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Business Checking Fees: A Beginner’s Guide #own #business #ideas

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Business Checking Fees: A Beginner’s Guide

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Business checking accounts differ markedly from personal checking, and the fees can be far more complicated. But if you understand the basics of business checking fees, your company might be able to minimize or avoid them altogether.

Here’s a look at three of the most common fees.

Monthly service fee

What it is: A charge that occurs each month the account is open.

How much it is: The nation s largest banks typically charge $8 to $12 a month.

You can also select a business bank account at a bank where you meet the average balance requirement to waive the monthly fee. A typical bank requires an average daily balance of about $1,500 to avoid this charge. Some banks will also waive the fee if you meet other conditions, such as making a minimum number of debit or credit card card purchases each month.

Excess transaction fee

What it is: A fee for each transaction you make over a monthly maximum.

How much it is: At the 10 largest banks, fees range up to 75 cents per transaction.

How to avoid it: Come up with a ballpark number of transactions your small business will make each month. These include checks you write, debit card transactions and ATM deposits. Then look for a bank account that allows that number of transactions without charging extra fees.

Most of the top 10 U.S. banks by deposits have a 200-transaction limit on their basic business checking accounts before fees are charged. At banks that offer business checking accounts with no monthly fee, the transaction limit tends to be lower, often around 100.

Cash handling fee

What it is: You can deposit only a certain amount of cash at many banks. After that, you’ll be charged a fee to process all those bills and coins.

How much it is: Usually about 20 cents to 30 cents for each $100 you deposit above the cash handling limit.

How can I avoid it? Estimate how much cash you’ll deposit each month. Then choose a checking account with a higher cash handling limit.

You ll have an easier time avoiding fees if your small business doesn t have a ton of cash transactions. But if you do handle a lot of cash — you own a restaurant or a convenience store, for example — you could lower your costs by shopping around.

Say you own a deli and expect to deposit about $10,500 in cash each month:

  • Option 1: Bank A allows up to $7,500 in cash deposits a month and charges 30 cents for every additional $100 you deposit during a statement period. You re $3,000 over the cash deposit limit. Since you’re charged 30 cents for each $100, you’d multiply 30 cents by 30. Your cash handling fee would be $9 for the statement period.
  • Option 2: Bank B allows $5,000 in cash deposits and charges 25 cents for every additional $100 you deposit during its statement cycle. You have $5,500 in excess cash deposits. Since you’re charged 25 cents for each $100, you’d multiply 25 cents by 55. That’s a cash handling fee of $13.75 for the statement cycle.

Reducing your business checking fees can be an easy way to help your company cut costs. To learn more, check out NerdWallet’s small business checking primer .

This article was updated June 28, 2016.

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Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and guide #business #logo

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Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and guide

FREE DOWNLOAD:

SearchDisasterRecovery’s business continuity template

For many professionals, these steps present a formidable challenge. To make the process easier, people seek out alternatives, such as software, templates, checklists, or consultants. While each of these options can build a plan and its associated program elements, too often these tools are used to get something done quickly. Typically, the process involves some data gathering and interviewing, followed by a fill-in-the-blanks process that somehow magically creates a finished product.

SearchDisasterRecovery.com has created a free downloadable business continuity template to assist you in your business continuity planning. Download and print out our template, and then read the step-by-step guide below to create a successful business continuity plan .

A GUIDE TO USING OUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

Here’s a look a the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  • Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan, so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  • Revision management: Have a page that reflects your change management process.
  • Purpose and scope (Sections 1.1 through 1.6): Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  • How to use the plan (Sections 1.7.1 through 1.7.4): Provide information on circumstances under which the plan will be activated, including outage time frames, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted on this situation.
  • Provide policy information (Section 1.7.5): this is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  • Emergency response and management (Section 1.7.6): Specify situations in which the plan is to be activated and response procedures.
  • Use step-by-step procedures (Sections 1.7.7 through 1.7.10): These are easier to follow than broad general statements such as relocate to alternate building that require considerable details to work properly.
  • Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom (Section 1.8).
  • Assuming a situation has occurred, Section 2 provides steps to take to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  • Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as needed with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  • Section 3 addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company management.
  • Section 4 provides detailed instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  • Detailed appendices are provided in Section 5; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations. and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.
  • Additional forms can be found in Appendix 5.7; these should be developed in advance, validated by exercising (as is the entire plan) and kept in a ready-to-use format.

