Tag: Five

Five top business ideas that made millions #bond #market #news


#great business ideas

#

Five top business ideas that made millions

This piece was first published on January 29, 2008.

According to Paul Graham, investor and founder of Y Combinator, the best way to get a winning business idea is to not think of any. Instead, you should be looking at which problems you can solve.

“The very best start-up ideas tend to have three things in common: they’re something the founders themselves want, that they themselves can build, and that few others realize are worth doing,” Graham said in a blog post in November.

“Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo, Google and Facebook all began this way.”

Now that the working year is well underway, there will be plenty of unfulfilled employees wracking their brains for that one business concept that will make them their fortune.

Here are the stories of five great ideas that actually managed to blossom into highly successful businesses:

1. Innocent Drinks

Friends Adam Balon, Jon Wright and Richard Reed appeared to have been pretty well set after leaving Cambridge University.

Two became management consultants. One moved into advertising. They all made good money and lived comfortable lives in London.

But there was a shared nagging feeling that there was a bit more to life. On a snowboarding holiday in 1998, the trio did little else than throw around ideas for a new business.

They realised there was a gap in the market for a new type of smoothie product, one based on natural ingredients and overtly ethical values.

After spending six months blending different combinations of fruit at home, the trio set up a stall at a music festival to test the concept.

The decision whether to continue was left entirely in the hands of consumers. A sign above the stall read “shall we give up our jobs to make these smoothies?” One bin read ‘Yes’, the other ‘No.’ Customers would make their judgement by throwing their empty bottles in either bin.

Happily, ‘yes’ won. Balon, Wright and Reed went on to write and re-write their business plan 11 times, before being turned down by a succession of potential investors and banks for funding.

A desperate email with the subject line ‘Does anyone know anyone rich?’ was sent to everyone the founders knew, resulting in Maurice Pinto, a wealthy American businessman, pitching in £250,000.

Innocent Drinks made its first million in turnover in its second year and now sells around two million smoothies a week, commanding a 75% market share in the UK. In 2009, Coca-Cola took an 18% stake in the company for £30 million. A year later the beverage giant paid £65 million for a 58% stake.

Reed says: If you re 70% sure about an idea then go for it. Because if you wait till you re 100% confident in business… you ll never make a decision, you ll never get anywhere.

Story continues on page 2. Please click below.


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Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #good #small #business

#investor business daily

#

Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

Buying Low-Priced Stocks
What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
“Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

Averaging Down
Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

Buying Stocks In A Down Market
Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .


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Five months into my #Helen4SG campaign #small #business #financing


#business venture ideas

#

Five months into my #Helen4SG campaign

I said at the outset that this campaign would be a marathon, not a sprint, and so it has proved to be.

The UN Security Council has now conducted three indicative ballots. I am still positioned in the middle of the pack.

Media interest continues to be high, not least on whether the UN might follow the lead of other major countries and organisations and look seriously at appointing a woman SG.

It was pleasing to see the outcome of a survey of UN staff which rated me highly for the position. The UN’s greatest asset is its dedicated staff. The bureaucratic systems don’t serve them well. I would want to work closely with staff to build the best, most responsive, most effective UN there could be – the world’s peoples and our staff deserve no less. In the end our work is all about people.

The New Zealand Herald editorialized on the contest on Thursday; their theme – is Helen too strong? One would hope strength of character would be a prerequisite for the position! http://m.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1 objectid=11702283

The NZ Herald also covered the outcome and implications of the third straw poll: http://linkis.com/www.nzherald.co.nz/n/APO9G

The next indicative poll will be conducted at the UN Security Council next Friday – 9 September. Following the Leaders’ week at the UN General Assembly beginning Monday 19 September, the final indicative poll will be held on Monday 26 September. It is then expected that that the UNSC will move to ballots where coloured cards – code for vetoes – by Permanent Members are used in the first week of October.


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Uk online degrees #forty, #five, #45, #degrees, #graphic, #design, #derby, #print, #litho #4, #colour,

#

So this is our shop, here we create design work that goes all over the world, it still amazes me! But I guess that is the power of the Internet!

In the shop we can also print your short run digitally printed poster’s, flyer’s, leaflet’s, pretty much anything, including up to 60 page booklets at A4 A5.

We can also print posters up to A1 and

photocopy up to A0.

Dean, Jay, Sarah, Andy Alan

OUR NEW PURPOSE

REBUILT STUDIO IN BELPER

We try our very best to make things as easy

as possible for you during the design process, and when it comes to print just tell us what you want and we will sort it all out for you, no fuss!

Don’t just take our word for it.

You make this process super simple and I really appreciate all your work and assistance. You are a vital member of the What’s On! team and I look forward to continuing to work with you.

