Tag: guides

Harvard Business Publishing – Business Information Guide – Subject Guides at Syracuse University Libraries

#harvard business publishing

#

Business Information Guide

PDF of step-by-step instructions on how to find HBR articles and case studies in Business Source Elite.

Significant reporting and analysis of management topics appear in the periodical Harvard Business Review . Syracuse University Libraries offers affiliated students, staff, and faculty full-text access to HBR articles and case studies online via the database Business Source Elite (which indexes HBR content back to 1922, with full-text article coverage from 1985 thru present).

Instructions for finding Harvard Business Review Articles Case Studies in Business Source Elite

NOTE: The case studies in HBR are short (around four pages each) and should not be confused with the premium Harvard Business Publishing case studies noted on this page under Harvard Case Studies.

Harvard Business Review 500
At the request of Harvard Business Publishing, EBSCO has made 500 of the most popular Harvard Business Review articles read only by disabling the printing, saving, and persistent linking functionality for these articles in Business Source Elite. All Business Source Elite subscribers (including SU Libraries) were offered the option to restore this basic functionality by paying an additional annual premium fee. When Syracuse University Libraries requested a quote from EBSCO to restore full access to the 500 HBR articles, we were presented with a significant five figure amount. SU Libraries is disinclined to pursue the option to restore full access to the HBR 500 by paying this premium. Not only is the price per article exorbitant, but more importantly, agreeing to such a fee in order to restore access to content for which we have already paid. could set a terrible precedent.

What matters and what we wish to emphasize is that, if HBP s new model catches on, having to essentially pay twice (or multiple times) for the same online content will erode the Libraries ability to provide other resources to the SU research community. In short, it s a zero-sum game when it comes to Libraries acquisitions that support research, and this development further adds to the costs of supporting scholarship. In declining to license with HBP under the proffered terms, the SU Libraries goal is to protect our ability to support research at SU to our utmost. While that may sound contradictory, at least in the short-term, in the long-term it most assuredly is not. To learn more about this, please see the blog post titled SU Libraries Stance on Restricted HBR Articles .

Harvard Business Review in Print

Print editions of the Harvard Business Review from 1922 to the present are available in Syracuse University Libraries’ print collection.

Harvard Case Studies

Harvard Business Publishing case studies cover all areas of management, business planning, marketing, accounting, finance, organizational behavior, entrepreneurship and more. The case studies range from 10 to 30 pages in length and often include an author provided guide, called a teaching note, on how to teach the case in the classroom.

These case studies should not be confused with the short case studies published in the Harvard Business Review and available in full text via SU Libraries’ database Business Source Elite.

Access to the Harvard Business Publishing case studies requires individual purchase of cases, including purchase of copyright permission in situations where multiple copies are desired. Harvard does not offer institutional subscriptions that permit an academic library to subscribe to these case studies.

  • Students and faculty visiting the HBP site can freely search and browse topics to identify case studies of interest
  • Access to the full-text case study PDFs requires individual purchase (often priced between $5 and $10 per case)
  • Options for student access to cases selected by faculty are available under a coursepack style access model (in some instances, students enrolled in such courses can receive purchase discounts on cases their faculty identify)
  • S.U. faculty interested in access (for themselves or their students) should explore detailed information about applying for Harvard Business Publishing’s Case Study “Educator Access”

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Best Travel Sites – World Best Travel Sites #best #travel #sites, #top #travel #guides,

#

National Geographic Cruise GuideGO – tips on choosing and organizing a cruise.

Cruise ProfessionalsGO luxury cruises from some of the world’s best luxury cruiselines.

Seven Seas CruisesGO customize a personalized luxury vacation.

Great Holidays.net
– GO – independent UK travel site drawing on 300+ tour operators.

Cruise WebGO take a cruise to some of the most beautiful destinations in the world – book online with most major cruiselines.

Cruise DirectGO independent UK travel agency with an eye on luxury travel.

Cruising.OrgGO Cruise Line International Association – tips on planning your cruise, cruise finder, cruise news.

The GhanGO take a luxury train trip through the heart of Australia.

Working Holidays

Top Destinations

IbizaGO – take a holiday in paradise chill out to the enchanting sounds from Cafe Del Mar.

New Zealand
GO see the pristine beauty of the coastline visit the celestial landscapes of Lord of the Rings territory.

