Tag: Etiquette:

E-mail etiquette, German business etiquette, manners, customs, business etiquette.#Business #etiquette


Netiquette, the E-mail Etiquette

The fast spread use of e-mail has made communication much easier, especially with overseas business partners and clients. Unfortunately, this form of communication also increases your risk of making written mistakes and e-mail faux pas. For this reason, online etiquette rules (also known as Netiquette) were developed. Here are a few of the most important things you should remember when corresponding through e-mail.

Business etiquette

Business and private life

You should try to adhere to e-mail etiquette rules not only when composing business e-mail, but also when sending e-mail on a personal basis. Even if you have a friendly or casual relationship with colleagues, you should remember that on-the-job correspondence means that an e-mail message is a business letter, which should include salutations, greetings and disclaimers. Only when quickly corresponding back and forth via e-mail, is it acceptable to leave salutations off without showing a lack of respect.

Business etiquette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business etiquette

When composing formal e-mails or sending documents such as legal warnings or final contracts, and especially when sending an e-mail to several people, your grammar must be correct. Typing mistakes do not give the impression that you are extremely busy, but that you are careless, and could be interpreted as impolite. So, be sure to thoroughly read through an e-mail before you send it, and do not hesitate to use your spell and grammar check. When sending personal e-mails, a forgotten salutation, the absence of a signature listing personal details, and even typing errors will be tolerated. If you jumbled the letters in a word because you were typing too fast, don t worry.

However, if simple grammar errors are made, regardless of the language in which you are corresponding, you may look sloppy, if not incompetent. Worse yet is the incorrect spelling of a person s or a company s name. Such an error will simply be interpreted as a lack of concern and interest. For many it has become a sort of hobby to strive for atomization and speed when it comes to using e-mail and the Internet. For this reason, you should always attach an automatic signature, if only to satisfy the requirement of identification when sending or publishing information electronically. In addition to this, a company s individual data protection laws should be respected and the electronic sending of internal corporate information to external addresses should be avoided.

When starting your letter, the best forms of address are still, Sehr geehrter Herr. ( Dear Mr. . ), Sehr geehrte Frau ( Dear Ms. . ) and Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren ( Dear Sir or Madam. ) despite the more informal style associated with e-mail correspondence. This rule holds true especially when writing to individuals whom you have not yet met in person. By using a formal manner of address, the recipient will feel honored and respected. Although Hallo ( Hello ) is heard and read frequently, this word is too informal and demonstrates poor style even if it is often written out of habit. Having said that, even when writing personal e-mails, a formal address such as Dear . ( Liebe / Lieber ) is always a better start .


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Business Lunch Etiquette – Etiquette Tips, Manners – Communication, business etiquette.#Business #etiquette


Business Lunch Etiquette

Some business discussions are meant to happen in the office meeting rooms. For example, when you need to talk about company s strategy for the next year or if you have to decide on a quarterly marketing budget. But in case of corporate networking, a meeting with prospective client or when you are willing to clarify some less important business details, a business lunch appointment is just what the doctor ordered.

Let s revisit business lunch etiquette rules and make sure you did everything for the dining to go off without a hitch.

He who fails to plan, plans to fail

Business etiquette

  • If you are the initiator of the business lunch, you are the one who has to organize it.
  • In case you are preparing to dine with more than one person, avoid any exotic places and stick to a restaurant with classic menu. See if there are vegetarian dishes in the list for when some of the participants doesn t eat meat. The best practice include asking the attendees about their meal preferences in advance.
  • If you meet one person, you might want to invite her/him to dine at a place you know (s)he enjoys. Email or call the person and check if there is a place (s)he d like to visit.
  • It is essential to book a table before going to a place, especially if you know the restaurant is crowded during the lunch hours.
  • Reserve a table in a familiar establishment. If you never been there before, check the restaurant before the meeting and preferably during lunch hours; see if the place is suitable for your get-together.
  • The safe choice is a restaurant that is specialized on business lunches. Avoid family friendly eating houses. You don t want your partners to be annoyed by children running around the table.
  • Try to book the best table at the place. It shouldn t be too close to the kitchen or rest room doors or anywhere where people will pass by often.
  • Email the reservation details (time, place and the restaurant s web page if there is one) and full list of parties to all the participants. There should be no surprises for anyone; if you decide to invite someone else last-minute, it is always good to confirm that other people won t mind the extra guest.
  • Think of the outfit you chose for the business lunch. Unless you are confident other attendees will appear in casual, stick to the business attire. Even if you don t have a strict office dress code, try to take some formal clothes with you and change before going to the meeting.
  • If you are the host of the lunch, arrive at least 10 minutes early. You can check if the table position is good enough and review the menu while waiting for other guests.

Bad table manners is grounds for impeachment

  • While at lunch switch off your mobile or at least put it on silent mode. Continuously ringing phone can turn the most loyal associate against you.
  • Be polite with the stuff. Rude attitude towards a sluggish waiter can be a deal breaker at your meeting. No one likes to interact with ill-mannered individuals, especially when it comes to a potential business together.