GENERAL BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING TIPS

Here’s a checklist of things to keep in mind during business continuity planning:

  • Take the process seriously. If you want to protect your business from unplanned events that could disrupt operations, create a plan. It doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate.
  • Use disaster recovery/business continuity standards as a starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use:
    1. NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard)
    2. BSI BS 25999 (the British standard)
    3. FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors)
    4. DRII/DRJ Generally Accepted Principles (GAP)
  • Keep it simple. Less can definitely be more in this situation, unless the user is primarily a technology-based group, such as IT.
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions. Assuming you are creating a plan to respond to specific incidents, include only the information needed for the response and subsequent recovery.
  • Make it happen. Once the business continuity plan is complete, exercise it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all department and/or locations in your organization; consider other templates, software or consultants.

The keys to a creating a successful business continuity plan are to define step-by-step procedures for response and recovery, validate these activities through periodic exercising, and maintain the plan and its various components up to date.

More business continuity template resources

About this author:
Paul F. Kirvan, FBCI, CBCP, CISSP, has more than 20 years experience in business continuity management as a consultant, author and educator. He is also secretary of the Business Continuity Institute USA Chapter.

This was first published in April 2009





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Social Media for Business: 2016 Marketer’s Guide #start #a #business #ideas

#business networking sites

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Social Media for Business: 2016 Marketer’s Guide

Credit: Gonzalo Aragon/Shutterstock

Social media networks are fantastic resources for businesses of all sizes looking to promote their brands online. The platforms themselves are free to use, and they also have paid advertising options specifically for brands that want to reach even more new audiences. But just because your business should be on social media, that doesn t mean your business should be on every network. It s important that you choose and nurture the social platforms that work best for your business so that you don t spread yourself too thin.

If you want to create a successful social strategy, you need to familiarize yourself with how each network runs, the kinds of audiences you can reach and how your business can best use each platform. We profiled the top social media platforms so you can learn more about them and market your business better.

Facebook

Facebook is the biggest social network on the Web, both in terms of name recognition and the total number of users. With more than 1.55 billion active users, Facebook is a great medium for connecting people from all over the world with your business. And Facebook is not only the biggest network, but it s arguably the most versatile one. In the 12 years since it launched, Facebook grew from a simple website where college students could keep in touch into a multifaceted Web and mobile social platform where anyone can connect with not just their friends and family, but also with celebrities, organizations, businesses and more, thanks to the Pages feature.

Considering that Facebook has a wealth of options for any type of organization, it s a great starting point for your business, regardless of your industry. You can use it to share photos, videos, important company updates and more. Additionally, Facebook can be more low-maintenance than other social networks whether you post several updates a day or only a few a week won t make much of a difference in terms of what your fans will think of you. To find out more about Facebook for business, check out our guide .

Editor s Note: Looking for information on social media marketing for your business? Use the questionnaire below, and our vendor partner will contact you to provide you with the information you need:

Twitter

Twitter is another social network where you can post mostly anything. With Twitter, you can share short (140 or fewer characters) text updates, along with videos, images, links, polls and more. You can also easily interact with other users by mentioning their usernames in your posts, so Twitter is a great way to quickly connect with people all around the world. (The platform has more than 320 million active users worldwide and is one of the top 10 websites in the United States.) Because of its wide reach, Twitter is not only a great way to market your business but also an effective channel for handling customer service. For example, if you maintain an active Twitter presence, customers who are also active on the platform will seek you out to express concerns or share their praise.

If you have interesting content, Twitter is also a great tool for quickly spreading the word. Retweeting and sharing other users content is incredibly simple, hashtags help boost posts, and if a user with a lot of followers retweets you, your content has the potential to go viral. But with Twitter, it s important to remember to find balance don t simply share your own links or media; make sure you are also sharing a lot of interesting, relevant content from other Twitter users and from around the Web so your audience doesn t think you only care about what your business is doing. Check out our guide to learn more about using Twitter for business .

Pinterest

This platform consists of digital bulletin boards where users can save and display content they like in the form of pins. Users create and organize their boards by category. So, for example, as a personal user, one might have a board dedicated to food, where they pin recipes; another board dedicated to photography they find interesting; and so on. Pinterest is very visually oriented (every post has to be an image or video), and like Facebook, it is also fairly low-maintenance in terms of post frequency. However, keeping your boards organized and search-friendly can be time-consuming.

