Tag: Explained

What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences

#investing in stocks

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What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences Explained

NEW YORK (TheStreet ) — When you step into the investing jungle, what will you find there? Lions (stocks) and tigers (bonds) and bears (cash), for sure. But they’re not as scary as you think.

These three are the main investment classes, but the one we’ll be tracking exclusively in this guide is the king of the jungle: stocks.

You may have heard stocks referred to as equities or securities. The reason they’re called equities is that you purchase an equity, or ownership, share of a company. Stock is also called a security for the same reason, because you’re securing a share of ownership in the company. That’s right; you’ll be a business owner just like you’ve always dreamed!

But, as you know from everyday life, there are terrifically run businesses and there are businesses that make you say, “I’ll never go back there again!” How do you know the difference before you buy the stock? That’s what this guided tour will be teaching you.

So when you buy stock, you become part owner of the company — maybe only a very small part, but still an owner. The size of the part you own, by the way, is irrelevant to your personal objectives.

We won’t cover bonds in this guide, but it’s important for you to know that they’re out there in the investing jungle. When you buy a bond, you don’t become part owner of a company — you’re the bank! You lend the company, or others, money. When companies, counties, municipalities or the U.S. government need to raise money, but not raise taxes or prices, they have bond offerings.

Bonds are loans, with a maturity date, and a percentage rate, promised to you, the Bank of I.O.U. The maturity date and set percentage rates can make bonds an attractive investment as part of a stabilizing influence in your investment portfolio. But you don’t want just bonds in your portfolio — over the long haul, stocks outperform bonds. If you want to purchase and own bonds, it’s very important to have quality bonds in your portfolio. If you want to continue to learn about bonds, see “Why Buy Bonds?”

When financial advisers suggest you diversify, or vary your investments, they’re advising you to spread out any potential risk, or decline, in your investment portfolio. Your investment portfolio is a collection of all of your investments, which could include assets from each of these three classes.

It’s like a nutritionist telling you to eat a little bit of each type of food to maximize your health. A balance of green vegetables, lean meats, dairy products and whole grain breads keep you physically and mentally healthy. Likewise, you want to invest your money in a variety of assets in your portfolio: stocks, bonds and cash products. Cash investments include products such as certificates of deposit (CDs) and money market mutual funds that keep you financially healthy.

Ready then? Get out your compass.


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Different Types of Mortgage Loans Explained – 2017 Update #mortgage, #types, #explained, #2017


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The Different Types of Mortgage Loans in 2017, Explained

What are the different types of mortgage loans available to home buyers in 2017, and what are the pros and cons of each? This is one of the most common questions we receive here at the Home Buying Institute. This page offers some basic information about the types of loans available in 2017. Follow the hyperlinks provided for even more information. And be sure to send us your questions!

Loan Reps Are Standing By

Did you know you can get free, no-obligation mortgage quotes online? It’s a great way to get the ball rolling.

If you already understand the basic types of home loans, and you’re ready to move forward with the process, use one of the links provided below. Otherwise, keep reading below to learn about the different financing options available in 2017. You can always come back to these links later on.

Types of Mortgages Available in 2017, Explained

There are many different types of mortgages available to home buyers. They are all thoroughly explained on this website. But here, for the sake of simplicity, we have boiled it all down to the following options and categories.

Option 1: Fixed vs. Adjustable Rate

As a borrower, one of your first choices is whether you want a fixed-rate or an adjustable-rate mortgage loan. All loans fit into one of these two categories, or a combination hybrid category. Here’s the primary difference between the two types:

  • Fixed-rate mortgage loans have the same interest rate for the entire repayment term. Because of this, the size of your monthly payment will stay the same, month after month, and year after year. It will never change. This is true even for long-term financing options, such as the 30-year fixed-rate loan. It has the same interest rate, and the same monthly payment, for the entire term.
  • Adjustable-rate mortgage loans (ARMs) have an interest rate that will change or adjust from time to time. Typically, the rate on an ARM will change every year after an initial period of remaining fixed. It is therefore referred to as a hybrid product. A hybrid ARM loan is one that starts off with a fixed or unchanging interest rate, before switching over to an adjustable rate. For instance, the 5/1 ARM loan carries a fixed rate of interest for the first five years, after which it begins to adjust every one year, or annually. That’s what the 5 and the 1 signify in the name.

As you might imagine, both of these types of mortgages have certain pros and cons associated with them. Use the link above for a side-by-side comparison of these pros and cons. Here they are in a nutshell: The ARM loan starts off with a lower rate than the fixed type of loan, but it has the uncertainty of adjustments later on. With an adjustable mortgage product, the rate and monthly payments can rise over time. The primary benefit of a fixed loan is that the rate and monthly payments never change. But you will pay for that stability through higher interest charges, when compared to the initial rate of an ARM.