Cory Cassell
Mission, Vancouver, Canada

WE MAKE THE PROCESS AS EASY AS POSSIBLE FOR YOU

WORKING WORLDWIDE FROM BELPER

We are based in a small market town in Derbyshire called Belper, however as you can see by the testimonial to the left to the left this does not limit us.

We work with businesses all over the world including Canada, America, China, and all over Europe, however most of our customers are here in the UK

We also repair Apple Mac Computers, we offer a buy install service too.
Call 01773 880 365 for more information.


Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #business #communication


#investor business daily

#

Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

Buying Low-Priced Stocks
What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
“Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

Averaging Down
Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

Buying Stocks In A Down Market
Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .


Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Five top business ideas that made millions #financing #a #small #business


#great business ideas

#

Five top business ideas that made millions

This piece was first published on January 29, 2008.

According to Paul Graham, investor and founder of Y Combinator, the best way to get a winning business idea is to not think of any. Instead, you should be looking at which problems you can solve.

“The very best start-up ideas tend to have three things in common: they’re something the founders themselves want, that they themselves can build, and that few others realize are worth doing,” Graham said in a blog post in November.

“Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo, Google and Facebook all began this way.”

Now that the working year is well underway, there will be plenty of unfulfilled employees wracking their brains for that one business concept that will make them their fortune.

Here are the stories of five great ideas that actually managed to blossom into highly successful businesses:

1. Innocent Drinks

Friends Adam Balon, Jon Wright and Richard Reed appeared to have been pretty well set after leaving Cambridge University.

Two became management consultants. One moved into advertising. They all made good money and lived comfortable lives in London.

But there was a shared nagging feeling that there was a bit more to life. On a snowboarding holiday in 1998, the trio did little else than throw around ideas for a new business.

They realised there was a gap in the market for a new type of smoothie product, one based on natural ingredients and overtly ethical values.

After spending six months blending different combinations of fruit at home, the trio set up a stall at a music festival to test the concept.

The decision whether to continue was left entirely in the hands of consumers. A sign above the stall read “shall we give up our jobs to make these smoothies?” One bin read ‘Yes’, the other ‘No.’ Customers would make their judgement by throwing their empty bottles in either bin.

Happily, ‘yes’ won. Balon, Wright and Reed went on to write and re-write their business plan 11 times, before being turned down by a succession of potential investors and banks for funding.

A desperate email with the subject line ‘Does anyone know anyone rich?’ was sent to everyone the founders knew, resulting in Maurice Pinto, a wealthy American businessman, pitching in £250,000.

Innocent Drinks made its first million in turnover in its second year and now sells around two million smoothies a week, commanding a 75% market share in the UK. In 2009, Coca-Cola took an 18% stake in the company for £30 million. A year later the beverage giant paid £65 million for a 58% stake.

Reed says: If you re 70% sure about an idea then go for it. Because if you wait till you re 100% confident in business… you ll never make a decision, you ll never get anywhere.

Story continues on page 2. Please click below.


Tags : , , , , , ,

Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily #business #applications


#investor business daily

#

Five Investing Pitfalls To Avoid, According to Investor s Business Daily

Big stock market winners look a lot alike — they have strong earnings and sales growth, a dynamic new product or service, leading price performance and rising mutual fund ownership. Interestingly, successful investors share similar traits.

Top investors always keep their losses small; they never average down in price; they don’t immediately shun a stock because it has a high price-earnings ratio (P/E Ratio); and finally, they pay attention to the general health of the market when they buy and sell stocks.

Yet, at the same time, many investors still operate using unsound principles. Successful investors learn to avoid the common pitfalls, and follow these insights that can put you well on your way to becoming a better investor.

Buying Low-Priced Stocks
What sounds better? Buying 1,000 shares of a $1 stock or buying 20 shares of a $50 stock? Most people would probably say the former because it seems like a bargain, with more opportunity for big increases from owning more shares. But the money you make in a stock isn’t based on how many shares you own. It’s based on the amount of money invested.

Many investors have a love affair with cheap stocks, but low-priced stocks are generally missing a key ingredient of past stock market winners: institutional sponsorship.

A stock can’t make big gains without the buying power of mutual funds, banks, insurance companies and other deep-pocketed investors fueling their price moves. It’s not retail trades of 100, 200 or 300 shares that cause a stock to surge higher in price, it’s big institutional block share trades of 10,000, 20,000 or more that cause these great jumps in price when they buy — as well as great price drops when they sell.