Business etiquette

  • Always start with a small talk and don t jump to the business discussions from the 1 st minute. At the same time, if you are the host of the business lunch, it is you who will need to initiate the formal part of the conversation.
  • When at the table, let the invited guests start with the order. If you were planning on eating a steak and your guests take a salad, go easy on the menu as well, business lunch is much more about business than about food. Sometimes it is a good idea to come to the rendezvous not that hungry, just in case your partners decide to keep it light.
  • Don t order a dessert initially. Wait till you are done with the main meal and see if you and other people would like to have the last course as well.
  • Never order messy food. Avoid chicken wings and other finger dishes.
  • The lunch begins when the host unfolds her/his napkin. While eating, place the napkin on your lap and take it from there only if you need to go to the rest room. In such case, place the napkin on the chair and put it back on your knees when you are back.
  • If there is a full tableware set if front of you and you are not sure which fork to use next, remember the work from the outside in rule. Starting with the spoon, fork, or knife that is farthest from your plate, work your way in, using one utensil for each course.

Business etiquette

  • Salt pepper always come together, even if someone asked you to pass salt only, always give the full set.
  • Eat in small bites and don t cut more than 2 bites at the time.
  • Don t talk with your mouth full, wait until you swallowed the food and then continue the conversation.
  • Don t get drunk at the business lunch. It is appropriate to order a glass of wine of beer while dining, but any strong alcoholic beverage should be excluded from your menu.

It s what you do when you walk out. That s when you ve made a lasting impression.

  • If you are the host of the lunch, you have to pay the bill. Even if your guests offer to split the bill, best practice would be to decline the proposal and take care of the check yourself. At the same time, as an invited person, you should always suggest covering part of the fees.

Business etiquette

  • As the host, you should leave generous tips to stuff. Even if you weren t that happy with the service, business meeting is not a good place to display your dissatisfaction. Leave 10-15% tips and avoid the restaurant next time.
  • If the dining didn t go the way you hoped and you failed to find common ground with the attendees, thank the participants for the lunch and the time they took to meet you anyway.
  • When you are back in the office, send a follow-up email with a thank you note to all the parties. In the email you may also highlight the most important discussion parts and conclusions.

Do you have some questions on Business Lunch Etiquette or you think we forgot to mention something important? Come talk with us! Leave your comment below!

Alona is the co-founder of Etiquette Tips an online magazine that features articles on business etiquette, communication, dress code, table manners, international code of behaviour, gift giving, events celebrations and more.


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American Business Etiquette – US Business Etiquette, business etiquette.#Business #etiquette


American Business Etiquette

by Claire Valenty on January 23, 2010

Business etiquette

In the United States business is conducted at the speed of light!

Being one of the largest economies of the world, its business practices are generally very well respected. But when going to the United States, remember that the Americans like to be efficient and quick with their work.

So what should you expect on the first meeting with a potential client?

1. A corporate gift

2. Product specs and a final contract

3. Rounds and rounds of drinks before getting to business!

Yup, number 3 isn’t even a remote option when conducting business in US. American business etiquette dictates that gift giving in business context doesn’t happen until the deal is closed, especially between men! Although there aren’t any taboos about gift giving, gifts from your local country or culture are always appreciated.

So yes number 2 is the correct answer. American business people are so eager and quick that expect many sales reps to travel with a final contract just in case! Business talk is started after a very small exchange of words.

In short, Americans like to get down to business!

So, American business etiquettes say that punctuality is a must. The bad thing is that in major American cities traffic delays are normal. So when leaving for an appointment, make haste! If you have been invited to a dinner, being on time is very crucial to your image.

Some more points to keep in consideration:

* Keep at least an arms length distance when conversing.

* Business is usually conducted on a more direct, first name basis.

* Americans smile a lot, even at strangers. They appreciate it if their smiles are returned.

* Eye contact is important when shaking someone’s hand. But keep a firm grip!

* “See you later” is just an expression. People say this even if they never plan to see you again.

* Americans prefer directness in communication. Yes means yes and No means no!

But all this informality doesn’t mean you forget your manners! Words like “thank you”, “please”, “excuse me” should be used regularly.

A word of caution: American business etiquette requires that American women be treated no differently than men. American women don’t appreciate the gender- related “special help” that most Asian and Middle Eastern men usually find OK. So, whenever going to lunch, keep in mind that whoever invites pays!


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Business Etiquette for Responding to Mail – Email, business etiquette.#Business #etiquette


Business Etiquette for Responding to Mail & Email

Business etiquette

When writing business email, follow rules that maintain professionalism.

Related Articles

  • 1 Replying to Thank You Emails
  • 2 10 Tips for Business Email Etiquette
  • 3 Business Email Etiquette for Reply All
  • 4 Business Language Etiquette

Maintaining high standards in business communication is a sign of professionalism. Poorly structured and untimely responses — whether via email or postal mail — make customers feel underappreciated and undervalued and can potentially result in lost business. Consequently, observing proper etiquette for responding to mail and email is key component of communications strategy for any small business.

Email — Respond Within 24 Hours

Responding to an email within 24 hours is good etiquette. Responding sooner is better because customers will be assured their concerns are being heard and their needs attended to. If a customer’s concern is negative or powerfully expressed, a phone call may be a more appropriate response than a return email. A call implies you consider the matter too important for an electronic response. Just hearing a human voice can help clients feel respected.