Option 2: Government-Insured vs. Conventional Loans

So you’ll have to choose between a fixed and adjustable-rate type of mortgage, as explained in the previous section. But there are other choices as well. You’ll also have to decide whether you want to use a government-insured home loan (such as FHA or VA), or a conventional regular type of loan. The differences between these two mortgage types are covered below.

A conventional home loan is one that is not insured or guaranteed by the federal government in any way. This distinguishes it from the three government-backed mortgage types explained below (FHA, VA and USDA).

Government-insured home loans include the following:

FHA Loans
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgage insurance program is managed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which is a department of the federal government. FHA loans are available to all types of borrowers, not just first-time buyers. The government insures the lender against losses that might result from borrower default. Advantage. This program allows you to make a down payment as low as 3.5% of the purchase price. Disadvantage. You’ll have to pay for mortgage insurance, which will increase the size of your monthly payments.

VA Loans
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers a loan program to military service members and their families. Similar to the FHA program, these types of mortgages are guaranteed by the federal government. This means the VA will reimburse the lender for any losses that may result from borrower default. The primary advantage of this program (and it’s a big one) is that borrowers can receive 100% financing for the purchase of a home. That means no down payment whatsoever.
Learn more: VA loan eligibility requirements

USDA / RHS Loans
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers a loan program for rural borrowers who meet certain income requirements. The program is managed by the Rural Housing Service (RHS), which is part of the Department of Agriculture. This type of mortgage loan is offered to rural residents who have a steady, low or modest income, and yet are unable to obtain adequate housing through conventional financing. Income must be no higher than 115% of the adjusted area median income [AMI]. The AMI varies by county. See the link below for details.
Learn more: USDA borrower eligibility website

Combining. It’s important to note that borrowers can combine the types of mortgage types explained above. For example, you might choose an FHA loan with a fixed interest rate, or a conventional home loan with an adjustable rate (ARM).

Option 3: Jumbo vs. Conforming Loan

There is another distinction that needs to be made, and it’s based on the size of the loan. Depending on the amount you are trying to borrow, you might fall into either the jumbo or conforming category. Here’s the difference between these two mortgage types.

  • A conforming loan is one that meets the underwriting guidelines of Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, particularly where size is concerned. Fannie and Freddie are the two government-controlled corporations that purchase and sell mortgage-backed securities (MBS). Simply put, they buy loans from the lenders who generate them, and then sell them to investors via Wall Street. A conforming loan falls within their maximum size limits, and otherwise conforms to pre-established criteria.
  • A jumbo loan. on the other hand, exceeds the conforming loan limits established by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. This type of mortgage represents a higher risk for the lender, mainly due to its size. As a result, jumbo borrowers typically must have excellent credit and larger down payments, when compared to conforming loans. Interest rates are generally higher with the jumbo products, as well.

This page explains the different types of mortgage loans available in 2017. But it only provides a brief overview of each type. Follow the hyperlinks provided above to learn more about each option. We also encourage you to continue your research beyond this website. Education is the key to making smart decisions, as a home buyer or mortgage shopper.

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Martin Lewis Money Saving Expert reveals his best cash ISAs for this year #apr

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Martin Lewis – the best cash ISAs and what YOU need to know before investing

Firstly, Martin explained cash ISAs are just savings accounts you never pay tax on.

He said: Everyone in the UK who’s 16 or over gets an ISA allowance at the start of each tax year.

For 2016/17 it’s 15,240 if you put money in it then it isn’t eligible to be taxed, and this stays the same year after year.

Many are confused as to whether cash ISAs are worth it, as all savings are now tax free.

Related articles

ISA 2017: What happens if I’ve paid too much into my ISA?

  • ISA 2017: If you already have an ISA do you get 2 allowances each year

  • Martin explained: On 6 April 2016 the new personal savings allowance (PSA) launched.

    It means all savings are now automatically paid tax-free. Basic 20 per cent rate taxpayers can earn up to 1,000 interest a year without needing to pay tax on it, higher 40 per cent rate taxpayers 500 (top 45 per cent taxpayers will always pay tax on savings).

    For most people that will be enough to make all their savings tax-free, and therefore the question is simply what pays the highest rate?

    The answer to that isn’t cash ISAs – so for most people with under around 20,000 of total savings, cash ISAs won’t be a winner.

    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert, shared his top tips on ISAs and which are best this year

    ISA advice from Martin Lewis

    Thu, February 9, 2017

    ISA advice from Money Saving Expert Martin Lewis.

    With this in mind, when is a cash ISA worth it? Martin explained why you might still want one and said: The most important thing to note is that cash ISA interest doesn’t count towards your PSA, so you can earn it tax-free, and still have your full 1,000 (or 500) PSA allowance.

