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Small-Business Loans – 3 ways to get a loan, loans for business.#Loans #for #business


3 ways to get a small-business loan

The recovering economic environment has meant that small businesses have had to be more creative when looking for loans.

However, companies with sound business strategies still can borrow. Options include loans from traditional banks and institutions affiliated with the Small Business Administration, as well as financing from Internet-based lenders.

“For creditworthy, high-scoring small businesses, there is money available,” says George Cloutier, CEO of American Management Services, a consultant to small businesses.

Bank loans

The best place to get a small-business loan is still a bank, says Cloutier. Banks typically offer the lowest interest rates and many have established reputations as trustworthy lenders.

“Many small businesses try three or four banks and then stop looking,” Cloutier says. A more persistent approach has better odds of success.

Calculate business loan payment

Want to calculate your small-business loan payment? Go to Bankrate’s loan and amortization calculator.

“Take out the phone book, target 10 banks and work through that list,” he says.

That strategy worked for Michael McKean. He is founder of The Knowland Group, a company that helps hotels fill up their meeting space.

A few years ago, as the success of The Knowland Group grew, McKean began searching for a bank that would give the growing company expanded access to credit.

“We talked to every bank in our area, at least a dozen,” McKean says. “Many came back with proposals, but the terms were very onerous. Or sometimes they shifted terms.”

Finally, M T Bank came through.

“They just wanted to get our business,” McKean says.

McKean says his company did not approach M T any differently than it had approached the other banks. It was just a matter of being persistent until the right deal came along, he says.

“We did everything right, approaching the right person at each bank,” he says. “We’re a profitable business. I think it was just the … credit crunch that prevented us from getting a loan.”

Cloutier says the key to success with banks is to show past profitability, and to describe a well thought-out plan for future profits.

“If you aren’t making a profit now, you must be able to tell the bank how you will change that in the short term, or you really won’t be able to get a loan,” he says.

He also recommends that businesses start small in their loan requests.

“If you need money for four trucks, ask for two,” Cloutier says. “The bigger the loan request, the harder it is to get it approved.”

SBA loans

Another way to find a bank loan is through the Small Business Administration, or SBA. The SBA can direct you to banks that offer loans guaranteed by the agency. This way, you’ll have the advantage of approaching banks specifically interested in lending to small businesses.

Interested businesses should contact the SBA office nearest to them, which can be found on the agency’s website. Jeanne Hulit, the SBA’s acting administrator, urges businesses to seek a bank that is an experienced SBA lender.

Banks granting SBA loans place increased emphasis on business plans, cash flow and profit forecasts in deciding whether to lend, she says. The SBA also can refer businesses to free counseling centers to improve their performance.

Online opportunities

Another source for loans is the Internet. There are several sites where businesses can seek alternative lenders, such as individuals and small companies.

Interest rates are generally a little higher than what a bank will charge, but it’s much less than what you’ll have to pay on many credit cards.

Look around at different sites, some may charge a one-time fee to list your business, while others are free to list but might have fees reflected in loan rates.

If you’re going to list your company on one of these sites, describe your business in clear and concise language.

Lastly, make sure to investigate the company you are looking to post your business on. These kinds of companies were successful in 2008 and during the recession, but times have changed. Many have since gone out of business. Before paying for anything, make sure the company is legit.


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Businesses Loans – 900 Loans Unsecured, loans for business.#Loans #for #business


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8 Great Sources of Financing for Women Starting a Business – Next Avenue, loans

8 Great Sources of Financing for Women Starting a Business

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Four years ago, Linda Waitkus quit her job as store manager for a Bloomingdale’s near Washington, D.C., to open Great Dogs of Great Falls, an 1,800-square-foot pet shop with grooming services in Great Falls, Va.

When I stopped by to interview her recently, I was impressed to discover that Waitkus, now 57, made all the right moves for launching a new venture, starting with a rock-solid business plan. But what really impressed me is this: She had saved enough money outside of her retirement accounts to finance the startup.

Great Dogs started turning a profit in its first year, and Waitkus has been able to pay herself a salary. (I contributed to the cause by purchasing some treats and marrowbones for my Lab, Zena, when I popped in.)