Postal Mail — Respond Within Five Days

Five business days is the standard business letter response time. Postal mail can take two to three days or longer to reach even a local client. A further delayed mail response can indicate to a customer that your company is disinterested in his business, or worse, unprofessional and sloppily run. Again, if a client letter expresses hostility or threatens to discontinue the business relationship, a phone call or personal visit is the best response.

Email — Subject Line

Use an appropriate heading in the email subject line. A heading that is specific to the customer’s concerns lets him know you have crafted an individual response rather than sending along a form letter. For example, the heading response time issues works better than your recent concerns.

Email or Letter Content

Open the letter or email with an expression of thanks, such as Thank you for your recent correspondence regarding . . This lets a client know you read his note and sets the stage for a reasoned response. It also conveys gratitude that the customer took the time to write to your company. Next, get straight to the point, addressing the customer’s concern directly and succinctly. Provide any explanation as to why the customer encountered a problem, but keep it brief. Close the letter by thanking the customer for his business and providing a phone number or email address to which he can forward further concerns.

Style and Grammar

The tone of the letter should correspond to the nature of the issue at hand. If a customer wrote to express his great satisfaction, a friendly, enthusiastic response is in order. If, instead, the client communication had a negative tone, the response should be businesslike but polite and should invite further communication to ensure concerns are fully addressed. Proper grammar and spelling are de rigueur, whether you respond by mail or email. A letter or message rife with misspellings makes you look incompetent and may encourage a customer or client to take his business elsewhere.

References (3)

About the Author

D. Laverne O Neal, an Ivy League graduate, published her first article in 1997. A former theater, dance and music critic for such publications as the Oakland Tribune and Gannett Newspapers, she started her Web-writing career during the dot-com heyday. O Neal also translates and edits French and Spanish. Her strongest interests are the performing arts, design, food, health, personal finance and personal growth.


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Business Etiquette: 5 Rules That Matter Now #business #start #up


#business etiquette

#

The word “etiquette” gets a bad rap. For one thing, it sounds stodgy and pretentious. And rules that are socially or morally prescribed seem intrusive to our sense of individuality and freedom.

But the concept of etiquette is still essential, especially now and particularly in business. New communication platforms, like Facebook and Linked In, have blurred the lines of appropriateness and we’re all left wondering how to navigate unchartered social territory.

At Crane Co. we have been advising people on etiquette for two centuries. We have even published books on the subject covering social occasions, wedding etiquette and more.

Boil it down and etiquette is really all about making people feel good. It’s not about rules or telling people what to do, or not to do, it’s about ensuring some basic social comforts.

So here are a few business etiquette rules that matter now whatever you want to call them.

1. Send a Thank You Note

I work at a paper company that manufactures stationery and I’m shocked at how infrequently people send thank you notes after interviewing with me. If you’re not sending a follow-up thank you note to Crane, you’re not sending it anywhere.

But the art of the thank you note should never die. If you have a job interview, or if you’re visiting clients or meeting new business partners especially if you want the job, or the contract or deal take the time to write a note. You’ll differentiate yourself by doing so and it will reflect well on your company too.

2. Know the Names

It’s just as important to know your peers or employees as it is to develop relationships with clients, vendors or management. Reach out to people in your company, regardless of their roles, and acknowledge what they do.

My great-grandfather ran a large manufacturing plant. He would take his daughter (my grandmother) through the plant; she recalled that he knew everyone’s name his deputy, his workers, and the man who took out the trash.

We spend too much of our time these days looking up impressing senior management. But it’s worth stepping back and acknowledging and getting to know all of the integral people who work hard to make your business run.

3. Observe the ‘Elevator Rule’

When meeting with clients or potential business partners off-site, don’t discuss your impressions of the meeting with your colleagues until the elevator has reached the bottom floor and you’re walking out of the building. That’s true even if you’re the only ones in the elevator.

Call it superstitious or call it polite but either way, don’t risk damaging your reputation by rehashing the conversation as soon as you walk away.

4. Focus on the Face, Not the Screen

It’s hard not to be distracted these days. We have a plethora of devices to keep us occupied; emails and phone calls come through at all hours; and we all think we have to multitask to feel efficient and productive.

But that’s not true: When you’re in a meeting or listening to someone speak, turn off the phone. Don’t check your email. Pay attention and be present.

When I worked in news, everyone was attached to a BlackBerry, constantly checking the influx of alerts. But my executive producer rarely used hers and for this reason, she stood out. She was present and was never distracted in editorial meetings or discussions with the staff. And it didn’t make her any less of a success.

5. Don’t Judge

We all have our vices and we all have room for improvement. One of the most important parts of modern-day etiquette is not to criticize others.

You may disagree with how another person handles a specific situation, but rise above and recognize that everyone is trying their best. It’s not your duty to judge others based on what you feel is right. You are only responsible for yourself.

We live in a world where both people and businesses are concerned about brand awareness. Individuals want to stand out and be liked and accepted by their peers–both socially and professionally.

The digital landscape has made it even more difficult to know whether or not you’re crossing a line, but I think it’s simple. Etiquette is positive. It’s a way of being not a set of rules or dos and don’ts.

So before you create that hashtag, post on someone’s Facebook page or text someone mid-meeting, remember the fundamentals: Will this make someone feel good?