Institutional investors account for about 70% of the trading volume each day on the exchanges, so it’s a good idea to fish in the same pond as they do. Stocks priced at $1, $2 or $3 a share are not on the radar screens of institutional investors. Many of these stocks are thinly traded so it’s hard for mutual funds to buy and sell big volume shares.

Remember: Cheap stocks are cheap for a reason. Stocks sell for what they’re worth. In many cases, investors that try to grab stocks on the cheap don’t realize that they’re buying a company mired in problems with no institutional sponsorship, slowing earnings and sales growth and shrinking market share. These are bad traits for a stock to have. Institutions have research teams that seek out great opportunities, and because they buy in huge quantities over time, consider piggybacking their choices if you find these fund managers have better-than-average performance.

The reality is that your prospect of doubling your money in a $1 stock sure sounds good, but your chances are better of winning the lottery. Focus on institutional quality stocks.

Avoiding Stocks With High P/E Ratios
“Focus on stocks with low P/E ratios. They’re attractively valued and there’s a lot of upside.” How many times have you heard this statement from investment pros?

While it’s true that stocks with low P/E ratios can go higher, investors often misuse this valuation metric. Leaders in an industry group often trade at a higher premium than their peers for a simple reason: They’re expanding their market share faster because of outstanding earnings and sales growth prospects.

Stocks on your watch list should have the traits of past big stock market winners we mentioned earlier: leading price performance in their industry group, top-notch earnings and sales growth and rising fund ownership, to name a few. A dynamic new product or service doesn’t hurt either.

Stocks with “high” P/E ratios share a common trait: their performance shows there’s plenty of bullishness about the company’s future prospects. For example: In Aug 2003, stun-gun maker Taser International had a P/E of 44 before a 900% increase. At the time, the market was bullish about the firm’s earnings and sales growth prospects. The market turned out to be right. For five straight quarters, Taser has posted triple-digit earnings and sales gains.

More great examples come from the medical, retail, and oil and gas sector, which were all strong performers in the 2003-2004 period. The table below shows leading stocks in the sectors that staged big price runs from seemingly high P/E ratios. In every case, it was explosive fundamentals that drove their stock price.

At end-Oct 2004, the average P/E Ratio of stocks in the S P 500 Index was around 17.

Letting Small Losses Turn Into Big Ones
Insurance policies help us minimize risk when it comes to our health, home or car. In the stock market, most people don’t even think about buying insurance policies with individual stocks but it’s a good practice.

Cut your losses in any stock at 7% or 8% and you’ll never get hit with a big loss. This is your insurance policy. If you buy stocks at the right time, they should never fall 7-8% below your purchase price.

A small loss in a stock can easily be overcome. It’s the big ones that can do serious damage to a portfolio. Take a 50% loss on a stock, and it would need to rise 100% to get back to break-even. But if you cut your losses at 7% or 8%, a single 25% gain can wipe out three 7%-8% losses.

Here’s a set of hypothetical trades to illustrate the point. Even if you had made these seven trades over a period of time – and taken losses on five of them – you would still come out ahead by more than $3,700. That’s because the two stocks that worked out resulted in a combined profit of $5,500. And the five losses – all capped at 7% or 8% – added up to $1,569.

The rationale for that 7% Sell Rule was never clearer than in the bear market that began in Mar 2000. It caused unnecessary, severe damage to many investors’ portfolios. Small losses in tech stocks snowballed into huge ones. Some stocks lost 70%-80% or more of their value. Some will never reclaim their old highs. Others may, but it’ll be a long road back. All successful investors share one trait: they firmly recognize the importance of protecting hard-earned capital by selling fast when a stock declines 7% or 8% from where they bought it.

If a stock you own starts to fall on expanding trading volume, it’s usually better to sell first and ask questions later, rather than the other way around. Keep losses small to avoid severe damage. You can always re-enter the game if you’ve only lost 7%. Don’t ever look back after a smart sell, even if the stock rebounds. You have no way of knowing its future, so you are best off reacting to what your stock is telling you right now. Learning this trait is hard — but it will save you a great deal in the long run.

Averaging Down
Averaging down means you’re buying stock as the price falls in the hopes of getting a bargain. It’s also known as throwing good money after bad or trying to catch a falling knife. Either way, trying to lower your average cost in a stock is another risky proposition.

For example, take Amazon.com between June and Oct of 2004. Its chart revealed much institutional selling by mutual funds and other big investors.

In June, it was a $54 stock. In July, it was a $45 stock. Investors who bought in at $45 may have thought they were getting a bargain, but they weren’t paying attention to multiple heavy-volume declines in the stock. What’s the sense of buying a stock when mutual funds and other big investors are selling big blocks of shares? That’s a tough tide to swim against.