Pinterest is also more of a niche network than Facebook or Twitter, so it may not work for everyone. Pinterest s users are primarily women, and popular categories on the site are DIY projects, fashion, exercise, beauty, photography and food. That s not to say that businesses outside of these categories can t succeed on the platform, but it does make it a great marketing tool for businesses that do work in those areas. If you can find ways to connect your content to Pinterest s audience, then go for it. The platform also has a series of special types of pins called Rich Pins, which brands can use to add special information to their pins, like product details and even location maps. There are plenty of cool ways to use this platform to your advantage, and you can read more about them in our Pinterest for Business Guide .

Instagram

Instagram, like Pinterest, is a visual social media platform based entirely on photo and video posts. The network, which Facebook owns, has more than 400 million active users, many of whom post about food, art, travel, fashion and similar subjects. Instagram is distinguished by its unique filters and photo and video editing options. This platform, unlike the others, is almost entirely mobile (there is a Web version, but you can t take photos or create new posts on it, and other functions are limited as well).

Instagram is another platform where more artistic niches excel, so again, it may not be the best fit for your business, depending on your industry. If you want to succeed with Instagram, it s important that the person running your account has a good eye for detail and has at least basic photography skills, so that the photos and videos posted to your account are high-quality. And don t be discouraged if your industry is underrepresented on Instagram; if you can find the right hashtags to latch onto and can post intriguing photos, you will most likely make it work. To find out more about using Instagram for business, read our guide.

Tumblr

Tumblr is arguably the most difficult social media platform to use as a business, but it s also one of the most interesting networks. Tumblr allows several different post formats including text posts, chat posts, quote posts, audio posts, photo posts and video posts so you re not limited as to what kind of content you can share. As with Twitter, reblogging (reposting other users content) is very quick and easy, so if a user with a lot of followers shares your content, it s possible to go viral fairly quickly. However, what sets Tumblr apart more than anything is its audience, which is less like a pool of users and more like one big tight-knit community full of smaller subcommunities.

Tumblr currently hosts more than 200 million blogs, and the majority of these blogs are run by young people (half of Tumblr s visitor base is under age 25). But this means that businesses that don t cater to young people s interests or aren t relatable to young people in some way are not poised for success on the network. The good news is, there s a subcommunity or fandom for almost every niche and interest you can think of, so a successful marketing campaign is possible if you use Tumblr correctly. You can learn more about the Tumblr community and how to use Tumblr for business in our guide.

Editor s Note: Looking for information on social media marketing for your business? Use the questionnaire below, and our vendor partner will contact you to provide you with the information you need:





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Top 10 UK Universities for Business – Management Studies 2017 – Complete University Guide #local #business #directory

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Top 10 UK Universities for Business Management Studies 2017

The Complete University Guide’s 2017 subject league tables rank institutions by Entry Standards, Student Satisfaction, Research Quality, Research Intensity and Graduate Prospects.

A degree in a Business Management Studies course has a number of benefits and it’s easy to see why prospective students choose this route. Heart set on business but at a loose end? Our countdown of the top 10 universities for Business Management Studies may help:

10. University College London

2016 marked UCL ‘s first appearance in the Business Management Studies top 10, and this year has seen them continue that stellar form. Just look at its Graduate Prospects score – a whopping 81%. UCL School of Management offers some of the most up to date programmes out there, incorporating learning activities and industrial experiences to develop commercial competencies.





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Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and guide #business #analyst #jobs

#business continuity plan

#

Using a business continuity plan template: A free business continuity template and guide

FREE DOWNLOAD:

SearchDisasterRecovery’s business continuity template

For many professionals, these steps present a formidable challenge. To make the process easier, people seek out alternatives, such as software, templates, checklists, or consultants. While each of these options can build a plan and its associated program elements, too often these tools are used to get something done quickly. Typically, the process involves some data gathering and interviewing, followed by a fill-in-the-blanks process that somehow magically creates a finished product.

SearchDisasterRecovery.com has created a free downloadable business continuity template to assist you in your business continuity planning. Download and print out our template, and then read the step-by-step guide below to create a successful business continuity plan .

A GUIDE TO USING OUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY TEMPLATE

Here’s a look a the structure and content of the template, indicating key issues to address and activities to perform.

