Tag: Entrepreneurs:

Small Business Bureau signs MoU with 12 groups to train entrepreneurs – Stabroek News

#small business bureau

#

Small Business Bureau signs MoU with 12 groups to train entrepreneurs

Twelve private training institutions have signed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with the Small Business Bureau (SBB) to train entrepreneurs.

GINA said this is being facilitated through the Micro and Small Enterprise Development programme (MSED).

The MoU will allow these institutions to train young entrepreneurs, who have benefitted from cash grants and loans through the SBB, in managing their own small businesses, GINA added.

Minister of Business and Tourism, Dominic Gaskin and his Permanent Secretary, Rajdai Jagernauth (GINA photo)

The institutions which will facilitate the training are the Ruimveldt Life Improvement Centre, Generation Next, Roadside Baptist Church Skills Training Centre, Partners of the Americas, Kuru Kuru Co-operative College, Action Coach Guyana, Guyana School of Agriculture, EMPRETEC, Cerulean Inc, the Critchlow Labour College, Management Options and Interweave Solutions.

Minister of Business and Tourism, Dominic Gaskin encouraged the trainers to utilise modern technologies which would make the training relevant to the contemporary business environment.

GINA said that the MSED programme which began in 2013 has trained more than 1,000 young entrepreneurs who accessed small loans and grants through the SBB.

Officer in Charge of the bureau, Gillian Edwards-Griffith said, “We have done to date 193 grants, $300,000 each, and in terms of loans with financial partners, we have three, of which two are active giving a total of 63 loans”.

The MSED programme will be evaluated by an independent body to give the SBB a fair idea of the successes prior to the second phase of the training.

Funding will be evenly disbursed among the training institutions, GINA added.

Share on Facebook Tweet This

More in Local News

Comments

About these comments

The comments section is intended to provide a forum for reasoned and reasonable debate on the newspaper’s content and is an extension of the newspaper and what it has become well known for over its history: accuracy, balance and fairness. We reserve the right to edit or delete comments which contain attacks on other users, slander, coarse language and profanity, and gratuitous and incendiary references to race and ethnicity.

Today’s Frontpage

Get the day’s headlines from SN in your inbox every morning:

Most Read This Week





  • Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
  • 6 Best Business Tips from 6 Top Entrepreneurs #business #laptop

    #business tips

    #

    6 Best Business Tips from 6 Top Entrepreneurs

    Entrepreneur, content marketer, online educator

    Becoming a successful entrepreneur is no easy feat. Sacrifice, hard work and an unwavering determination for achieving greatness are required. So is surviving your mistakes — because they will happen.

    At CreativeLive, I ve always strived to learn from my own mistakes and to gain powerful insights from those who have successfully gone down the path before me. That s why I reached out to six top entrepreneurs, writers and CEOs I ve admired for years.

    I asked each of them to share with me, in a selfie-style video clip, their single most impactful piece of advice for fellow entrepreneurs. Those interviewees included:

    • Chase Jarvis. the prolific photographer and CEO at CreativeLive, who s on a mission to revolutionize the way the world learns
    • Jon Acuff. the best-selling author of five books designed to teach how to find and create meaningful work
    • Sophia Amoruso. the founder of NastyGal and the best-selling author of #GIRLBOSS. who launched one of the fastest-growing retail brands in recent history
    • Lewis Howes. the best-selling author, lifestyle entrepreneur and podcast host, who s interviewed more than 200 influential entrepreneurs on how to achieve greatness
    • Nir Eyal. the best-selling author, entrepreneur and speaker, who s pioneering the psychology behind creating habit-forming products
    • Guy Kawasaki. the entrepreneur, investor and former chief evangelist at Apple, who s helped dozens of well-known startups launch with a bang

    Here s what each had to say:

    Just about any and all business owners who have created a sustainable self-employed career will tell you that they wouldn t have achieved their goals without guidance from others. They re not afraid to ask for help. In fact, most of them are successful in a large part, because they ve surrounded themselves with trusted advisors. mentors and industry experts.

    Here s more from these top entrepreneurs on how they ve risen to success in the world of business.

    1. Chase Jarvis, CEO at CreativeLive

    Image credit: Chase Jarvis

    Scratch your own itch.

    After becoming one of the world s best-known photographers at a relatively young age, Chase went on to found CreativeLive. the world s largest live-streaming education company. He credits much of his success to following his passions and pursuing only the opportunities that he s genuinely interested in.

    Jarvis: Go after solving a problem that you have. Something that s near and dear to you, not some random market opportunity. Because, when things get hard, if you re chasing just the dollars, or a random market opportunity, you re not going to be able to have the fortitude, the passion, to stay with it.

    2. Jon Acuff, New York Times best-selling author of Do Over

    Image credit: Jon Acuff

    Success takes hustle.

    Acuff, the New York Times best-selling author of five books, including Do Over . set out early on in his career to pursue at all costs only meaningful work. For him, that meant 16 long years of being hired and fired, before eventually finding his dream job and launching his self-employed career as a writer, speaker and brand consultant.

    Accomplishing his dream of working for himself took a lot of hard work, focus and hustle.

    Acuff: Hustle is an act of focus, not frenzy. Hustle is about subtraction and addition. It s not about doing more, it s about focusing on the things you need to do, in order to move your business forward.