    Therefore for top-rate taxpayers or bigger savers who’ve used up the PSA, there are big tax advantages of saving in a cash ISA.

    You can now save up to 15,240 in a cash ISA after a radical overhaul of the accounts in 2014.

    Martin also revealed from April 2017, due to the launch of the new Lifetime ISA, the limit will increase to 20,000.

    If you already have a lot of savings, an ISA could be a great option for you

    This tax year, for the first time, flexible cash ISAs have been introduced.

    Martin explained: This means you can replace cash withdrawn from an ISA earlier in the same tax year without it using up your year’s ISA limit.

    However, each different provider can decide whether they will let you do this.

    For those saving to buy their first home, Martin advised a Help to Buy ISA, not a cash ISA, was the best one to open.

    Most of these accounts can be applied for online

    This is because of the 25 per cent bonus added on to savings with the Help to Buy makes it worth it, despite the fact the cap on how much you can save is lower. You can t save into a cash ISA and Help to Buy ISA in the same tax year.

    Finally, Martin warned those who already have an ISA to check rates on old ISAs as many are pitiful .

    Martin recommended a selection of cash ISAs for different reasons.

    Virgin Money Defined Access E-ISA 1.01 per cent AER was nominated as have the top rate, though limited withdrawals.

    He flagged up the ns i one per cent AER Direct ISA as having a decent rate with unlimited withdrawals – though the rate is dropping soon.

    The Post Office Online ISA has an OK rate of 0.9 per cent AER with a bonus that acts as a minimum rate guarantee.

    Finally, he pointed to the Coventry Easy Access ISA with a 0.9 per cent rate as OK – and you only need 1 to open it.

    Related articles


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    Business address explained #business #checking #account


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    Business address

    Contents

    What is a business address?

    A business address is the address where your business is situated and can be contacted by customers, suppliers, service providers and other general business associates and third parties. It is essentially the contact address you use for deliveries, non-statutory business mail and customer returns. If you have a shop or office, for example, this would be your business address. If you have multiple trading locations throughout the UK and abroad, you will have several business addresses.

    Do I have to provide a business address for Companies House?

    A business address is not a legal requirement, so there is no need to provide this information for Companies House when you incorporate a company or limited liability partnership. You only need to provide a registered office address and service address for Companies House, because this information is placed on public record.

    What is the purpose of a business address?

    A business address can be used for many different reasons:

    1. Creating a professional image – particularly relevant if you work from home.
    2. Protecting the privacy of your home.
    3. If you run a limited company or LLP, a business address will be used to receive non-statutory, general business correspondence from anyone other than Companies House and HMRC.
    4. If you are a sole trader, a business address will be used to receive official and general business mail from HMRC, clients, banks, business contacts and other third parties.
    5. Product return address for customers.
    6. Accepting deliveries – materials, stock, equipment, etc.
    7. Receiving order forms, invoices, postal orders payments and cheques.

    Where can my business address be situated?

    A business address can be situated anywhere in the world. There are no restrictions, so you can use any address you like. You can also have multiple business addresses if you trade in more than one place or you want to attract more clients and expand your business.

    What types of addresses can be used as a business address?

    You can use any kind of address that you have permission to use, including:

    • Your home address
    • Your trading address – the address where the majority of your business activities take place
    • The registered office address of your company or LLP
    • A PO Box or mailbox service from providers like UPS, FedEx and Mail Boxes Etc
    • A professional mail forwarding service from a company formation agent
    • Any other type of residential or non-residential address in the UK or overseas that you have permission to use

    Should I use a residential or non-residential address?

    You can use either type of address as a business address – it’s entirely up to you. Small business owners and entrepreneurs often use a residential address for this purpose because it’s convenient and affordable – especially for those who work from home. However, it is important to consider your privacy and the type of business image you want to establish.

    Instead of using a home address, many people use a professional, non-residential business address. This type of address service is usually provided by company formation agents who offer the use of their business premises as a business address for limited companies and LLPs. A non-residential address enables you to protect the privacy of your home, create a credible and impressive corporate image, and minimise the risk of business contacts turning up at your private residence.

    Can I have an overseas business address?

    Yes, you can have a business address anywhere in the world. Unlike the rules for registered offices, there are no such restrictions for business addresses.

    Can I have more than one business address?

    Yes, you can have as many business addresses as you like in the UK and all around the world. If your business has any foreign branches, you would have a different business address for each branch. If you want to trade in different cities and/or countries, a business address is an effective way to create a professional presence and contact address at each location.

    Can I change my business address?

    Yes, you can change your business address whenever you like. There is no need to report any such changes to Companies House or HMRC, but you must notify your clients, suppliers, investors, service providers and other business contacts to ensure they can reach you at your new location.

    Do I have to work from my business address?