  • Initial data: If you have identified various people to contact in an incident, locate their contact information at the front of the plan, so you won’t have to waste valuable seconds paging through a lengthy document.
  • Revision management: Have a page that reflects your change management process.
  • Purpose and scope (Sections 1.1 through 1.6): Provide details on these attributes, as well as assumptions, team descriptions, a list of terms, and other background information.
  • How to use the plan (Sections 1.7.1 through 1.7.4): Provide information on circumstances under which the plan will be activated, including outage time frames, who declares a disaster, and who should be contacted on this situation.
  • Provide policy information (Section 1.7.5): this is a good place to use standards documents as references.
  • Emergency response and management (Section 1.7.6): Specify situations in which the plan is to be activated and response procedures.
  • Use step-by-step procedures (Sections 1.7.7 through 1.7.10): These are easier to follow than broad general statements such as relocate to alternate building that require considerable details to work properly.
  • Describe how often the plan is to be reviewed and updated, and by whom (Section 1.8).
  • Assuming a situation has occurred, Section 2 provides steps to take to address it; these can be in the form of checklists (useful to keep track of scheduled and completed tasks) and flow diagrams that provide a high-level view of response and recovery.
  • Information needs to be gathered before officially declaring a disaster; this includes damage assessment data and first-hand reports from staff and first responders; convene meetings as needed with key emergency team members to evaluate the facts before proceeding to a declaration.
  • Section 3 addresses actions to take when it becomes obvious that management needs to declare a disaster. A damage assessment can be initiated either before or after the declaration; it is up to company management.
  • Section 4 provides detailed instructions on recovering operations, relocating to an alternate site and related activities.
  • Detailed appendices are provided in Section 5; these include lists and contact details on all emergency teams, primary and alternate vendors, alternate work space locations. and other relevant information. It is very important to keep this information up to date.
  • Additional forms can be found in Appendix 5.7; these should be developed in advance, validated by exercising (as is the entire plan) and kept in a ready-to-use format.

GENERAL BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING TIPS

Here’s a checklist of things to keep in mind during business continuity planning:

  • Take the process seriously. If you want to protect your business from unplanned events that could disrupt operations, create a plan. It doesn’t have to be hundreds of pages long. It just needs the right information, and that information should be current and accurate.
  • Use disaster recovery/business continuity standards as a starting point. Almost two dozen business continuity standards are available worldwide. In the U.S. several options are currently in use:
    1. NFPA 1600 (the current U.S. national standard)
    2. BSI BS 25999 (the British standard)
    3. FFIEC Business Continuity Handbook (used by the banking and finance sectors)
    4. DRII/DRJ Generally Accepted Principles (GAP)
  • Keep it simple. Less can definitely be more in this situation, unless the user is primarily a technology-based group, such as IT.
  • Limit content to actual disaster response actions. Assuming you are creating a plan to respond to specific incidents, include only the information needed for the response and subsequent recovery.
  • Make it happen. Once the business continuity plan is complete, exercise it to ensure that the documented procedures make sense in the sequence indicated.
  • Be flexible. A single template may not be universally applicable to all department and/or locations in your organization; consider other templates, software or consultants.

The keys to a creating a successful business continuity plan are to define step-by-step procedures for response and recovery, validate these activities through periodic exercising, and maintain the plan and its various components up to date.

More business continuity template resources

About this author:
Paul F. Kirvan, FBCI, CBCP, CISSP, has more than 20 years experience in business continuity management as a consultant, author and educator. He is also secretary of the Business Continuity Institute USA Chapter.

This was first published in April 2009





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Guide to Majors in Business Management #sample #business #plan

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Guide to Majors in Business Management

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Business management is a versatile field that offers opportunities for individuals with a variety of interests and skills. Talented business managers are in demand and may remain so as the global business environment becomes more complex.

If you get along well with people, have an interest in business and technology, and have excellent communication skills, you could be a good fit for a career in this field. The ability to think critically and a willingness to work independently are important factors in determining success in business management. In addition, an enjoyment of solving complex problems and an understanding of complicated financial data are helpful.

This guide to majors in business management will give you in-depth information about careers and degrees in business management, including what you ll learn, the expectations and requirements of a business management career, and what it may take to succeed.

What is Business Management?

Business management is the process of developing the strategies, plans, procedures and policies that guide a business on both a day-to-day and long-term basis. It involves coordinating human, financial and material resources to achieve organizational objectives.

Whether you re interested in becoming an entrepreneur and launching your own business or joining a Fortune 500 firm and starting your climb up the corporate ladder, it s imperative to start your path to your business management career with a strong educational foundation.

What Will I Learn by Obtaining a Business Management Degree?

Majoring in business management offers a broad foundation in business basics such as accounting, budgeting, marketing, planning, hiring and leadership. When pursuing an advanced degree, you may choose to specialize in any of these areas, as well as in human resources, healthcare management or computer information systems.