Women have been starting businesses like mad in recent years, and at a higher rate than men, according to a report from American Express OPEN Forum. Between 1997 and 2012, the number of women-owned firms increased by 54 percent, a rate 1.5 times the national average.

But starting a business may be even harder for women than for men, as explained in a recent Forbes.com article by Susan Coleman and Alicia Robb. Authors of a new book released by the Kaufmann Foundation, A Rising Tide: Financial Strategies for Women-Owned Firms, Coleman and Robb contend that businesses run by women face hurdles that aren’t encountered by men.

For instance, they report, women seeking first-year financing to get a business off the ground receive about 80 percent less capital than men. This echoes what I’ve heard from female entrepreneurs I know, who’ve told me that finding money to finance their companies was the hardest part of their launches.

With that in mind, here are eight resources women should consider if they want to raise cash for a fledgling business — and two to avoid at all costs:

Personal savings Most startups, like Waitkus’s pet shop, are financed with an entrepreneur’s own money. But as I wrote in my Next Avenue blog post, “When It Comes to Money, the Deck is Stacked Against Women,” women tend to earn less than men, which means they often don’t have a full cupboard to tap.

Loans from banks and credit unions These are the chief sources of financing for women-owned firms. Fortunately, women are no longer more likely to be rejected for these loans than men, according to Coleman and Robb’s research.

If you plan to apply for a bank or credit union loan, I recommend you have a solid business plan, a stellar credit record and an excellent credit score (720 or higher). You might want to try a bank where you’ve been a longtime customer or one that is familiar with your company’s field. For more tips, read the Next Avenue article, “How to Get the Business Loan You Want” by Steve Bloom, a counselor with SCORE, the nonprofit small business adviser affiliated with the U.S. Small Business Administration.

An SBA-guaranteed bank loan can keep your down payment and monthly payments low. To find a bank offering one of these loans, check the Local Resources section of the SBA’s website as well as the site’s loans and grants search tool.

Home equity credit lines or loans Lenders typically let you borrow 75 to 80 percent of your home’s value, minus the amount of money you still owe on the mortgage. With a home-equity line, you receive the money in increments, rather than the lump sum you get with a home equity loan. The interest rate on home equity credit lines is typically lower than on loans, which you receive as a lump sum.

According to Bankrate.com, the average rate for a $30,000 home equity credit line is 4.58 percent; for a $30,000 home equity loan, it’s 5.71 percent. Just be certain that you’ll be able to repay this kind of financing — your house is on the line.

Relatives and friends Family members and pals often lend money interest free or at a low rate of, say, 3.5 percent. Be sure to get legal advice and create a binding contract if you want to finance your business this way. You’ll want to put the loan’s terms in writing to avoid any misunderstanding about repayment dates and interest.

Angel investors and venture capital firms These financing sources provide money in exchange for equity or fractional ownership. However, they’re typically swamped by requests and extremely careful with their money.

Compared with men, only a tiny percentage of women rely on this kind of financing, according to Coleman and Robb. One possible explanation, the authors say, is the difference between the types of firms typically started by each sex. Women-owned firms tend to be less growth-oriented and heavily represented in the retail and service sectors. Equity investors prefer growth-oriented sectors, like technology and bioscience.

Another reason women have often find equity-financing windows shut is that don’t belong to the key networks that provide this financing. Traditionally, the authors note, angel investing and venture capital fields are closely knit, difficult to penetrate and dominated by men.

Crowdfunding websites Financing for the incredibly successful Pebble smartwatch was ramped up via Kickstarter, a crowdfunding website that entrepreneurs use to find people who’ll invest small amounts of money in tech projects or creative endeavors like music or video games. Pebble’s founders hoped to raise $100,000 through Kickstarter; they ended up bringing in more than $10 million.

With Kickstarter, listing your project is free. You simply post a description of the project, including a video, your target dollar amount and a deadline. Then you send a mass e-mail to family, friends and colleagues, asking them to help and also to share your financing invitation with others. When you reach your goal, Kickstarter takes 5 percent, and you pay 3 to 5 percent to Amazon.com’s credit-card service. If you don’t raise the money by the deadline, all pledges are canceled.

Similar crowdfunding sites, like Rock the Post, Indiegogo and AngelList, can also connect you with angel investors.