BaliGO the beautiful island of Bali is back in business delighting surfers, sunseekers tourists with economy holidays friendly people – more Bali info.

Best EcoTourism Sites

Travel Tools

Babelfish Language Translator– GO international language translation service from Alta Vista.

Luxury Motorhomes

Adventure Holidays

Quality training solutions


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Advantages and Disadvantages of Advanced Technology #teen #ink, #teenink, #teen #website, #teen #writing, #teen

#

Advantages and Disadvantages of Advanced Technology

By Jin Sun K. Wellesley, MA

Today, we can’t imagine ourselves without technological advances such as cars, microwaves, cell phones, computers, and televisions. However, technology won’t stop here, but develop further. As technology develops, there are not only advantages, but disadvantages from them. A few advantages of upgraded technology are that one can save time and money and life will be made easier as a result of not having to do all the hard labor. In contrast, the disadvantages of upgraded technology are that people will loose their jobs to machines that will do the work for them. In addition, machines and robots are too complex for most people to use.

I personally would want a developed world with advanced technologies. The following are the reasons why I do want a more advanced world with advanced technologies. My major reason is because when you have advanced technologies, life is much easier as robots and machines would take over your daily life chores. For example, daily life chores might be serving your breakfast, cutting your lawn, or cleaning your room. With robots and machines doing one’s chores one has time to relax. Another reason is because unlike humans, robots and machines do not make mistakes when programmed correctly. They always accomplish tasks perfectly so you won’t have to worry about making a mistake and getting trouble.

Other reasons why I want advanced technologies are because they save a great deal of time and money. For example, if you are a wealthy man who always had trouble employing talented maids, you can buy a cleaning robot and use it for the rest of your life. Therefore, you won’t have to use all your time employing talented maids. Also, you will save a lot of money from not having to pay servants. Another example of benefits from advanced technology is that if there are new, developed vehicles that will transport people to anywhere rapidly, so that one would not need to spend all those boring, long hours in an airplane to try to get to another country, which will save much time not only on long travels but also on daily commutes.

As there are so many advantages from highly developed technology, there also is a great deal of disadvantages from them. One disadvantage is that as technology develops, robots and machines will take over many jobs and people will loose their jobs by contrast. As people loose their jobs, they will have hard time getting money which would make it hard for them to continue to meet living expenses. Moreover, as people use less money the economy would be difficult to control and especially if it is a country as large as the United States, the problem will influence the world greatly.

Another disadvantage of highly developed technology is that machines and robots are complex. It is hard to activate all the machines you have unless you can multitask. Think about it, if most people have trouble on computers and almost all of us don’t know the actual limit of computers’ abilities, how will us, normal people, work with all the robots and machines? Moreover, just like computers, robots and machines will easily break and most time you won’t know how to fix them and one will have to call someone to fix them. People will loose their temper over this and it will create a large expense to repair them.

Even as there are as many advantages ad disadvantages of technology, I personally wish a more advanced world with great technologies. It would be so cool to work out all the complicated machines and robots. Don’t you think it will be awesome to press just a few complicated buttons than do the labor yourself? In the future it would be more about using your brain and being intelligent than doing the hard labor yourself. I hope these days come within my lifetime.

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Yes. It’s true that technology is very useful to us but not to the point of being dependent on it. It may help us make our work easier and more efficient but it will also make us lazy. We will never know the essence of hardwork and manpower because we think technology can do all the works.

Robert said.
Mar. 16, 2016 at 3:58 am

I went to school with Kaylie when I was in 7th grade (Providence K-8). Me and her dated for 4 months. We still talked a lot everyday. I was tried to talk to her the day she left us but as I found out I was 15 minutes to late. I beat myself up saying things could ve been different if I would have messaged her sooner . She is in a better place making god laugh now. I miss her, but I will see her again one day. She was such a great, happy, beautiful person.

monster-man said.
Feb. 3, 2011 at 9:34 am

i honestly think that people can survive without all this technoligybut people just dont think so imean if you out to a camp then your likely to bring some kind of technoligy, and if you do ittl probably be your ipod or something and if you have app and stuff that you use all the time on it then all you will be doing is staying in your trailer or tent or something and not even go outside and that is not camping to me, and robots do ing all of our chores it sounds good and all but what. (more )

Padfoot replied.
Mar. 17, 2015 at 12:00 pm

did you know there is a kind of punctuation called a period? It ends a sentence. It looks like this.