Working in teams is a mainstay of business management education and a valuable way to prepare for the real world. Your coursework may include accounting, finance, business law, economics, statistics, principles of management, organizational development and human relations. Through your business management classes, you ll be honing your problem solving, critical thinking, forecasting, project management and entrepreneurial abilities.

Requirements to Earn a Business Management Degree

Because business management is such a versatile career, you can choose the educational path that best prepares you to achieve your career goals.

Associate s Degree

Earning a two-year associate s degree in business administration or business management can offer opportunities to break into the business world. Advancement often requires a bachelor s degree, which can be pursued while working in the field.

Bachelor s Degree

A four-year bachelor s degree, such as a BA in Business Administration Management. may open the door to additional career options, since employers hiring for business management positions usually require a bachelor s degree at minimum. Additional education, professional certification or an advanced degree may be required to advance your career. Those interested in human resources may want to consider a Human Resources Administration minor. which could make you a stronger candidate for HR jobs.

Master s Degree

For top-level positions, employers may prefer candidates with advanced degrees. With an MBA in Management. an MBA in Marketing. or an MBA in Healthcare Management. you could be positioned to compete for senior-level jobs. An advanced degree typically takes an additional one to two years beyond the bachelor s level.

Some employers may offer tuition assistance to help you obtain a master s degree while establishing yourself in your career.

Career Opportunities in Business Management

Business management career opportunities vary in level of responsibility, salary expectations, and education and preparation required.

  • An associate s degree may qualify you for labor relations specialist, office manager or administrative specialist jobs.
  • Positions such as business analyst. account executive, HR manager and management consultant typically require a four-year degree, such as a BA in Business Administration Management.
  • You could qualify for executive-level positions, such as chief executive officer. senior management consultant, director of operations or brand manager. with an advanced degree, such as an MBA in Management or an MBA in Marketing.

Additional potential careers include management analyst, retail store manager, hospitality manager, human resources administrator and small business manager. Business management can be applied in areas such as organizational behavior, human resources, operations and strategic planning. You can work in a variety of industries, including manufacturing, medical and health, charities, hotels, government, chemical, computer and information systems, fashion, grocery, advertising and promotions, utilities and construction.

Opportunities exist in the public, private and nonprofit sectors.

With a field as varied and open-ended as business management, consider your strengths when selecting a specialization. If you enjoy dealing with people one-on-one, human resources may be a good fit. An entrepreneurial focus is suitable if you are planning on starting your own business. It is critical to research specific management roles to select a path that suits your interests.

Expectations for a Business Management Career

Business management majors can expect to see solid employment growth across a variety of industries in the coming years, according to federal projections. Potential salary ranges for business management professionals will vary according to several factors, including the specific industry, regional market conditions, and a candidate s educational qualifications and employment history.

As of May 2015, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported average annual wages for the following management roles nationwide:

*Please note that the hyperlinks remain updated, so the most recent salary information will be found by clicking on the job title. This information is updated every one to two years by the BLS.

Your professional responsibilities may include supervising staff, analyzing data, planning operations and making crucial business decisions. Business managers may take care of day-to-day tasks such as hiring, training, purchasing and quality control in smaller firms. For larger organizations, formulating policy, planning for resource needs, setting overall direction and implementing strategies are some of the tasks often required of business managers.

Because salaries vary depending on the specific position, as well as location, education and experience, prospective students are encouraged to conduct independent research to determine actual earning potential.

Training, Other Qualifications and Advancement in Business Management

Business management professionals need a wide variety of up-to-date business expertise to succeed and advance in their careers. Additional requirements will vary according to each individual position, but employers generally seek strong decision-making and organizational ability. Candidates for a career in business management must develop outstanding interpersonal and communication expertise, as well as creative problem-solving ability.

After obtaining work experience, an advanced degree such as an MBA or both, business professionals may advance to positions with more responsibility and higher pay. Some graduates may pursue further study in finance, human resources, marketing, international business or computing to develop their expertise in a business specialization. For instance, labor relations specialists may be promoted to human resources directors; department managers may become operations managers; management consultants may be promoted to chief financial officers. As a business management major, you could find yourself positioned for opportunities throughout your career, up to and including the executive suite.

Business Management Majors Offer Versatility and Opportunity

If you re interested in making a difference in the exciting world of business, earning a business management or business administration degree is a great place to begin. A business management major provides the broad knowledge employers need, while giving you the option to specialize in many interesting and rewarding areas.