When Amazon released its earnings on Oct 21, it fell another 10% to around $37. In general, stock charts tell bullish or bearish stories long before headlines do. In Amazon’s case, heavy volume declines between July 8 to 23 told a bearish story.

Buying Stocks In A Down Market
Some investors don’t pay any attention to the current state of the market when they buy stocks. And that’s a mistake.

The goal is to buy stocks when the major indexes are showing signs of accumulation (buying: heavy volume price increases) and to sell when they’re showing signs of distribution (selling: heavy volume price declines). Three-fourths of all stocks follow the market’s trend, so watch it each day, and don’t go against the trend. It’s not hard to tell when the indexes start to show signs of duress.

Distribution days will start to crop up in the market where the indexes close lower on heavier volume than the day before. In this case, a strong market opening will fizzle into weak closes. And leading stocks in the market’s leading industry groups will start to sell off on heavy volume. This is exactly what happened at the start of the bear market in Mar 2000.

When you’re buying stocks, make sure you’re swimming with the market tide, not against it.

CAN SLIM™ and the IBD Way
If you are a reader of Investor’s Business Daily (IBD) or any other of William O’Neil’s writings, you may have noticed that these five pitfalls compliment the CAN SLIM methodology of stock selection. By avoiding low-priced stocks, looking beyond the P/E, implementing a stop-loss plan, not averaging down and monitoring the overall market, you’ll be well on your way to a sound investing strategy based on years of studies and research from IBD.

For more on CAN SLIM, see Finding The Magic Mix Of Fundamentals And Technicals or Guide To Stock-Picking Strategies .


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Five months into my #Helen4SG campaign #stockmarket #today


#business venture ideas

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Five months into my #Helen4SG campaign

I said at the outset that this campaign would be a marathon, not a sprint, and so it has proved to be.

The UN Security Council has now conducted three indicative ballots. I am still positioned in the middle of the pack.

Media interest continues to be high, not least on whether the UN might follow the lead of other major countries and organisations and look seriously at appointing a woman SG.

It was pleasing to see the outcome of a survey of UN staff which rated me highly for the position. The UN’s greatest asset is its dedicated staff. The bureaucratic systems don’t serve them well. I would want to work closely with staff to build the best, most responsive, most effective UN there could be – the world’s peoples and our staff deserve no less. In the end our work is all about people.

The New Zealand Herald editorialized on the contest on Thursday; their theme – is Helen too strong? One would hope strength of character would be a prerequisite for the position! http://m.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1 objectid=11702283

The NZ Herald also covered the outcome and implications of the third straw poll: http://linkis.com/www.nzherald.co.nz/n/APO9G

The next indicative poll will be conducted at the UN Security Council next Friday – 9 September. Following the Leaders’ week at the UN General Assembly beginning Monday 19 September, the final indicative poll will be held on Monday 26 September. It is then expected that that the UNSC will move to ballots where coloured cards – code for vetoes – by Permanent Members are used in the first week of October.


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Five Best Business Card Printing Sites #business #loans #online


#cheap business cards

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Looking to do a little professional networking? A business card might help, but if your company won t pay to print them, you work for yourself, or want control over what s on your card, you ll have to print them on your own. Thankfully, there are plenty of great sites that print high-quality custom business cards without busting your wallet in the process. Here s a look at five of the best, based on your nominations.

Earlier in the week we asked you which business card printing sites you thought were the best. You responded with some great nominees, all of which offer custom design tools, quality cards, and decent prices, but we only have room for the top five:

If you want to make a great impression, you need a great business card. If your company won t… Read more Read more

The poll is closed and the votes are counted! To see which business card printing site you declared the winner, head over to our hive five followup post to read and discuss the champion!

If you re getting your own business cards printed and you don t have a ton of money or… Read more Read more

Moo earned its place with many of you for great, high quality cards and card stock, tons of designs (and the ability to customize or make your own), decent pricing, and plenty of deals with services like About.me and Facebook for free business cards. Moo offers mini cards and full-sized business cards, and you can design your cards through a great webapp that lets you tweak and customize the front and the back with virtually any text, image, or design you choose. If you choose, you can even customize your card order to include different photos or designs on each card, ideal for photographers looking to show off their work. You can even get NFC business cards if you want. It doesn t hurt that Moo reps are always a phone call away, and their printing and shipping are remarkably fast. Plus, they don t always watermark your cards—even when you get free ones.