    There is no requirement for you to work from your business address. You can simply use a business address for general contact purposes and carry out your work elsewhere. It is entirely up to you. This is common practice for business owners who work from home. The use of a non-residential business address enables them to create a professional, credible image to the rest of the world.

    What is the difference between a business address and a registered office?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you – but it is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A registered office is the statutory mailing address and official inspection location of a limited company or LLP. This type of address is a legal requirement of company formation and is disclosed on public record. Read our Registered office address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my registered office address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as a business address and a registered office, provided the nominated address meets all legal requirements of a registered office, and you have permission to use the address for both of these purposes. Many businesses use the same address for both purposes because it is the most practical and convenient choice.

    What is the difference between a business address and a service address?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you. It is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A service address is the statutory mailing address of an individual company director or LLP member, and this type of address is displayed on public record. Take a look at our Service Address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my service address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as your business address and service address (and registered office), as long as the nominated address meets all legal requirements and you have permission to use it for these purposes.

    Do I have to display any corporate information at my business address?

    There is no legal requirement to disclose any corporate details at your business address, unless it is also used as the registered office of your company or LLP. Read our Registered office guidance page for information about the legal requirements of this type of address.

    Are business addresses displayed on public record?

    Unlike registered office and service address details, there is no need for you to provide your business address details for Companies House; therefore, your business address(es) will not be made available to the public on the official register of companies.

    We hope you found the information you were looking for; however if you haven’t ask a new question.


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    Business finance explained #business #name


    #business finance loan

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    Business finance explained

    4. Loans

    A loan is credit, usually in the form of cash, that you borrow and repay over an agreed length of time. Banks, community development finance institutions, other businesses and even friends and family can provide businesses with loans.

    As well as repaying the amount you’ve borrowed, you normally have to pay interest on a loan. The amount will depend on:

    • how long you need the loan for
    • how much you borrow
    • whether the loan is ‘secured’ – eg if you own your home and agree to transfer ownership to the loan provider if you don’t keep up your payments
    • other factors, like the Bank of England base rate

    The interest rate may be:

    • fixed, so it won’t change for the length of the loan
    • variable, so it will change with the Bank of England base rate or the bank’s cost of borrowing

    Reasons for getting a loan

    Loans are generally suitable for:

    • paying for assets – eg vehicles or computers
    • start-up capital
    • instances where the amount of money you need won’t change

    It’s not a good idea to take out a loan for ongoing expenses – you might find it difficult to keep up repayments.

    Advantages

    • unlike overdrafts. loans are not repayable on demand – this means that you’re guaranteed the money for the whole term (generally 3 to 10 years)
    • loans can be tied to the lifetime of equipment or other assets you’re borrowing the money to pay for
    • you won’t have to give the lender a percentage of your profits or a share in your company

    Disadvantages

    • loans aren’t very flexible – eg you may have to pay charges if you repay early
    • you might struggle to meet monthly payments if your customers don’t pay you
    • if your loan is secured against your personal property or assets (eg your home) you could lose them if you don’t keep up the payments
    • the cost of repayments for variable rate loans can change, making it harder to plan your finances

    Find funding

    You can look for either:


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    Business address explained #business #current #events


    #business address

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    Business address

    Contents

    What is a business address?

    A business address is the address where your business is situated and can be contacted by customers, suppliers, service providers and other general business associates and third parties. It is essentially the contact address you use for deliveries, non-statutory business mail and customer returns. If you have a shop or office, for example, this would be your business address. If you have multiple trading locations throughout the UK and abroad, you will have several business addresses.

    Do I have to provide a business address for Companies House?

    A business address is not a legal requirement, so there is no need to provide this information for Companies House when you incorporate a company or limited liability partnership. You only need to provide a registered office address and service address for Companies House, because this information is placed on public record.

    What is the purpose of a business address?

    A business address can be used for many different reasons:

    1. Creating a professional image – particularly relevant if you work from home.
    2. Protecting the privacy of your home.
    3. If you run a limited company or LLP, a business address will be used to receive non-statutory, general business correspondence from anyone other than Companies House and HMRC.
    4. If you are a sole trader, a business address will be used to receive official and general business mail from HMRC, clients, banks, business contacts and other third parties.
    5. Product return address for customers.
    6. Accepting deliveries – materials, stock, equipment, etc.
    7. Receiving order forms, invoices, postal orders payments and cheques.

    Where can my business address be situated?

    A business address can be situated anywhere in the world. There are no restrictions, so you can use any address you like. You can also have multiple business addresses if you trade in more than one place or you want to attract more clients and expand your business.

    What types of addresses can be used as a business address?

    You can use any kind of address that you have permission to use, including:

    • Your home address
    • Your trading address – the address where the majority of your business activities take place
    • The registered office address of your company or LLP
    • A PO Box or mailbox service from providers like UPS, FedEx and Mail Boxes Etc
    • A professional mail forwarding service from a company formation agent
    • Any other type of residential or non-residential address in the UK or overseas that you have permission to use

    Should I use a residential or non-residential address?