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The Beginner – s Guide to Different Types of Business Degrees #new #business

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The Beginner s Guide to Different Types of Business Degrees

Take a look around your home. Nearly every item you own has an entire industry based around it, and each of those industries has multiple business functions within them. Because of this complexity, there is a huge variety in the different types of business degrees available to you.

With so many specializations within business degree programs, it can be a bit daunting when trying to decide which best fits your interests or career aspirations. To help you decipher the diversity, we broke down a list of some of the most common types of business degrees, the courses to expect and some examples of the jobs you can do with them.

Keep reading to get acclimated with 15 facets of the business field and start to get a feel for which area appeals to you.

15 Types of business degrees to consider

Accounting

Overview. Love numbers? Have an eye for detail? When studying accounting you will develop your understanding of generally accepted accounting principles, tax law, the process of managing financial documents and how it impacts business operations. The accounting field has several potential career paths and this degree will equip you to pursue different types of accounting, audit or tax-related positions within a variety of organizations.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

Advertising

Overview. Think you have the creativity to develop an ad that cuts through the clutter and sticks in the mind of a potential customer? With an advertising degree you ll learn how to make a message stand out from the crowd by learning about what makes an audience tick and how to best reach them. This is a great choice if you re looking for a way to leverage your creative ability in the world business.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Business management

Overview: There s a lot to learn about managing a business or department. A business management degree will give you a solid comprehensive foundation in important business areas like accounting, sales, operations and organizational leadership. You ll also be better equipped to manage and lead a team of people, which is beneficial if you have hopes of advancing your career into leadership positions.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Economics

Overview. If you choose to study economics, you can expect to learn about economic principles and theory, including the use of math and data analysis. An economics degree can help prepare you for analyzing and forecasting economic trends in order to improve business operations and performance.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Entrepreneurship

Overview. If you want to start, build and manage a business of your own, an entrepreneurship degree can help you to develop the necessary skills to succeed. However, don t be fooled into thinking this degree is only for aspiring business owners. Most of the principles and courses can be applied in any business setting.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Finance

Overview. If you choose to study finance. you ll learn a broad range of concepts and skills including financial analysis, economics, statistics and portfolio management. Majoring in finance will help you pursue opportunities in finance sectors as well as accounting or investment areas.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Healthcare management

Overview. It takes a lot of business acumen to keep a healthcare facility running smoothly and profitably. This major prepares you for providing business management leadership strategies designed to address the unique challenges and intricacies within the growing healthcare industry. You will learn about many of the proven management techniques with a focus on the nuances found within the healthcare industry.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Health services manager

Patient care associate

Hospitality management

Overview. If you have a passion for working with people and a knack for making sure everyone is taken care of, then a hospitality management degree may be right for you. Hotels, event venues and other similar establishments have unique management needs that are different than other businesses. Utilizing a variety of management and communications skills is important for making sure operations run smoothly and guests leave happy.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

Human resources

Overview. This field is all about people. Whether it s helping employees with navigating benefits enrollment or helping secure the top talent needed for business growth, this field relies on impeccable interpersonal skills. With a human resources (HR) degree. you will learn the skills necessary for managing business and labor practices in addition to learning about organizational development, resources planning and training.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

International business

Overview. International business focuses on you guessed it global business organizations. Multinational corporations need employees who are well-suited to deal with the unique challenges presented by doing business across multiple countries.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Supply chain analyst

Business development specialist

Marketing

Overview. Want to help grow and maintain a business by attracting and retaining customers? This is a great option. By majoring in marketing. you ll be focused on learning the fundamentals of areas such as market research, communication and marketing strategies. The marketing department of a business helps accomplish tasks such as product promotion or consumer research in order to achieve business goals like increasing sales, building brand awareness and improving customer retention.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

Statistics

Overview. We live in an era where more data is being collected by businesses than ever before. But what good is that data if there s no one around to collect, organize and make sense of it all? Statisticians are trained in the collection, organization, analysis and interpretation of numbered data sets. They use these skills to help improve the decision-making ability of businesses by uncovering and planning for trends or patterns on which to act.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Supply chain management

Overview: Ever wonder how the products you order online ends up on your doorstep within days? To steal a line from UPS: That s logistics! A supply chain management degree will prepare you to handle the intricacies of managing a global supply chain (and all of the moving parts that come with it) to ensure a business operations are running efficiently.

