese-American businessman, and named after his late wife. It is the first building at HBS to bear the name of a woman — appropriately, as four of Mr Chao’s six daughters went to HBS — or that of an Asian-American.

Tellingly, the temporary structure that housed the dining hall for visiting executives during construction was so plush and solid that it would not have looked out of place as a permanent fixture on less-endowed campuses.

The Chao Center is just one of the more visible manifestations of the heavy spending currently under way at HBS — some arising from donations, some from its own resources — as it tries to adjust to the changing global economy.

The outlay can be tracked in the un­usually detailed annual accounts that the school produces. Its 2015 fiscal year report showed its costs had on average increased faster than sales over the previous five years, dragging down its operating profit margin from 9.6 per cent to 6.6 per cent.

Although reversing this trend is a long-term priority for HBS, margins were expected to come under further pressure this decade as strategic spending continues to ramp up.

Investment in the MBA course that Harvard created more than a century ago accounts for part of the spending increase. While other business schools have diverted resources into one-year courses, such as the Masters in Management qualification aimed at recent graduates, HBS has remained wedded to the two-year MBA course catering for those with a few years of career experience.

The “core and soul of the school”, is how Prof Nohria describes the MBA in an interview with the Financial Times. “In the last five years we have been very determined to double down in some ways on the MBA,” he says.

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“Many of the investments we have made, they have been investments to strengthen and make even more compelling why you should spend two years in an MBA programme.”

One of those investments has been into a curriculum innovation it calls “Field Immersion Experiences for Leadership Development”, or “Field”, to use the inevitable acronym. This is designed to complement the more abstract discussion of case studies in the classroom. A typical project might involve travelling to China to research the market for personal computers on behalf of Intel.

Not all are convinced that it equates to real experience, however. Henry Mintzberg, a McGill University management professor, is a long-time critic of MBAs and the case method, which he sees as too theoretical. He characterises the Field innovation as “young know-nothings shooting off their mouths about things they don’t understand”.

The stubborn focus on a two-year course has its risks in a world where workers often struggle to make time for even short courses. But the Harvard MBA, which each year sucks in 900 students and levies a $64,000 annual tuition fee, is still an attractive calling card for those seeking to run the world’s biggest companies. In the past month alone, Nestlé and US industrial conglomerate Honeywell have opted to be led by HBS alumni, for instance.

In spite of its huge resources the venerable institution has not yet been able to develop a reputation for fostering entrepreneurship that is equal to its lustre in the traditional corridors of corporate power.

A round-up of free online business and management courses currently offered on Mooc platforms

An FT 2016 ranking of the best MBA programmes for entrepreneurship placed HBS in 13th position, for instance, whereas Stanford Graduate School of Business — with its strong links to Silicon Valley — came top.

Overall, HBS has this year’s second-highest FT-ranked MBA in the world, having come top in 2015 and 2014.

Harvard still has an entrepreneurial ace to play. This spring, the broader university won final approval to construct a new building next to the business school that will house the bulk of its school of engineering and applied sciences — a clear sign of desire to foster more partnerships between techies and MBAs.

Amid all the physical construction work and architects’ plans, there is another destination for HBS spending that could prove to be more significant than yet another building.

It has also been pouring money — the sum is confidential — into an online learning platform called HBX that targets different markets from its usual MBA and executive education offerings.

Launched a year ago, the product is very different from the Moocs — or massive open online courses — produced in vast quantities, often for free, by educational providers in recent years, with variable success.

There is the cost, for a start: a hefty $1,800 for HBX’s 12-week primer on the fundamentals of business thinking. say. There is an element of social learning, with students incentivised to answer each other’s questions. And the platform also contains a digital version of one of the scariest conventions of the Harvard MBA classroom — the “cold call”, where a professor randomly chooses a student to start the debate.

“HBX is a huge bet that we are making what will end up being a deeply important strand of our education,” says Prof Nohria. But HBS expects it will take time for the project to practise what it preaches — and make a profit.

Nitin Nohria: A political pragmatist

Born in India, Nitin Nohria is the first Harvard Business School dean from outside North America. After his appointment in 2010, he also became the first head of the school since the 1970s to live in the dean’s house on campus, giving him a prime view of all the building work.

His links to the world beyond the Charles River include a non-executive directorship at Tata Sons, the Indian holding company. Ratan Tata. its former chairman, attended the HBS Advanced Management Program in 1975, and bankrolled a glass-and-brick building at the school for other executive education clients four decades later.

Prof Nohria describes himself as a pragmatist about politics, saying that he has not been tempted to take a high-profile stance against the economic populism and hostility to globalisation that has characterised much of the US election campaign so far.

On the controversial issue of Donald Trump. a graduate of rival business school Wharton, Prof Nohria says it is important to differentiate between what a candidate says on the campaign trail and what they might do if elected president. “Campaigns make you recognise that there are checks and balances in our political system that will be an important counterweight to the rhetoric of any political candidate.”

And he feels that the mood is not in danger of creating the kind of backlash against leading business schools seen after the financial crisis, although he acknowledges that inequality is a serious issue for capitalism to confront.

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LBS at Harvard Business School – Lauder Business School #business #consultant

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LBS at Harvard Business School

LBS Faculty Members Participate at the MOC Faculty Meeting Under the Auspices of Harvard University Professor Michael E. Porter

Professor Michael E. Porter, one of the world’s leading business scholars, welcomed LBS as a ‘rookie’ to the Microeconomics of Competitiveness (MOC) affiliate network. The MOC network includes more than 100 major business schools from 65 countries across the globe. Based at Professor Porter’s Institute of Strategy Competitiveness at Harvard Business School, the network promotes scholarship, research and capacity building on some of the key concepts of Michael Porter’s groundbreaking scholarship: strategy, competitiveness of firms and nations, economic prosperity, and the significance of clusters.

LBS master students will see immediate benefit from the school’s participation in the MOC network. Every IML and BFC student will explore the impactful ideas of MOC, in courses taught by experienced MOC scholars and LBS faculty members Professor Pablo Collazzo and Professor Christopher Kummer. These intense courses are designed on the highly engaging case teaching method developed at Harvard Business School.

LBS furthermore envisages to set up an Institute for Competitiveness on the school’s premises to bring together international experts and local decision-makers from the business and public sector.

In December 2014 LBS faculty members as well as Head of International Relations Professor Elisabeth Kübler take part in the annual MOC faculty meeting at Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts. The meeting encompasses inspiring lectures by Professor Porter and global leaders who put the idea of competitiveness into business and policy practice.





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