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Start a new business – Industry start-up guides – Cleaning Services – Small Business

#cleaning business

#

Cleaning Services

What is involved in running a cleaning services business?

Cleaning service business operators provide a wide range of domestic and commercial cleaning services. This may include working in homes, businesses, schools, shopping centres, public spaces and other buildings and facilities.

As a cleaner, your role will involve the following activities and tasks:

  • cleaning and sanitising kitchen areas
  • cleaning and sanitising bathrooms and toilets
  • vacuuming and cleaning carpets
  • cleaning upholstery and drapery
  • mopping, polishing and waxing floors
  • dusting high and low surfaces
  • swimming pool maintenance
  • making beds and changing bed linen
  • performing home duties such as loading dishwashers, doing laundry and ironing
  • polishing furniture and fittings
  • cleaning windows, mirrors and light fixtures
  • cleaning corridors and entrance ways, stairs, lifts and foyers
  • emptying rubbish bins
  • moving furniture
  • r eporting faulty plumbing or other problems

Running a cleaning services business will also involve some tasks in addition to cleaning duties, such as finding new clients, managing your existing client accounts, creating invoices and completing some bookkeeping tasks. You will also need to maintain your equipment and manage your inventory and supplies.

Do I need any qualifications, licences or permits to work as a cleaner?

It is possible to work within the personal and home services industry as a cleaner without formal qualifications; however, there are various courses that can assist in developing customer service skills and personal and home services industry knowledge, such as a Certificate III in Cleaning Operations. For further information about undertaking an accredited course, please contact your nearest TAFE or Registered Training Organisation.

You should also check the relevant business licensing authority in your state and see if you are required to obtain any permits and/or licences prior to setting up your cleaning business.

You need to be aware that there may be some licensing and registration regulations in your state that govern water use for business, and storing bulk cleaning chemicals. As a business owner, you are responsible for the handling, labelling and storage of hazardous chemicals used in your business. If you plan to discharge trade waste into the sewerage system, you may need to check with your local council to see if a permit is required.

What facilities and equipment will I need to run my business?

Generally, cleaners don t need an office space or other facilities. As long as you have the essentials such as access to a mobile phone, fax, computer and internet access you should be able to effectively operate your business. It is important to ensure that it is easy for potential clients to contact you for quotes and enquiries.

A cleaning business will need to have a vehicle in order to provide a mobile service for the transportation of the required equipment (vacuum cleaner, mop and bucket, etc.). Reliable transport is very important for cleaners who are travelling outside their local areas. A vehicle such as a mini-van is useful for this type of business as it has the necessary storage space.

Depending on the type of services you plan to include, some of the equipment you may require include;

  • back pack vacuum cleaners
  • window squeegee
  • cleaning chemicals (for windows, tables, and tiles, etc.)
  • blade scrapers
  • safety equipment such as uniforms, goggles, boots and gloves etc.
  • garbage bags
  • cloths
  • dusters
  • polishing pads

What about the costs and how much can I charge?

Often new cleaning businesses will utilise their own equipment from home, and then purchase professional gear as they build the business. This makes for a smaller initial outlay and less financial risk if the business is slow to get going at the beginning.

If your start up capital permits, look at buying cleaning chemicals in bulk and try to get concentrates as this will save you a significant amount in the long run. Remember to keep in mind the storage requirements and regulations that might apply to bulk chemical purchases.

A cleaning business normally charges by the hour. Some may require a service to be undertaken for a minimum number of hours, e.g. minimum charge two hours. This means clients pay for two hours for any service equal to or under two hours, and extra payment is required on a hourly base for any time over two hours. Alternatively, some businesses charge by the size of facility to be serviced, e.g. number of rooms.

Customer service is crucial to the success of your business. If you are taking on domestic cleaning jobs you need to be mindful that are you entering a client s home, which is their personal space. You need to be dressed appropriately, not only to do your job but so that you look professional and presentable. You need to have good communication skills and know how to deal with customer complaints and dissatisfaction. A cleaning business heavily relies on word of mouth for advertising and reputation, so you must ensure that every customer is satisfied with the product or level of service you are providing.

Do I need insurance?