A personal business card doesn t have to come from the company you work for. Sometimes, you… Read more Read more

Another more affordable option than some of the others in the roundup, GotPrint offers multiple card size, stock, and paper options, but make no mistake—the service prints business cards, not photo or designer cards. Those of you who nominated GotPrint noted that it s a great option if you have access to a designer or want simple, elegant, and clean business cards with a more traditional look. If you want something fancy and special though, the service does offer a number of cuts, shapes and colors, all of which are available at competitive prices. Many of you also praised GotPrint on their fast turnaround and quick shipping.

VistaPrint s doesn t offer the same customization tools that some of the other competitors do, but their biggest benefit is their price. The company was one of the first to offer super-affordable business card printing for individuals who just wanted their own cards for themselves or their businesses, usually tossing 250-500 free cards to any new customer who signs up. Even now a quick Google search will turn up deals where you can get free cards as long as you pay shipping. Alternatively, other codes will shave a hefty amount off of your order or give you free shipping. You usually have to choose from predetermined designs and layouts and deal with a VistaPrint watermark on the back of your card unless you re willing to pay, but if cost is king and free is your favorite flavor, VistaPrint is where it s at.

An independent printing company with serious attention to detail, JukeBox offers an incredible selection of card stock types, including traditional white paper to textured pulp and beautiful recycled paper options. The company even offers wood business cards, if you want something that s truly and completely unique. They also offer a wide variety of paper colors, typefaces, and more customization and personalization options than a lot of other printing companies. You can be sure that when you order your cards from JukeBox, they won t look like everyone else s. JukeBox s pricing is competitive (although not bargain basement—their approach is that you get what you pay for.) You ll have to supply your own designs though—no online wizard to walk you through the process, but the end result is that you get truly personal cards. The company is based in Canada, but they ship worldwide.

OvernightPrints.com

Overnight Prints, like GotPrint, specializes in all kinds of mass printing, not just business cards. They give you the option to upload your own design, use their wizard, or choose from pre-defined templates, whichever you choose. You can also choose your finish, card stock, and colors—you ll find somewhat fewer customization options here (in the wizard anyway, you can upload any design you want, or contact them for something special), but the value is in the name: OvernightPrints is committed to fast, easy, affordable printing, and will get you your order quickly without breaking the bank in the process. If you re looking for fancy designer cards they may not be the best option, but if you re looking for something traditional in large quantities without spending a ton of cash, they re worth a look.

Now that you ve seen the top five, it s time to put them all to a vote to decide the winner.

No honorable mentions this week – the vast majority of your nominations went to the five above. That said, if you have a nominee that didn t make the cut but you think really should have, don t just gripe about it below, let us know why it s better than the rest, or share some example cards you ve ordered that you think are great!

Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn t included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week . Make your case for your favorite—or alternative—in the discussions below.

Gear from Kinja Deals


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Trudy s Flowers: Stunning arrangements and same day delivery #flowers, #flower #shop, #florist, #seattle,

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Trudy’s Floral Design

Contact Trudy’s Floral Design for all your same day deiivery requests. We carry the most fresh flowers for All Occasions, including Valentines, Anniversary, Sympathy, Funeral Flowers, Holiday, Birthday, Wedding or other special events. Order your flowers today with our Florist Shop in Seattle, WA. Your Local Florist Shop.

For the perfect floral arrangement, look no further! Trudy’s Floral Design offers elegant bouquets and arrangements for every occasion or just because. Trust in your local Seattle, Washington florist to fill your flower needs. We offer flower delivery to Seattle, WA and all of King county. Same day delivery is also offered at no additional cost!

Our customers are like family. The staff here at Trudy’s Floral Design are professional flower experts and will not let you settle for anything less than the best. Let us cater to your floral needs – you will not be disappointed! We listen to our clients and make sure that every order is handled with genuine care. Satisfaction is guarenteed when shopping at Trudy’s Floral Design.

Delight your friends and family with a beautiful, fresh arrangement from Trudy’s Floral Design in Seattle, Washinton
Local and trust florist

Other shops buy their flowers in bulk and without care – not Trudy’s Floral design . We use only the freshest flowers to fill your floral needs. If you want your friends and family to marvel at beautiful buds, place an order today. Our gorgeous arrangements will surely surprise and delight!

Trudy’s Floral Design in Seattle, WA provides flower delivery service to the following areas and zip codes in Washington:

98004, 98005, 98006, 98007, 98011, 98012, 98020, 98021, 98026, 98028, 98033, 98034, 98036, 98037,

98040, 98043, 98052, 98056, 98072, 98087 98101, 98102, 98103, 98104, 98405, 98106, 98107,

98108, 98109, 98112, 98115, 98117, 98118, 98119, 98121, 98122, 98125, 98126, 98133, 98134,

98144, 98148, 98155, 98166, 98168, 98177, 98178, 98188, 98199, 98204, 98208


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