    You can use either type of address as a business address – it’s entirely up to you. Small business owners and entrepreneurs often use a residential address for this purpose because it’s convenient and affordable – especially for those who work from home. However, it is important to consider your privacy and the type of business image you want to establish.

    Instead of using a home address, many people use a professional, non-residential business address. This type of address service is usually provided by company formation agents who offer the use of their business premises as a business address for limited companies and LLPs. A non-residential address enables you to protect the privacy of your home, create a credible and impressive corporate image, and minimise the risk of business contacts turning up at your private residence.

    Can I have an overseas business address?

    Yes, you can have a business address anywhere in the world. Unlike the rules for registered offices, there are no such restrictions for business addresses.

    Can I have more than one business address?

    Yes, you can have as many business addresses as you like in the UK and all around the world. If your business has any foreign branches, you would have a different business address for each branch. If you want to trade in different cities and/or countries, a business address is an effective way to create a professional presence and contact address at each location.

    Can I change my business address?

    Yes, you can change your business address whenever you like. There is no need to report any such changes to Companies House or HMRC, but you must notify your clients, suppliers, investors, service providers and other business contacts to ensure they can reach you at your new location.

    Do I have to work from my business address?

    There is no requirement for you to work from your business address. You can simply use a business address for general contact purposes and carry out your work elsewhere. It is entirely up to you. This is common practice for business owners who work from home. The use of a non-residential business address enables them to create a professional, credible image to the rest of the world.

    What is the difference between a business address and a registered office?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you – but it is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A registered office is the statutory mailing address and official inspection location of a limited company or LLP. This type of address is a legal requirement of company formation and is disclosed on public record. Read our Registered office address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my registered office address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as a business address and a registered office, provided the nominated address meets all legal requirements of a registered office, and you have permission to use the address for both of these purposes. Many businesses use the same address for both purposes because it is the most practical and convenient choice.

    What is the difference between a business address and a service address?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you. It is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A service address is the statutory mailing address of an individual company director or LLP member, and this type of address is displayed on public record. Take a look at our Service Address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my service address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as your business address and service address (and registered office), as long as the nominated address meets all legal requirements and you have permission to use it for these purposes.

    Do I have to display any corporate information at my business address?

    There is no legal requirement to disclose any corporate details at your business address, unless it is also used as the registered office of your company or LLP. Read our Registered office guidance page for information about the legal requirements of this type of address.

    Are business addresses displayed on public record?

    Unlike registered office and service address details, there is no need for you to provide your business address details for Companies House; therefore, your business address(es) will not be made available to the public on the official register of companies.

    We hope you found the information you were looking for; however if you haven’t ask a new question.


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    Business address explained #cincinnati #business #courier


    #business address

    #

    Business address

    Contents

    What is a business address?

    A business address is the address where your business is situated and can be contacted by customers, suppliers, service providers and other general business associates and third parties. It is essentially the contact address you use for deliveries, non-statutory business mail and customer returns. If you have a shop or office, for example, this would be your business address. If you have multiple trading locations throughout the UK and abroad, you will have several business addresses.

    Do I have to provide a business address for Companies House?

    A business address is not a legal requirement, so there is no need to provide this information for Companies House when you incorporate a company or limited liability partnership. You only need to provide a registered office address and service address for Companies House, because this information is placed on public record.

    What is the purpose of a business address?

    A business address can be used for many different reasons:

    1. Creating a professional image – particularly relevant if you work from home.
    2. Protecting the privacy of your home.
    3. If you run a limited company or LLP, a business address will be used to receive non-statutory, general business correspondence from anyone other than Companies House and HMRC.
    4. If you are a sole trader, a business address will be used to receive official and general business mail from HMRC, clients, banks, business contacts and other third parties.
    5. Product return address for customers.
    6. Accepting deliveries – materials, stock, equipment, etc.
    7. Receiving order forms, invoices, postal orders payments and cheques.

    Where can my business address be situated?

    A business address can be situated anywhere in the world. There are no restrictions, so you can use any address you like. You can also have multiple business addresses if you trade in more than one place or you want to attract more clients and expand your business.

    What types of addresses can be used as a business address?

    You can use any kind of address that you have permission to use, including:

    • Your home address
    • Your trading address – the address where the majority of your business activities take place
    • The registered office address of your company or LLP
    • A PO Box or mailbox service from providers like UPS, FedEx and Mail Boxes Etc
    • A professional mail forwarding service from a company formation agent
    • Any other type of residential or non-residential address in the UK or overseas that you have permission to use

    Should I use a residential or non-residential address?