And remember the elemental act of putting pen to paper and writing a note. You’ll make a lasting impression that a shout-out on Twitter or a Facebook wall mention can’t even touch.

00:12 Christine Lagorio: So Mark we have been working on this world’s coolest office package for two years now I think it’s time to sit back and reflect. What actually is a cool office?

00:22 Marc Kushner: A cool office. Well you know I work, I’m an architect, I work in an office, and I run an archaizer, and I think fundamentally a cool office is one that functions really well as an office. And then I think the potential for working with an architect, working with a designer and making it really cool is to kind of pump that up. And find the opportunities to make it a special place; a place that makes people work better together, that makes people excited to come to work. I think that’s what really makes it cool.

00:51 Lagorio: That’s great. We all work in offices but a lot of startups and small companies don’t necessarily have the budget for an architect or even a designer to consult. What are some little things they can do to keep the space in mind and make the space that they have available to them work well for them?

01:09 Kushner: Yeah I think. I think there are opportunities in the everyday kind of office experience. So we all need conference rooms, usually need a conference room, and a conference room comes with things like a table, and lights. And these can be really generic obvious solutions or you can take the time and challenge yourself and maybe your staff and actually turn it into a kind of experience to think about how that can become something else. So we saw some tables that were made out of old cast iron bath tubs right with a slab of glass on top which was a cute way to kind of up the ante on what a conference table could be. But then even the way that lighting is hung that it doesn’t have to be a geometric patterns that you can actually start express moments within the room that are maybe more important and find those little ways in to question the status quo of design.

02:05 Lagorio: Right. And you’re talking about some of the entries that we just saw because we were just judging this year’s entries. What are some of themes that emerged from this year’s entries, anything that you saw different from last year that may be indicative of where office design is going?

02:20 Kushner: We saw. Well, first of all they were all fantastic, and it was really excellent to see the breath of entries. We saw some interesting things. We saw, a lot of brands were bringing in the products that they make into the actual office design. So like Wilson who makes tennis products have entire walls made of tennis ball material, kind of unraveled tennis balls, so that the actual you know stuff that people are selling everyday on the phone and working with and designing shows up in the, in the everyday office experience, which I think is really, I think that’s really successful. Adidas also did something really cool where, a lot of sports companies make obviously are. Well, they make really cool stuff. But Adidas did this really neat thing where they took inspiration from kind of in the locker room and the idea of how you store things in a office. So instead of it being traditional file cabinets there are sort of lockers for everyone that have a roll up capabilities and can be moved all over the office. So I think, you know bringing in the stuff that motivates the company in the first place into the design is a great cue.

03:30 Lagorio: That’s great. Was there. I guess was there anything else that you loved about this year’s entries? Anything else that really stood out or anything that you think is kind of showing a changing pace in or face of office design?

03:44 Kushner: Yeah we saw, we saw a lot of use of, I’ll just say the natural in the most general way. But I think it’s obviously part of a general trend worldwide, and what’s nice is that what’s been happening in Europe is now moving to the United States. The realization that natural lighting is not just a good ecologically move but it’s also you know a happy factor. And people are, are more productive and have a better experience when there closer to a window. So bringing nature in, sometimes it’s not efficient or effective to move everyone in the office to the window, but finding ways to bring nature into the office, as far as you know cutting holes in buildings or approximating nature; we saw some artificial landscapes which were pretty, pretty fun. And I think that’s a really nice trend that’s going on in the office space.

04:34 Lagorio: That’s great. Thanks so much Mark.

04:36 Kushner: Thank you and thanks to Inc.


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Business Etiquette: 5 Rules That Matter Now #best #small #business #to #start


#business etiquette

#

The word “etiquette” gets a bad rap. For one thing, it sounds stodgy and pretentious. And rules that are socially or morally prescribed seem intrusive to our sense of individuality and freedom.

But the concept of etiquette is still essential, especially now and particularly in business. New communication platforms, like Facebook and Linked In, have blurred the lines of appropriateness and we’re all left wondering how to navigate unchartered social territory.

At Crane Co. we have been advising people on etiquette for two centuries. We have even published books on the subject covering social occasions, wedding etiquette and more.

Boil it down and etiquette is really all about making people feel good. It’s not about rules or telling people what to do, or not to do, it’s about ensuring some basic social comforts.

So here are a few business etiquette rules that matter now whatever you want to call them.

1. Send a Thank You Note

I work at a paper company that manufactures stationery and I’m shocked at how infrequently people send thank you notes after interviewing with me. If you’re not sending a follow-up thank you note to Crane, you’re not sending it anywhere.

But the art of the thank you note should never die. If you have a job interview, or if you’re visiting clients or meeting new business partners especially if you want the job, or the contract or deal take the time to write a note. You’ll differentiate yourself by doing so and it will reflect well on your company too.

2. Know the Names

It’s just as important to know your peers or employees as it is to develop relationships with clients, vendors or management. Reach out to people in your company, regardless of their roles, and acknowledge what they do.

My great-grandfather ran a large manufacturing plant. He would take his daughter (my grandmother) through the plant; she recalled that he knew everyone’s name his deputy, his workers, and the man who took out the trash.

We spend too much of our time these days looking up impressing senior management. But it’s worth stepping back and acknowledging and getting to know all of the integral people who work hard to make your business run.