Before you start taking on any jobs, make sure you have adequate insurance coverage in place for damage and liability. Things may happen unexpectedly while on the job and you need to be in a position where you are sufficiently covered for any accidents or claims against you and your business. You also need to check your insurer s policy to see if they will cover you for both domestic and commercial cleaning or if you have to pay an additional premium to be insured for commercial jobs.

What if I want to employ staff or use contractors?

If you plan on employing staff for your business, you will need to be aware and up to date on issues such as:

  • Awards
  • Pay rates and allowances
  • Annual leave calculations
  • National employment standards
  • Industrial relations news

Where can I find more help and assistance?

Below is a list of industry associations that can further assist you in starting up a cleaning business and providing industry specific information:

The first step is to talk to your local business advisor about starting up your new venture. You can also call the Small Business Support Line on 1800 777 275 for more information.


Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

Start a new business – Industry start-up guides – Cleaning Services – Small Business

#cleaning business

#

Cleaning Services

What is involved in running a cleaning services business?

Cleaning service business operators provide a wide range of domestic and commercial cleaning services. This may include working in homes, businesses, schools, shopping centres, public spaces and other buildings and facilities.

As a cleaner, your role will involve the following activities and tasks:

  • cleaning and sanitising kitchen areas
  • cleaning and sanitising bathrooms and toilets
  • vacuuming and cleaning carpets
  • cleaning upholstery and drapery
  • mopping, polishing and waxing floors
  • dusting high and low surfaces
  • swimming pool maintenance
  • making beds and changing bed linen
  • performing home duties such as loading dishwashers, doing laundry and ironing
  • polishing furniture and fittings
  • cleaning windows, mirrors and light fixtures
  • cleaning corridors and entrance ways, stairs, lifts and foyers
  • emptying rubbish bins
  • moving furniture
  • r eporting faulty plumbing or other problems

Running a cleaning services business will also involve some tasks in addition to cleaning duties, such as finding new clients, managing your existing client accounts, creating invoices and completing some bookkeeping tasks. You will also need to maintain your equipment and manage your inventory and supplies.

Do I need any qualifications, licences or permits to work as a cleaner?

It is possible to work within the personal and home services industry as a cleaner without formal qualifications; however, there are various courses that can assist in developing customer service skills and personal and home services industry knowledge, such as a Certificate III in Cleaning Operations. For further information about undertaking an accredited course, please contact your nearest TAFE or Registered Training Organisation.

You should also check the relevant business licensing authority in your state and see if you are required to obtain any permits and/or licences prior to setting up your cleaning business.

You need to be aware that there may be some licensing and registration regulations in your state that govern water use for business, and storing bulk cleaning chemicals. As a business owner, you are responsible for the handling, labelling and storage of hazardous chemicals used in your business. If you plan to discharge trade waste into the sewerage system, you may need to check with your local council to see if a permit is required.

What facilities and equipment will I need to run my business?

Generally, cleaners don t need an office space or other facilities. As long as you have the essentials such as access to a mobile phone, fax, computer and internet access you should be able to effectively operate your business. It is important to ensure that it is easy for potential clients to contact you for quotes and enquiries.

A cleaning business will need to have a vehicle in order to provide a mobile service for the transportation of the required equipment (vacuum cleaner, mop and bucket, etc.). Reliable transport is very important for cleaners who are travelling outside their local areas. A vehicle such as a mini-van is useful for this type of business as it has the necessary storage space.

Depending on the type of services you plan to include, some of the equipment you may require include;

  • back pack vacuum cleaners
  • window squeegee
  • cleaning chemicals (for windows, tables, and tiles, etc.)
  • blade scrapers
  • safety equipment such as uniforms, goggles, boots and gloves etc.
  • garbage bags
  • cloths
  • dusters
  • polishing pads

What about the costs and how much can I charge?

Often new cleaning businesses will utilise their own equipment from home, and then purchase professional gear as they build the business. This makes for a smaller initial outlay and less financial risk if the business is slow to get going at the beginning.

If your start up capital permits, look at buying cleaning chemicals in bulk and try to get concentrates as this will save you a significant amount in the long run. Remember to keep in mind the storage requirements and regulations that might apply to bulk chemical purchases.

A cleaning business normally charges by the hour. Some may require a service to be undertaken for a minimum number of hours, e.g. minimum charge two hours. This means clients pay for two hours for any service equal to or under two hours, and extra payment is required on a hourly base for any time over two hours. Alternatively, some businesses charge by the size of facility to be serviced, e.g. number of rooms.