    You can use either type of address as a business address – it’s entirely up to you. Small business owners and entrepreneurs often use a residential address for this purpose because it’s convenient and affordable – especially for those who work from home. However, it is important to consider your privacy and the type of business image you want to establish.

    Instead of using a home address, many people use a professional, non-residential business address. This type of address service is usually provided by company formation agents who offer the use of their business premises as a business address for limited companies and LLPs. A non-residential address enables you to protect the privacy of your home, create a credible and impressive corporate image, and minimise the risk of business contacts turning up at your private residence.

    Can I have an overseas business address?

    Yes, you can have a business address anywhere in the world. Unlike the rules for registered offices, there are no such restrictions for business addresses.

    Can I have more than one business address?

    Yes, you can have as many business addresses as you like in the UK and all around the world. If your business has any foreign branches, you would have a different business address for each branch. If you want to trade in different cities and/or countries, a business address is an effective way to create a professional presence and contact address at each location.

    Can I change my business address?

    Yes, you can change your business address whenever you like. There is no need to report any such changes to Companies House or HMRC, but you must notify your clients, suppliers, investors, service providers and other business contacts to ensure they can reach you at your new location.

    Do I have to work from my business address?

    There is no requirement for you to work from your business address. You can simply use a business address for general contact purposes and carry out your work elsewhere. It is entirely up to you. This is common practice for business owners who work from home. The use of a non-residential business address enables them to create a professional, credible image to the rest of the world.

    What is the difference between a business address and a registered office?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you – but it is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A registered office is the statutory mailing address and official inspection location of a limited company or LLP. This type of address is a legal requirement of company formation and is disclosed on public record. Read our Registered office address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my registered office address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as a business address and a registered office, provided the nominated address meets all legal requirements of a registered office, and you have permission to use the address for both of these purposes. Many businesses use the same address for both purposes because it is the most practical and convenient choice.

    What is the difference between a business address and a service address?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you. It is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A service address is the statutory mailing address of an individual company director or LLP member, and this type of address is displayed on public record. Take a look at our Service Address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my service address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as your business address and service address (and registered office), as long as the nominated address meets all legal requirements and you have permission to use it for these purposes.

    Do I have to display any corporate information at my business address?

    There is no legal requirement to disclose any corporate details at your business address, unless it is also used as the registered office of your company or LLP. Read our Registered office guidance page for information about the legal requirements of this type of address.

    Are business addresses displayed on public record?

    Unlike registered office and service address details, there is no need for you to provide your business address details for Companies House; therefore, your business address(es) will not be made available to the public on the official register of companies.

    We hope you found the information you were looking for; however if you haven’t ask a new question.


    Tags : , ,

    Business address explained #business #consultant


    #business address

    #

    Business address

    Contents

    What is a business address?

    A business address is the address where your business is situated and can be contacted by customers, suppliers, service providers and other general business associates and third parties. It is essentially the contact address you use for deliveries, non-statutory business mail and customer returns. If you have a shop or office, for example, this would be your business address. If you have multiple trading locations throughout the UK and abroad, you will have several business addresses.

    Do I have to provide a business address for Companies House?

    A business address is not a legal requirement, so there is no need to provide this information for Companies House when you incorporate a company or limited liability partnership. You only need to provide a registered office address and service address for Companies House, because this information is placed on public record.

    What is the purpose of a business address?

    A business address can be used for many different reasons:

    1. Creating a professional image – particularly relevant if you work from home.
    2. Protecting the privacy of your home.
    3. If you run a limited company or LLP, a business address will be used to receive non-statutory, general business correspondence from anyone other than Companies House and HMRC.
    4. If you are a sole trader, a business address will be used to receive official and general business mail from HMRC, clients, banks, business contacts and other third parties.
    5. Product return address for customers.
    6. Accepting deliveries – materials, stock, equipment, etc.
    7. Receiving order forms, invoices, postal orders payments and cheques.

    Where can my business address be situated?

    A business address can be situated anywhere in the world. There are no restrictions, so you can use any address you like. You can also have multiple business addresses if you trade in more than one place or you want to attract more clients and expand your business.

    What types of addresses can be used as a business address?

    You can use any kind of address that you have permission to use, including:

    • Your home address
    • Your trading address – the address where the majority of your business activities take place
    • The registered office address of your company or LLP
    • A PO Box or mailbox service from providers like UPS, FedEx and Mail Boxes Etc
    • A professional mail forwarding service from a company formation agent
    • Any other type of residential or non-residential address in the UK or overseas that you have permission to use

    Should I use a residential or non-residential address?

    You can use either type of address as a business address – it’s entirely up to you. Small business owners and entrepreneurs often use a residential address for this purpose because it’s convenient and affordable – especially for those who work from home. However, it is important to consider your privacy and the type of business image you want to establish.