3. Observe the ‘Elevator Rule’

When meeting with clients or potential business partners off-site, don’t discuss your impressions of the meeting with your colleagues until the elevator has reached the bottom floor and you’re walking out of the building. That’s true even if you’re the only ones in the elevator.

Call it superstitious or call it polite but either way, don’t risk damaging your reputation by rehashing the conversation as soon as you walk away.

4. Focus on the Face, Not the Screen

It’s hard not to be distracted these days. We have a plethora of devices to keep us occupied; emails and phone calls come through at all hours; and we all think we have to multitask to feel efficient and productive.

But that’s not true: When you’re in a meeting or listening to someone speak, turn off the phone. Don’t check your email. Pay attention and be present.

When I worked in news, everyone was attached to a BlackBerry, constantly checking the influx of alerts. But my executive producer rarely used hers and for this reason, she stood out. She was present and was never distracted in editorial meetings or discussions with the staff. And it didn’t make her any less of a success.

5. Don’t Judge

We all have our vices and we all have room for improvement. One of the most important parts of modern-day etiquette is not to criticize others.

You may disagree with how another person handles a specific situation, but rise above and recognize that everyone is trying their best. It’s not your duty to judge others based on what you feel is right. You are only responsible for yourself.

We live in a world where both people and businesses are concerned about brand awareness. Individuals want to stand out and be liked and accepted by their peers–both socially and professionally.

The digital landscape has made it even more difficult to know whether or not you’re crossing a line, but I think it’s simple. Etiquette is positive. It’s a way of being not a set of rules or dos and don’ts.

So before you create that hashtag, post on someone’s Facebook page or text someone mid-meeting, remember the fundamentals: Will this make someone feel good?

And remember the elemental act of putting pen to paper and writing a note. You’ll make a lasting impression that a shout-out on Twitter or a Facebook wall mention can’t even touch.

00:12 Christine Lagorio: So Mark we have been working on this world’s coolest office package for two years now I think it’s time to sit back and reflect. What actually is a cool office?

00:22 Marc Kushner: A cool office. Well you know I work, I’m an architect, I work in an office, and I run an archaizer, and I think fundamentally a cool office is one that functions really well as an office. And then I think the potential for working with an architect, working with a designer and making it really cool is to kind of pump that up. And find the opportunities to make it a special place; a place that makes people work better together, that makes people excited to come to work. I think that’s what really makes it cool.

00:51 Lagorio: That’s great. We all work in offices but a lot of startups and small companies don’t necessarily have the budget for an architect or even a designer to consult. What are some little things they can do to keep the space in mind and make the space that they have available to them work well for them?

01:09 Kushner: Yeah I think. I think there are opportunities in the everyday kind of office experience. So we all need conference rooms, usually need a conference room, and a conference room comes with things like a table, and lights. And these can be really generic obvious solutions or you can take the time and challenge yourself and maybe your staff and actually turn it into a kind of experience to think about how that can become something else. So we saw some tables that were made out of old cast iron bath tubs right with a slab of glass on top which was a cute way to kind of up the ante on what a conference table could be. But then even the way that lighting is hung that it doesn’t have to be a geometric patterns that you can actually start express moments within the room that are maybe more important and find those little ways in to question the status quo of design.

02:05 Lagorio: Right. And you’re talking about some of the entries that we just saw because we were just judging this year’s entries. What are some of themes that emerged from this year’s entries, anything that you saw different from last year that may be indicative of where office design is going?

02:20 Kushner: We saw. Well, first of all they were all fantastic, and it was really excellent to see the breath of entries. We saw some interesting things. We saw, a lot of brands were bringing in the products that they make into the actual office design. So like Wilson who makes tennis products have entire walls made of tennis ball material, kind of unraveled tennis balls, so that the actual you know stuff that people are selling everyday on the phone and working with and designing shows up in the, in the everyday office experience, which I think is really, I think that’s really successful. Adidas also did something really cool where, a lot of sports companies make obviously are. Well, they make really cool stuff. But Adidas did this really neat thing where they took inspiration from kind of in the locker room and the idea of how you store things in a office. So instead of it being traditional file cabinets there are sort of lockers for everyone that have a roll up capabilities and can be moved all over the office. So I think, you know bringing in the stuff that motivates the company in the first place into the design is a great cue.

03:30 Lagorio: That’s great. Was there. I guess was there anything else that you loved about this year’s entries? Anything else that really stood out or anything that you think is kind of showing a changing pace in or face of office design?

03:44 Kushner: Yeah we saw, we saw a lot of use of, I’ll just say the natural in the most general way. But I think it’s obviously part of a general trend worldwide, and what’s nice is that what’s been happening in Europe is now moving to the United States. The realization that natural lighting is not just a good ecologically move but it’s also you know a happy factor. And people are, are more productive and have a better experience when there closer to a window. So bringing nature in, sometimes it’s not efficient or effective to move everyone in the office to the window, but finding ways to bring nature into the office, as far as you know cutting holes in buildings or approximating nature; we saw some artificial landscapes which were pretty, pretty fun. And I think that’s a really nice trend that’s going on in the office space.

04:34 Lagorio: That’s great. Thanks so much Mark.

04:36 Kushner: Thank you and thanks to Inc.