Customer service is crucial to the success of your business. If you are taking on domestic cleaning jobs you need to be mindful that are you entering a client s home, which is their personal space. You need to be dressed appropriately, not only to do your job but so that you look professional and presentable. You need to have good communication skills and know how to deal with customer complaints and dissatisfaction. A cleaning business heavily relies on word of mouth for advertising and reputation, so you must ensure that every customer is satisfied with the product or level of service you are providing.

Do I need insurance?

Before you start taking on any jobs, make sure you have adequate insurance coverage in place for damage and liability. Things may happen unexpectedly while on the job and you need to be in a position where you are sufficiently covered for any accidents or claims against you and your business. You also need to check your insurer s policy to see if they will cover you for both domestic and commercial cleaning or if you have to pay an additional premium to be insured for commercial jobs.

What if I want to employ staff or use contractors?

If you plan on employing staff for your business, you will need to be aware and up to date on issues such as:

  • Awards
  • Pay rates and allowances
  • Annual leave calculations
  • National employment standards
  • Industrial relations news

Where can I find more help and assistance?

Below is a list of industry associations that can further assist you in starting up a cleaning business and providing industry specific information:

The first step is to talk to your local business advisor about starting up your new venture. You can also call the Small Business Support Line on 1800 777 275 for more information.


Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

Primary Database List – WCL Business Database List – Guides at Texas A &

#business database

#

WCL Business Database List Tags: accounting. business. company research. database. economics. finance. human resource development. industry. industry research. information management. law. management. marketing. news. newspapers. operations management. patent. reference. trademark. wcl

Market Research Reports

Searchable database of consumer products from around the world

  • RKMA Market Research Handbooks

    – Business-to-Business Marketing 2014/15
    – Casinos,Gaming & Wagering 2010-2013
    – Consumer Behavior 2010-2015/2016
    – Consumer Marketing 2010, 2014/15
    – Entertainment, Media & Advertising 2011-2015/16
    – Healthcare Business 2010-2015/16
    – International Consumer Markets 2014/15
    – Leisure Markets 2010/11-2015/16
    – Restaurant, Food & Beverage Market 2010-2014/15
    – Retail Business 2010-2015/16
    – Sports Marketing 2011-2014/15
    – Travel & Tourism Market 2010-2015/16

    National Consumer Survey Database

    Data of recreational, collegiate, and professional sports

    Advertising media information

  • Warc

    Marketing case studies, advertising data, and consumer information


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,
  • Primary Database List – WCL Business Database List – Guides at Texas A &

    #business database

    #

    WCL Business Database List Tags: accounting. business. company research. database. economics. finance. human resource development. industry. industry research. information management. law. management. marketing. news. newspapers. operations management. patent. reference. trademark. wcl

    Market Research Reports

    Searchable database of consumer products from around the world

  • RKMA Market Research Handbooks

    – Business-to-Business Marketing 2014/15
    – Casinos,Gaming & Wagering 2010-2013
    – Consumer Behavior 2010-2015/2016
    – Consumer Marketing 2010, 2014/15
    – Entertainment, Media & Advertising 2011-2015/16
    – Healthcare Business 2010-2015/16
    – International Consumer Markets 2014/15
    – Leisure Markets 2010/11-2015/16
    – Restaurant, Food & Beverage Market 2010-2014/15
    – Retail Business 2010-2015/16
    – Sports Marketing 2011-2014/15
    – Travel & Tourism Market 2010-2015/16

    National Consumer Survey Database

    Data of recreational, collegiate, and professional sports

    Advertising media information

  • Warc

    Marketing case studies, advertising data, and consumer information


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,
  • Primary Database List – WCL Business Database List – Guides at Texas A &

    #business database

    #

    WCL Business Database List Tags: accounting. business. company research. database. economics. finance. human resource development. industry. industry research. information management. law. management. marketing. news. newspapers. operations management. patent. reference. trademark. wcl