In the past, small businesses couldn’t sell shares of their company through crowdfunding sites because that violated Securities and Exchange Commission rules. But this spring, Congress passed the JOBS Act, which will allow such equity-based crowdfunding sometime next year, when the SEC’s new rules kick in.

(For more about this law, read NextAvenue small-business blogger Gwen Moran’s post “What the New Crowdfunding Law Means to Small Business Owners.”)

Economic development programs You’ll need to do some legwork for this type of financing, but it could be well worth your time. As Moran blogged in “A Great Way to Give Your Small Business an Edge,” getting your firm certified as a woman-owned business can help you qualify for money that’s only available to companies with that designation. Certification can also help you land government and big-business clients.

Some corporations offer these types of programs. For example, Michelin North America, based in Greenville, S.C., has provided $1 million in low-interest financing — loans range from $10,000 to $100,000 — to certain businesses, including women-owned firms, in parts of South Carolina.

Local economic development agencies, such as Rockville Economic Development in Maryland, also award cash prizes for new, female business owners. Check the SBA’s online directory and contact the office in your area to see if any money is available for women-owned businesses.

Grant programs for women The SBA operates a network of nearly 100 Women’s Business Centers around the country. They provide state, local and private grant information to women eager to start for-profit or nonprofit businesses.

Grants.gov lists information on more than 1,000 federal grant programs; many are specifically for women-owned businesses.

Business.usa.gov is the federal government’s site for entrepreneurs looking for short-term microloans and small business loans. Search this site for info on all programs available to women business owners in your state.

2 Financing Sources to Avoid

And now the two sources of money you don’t want to use:

Credit cards Avoid using plastic at all costs. Most cards carry double-digit interest rates, which is an outlandish price to pay for starting a business. Also, it’s very easy to get yourself into trouble this way, given the financial ups and downs of a new venture.

Retirement savings Trust me, you don’t want to dip into your 401(k) and IRA. Not only will you owe income taxes by taking money out, you’ll lose the tax-deferred compounding and, if you’re younger than 59½, you’ll owe Internal Revenue Service withdrawal penalties. Worst of all, you’ll highjack your future financial security. Please don’t do that. No business is worth it.

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Small Business Loans Reviews for 2017, loans for starting a business.#Loans #for #starting #a

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How to Shop for a Bank – Small Business, best bank for small business.#Best

How to Shop for a Bank

  • Find out whether your bank can make prompt decisions, or has to check with the home office.
  • Learn whether the bank is comfortable making loans backed by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA loans).
  • Look into special services, but be aware of added fees.
  • Feedback

    Choosing a bank for your business involves more than opening a new account at your personal bank or picking the branch office nearest your company. You need to understand what services you require and how much they cost. Ideally you ll find a banker who will take the time to walk you through how to solve a problem, so you can go back to running your business. Still, some business owners may spend more time shopping for a $300 laser printer than they would shopping for a bank.

    Here are a few issues to keep in mind when you look for a banker:

    Does your local banker have lending authority? What s the largest loan he or she can approve without checking with higher ups? Relationship managers at community-based banks often have more discretion than those at a unit of a big institution and they may consider small-business lending to be their bread and butter. But lately, the distinctions between large and small banks have blurred with the industry s consolidation. Many community banks have undergone mergers that now allow them to offer a wider range of services. Banks of all sizes are emphasizing improved customer service, having discovered that many customers still like face-to-face service at branches versus conducting all transactions online.

    Smaller, regionally focused banks may be better because they know local market conditions. They often provide more one-on-one access to a loan officer and put more emphasis on a borrower s character rather than just applying a credit-score model. And they can be more flexible during tough times, such as covering overdrawn accounts without imposing stiff penalties.

    Rates charged by large financial institutions are systematically lower than those charged by community ones, according to a study cowritten by the National Federation of Independent Business, an advocacy group. Larger banks are more likely to issue corporate credit cards to small businesses, which can be used for financing.

    Is your bank comfortable working with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) loan system? Federally subsidized loans help protect the bank against default, which makes it easier for banks to lend money. SBA loans are available to businesses whose credit histories, cash flows or collateral would be inadequate for them to obtain traditional bank loans, and the SBA typically offers more flexible repayment terms. Larger institutions are likely to make loans backed by the SBA, which lets them accept riskier borrowers.