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International business etiquette in Europe – definition and etiquette tips #business #funding


#business etiquette

#

Business Etiquette

International Business Etiquette definition and tips

Do you know the definition of Business Etiquette? Business etiquette is about building relationships with other people. Etiquette is not about rules regulations but is about providing basic social comfort and creating an environment where others feel comfortable and secure, this is possible through better communication.

Social media communication platforms (i.e. Facebook, Linkedin) are evolving rapidly day by day, as the concept of social media etiquette becomes a crucial part of business. Business etiquette consists of two things. Firstly, thoughtful consideration of the interests and feelings of others and secondly, being able to minimise misunderstandings. These are influenced by individual behaviour demeanour. Business etiquette instructs this behaviour.

Business etiquette differs from region to region and from country to country. This creates a complex situation for people as it is hard to balance the focus on both international business etiquette and other business activities at the same time. Therefore, a wise step is to focus on some key pillars of business etiquette.

Here are some key business etiquette tips that mean real success to business:

‘ Thank You ’ Note

If you want to differentiate yourself from others then never forget to write a‘Thank You’ note to your job interviewer or your client. This will leave a good impression and also reflect well on your company.

Give others respect by knowing their names which will increase goodwill and communication. it is also worth management stepping back and acknowledging people individually for their good work as this will enhance their self esteem and increase motivation.

Observe the Elevator Rule

Be mindful of saying appropriate things at a job interview or client meeting. Don’t start discussing business with a client or interviewer as soon as you step out of the lift. By doing so, you avoid the risk of damaging your reputation.

Focus on the Face, Not the Screen

Never forget to switch off your phone and try not to use any other device just to prove you are a multitasking individual. In fact, in the world of business this is considered bad manners. Concentrate on the meeting and listen to what people are saying.

Everyone is unique in their own way and uses a different approach to deal with situations. Therefore, if you disagree with another person’s approach instead of criticising try to understand it from their point of view. By doing so, you create a friendly environment. Always remember you get respect by giving respect.

Whether in business or between individuals, one concern is brand awareness. Individuals want to be noticed both socially and professionally. People want to be remembered by others.

However, in the digital landscape you have to be very careful when trying to pursue your brand awareness. Think carefully before doing. What we mean by this is that before creating a hashtag, posting on a Facebook wall or texting think how the other person will feel when they receive your message.

Character, Behaviour, Honesty

Your character reflects your individuality and your behaviour exhibits your personality. Business etiquette encourages revealing your positive qualities. This helps your reputation.

Always be honest and remember that it takes a long time to develop trust and a good reputation and only one small mistake to lose it. Business etiquette provides a framework for stating the boundaries of terms conditions, contracts and promises.

Sensitivity Diplomacy

A key pillar of business etiquette is sensitivity, meaning giving careful thought to every business aspect before making a judgement. This gives a strong foundation to your business. Also, thoughtless words and actions lead to a negative outcome. Being aware of business etiquette encourages careful thought.

Elements of business etiquette

Business etiquette instructs on you how to present yourself professionally in different cultures. The keys for making a good impression are dressing appropriately, your body language, presenting your business cards, gift giving, conducting meetings and many other important elements.


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Business Etiquette Tips #business #agreement


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Business Etiquette You Should Know

What s the difference between the rising star whose career is picking up speed and his counterpart who can t seem to get the engine to turn over? Often, the star has mastered the nuances of business etiquette — the subtle but critical behaviors that can make or break an important meeting, influence a first impression or impress a potential client.

According to Hilka Klinkenberg, director of Etiquette International, a business etiquette firm, the basics of professional etiquette are really quite simple. First, understand the difference between business etiquette and social etiquette. Business etiquette is genderless. For example, the traditional chivalrous etiquette of holding the door open for a woman is not necessary in the workplace and can even have the unintended effect of offending her. In the work environment, men and women are peers.

Second, your guiding principle should always be to treat people with consideration and respect. Although this may seem obvious, Klinkenberg cites this basic decency as a frequent casualty in today s workplace.

Here are a few of the specific dos and don ts of business etiquette you are likely to encounter during your workday.

The proper way to make an introduction is to introduce a lower-ranking person to a higher-ranking person. For example, if your CEO is Mrs. Jones and you are introducing administrative assistant Jane Smith to her, the correct introduction would be Mrs. Jones, I d like you to meet Jane Smith. If you forget a person s name while making an introduction, don t panic. Proceed with the introduction with a statement such as, I m sorry, your name has just slipped my mind. Omitting an introduction is a bigger faux pas than salvaging a botched introduction.

The physical connection you make when shaking hands with someone can leave a powerful impression. When someone s handshake is unpleasant in any way, we often associate negative character traits with that person. A firm handshake made with direct eye contact sets the stage for a positive encounter.

Women take note: To avoid any confusion during an introduction, always extend your hand when greeting someone. Remember, men and women are equals in the workplace.

Email, faxes, conference calls and cellphones can create a veritable landmine of professional etiquette. Just because you have the capability to reach someone 24/7, it doesn t mean you should.

Email is so prevalent in many of today s companies that the transmission of jokes, spam and personal notes often constitute more of the messages employees receive than actual work-related material. Remember that your email messages are an example of your professional correspondence. Professional correspondence does not include smiley faces or similar emoticons.