    Market Research Reports

    Searchable database of consumer products from around the world

  • RKMA Market Research Handbooks

    – Business-to-Business Marketing 2014/15
    – Casinos,Gaming & Wagering 2010-2013
    – Consumer Behavior 2010-2015/2016
    – Consumer Marketing 2010, 2014/15
    – Entertainment, Media & Advertising 2011-2015/16
    – Healthcare Business 2010-2015/16
    – International Consumer Markets 2014/15
    – Leisure Markets 2010/11-2015/16
    – Restaurant, Food & Beverage Market 2010-2014/15
    – Retail Business 2010-2015/16
    – Sports Marketing 2011-2014/15
    – Travel & Tourism Market 2010-2015/16

    National Consumer Survey Database

    Data of recreational, collegiate, and professional sports

    Advertising media information

  • Warc

    Marketing case studies, advertising data, and consumer information


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,
  • Start a new business – Industry start-up guides – Cleaning Services – Small Business

    #cleaning business

    #

    Cleaning Services

    What is involved in running a cleaning services business?

    Cleaning service business operators provide a wide range of domestic and commercial cleaning services. This may include working in homes, businesses, schools, shopping centres, public spaces and other buildings and facilities.

    As a cleaner, your role will involve the following activities and tasks:

    • cleaning and sanitising kitchen areas
    • cleaning and sanitising bathrooms and toilets
    • vacuuming and cleaning carpets
    • cleaning upholstery and drapery
    • mopping, polishing and waxing floors
    • dusting high and low surfaces
    • swimming pool maintenance
    • making beds and changing bed linen
    • performing home duties such as loading dishwashers, doing laundry and ironing
    • polishing furniture and fittings
    • cleaning windows, mirrors and light fixtures
    • cleaning corridors and entrance ways, stairs, lifts and foyers
    • emptying rubbish bins
    • moving furniture
    • r eporting faulty plumbing or other problems

    Running a cleaning services business will also involve some tasks in addition to cleaning duties, such as finding new clients, managing your existing client accounts, creating invoices and completing some bookkeeping tasks. You will also need to maintain your equipment and manage your inventory and supplies.

    Do I need any qualifications, licences or permits to work as a cleaner?

    It is possible to work within the personal and home services industry as a cleaner without formal qualifications; however, there are various courses that can assist in developing customer service skills and personal and home services industry knowledge, such as a Certificate III in Cleaning Operations. For further information about undertaking an accredited course, please contact your nearest TAFE or Registered Training Organisation.

    You should also check the relevant business licensing authority in your state and see if you are required to obtain any permits and/or licences prior to setting up your cleaning business.

    You need to be aware that there may be some licensing and registration regulations in your state that govern water use for business, and storing bulk cleaning chemicals. As a business owner, you are responsible for the handling, labelling and storage of hazardous chemicals used in your business. If you plan to discharge trade waste into the sewerage system, you may need to check with your local council to see if a permit is required.

    What facilities and equipment will I need to run my business?

    Generally, cleaners don t need an office space or other facilities. As long as you have the essentials such as access to a mobile phone, fax, computer and internet access you should be able to effectively operate your business. It is important to ensure that it is easy for potential clients to contact you for quotes and enquiries.

    A cleaning business will need to have a vehicle in order to provide a mobile service for the transportation of the required equipment (vacuum cleaner, mop and bucket, etc.). Reliable transport is very important for cleaners who are travelling outside their local areas. A vehicle such as a mini-van is useful for this type of business as it has the necessary storage space.

    Depending on the type of services you plan to include, some of the equipment you may require include;

    • back pack vacuum cleaners
    • window squeegee
    • cleaning chemicals (for windows, tables, and tiles, etc.)
    • blade scrapers
    • safety equipment such as uniforms, goggles, boots and gloves etc.
    • garbage bags
    • cloths
    • dusters
    • polishing pads

    What about the costs and how much can I charge?

    Often new cleaning businesses will utilise their own equipment from home, and then purchase professional gear as they build the business. This makes for a smaller initial outlay and less financial risk if the business is slow to get going at the beginning.

    If your start up capital permits, look at buying cleaning chemicals in bulk and try to get concentrates as this will save you a significant amount in the long run. Remember to keep in mind the storage requirements and regulations that might apply to bulk chemical purchases.

    A cleaning business normally charges by the hour. Some may require a service to be undertaken for a minimum number of hours, e.g. minimum charge two hours. This means clients pay for two hours for any service equal to or under two hours, and extra payment is required on a hourly base for any time over two hours. Alternatively, some businesses charge by the size of facility to be serviced, e.g. number of rooms.