COMMON COURSE SUBJECTS:

POTENTIAL JOB TITLES:

Supply chain risk

Choose your business career path

Now that you have a better understanding of the different types of business degrees and the career opportunities associated with each, it s time for you to do some self-evaluation. Do any of the specializations above match your skills and interests? Going forward, your best bet is to find a few areas that appeal to you and dig deeper to learn more about the ins and outs of each focus-area.

For more information about specific business-related career fields, download theBusiness Career Outlook guide.

AUTHOR S NOTE: This article was originally published in October 2013. It has since been updated to include information relevant to 2016.

External links provided on Rasmussen.edu are for reference only. Rasmussen College does not guarantee, approve, control, or specifically endorse the information or products available on websites linked to, and is not endorsed by website owners, authors and/or organizations referenced.

Will is a Content Marketing Specialist at Collegis Education. He researches and writes student-focused articles on a variety of topics for Rasmussen College. He is passionate about learning and enjoys writing engaging content to help current and future students on their path to a rewarding education.

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Small Business Startup Guide #free #business #software

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Communications Guide: How to Improve Your Communication Skills #business #accounting #software

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A Crash Course in Communication Need a quick refresher on effective interpersonal interaction? Two communication experts offer 12 steps to smoother conversations. Lost in Translation Thanks to e-mail, BlackBerrys, and text messaging, the face-to-face encounter is becoming a dying art. Here’s why you should revive it. The Power of Listening How does an old-line manufacturer in a stagnant industry manage to grow 25% a year for 10 years? By taking its employees seriously. Do as I Say: Quick Tips for Masterful Communication Tired of doing all the talking and not having your message get through to your staff? Try these suggestions to improve your leadership communication skills. Just Listen to Yourself Tape yourself to better understand your communications style. Powerful Questions Can Have a Powerful Effect Questions can be one of the most effective communication tools available to us. Do you use questions enough in your day-to-day interactions? When Do You Lie? Strategies For More Authentic, Respectful Communication Lies come in all shapes, sizes and colors. (Ever heard of flat-out, teensy or white lies?) This article focuses on when it’s appropriate, if at all, to lie. 10 Tips for Communicating Change Transition is inevitable, but exactly what you say and how you say it can make a major impact on how change is handled in your company. How to Motivate Employees Kevin Plank, founder of Under Armour, says it is vital to maintain regular face-to-face communication with employees even as a company expands. The 4-1-1 On Constructive Criticism Being critical is easy, and offering criticism seems easier still. Yet constructive criticism – – the more refined and effective brand of critical feedback – – is like an art. Lost in the Translation Tips on communicating with employees who don’t speak English.
How to Say You’re Sorry Apologizing is part of doing business. But do it wrong, and you’ll really be sorry. Tips on Becoming a Good Conversationalist In this excerpt from How to Work a Room: The Ultimate Guide to Savvy Socializing in Person and Online learn tips for becoming a talk target — someone with whom it is easy to make conversation.
10 Tips for Successful Networking Keith Ferrazzi needs two PalmPilots to keep track of all his contacts, people like Bill Clinton and Michael Milken. But there’s far more to cracking the inner circle of the power elite than just taking names.

Powerful Presentations Small-business columnist Rhonda Abrams shares nine strategies for giving powerful presentations. Reinventing the PowerPoint New tech tools to liven your tired old PowerPoint presentations–and give your online marketing efforts a boost. Perfecting Your Pitch Check out these tips from entrepreneurs and business experts on creating pitches that can help you raise capital. More Power Than Point PowerPoint (or “presentation software”) has become the lingua franca of American business. It’s also become the problem with American business. Best of the Net: Power Brokers When it comes to presentation software, most users agree there’s one clear standard. We’ve found some Web-based resources to help you make your point. Captivate Audiences with Powerful Presentations Do you want your speeches to pack a punch? Professional speaker and speech consultant Patricia Fripp offers ideas on humor, movement, and vocal techniques. Short and Sweet: Mastering Quick Presentations Called on to make a brief speech? Professional speaker and speech coach Patricia Fripp offers tips for saying what you want, short and sweet. Present Before You Propose Improve your presentation by saving handouts until the end. Finding the Perfect Pitch Watch three rookies gear up for the investor presentation of a lifetime. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Presenters Entrepreneurs learn pretty quickly that making a verbal pitch to investors is very different from submitting a written business plan. Here are seven good practices gleaned from a venture-capital boot camp. Elements of a Winning Pitch A presentation to potential investors in your business — to family, friends, or angels — should include most of these elements.