Faxes should always include your contact information, date and number of pages included. They should not be sent unsolicited — they waste the other person s paper and tie up the lines.

Conference-call etiquette entails introducing all the participants at the beginning of the call so everyone knows who is in attendance. Since you re not able to see other participants body language and nonverbal clues, you will have to compensate for this disadvantage by communicating very clearly. Be aware of unintentionally interrupting someone or failing to address or include attendees because you can t see them. And finally, don t put anyone on speakerphone until you have asked permission to do so.

Cellphones can be a lifesaver for many professionals. Unfortunately, if you are using a cell, you are most likely outside your office and may be preoccupied with driving, catching a flight or some other activity. Be sensitive to the fact that your listener may not be interested in a play-by-play of traffic or the other events you are experiencing during your call.

Even if you have impeccable social graces, you will inevitably have a professional blunder at some point. When this happens, Klinkenberg offers this advice: Apologize sincerely without gushing or being too effusive. State your apology like you mean it, and then move on. Making too big an issue of your mistake only magnifies the damage and makes the recipient more uncomfortable.

Read more about business etiquette in the following books:

  • At Ease Professionally
  • Letitia Baldrige s New Complete Guide to Executive Manners
  • Executive Etiquette in the New Workplace

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Business Etiquette: 5 Rules That Matter Now #sba #grants


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The word “etiquette” gets a bad rap. For one thing, it sounds stodgy and pretentious. And rules that are socially or morally prescribed seem intrusive to our sense of individuality and freedom.

But the concept of etiquette is still essential, especially now and particularly in business. New communication platforms, like Facebook and Linked In, have blurred the lines of appropriateness and we’re all left wondering how to navigate unchartered social territory.

At Crane Co. we have been advising people on etiquette for two centuries. We have even published books on the subject covering social occasions, wedding etiquette and more.

Boil it down and etiquette is really all about making people feel good. It’s not about rules or telling people what to do, or not to do, it’s about ensuring some basic social comforts.

So here are a few business etiquette rules that matter now whatever you want to call them.

1. Send a Thank You Note

I work at a paper company that manufactures stationery and I’m shocked at how infrequently people send thank you notes after interviewing with me. If you’re not sending a follow-up thank you note to Crane, you’re not sending it anywhere.

But the art of the thank you note should never die. If you have a job interview, or if you’re visiting clients or meeting new business partners especially if you want the job, or the contract or deal take the time to write a note. You’ll differentiate yourself by doing so and it will reflect well on your company too.

2. Know the Names

It’s just as important to know your peers or employees as it is to develop relationships with clients, vendors or management. Reach out to people in your company, regardless of their roles, and acknowledge what they do.

My great-grandfather ran a large manufacturing plant. He would take his daughter (my grandmother) through the plant; she recalled that he knew everyone’s name his deputy, his workers, and the man who took out the trash.

We spend too much of our time these days looking up impressing senior management. But it’s worth stepping back and acknowledging and getting to know all of the integral people who work hard to make your business run.

3. Observe the ‘Elevator Rule’

When meeting with clients or potential business partners off-site, don’t discuss your impressions of the meeting with your colleagues until the elevator has reached the bottom floor and you’re walking out of the building. That’s true even if you’re the only ones in the elevator.

Call it superstitious or call it polite but either way, don’t risk damaging your reputation by rehashing the conversation as soon as you walk away.

4. Focus on the Face, Not the Screen

It’s hard not to be distracted these days. We have a plethora of devices to keep us occupied; emails and phone calls come through at all hours; and we all think we have to multitask to feel efficient and productive.

But that’s not true: When you’re in a meeting or listening to someone speak, turn off the phone. Don’t check your email. Pay attention and be present.

When I worked in news, everyone was attached to a BlackBerry, constantly checking the influx of alerts. But my executive producer rarely used hers and for this reason, she stood out. She was present and was never distracted in editorial meetings or discussions with the staff. And it didn’t make her any less of a success.

5. Don’t Judge

We all have our vices and we all have room for improvement. One of the most important parts of modern-day etiquette is not to criticize others.

You may disagree with how another person handles a specific situation, but rise above and recognize that everyone is trying their best. It’s not your duty to judge others based on what you feel is right. You are only responsible for yourself.

We live in a world where both people and businesses are concerned about brand awareness. Individuals want to stand out and be liked and accepted by their peers–both socially and professionally.

The digital landscape has made it even more difficult to know whether or not you’re crossing a line, but I think it’s simple. Etiquette is positive. It’s a way of being not a set of rules or dos and don’ts.

So before you create that hashtag, post on someone’s Facebook page or text someone mid-meeting, remember the fundamentals: Will this make someone feel good?

And remember the elemental act of putting pen to paper and writing a note. You’ll make a lasting impression that a shout-out on Twitter or a Facebook wall mention can’t even touch.

00:12 Christine Lagorio: So Mark we have been working on this world’s coolest office package for two years now I think it’s time to sit back and reflect. What actually is a cool office?

00:22 Marc Kushner: A cool office. Well you know I work, I’m an architect, I work in an office, and I run an archaizer, and I think fundamentally a cool office is one that functions really well as an office. And then I think the potential for working with an architect, working with a designer and making it really cool is to kind of pump that up. And find the opportunities to make it a special place; a place that makes people work better together, that makes people excited to come to work. I think that’s what really makes it cool.