    Customer service is crucial to the success of your business. If you are taking on domestic cleaning jobs you need to be mindful that are you entering a client s home, which is their personal space. You need to be dressed appropriately, not only to do your job but so that you look professional and presentable. You need to have good communication skills and know how to deal with customer complaints and dissatisfaction. A cleaning business heavily relies on word of mouth for advertising and reputation, so you must ensure that every customer is satisfied with the product or level of service you are providing.

    Do I need insurance?

    Before you start taking on any jobs, make sure you have adequate insurance coverage in place for damage and liability. Things may happen unexpectedly while on the job and you need to be in a position where you are sufficiently covered for any accidents or claims against you and your business. You also need to check your insurer s policy to see if they will cover you for both domestic and commercial cleaning or if you have to pay an additional premium to be insured for commercial jobs.

    What if I want to employ staff or use contractors?

    If you plan on employing staff for your business, you will need to be aware and up to date on issues such as:

    • Awards
    • Pay rates and allowances
    • Annual leave calculations
    • National employment standards
    • Industrial relations news

    Where can I find more help and assistance?

    Below is a list of industry associations that can further assist you in starting up a cleaning business and providing industry specific information:

    The first step is to talk to your local business advisor about starting up your new venture. You can also call the Small Business Support Line on 1800 777 275 for more information.


    Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Start a new business – Industry start-up guides – Gardening and Lawn Mowing –

    #lawn mowing business

    #

    Gardening and Lawn Mowing

    What is involved in running a gardening or lawn mowing business?

    Starting up and running a garden and lawn care business is a popular option for many people who want to work for themselves. Although it can require a lot of hard work, there are many opportunities available and the costs to start and run the business are relatively low.

    The typical tasks you will be doing when working in a lawn mowing or gardening business include;

    • mowing
    • brush cutting
    • fertilising lawns and gardens
    • weed control and removal
    • sweeping and blowing pathways
    • raking, pruning and planting
    • watering lawns and gardens
    • re-potting plants,
    • mulching
    • clearing rubbish
    • hedge trimming.

    You will also need to carry out general business administration tasks such as generating invoices, managing inventory and equipment and submitting your tax reporting documentation.

    Will I need any special qualifications or skills?

    You do not need any specific qualifications to operate a garden and lawn care business. However, you may benefit from completing a general qualification that will help you learn how to run a business, such as the Certificate III in Micro Business Operations. Many of the skills you will need will be developed on the job, so it might also help to work for someone else in this industry prior to starting up your own venture.

    Are there any licences or permits that apply to this type of business?

    Before starting a gardening or lawn care business, you need to check the relevant business licensing authority in your state and see if you are required to obtain any permits and/or licences prior to setting up your business.

    The Australian Business Licence and Information Service (ABLIS) is a free online service that will help you find the right local, state and Australian government licences, permits, registrations and other support services that you need to operate a business.

    What type of equipment will I need?

    Most lawn mowers and gardeners operate as fully mobile businesses, so you will probably just need a home office and a suitable vehicle to get started. Start up businesses will often utilise their own home equipment and then purchase professional gear when the business gets going.

    Depending on the type of services that you plan to provide, some of the required equipment includes;

    • lawnmower and edger
    • hedge trimmer
    • chainsaw
    • blower
    • weed control sprayer and chemicals
    • fertiliser
    • hose and accessories
    • personal protection equipment (gloves, boots, glasses, etc).

    Do I need insurance?

    When operating a gardening or lawn mowing business, you will be travelling to different locations and working on other people s properties. It is important to ensure you have the right insurance protection in place to cover you for accidents, damages or injuries that occur on the job. You will want to cover your business for any claims made against it, as well as have cover in place for you, your equipment and your vehicle. It is best to talk to a leading business insurance provider about your needs and how to protect your business.

    What about employing people in the business?

    If you plan on employing staff for your business, you will need to be aware and up to date on issues such as:

    • Awards
    • Pay rates and allowances
    • Annual leave calculations
    • National employment standards
    • Industrial relations news

    For more information about employing people, visit Fair Work Ombudsman .

    Where can I go for further help and assistance?

    Below are some links to help you research and plan the startup and operational requirements of running a lawn mowing and gardening business:

    You can talk to your local small business advisor for more in depth help with setting up your garden and lawn care business. You can also contact the Small Business Support Line on 1800 777 275 for more information.


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