    What extras are available with your account? Despite stiffer lending procedures, larger banks may offer added benefits such as online services that help save time and money on tax and accounting assistance. These may include sending invoices, collecting payments, payroll and loan applications. Some banks may tie such help to requirements that a business s employees use direct-deposit channels. But keep in mind that banking is a competitive business, and it rarely takes more than a year for a new product or service to be copied by banks across the country. So trust and being comfortable with a bank can sometimes be more important than a seemingly new product.


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Options for Financing the Business Sale, financing for business.#Financing #for #business


Options for Financing the Business Sale

Business sales are rarely completed without some type of financing. Therefore, you’ll need to know where the buyer is going to get the money to purchase your business. Generally, the money will come from either third-party financing or seller-financing or a combination. It is important to know what you are getting into if you finance any part of the sale.

Seller financing is involved in up to 90 percent of small business sales and more than half of mid-size sales. If you’re not willing to finance at least some of the price, you may not be able to sell your company. The other option is for the buyer to obtain third-party financing. If the buyer is planning to obtain outside funding, the bank or other lender should confirm to you that the buyer is qualified and that the lender is willing to come up with the money before negotiations go too far.

Using Outside Lenders to Finance the Sale

When an outside lender such as a bank or investment firm finances the purchase of a business, the transaction is frequently called a leveraged buy out or LBO. LBOs were once very common, but many lenders have been stung as buyers tended to default when things got tough, or had such difficulty making payments that lenders were forced to restructure the loans. Lending criteria are stricter, now, and buyers are expected to put up more of their own money (or find a partner who’s willing to).

In the small business context, the typical LBO buyer is one or more of your managers or key employees who wants to take over after you retire. It may also be a combination of managers and other investors. In some cases it may be your children, or a group of them. Having an outside lender finance the transition of your family business to the next generation is a good way to transfer some of the risk outside your family, if you find an institutional lender who’s willing to participate. Institutional lenders are more likely to approve loans where the buyers already have experience in the particular business, so there will be a measure of management continuity.

LBO Financing Usually Includes Loans, Equity Interest

LBO financing is usually a package that combines several types of loans, as well as equity. The components may even come from different sources. The package itself may be put together by a bank, a commercial finance company, a venture capital firm, or a mergers and acquisitions intermediary that has access to capital markets.

Some typical components of the package might be 15 to 25 percent equity, 10 to 50 percent subordinated debt; and 40 to 70 percent senior debt. “Equity” would usually be in the form of common or preferred stock, held by the buyer or by other investors such as venture capitalists. “Senior debt” would be loans on assets such as receivables and inventory (for asset-based financing) or real estate and equipment (for more conventional financing). The senior debt holder is a secured lender who stands in first position to collect against the particular asset, if the buyer defaults.

In contrast, “subordinated debt,” also called mezzanine debt, is akin to a second mortgage in that if the buyer defaults, the debt holder would collect only after the senior debtors had been paid off. Consequently, the subordinate lenders frequently want a higher interest rate and an equity interest in the business as well, so there is a potentially greater reward in exchange for the greater risk they take in making the loan.

As you can guess, the complexity of the structure and the players involved make a typical LBO an unlikely prospect for the average small business, unless you’re in an industry that’s considered “sexy” at that moment in time. However, if you are willing to act as the subordinate debt holder, the LBO model can work for even a very small business. The determining factor would be whether the business has sufficient assets and cash flow to interest one or more institutional lenders in making the senior loan(s).

The buyer may have lined up a bank to do the primary financing on the deal, and may want you to take back subordinated debt for the remainder of the price, in a variation of a leveraged buy out (LBO). In that case, you are second in line if the buyer defaults on the primary loan.

Obviously, this is not as desirable a position for you, and if you agree to it you should demand a higher interest rate. You should also think about continuing to maintain an equity position in the company, so that you have a voice (even if not the controlling voice) in the management of the company.

If your buyer wants to do an LBO, recognize that it will require a lot of work on your part to make it happen. These deals are neither simple nor easy, and they take time to put together. Not only will you need to cooperate with the lender, you may even need to help sell the lender on the deal. However, the result can be significantly less risk to you than if you had financed the entire purchase yourself.