Escape From Meeting Hell It’s time for another soul-sapping, oxygen-depriving, time-wasting, mind-numbing company meeting. Or is it? We offer 15 clever solutions to the problems with most meetings. Meetings Go Virtual Web conferencing and other collaboration technologies — tools that help people work with one another through their computers — have become more available and affordable. This is a boon for smaller companies whose only previous collaboration option was to gather workers in a room with coffee, donuts and a whiteboard. Meetings 101: Was That a Good Meeting, or a Bad One? Five simple factors that help ensure every meeting is a good meeting. Tools for Boosting Communication Effectiveness Tips on how to boost the effectiveness of communication in meetings, during change initiatives, and in interviews. Advice on Getting the Most Out of Meetings Keith Lamb shares some advice on getting the most out of your meetings. Cure the Sick-Meeting Ills Ineffective meetings may be wasting time and lowering morale. Two communication experts offer seven strategies for dramatically improving your meetings. How to Manage Meetings More Effectively A look at companies that hold unique meetings for developing products, building camaraderie, generating ideas, and reviewing employees’ needs and achievements.

Writing and Organizing a Winning Speech Public speaker and speech consultant Patricia Fripp suggests following one of two basic outlines for your speech. She also offers speechwriting tips. Polishing and Rehearsing for a Perfect Presentation You’ve written a speech, but there’s still work to do before delivering it. Patricia Fripp gives six suggestions for making sure your speech hits home along with several ideas on effective rehearsing. Deliver a Stellar Speech Powerful presentations happen when you check out the room in advance and work to connect with the audience when talking. Patricia Fripp offers ideas for ensuring that what you say is a smashing success. No More Pre-Speech Jitters From virtual reality therapy to positive visualization, we’ve got relaxation techniques to help offset your fears of public speaking. Free Speech Preparing for a big speech? Resources on the Web can help.

Work through Writer’s Block Need help working through some written projects? Two communication experts offer eight tips for clear and effective writing. Writing Well on the Web Content is king. Here are easy ways to make your website more reader-friendly. Polish Your Prose Poor grammar and punctuation in proposals and reports could cost you business. How to Blog The trick, say experts and longtime bloggers, is restraint. “For marketers, it’s about being more authentic, which is so ironic,” says one analyst.
How to Drive Traffic to Your Company’s Blog Driving traffic to your small business’ corporate blog takes equal parts old-fashioned marketing and contemporary Web tools.

Troubleshooting

Are You Assertive or Aggressive? Assertiveness is the skill that tops the list for success or failure in any workplace situation. Learn how to be more assertive — not aggressive — and apply it to your interactions. Get Your Point Across without Being Rude Is your communication style a little rough around the edges? Here are five techniques for saying what you mean without making enemies in the process. Communicating When People Leave You Speechless Improved communication is a nice idea, but can it work in the real world? Take a look at these real-life business issues and suggestions for better communication that may lead to better business.





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Gear, Software – Other Products Guide – Photography Concentrate #business #solutions

#photography business

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Gear, Software Other Products Guide

A photographer needs a camera. But which one will work best for what you hope to achieve? And how about all of those software and app options that will help take your photos to the next level, and keep your business organized and efficient. And then there are the scanners, printers and photobooks that ll take your photos off the screen and put them into the hands of you and your clients. Across the board, there are an overwhelming number of options. Finding the right ones can make your head spin!

Well, the good news is that the tools don t matter nearly as much as the photographer. What really makes for great photos is you! But you still need some equipment to get you there, so check out thesearticles to help make gear, software and printing decisions a little simpler!

Gear

If you’re looking to learn how to take control over your camera, check out our tutorial Extremely Essential Camera Skills. It mixes text, video, illustrations and sample photos to help you get confident with your camera, super fast!

Software Apps

Need some help finding your way around Lightroom? Check out our tutorial, Super Photo Editing Skills. which uses video to show you how to navigate Lightroom 4, easily. Awesome!

Albums, Printers Scanners

Looking to sharpen your album design skills? Check out our tutorial, Awesome Album Design Skills. which uses videos and handy guides to teach you all you need to know to create beautiful albums in InDesign.

FREE Lightroom Presets! Yes!

Want to see how quick and easy it is to make stunning edits to your photos using Lightroom? Sign up for our free club and you’ll get a ton of high quality presets, totally free. Put your email in the form below and let’s get started!

About Rob + Lauren

We are two photographers who are obsessed with the magic of photography. We like it so much, in fact, that we want to help other people do it, so they can be super happy too.

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