    Instead of using a home address, many people use a professional, non-residential business address. This type of address service is usually provided by company formation agents who offer the use of their business premises as a business address for limited companies and LLPs. A non-residential address enables you to protect the privacy of your home, create a credible and impressive corporate image, and minimise the risk of business contacts turning up at your private residence.

    Can I have an overseas business address?

    Yes, you can have a business address anywhere in the world. Unlike the rules for registered offices, there are no such restrictions for business addresses.

    Can I have more than one business address?

    Yes, you can have as many business addresses as you like in the UK and all around the world. If your business has any foreign branches, you would have a different business address for each branch. If you want to trade in different cities and/or countries, a business address is an effective way to create a professional presence and contact address at each location.

    Can I change my business address?

    Yes, you can change your business address whenever you like. There is no need to report any such changes to Companies House or HMRC, but you must notify your clients, suppliers, investors, service providers and other business contacts to ensure they can reach you at your new location.

    Do I have to work from my business address?

    There is no requirement for you to work from your business address. You can simply use a business address for general contact purposes and carry out your work elsewhere. It is entirely up to you. This is common practice for business owners who work from home. The use of a non-residential business address enables them to create a professional, credible image to the rest of the world.

    What is the difference between a business address and a registered office?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you – but it is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A registered office is the statutory mailing address and official inspection location of a limited company or LLP. This type of address is a legal requirement of company formation and is disclosed on public record. Read our Registered office address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my registered office address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as a business address and a registered office, provided the nominated address meets all legal requirements of a registered office, and you have permission to use the address for both of these purposes. Many businesses use the same address for both purposes because it is the most practical and convenient choice.

    What is the difference between a business address and a service address?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you. It is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A service address is the statutory mailing address of an individual company director or LLP member, and this type of address is displayed on public record. Take a look at our Service Address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my service address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as your business address and service address (and registered office), as long as the nominated address meets all legal requirements and you have permission to use it for these purposes.

    Do I have to display any corporate information at my business address?

    There is no legal requirement to disclose any corporate details at your business address, unless it is also used as the registered office of your company or LLP. Read our Registered office guidance page for information about the legal requirements of this type of address.

    Are business addresses displayed on public record?

    Unlike registered office and service address details, there is no need for you to provide your business address details for Companies House; therefore, your business address(es) will not be made available to the public on the official register of companies.

    We hope you found the information you were looking for; however if you haven’t ask a new question.


    Tags : , ,

    Business address explained #business #cards


    #business address

    #

    Business address

    Contents

    What is a business address?

    A business address is the address where your business is situated and can be contacted by customers, suppliers, service providers and other general business associates and third parties. It is essentially the contact address you use for deliveries, non-statutory business mail and customer returns. If you have a shop or office, for example, this would be your business address. If you have multiple trading locations throughout the UK and abroad, you will have several business addresses.

    Do I have to provide a business address for Companies House?

    A business address is not a legal requirement, so there is no need to provide this information for Companies House when you incorporate a company or limited liability partnership. You only need to provide a registered office address and service address for Companies House, because this information is placed on public record.

    What is the purpose of a business address?

    A business address can be used for many different reasons:

    1. Creating a professional image – particularly relevant if you work from home.
    2. Protecting the privacy of your home.
    3. If you run a limited company or LLP, a business address will be used to receive non-statutory, general business correspondence from anyone other than Companies House and HMRC.
    4. If you are a sole trader, a business address will be used to receive official and general business mail from HMRC, clients, banks, business contacts and other third parties.
    5. Product return address for customers.
    6. Accepting deliveries – materials, stock, equipment, etc.
    7. Receiving order forms, invoices, postal orders payments and cheques.

    Where can my business address be situated?

    A business address can be situated anywhere in the world. There are no restrictions, so you can use any address you like. You can also have multiple business addresses if you trade in more than one place or you want to attract more clients and expand your business.

    What types of addresses can be used as a business address?

    You can use any kind of address that you have permission to use, including:

    • Your home address
    • Your trading address – the address where the majority of your business activities take place
    • The registered office address of your company or LLP
    • A PO Box or mailbox service from providers like UPS, FedEx and Mail Boxes Etc
    • A professional mail forwarding service from a company formation agent
    • Any other type of residential or non-residential address in the UK or overseas that you have permission to use

    Should I use a residential or non-residential address?

    You can use either type of address as a business address – it’s entirely up to you. Small business owners and entrepreneurs often use a residential address for this purpose because it’s convenient and affordable – especially for those who work from home. However, it is important to consider your privacy and the type of business image you want to establish.

    Instead of using a home address, many people use a professional, non-residential business address. This type of address service is usually provided by company formation agents who offer the use of their business premises as a business address for limited companies and LLPs. A non-residential address enables you to protect the privacy of your home, create a credible and impressive corporate image, and minimise the risk of business contacts turning up at your private residence.