When Should You Consider Seller Financing?

Should you finance a buyer who is purchasing your business? There are pros and cons to seller financing. On the downside, if you allow the buyer to pay you off slowly over time, you’ll retain many of the risks that come from continued ownership of the business while giving up control of its management.

In most cases, the buyer’s ability to make the payments will depend on the future success of the business, yet your buyer may know little about your company, your customers, or even your industry. The buyer can mismanage your company down to nothing very quickly, if you don’t keep an eye on him. If the buyer runs aground and stops making payments, your only real recourse may be to foreclose on the note and repossess the business, but that means you’ll have to find another buyer and start all over again.

On the upside, carrying back a note for some or all of the purchase price may be the only way to sell the business, since banks have fairly strict lending criteria for acquisition loans. Moreover, seller financing can provide a tax break for you if you qualify for installment sale treatment. For the buyer, seller financing can be a godsend because you’ll generally have more relaxed qualification standards and more lenient terms than a bank would have.

Seller Financing Can Take Variety of Forms

The simplest way to provide seller financing is to have the buyer make a down payment, with you taking a note or mortgage for the rest of the purchase price. The business itself, and/or the significant business assets, provides the primary collateral for the note. A lien on the property is filed with the secretary of state’s office, so the world at large knows that it exists. If the buyer defaults on the note, you’ll be the first in line to step back in and take over the business.

In addition to its simplicity, this type of deal can be very flexible — you can adjust the payment schedule, interest rate, loan period, or any other terms to reflect your needs and the buyer’s financial situation. For example, you can provide for a floating interest rate, or one that starts low but goes up gradually over time.

Most seller financing will be for a relatively short term (say, five to seven years) but will be amortized over a much longer payment schedule, so that at the end of the loan term there’s still a large portion of principal remaining. The buyer will have to obtain outside financing to pay off the balance of the loan in a “balloon” payment at the end of the loan period. The idea is that at that point, the business will be on a solid footing and bank financing will be easier to find.

Make Sure to Protect Your Interests

If you agree to finance part of the deal, you should try to get the buyer to provide more security for the loan, besides the business itself. For example, you might require the buyer to put up a personal residence as additional collateral (assuming there is significant equity in the home.) Some buyers have other commercial real estate, or investments that can provide more security.

You can also require the buyer to personally guarantee the loan, just as a commercial lender would. And, of course, you’ll want to thoroughly check out the buyer’s background, including credit record, management experience, personal assets, and character, just as the buyer will check you out during the due diligence phase of negotiations.

In order to further protect yourself, you should require the buyer to take out a life insurance policy with yourself as beneficiary, so that the loan will be paid off if the buyer meets an untimely demise. If the buyer will be actively working in the business, you might also consider requiring disability insurance on the buyer, although sometimes this is prohibitively expensive.

Your sales contract may also restrict the new owner’s sale of assets, acquisitions, and expansions until the note is paid off, and may specify that you get to see the quarterly financial statements so you can keep tabs on the business.

Instead of financing per se, particularly if you’re being asked to put up secondary financing to a bank’s acquisition loan, you might be able to have the buyer purchase an annuity contract for you, or purchase some zero-coupon bonds. These are sold at a deep discount off of their future value. With this approach, the buyer gets the benefit of a lower payment now, but you won’t be so dependent on his or her future success. This plan works best in the situation where you suspect that you have a well-qualified buyer who could actually pay cash for the business, but simply doesn’t want to tie up all his funds there.

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Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan

Applying for a business loan


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How to Apply for a Small Business Loan, applying for a business loan.#Applying #for

How to Apply for a Small Business Loan

In order for a small business to get off the ground, or to keep one operating, it must have financing which is often in the form of a business loan. One form of small business financing is debt financing. Small businesses can apply to banks or other financial institutions, like credit unions, for commercial loans. Usually, banks do not make loans to start-ups, but they do make loans to ongoing businesses. These are the major steps you should follow through the loan application process.