00:51 Lagorio: That’s great. We all work in offices but a lot of startups and small companies don’t necessarily have the budget for an architect or even a designer to consult. What are some little things they can do to keep the space in mind and make the space that they have available to them work well for them?

01:09 Kushner: Yeah I think. I think there are opportunities in the everyday kind of office experience. So we all need conference rooms, usually need a conference room, and a conference room comes with things like a table, and lights. And these can be really generic obvious solutions or you can take the time and challenge yourself and maybe your staff and actually turn it into a kind of experience to think about how that can become something else. So we saw some tables that were made out of old cast iron bath tubs right with a slab of glass on top which was a cute way to kind of up the ante on what a conference table could be. But then even the way that lighting is hung that it doesn’t have to be a geometric patterns that you can actually start express moments within the room that are maybe more important and find those little ways in to question the status quo of design.

02:05 Lagorio: Right. And you’re talking about some of the entries that we just saw because we were just judging this year’s entries. What are some of themes that emerged from this year’s entries, anything that you saw different from last year that may be indicative of where office design is going?

02:20 Kushner: We saw. Well, first of all they were all fantastic, and it was really excellent to see the breath of entries. We saw some interesting things. We saw, a lot of brands were bringing in the products that they make into the actual office design. So like Wilson who makes tennis products have entire walls made of tennis ball material, kind of unraveled tennis balls, so that the actual you know stuff that people are selling everyday on the phone and working with and designing shows up in the, in the everyday office experience, which I think is really, I think that’s really successful. Adidas also did something really cool where, a lot of sports companies make obviously are. Well, they make really cool stuff. But Adidas did this really neat thing where they took inspiration from kind of in the locker room and the idea of how you store things in a office. So instead of it being traditional file cabinets there are sort of lockers for everyone that have a roll up capabilities and can be moved all over the office. So I think, you know bringing in the stuff that motivates the company in the first place into the design is a great cue.

03:30 Lagorio: That’s great. Was there. I guess was there anything else that you loved about this year’s entries? Anything else that really stood out or anything that you think is kind of showing a changing pace in or face of office design?

03:44 Kushner: Yeah we saw, we saw a lot of use of, I’ll just say the natural in the most general way. But I think it’s obviously part of a general trend worldwide, and what’s nice is that what’s been happening in Europe is now moving to the United States. The realization that natural lighting is not just a good ecologically move but it’s also you know a happy factor. And people are, are more productive and have a better experience when there closer to a window. So bringing nature in, sometimes it’s not efficient or effective to move everyone in the office to the window, but finding ways to bring nature into the office, as far as you know cutting holes in buildings or approximating nature; we saw some artificial landscapes which were pretty, pretty fun. And I think that’s a really nice trend that’s going on in the office space.

04:34 Lagorio: That’s great. Thanks so much Mark.

04:36 Kushner: Thank you and thanks to Inc.


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Writing a Business Etiquette: Useful Tips – Business Letters – Sell Letter #current #stock

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Writing a Business Etiquette: Useful Tips

Writing a business etiquette can be quite complicated for someone who has never had any experience in this particular field. By following several important tips, you will be able to write the perfect cubicle etiquette. All you have to do is follow a few close-call rules. First and foremost, you have to know that when you start your message, you should not sound too harsh, nor too mellow. Start it with a casual greeting that is commonly used, including the name of the recipient. Use something like good morning , good day , good afternoon or a simple hello.

Another thing that you should keep in mind is send the e-mail to the appropriate recipients. Include all of the recipients who are supposed to read the e-mail, but aren t truly required to give you a reply. Include them in the cc section.

When you are writing your e-mail, make sure that your subject line is meaningful and descriptive. You can craft some interesting subject line which is going to give the recipient some info about the true content included in your e-mail.

While you are writing, make sure that your message is totally concise and clear. Stick to just one important topic while you are writing. Do not go off on different tangents based on all kinds of unrelated subjects. Also, proofreading is a must. Your e-mail should always be checked for all kinds of grammatical or spelling mistakes before you click the send button.

Think of computer viruses, too. They can be transported by a simple exchange of e-mails. That is why you should always protect all of your recipients by carefully scanning your attached photographs, documents and all kinds of files with your laptop or computer antivirus program.

Always avoid using some of those popular emoticons. Emoticons are not supposed to be used if you are writing a business etiquette! They come off as extremely unprofessional and should never be included in e-mails which are supposed to be sent to your boss or manager. Also, do not send some inappropriate jokes which you are going to be sorry for later on. What may be funny to your closest colleagues might not be that intriguing to your boss.

Use your signature in the e-mail you are writing. Write a thank you or sincerely , and of course use your business logo, alongside some personal info like your phone, e-mail, or some link that can connect the recipient to your profile on a social network. Another thing that you should always have in mind is that you are supposed to respond to e-mails in a timely manner. Do not let your boss wait around your e-mail for too long. The most appropriate time is in just a couple of hours after you have received the e-mail.

The perfect time would be within one hour after receiving the e-mail, but if you have not seen it, respond immediately after seeing it. Just don t do it late at night or on a Sunday, because that can sometimes seem a bit inappropriate and out of the blue. Respond in a normal timely manner.

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