    Can I have an overseas business address?

    Yes, you can have a business address anywhere in the world. Unlike the rules for registered offices, there are no such restrictions for business addresses.

    Can I have more than one business address?

    Yes, you can have as many business addresses as you like in the UK and all around the world. If your business has any foreign branches, you would have a different business address for each branch. If you want to trade in different cities and/or countries, a business address is an effective way to create a professional presence and contact address at each location.

    Can I change my business address?

    Yes, you can change your business address whenever you like. There is no need to report any such changes to Companies House or HMRC, but you must notify your clients, suppliers, investors, service providers and other business contacts to ensure they can reach you at your new location.

    Do I have to work from my business address?

    There is no requirement for you to work from your business address. You can simply use a business address for general contact purposes and carry out your work elsewhere. It is entirely up to you. This is common practice for business owners who work from home. The use of a non-residential business address enables them to create a professional, credible image to the rest of the world.

    What is the difference between a business address and a registered office?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you – but it is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A registered office is the statutory mailing address and official inspection location of a limited company or LLP. This type of address is a legal requirement of company formation and is disclosed on public record. Read our Registered office address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my registered office address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as a business address and a registered office, provided the nominated address meets all legal requirements of a registered office, and you have permission to use the address for both of these purposes. Many businesses use the same address for both purposes because it is the most practical and convenient choice.

    What is the difference between a business address and a service address?

    A business address is where your business is situated or where you would like people to contact you. It is not a legal requirement of company formation, nor is this type of address disclosed on public record. A service address is the statutory mailing address of an individual company director or LLP member, and this type of address is displayed on public record. Take a look at our Service Address guidance page for more information about the requirements and restrictions of this type of address.

    Can my business address be the same as my service address?

    Yes, you can use the same address as your business address and service address (and registered office), as long as the nominated address meets all legal requirements and you have permission to use it for these purposes.

    Do I have to display any corporate information at my business address?

    There is no legal requirement to disclose any corporate details at your business address, unless it is also used as the registered office of your company or LLP. Read our Registered office guidance page for information about the legal requirements of this type of address.

    Are business addresses displayed on public record?

    Unlike registered office and service address details, there is no need for you to provide your business address details for Companies House; therefore, your business address(es) will not be made available to the public on the official register of companies.

    We hope you found the information you were looking for; however if you haven’t ask a new question.


    Tags : , ,

    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences

    #investing in stocks

    #

    What Is Common Stock and What Is Preferred Stock? Stock Types and Their Differences Explained

    NEW YORK (TheStreet ) — When you step into the investing jungle, what will you find there? Lions (stocks) and tigers (bonds) and bears (cash), for sure. But they’re not as scary as you think.

    These three are the main investment classes, but the one we’ll be tracking exclusively in this guide is the king of the jungle: stocks.

    You may have heard stocks referred to as equities or securities. The reason they’re called equities is that you purchase an equity, or ownership, share of a company. Stock is also called a security for the same reason, because you’re securing a share of ownership in the company. That’s right; you’ll be a business owner just like you’ve always dreamed!

    But, as you know from everyday life, there are terrifically run businesses and there are businesses that make you say, “I’ll never go back there again!” How do you know the difference before you buy the stock? That’s what this guided tour will be teaching you.

    So when you buy stock, you become part owner of the company — maybe only a very small part, but still an owner. The size of the part you own, by the way, is irrelevant to your personal objectives.

    We won’t cover bonds in this guide, but it’s important for you to know that they’re out there in the investing jungle. When you buy a bond, you don’t become part owner of a company — you’re the bank! You lend the company, or others, money. When companies, counties, municipalities or the U.S. government need to raise money, but not raise taxes or prices, they have bond offerings.

    Bonds are loans, with a maturity date, and a percentage rate, promised to you, the Bank of I.O.U. The maturity date and set percentage rates can make bonds an attractive investment as part of a stabilizing influence in your investment portfolio. But you don’t want just bonds in your portfolio — over the long haul, stocks outperform bonds. If you want to purchase and own bonds, it’s very important to have quality bonds in your portfolio. If you want to continue to learn about bonds, see “Why Buy Bonds?”

    When financial advisers suggest you diversify, or vary your investments, they’re advising you to spread out any potential risk, or decline, in your investment portfolio. Your investment portfolio is a collection of all of your investments, which could include assets from each of these three classes.

    It’s like a nutritionist telling you to eat a little bit of each type of food to maximize your health. A balance of green vegetables, lean meats, dairy products and whole grain breads keep you physically and mentally healthy. Likewise, you want to invest your money in a variety of assets in your portfolio: stocks, bonds and cash products. Cash investments include products such as certificates of deposit (CDs) and money market mutual funds that keep you financially healthy.

    Ready then? Get out your compass.


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,