Applying for a business loan

It seems obvious that a small business owner would know the reason for and amount of the business loan they need. If the business is a start-up, this is not necessarily true. Owners of start-ups may only be in the process of determining the amount of funds they need and why. Business owners, whether the firms are start-ups or existing firms, need to take some time and be able to clearly articulate why they need a business loan and how much they need. Often, businesses may not be able to address the question of how much they need until they prepare their financial statements as part of their business plan. More

Especially if your business is a start-up, you may want to get some advice and help from experienced executives. If you have a chapter of SCORE in your area, they are a wonderful and free source of advice and help. SCORE is a non-profit, volunteer group of retired business executives. If you don t have a local chapter, you can get online advice and online counseling. You may also have a local chapter of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC), particularly if you have a nearby university. The SBDC is part of the Small Business Administration (SBA) and exists to help existing and new small businesses. It will help small business owners with the application process for a small business loan.

If your business is a start-up or less than three years old, your personal credit history will be evaluated as well as your business credit history. Before you apply for a small business loan, take some time to get your personal credit history in order. Request your credit report from each of the major credit reporting agencies. Review these credit reports. If you see any errors on your credit reports, write the agency a letter and detail the error and ask for it to be fixed. If there is an error that the agency will not fix, file a credit dispute report. Check on your credit score. A credit score about 700 is very good and significantly increases your chance of being approved for a loan. More

Look at the commercial banks available to you. Don t just go to the large, national commercial banks. You may have a better chance for a loan at the smaller regional commercial banks. Other non-bank institutions might be options for you such as credit unions. If you are a member of a local credit union, talk to the loan officer there about your need for a small business loan. If they make such loans, pick up a loan application there as well. There are other options such as microfinance loans that make loans to startups. If one lender turns you down, another may say yes to the same loan application so keep trying. More

This may be your most important step. In order to get a small business loan from just about any lender, you have to prepare a good business plan. In fact, until you have a good business plan, chances are you won t even know how much money you need or how fast you can repay it. The business plan is in addition to the loan application required by the financial institution. Business plans consist of many parts. A good business plan will have several years of past and project financial statements for your business. It will include a statement of collateral or the type and value of assets you will use to secure the loan. You will need to include an analysis of the market your business will serve as well as a statement of your own experience.

In order for the loan officer at your financial institution to give your application for a small business loan a second look, you have to make it compelling. Prepare a presentation of your business plan and application for your loan officer. Put together a professional package to hand to your loan officer with a narrative plus any financial statements, spreadsheets, charts, and graphs necessary. Be sure and include an Executive Summary. Many loan officers read the Executive Summary first and decide whether they are interested based on that. Make an appointment with your loan officer and request enough time to do a short presentation, with visual aids, based on your business plan. Be concise, succinct, and organized.


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Small business loans, Westpac, loans for a business.#Loans #for #a #business


Small business loans

Loans for a business

  • Access additional funds up to an agreed limit
  • Can help cover wages, invoices and other expenses during cash flow shortfalls.
  • Unsecured (guarantee may be required), or secured by real property*

Business Loan

Loans for a business

Take the next step in your business plan.
  • Great for purchasing an existing business or franchise, or investing to grow.
  • Unsecured (guarantee may be required), or secured by real property*.
Business Loan

Business Equity Access

Loans for a business

  • Choose between a line of credit for flexibility or a loan to grow your business
  • Option to pay interest only
  • Ideal short term finance option
  • Secure against residential or commercial property.
Business Equity Access

Insurance premium finance

Loans for a business

Make lump sum annual insurance premiums a thing of the past by paying with monthly instalments.
  • Available to businesses with annual total insurance costs over $5,000.
Insurance premium finance

Looking for other ways to finance your business purchases?

Check out our business credit cards

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Find a business banker

Call or visit your local branch

Things you should know

* Real property in the form of residential, commercial or rural property.

Credit criteria, fees, charges, terms and conditions apply. Talk to your banker for product details.

Conditions, fees and charges apply. These may change or we may introduce new ones in the future. Full details are available on request. Lending criteria apply to approval of credit products. This information does not take your personal objectives, circumstances or needs into account. Consider its appropriateness to these factors before acting on it. Read the disclosure documents for your selected product or service, including the Terms and Conditions or Product Disclosure Statement, before deciding. Unless otherwise specified, the products and services described on this website are available only in Australia from Westpac Banking Corporation ABN 33 007 457 141 AFSL and Australian credit licence 233714.


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