    3. Sophia Amoruso, founder of Nasty Gal, author of #GIRLBOSS

    Image credit: sophia amoruso

    Don t give up, don t take anything personally, and don t take no for an answer.

    Since founding Nasty Gal. in 2006, as an eBay store selling vintage clothing, Amoruso has transformed the business into a multi-million dollar empire with its own clothing line, which was named the Fastest Growing Retailer in 2012. Recently, TheNew York Times best-selling author of #GIRLBOSS has stepped out of her role as the CEO of Nasty Gal to become the executive chairman and to oversee the creative and brand marketing functions of the business.

    Without any fashion or business experience before starting Nasty Gal, Amoruso credits much of her hard-earned success to her refusal to accept failure as an option.

    Amoruso: The people who told me no were the people who eventually told me yes.

    4. Lewis Howes, author of The School of Greatness

    Image credit: Lewis Howes

    Follow your heart.

    Howes, The New York Times best-selling author of The School of Greatness , and host of the podcast bearing the same name, is a professional athlete-turned-entrepreneur. After suffering a debilitating injury on the field, Howes faced the fact that his football career was finished. Overnight, he lost his ability to do what he was passionate about, and was forced to discover a new way to live with purpose. Today, he s a writer, speaker and online educator who teaches entrepreneurs how to grow their online businesses .

    5. Nir Eyal, author of Hooked

    Image credit: Nir Eyal

    Certainty is more dangerous than ignorance.

    Eyal, the author of the Wall Street Journal best seller, Hooked . has become the authority on how to build habit-forming products. After years of research and experience in the video game and advertising industries, Eyal is a sought-after writer, speaker and educator on the psychology behind what motivates consumer engagement.

    Eyal: It s up to us as entrepreneurs, to see the world as it should be –not necessarily how it is. When you think you re sure of the way things are, that s when you get passed up and you don t see the opportunities that real entrepreneurs envision.

    6. Guy Kawasaki, chief evangelist of Canva, author of The Art of the Start 2.0

    Image credit: Guy Kawasaki

    Focus on the prototype.

    Kawasaki, the former chief evangelist of Apple, is an immensely successful marketing executive, investor and author of 13 books including The Art of the Start 2.0 . Over the years, he s helped dozens of well-known companies take their products from concept to market dominance.

    His formula for replicating startup success? Focusing only on the activities that drive positive results for your business.

    Kawasaki: If you get a prototype out and you get enough people using it, you never have to write a business plan. A prototype is where you separate the BS from the reality.





    Tags : , , , , , ,

    Green Business Ideas for Entrepreneurs #small #business #association #loans

    #green business ideas

    #

    Green Business Ideas for Entrepreneurs

    Updated August 11, 2016

    What is a Green Business and what are the advantages of starting one?

    A “green” business strives to have a positive impact on the environment and community. It develops and practices business strategies that go beyond regulation and demonstrate commitment to a healthy and sustainable future (earthshare.org ). German-based Roland Berger Strategy Consultants estimates that the global market volume for environmental technologies will reach a projected $2,740 billion by 2020.

    As someone thinking of starting a small business. a green business has two advantages over other kinds of businesses. First, environmentalism is growing rapidly so you will be targeting a growing market. Second, starting a green business can be particularly satisfying as you get to make your own contribution to making the world a better place.

    Here are what I think are the best green business ideas for entrepreneurs .

    1) Help them grow it.
    Gardens for Small Spaces

    The growing concern about where our food comes from and what s been done to it is translating into increasing numbers of people who want to grow their own food, wherever they live.

    One green business idea is to produce garden-paks , small collections of seeded plant trays that would fit on the smallest balcony and allow people to grow their own vegetables.

    On a larger scale, as a garden designer you could specialize in rooftop garden installations.

    Or you could develop a green business focusing on products that will help people grow their own food, such as greenhouses suitable for residential homes or ecological pest controls. Growing food is one trend that’s only going to. um. get bigger (excuse the pun).

    Worm farming and organic compost sales are other green gardening business ideas that might work for you.

    2) Help them cut energy costs.
    Solar Power Generation and Solar Water Heating Systems

    I think it s a safe bet that the cost of traditional energy going to go up – making green business ideas related to saving energy and cutting energy costs also a safe bet.

    Solar water heating systems can provide significant energy cost savings (providing up to 70% of a family s hot water when properly installed, according to some distributors).

    Between 2008 and 2011 solar panel (photovoltaic) electrical generation had an annual growth rate of 147%, helped by rebates and subsidies that vary from province to province. The installation of rooftop solar panels and the tie in to household/commercial electrical systems requires a lot of expertise and businesses that provide this service are flourishing.

    If either of these green business ideas appeals to you see Natural Resources Canada s Solar Thermal and Solar Photovoltaic Energy information sites.

    3) Help them clean it.
    Eco-friendly Cleaning Products

    From laundry through vehicles, things have to be cleaned.

    But people are a lot more sensitive to what s being poured down the drain and want to be able to get the sparkle without the environmental strain. One green business idea to help them accomplish this is to sell environmentally friendly cleaning products. This is another green business idea that could work well as an ecommerce site. (See 8 Easy Ways to Get Your Small Business Into Ecommerce ).

    Going green is also a great marketing strategy for a cleaning business. Commercial and residential cleaning businesses are still hot business ideas as the demand for cleaning services is still growing. Using only eco-friendly cleaning products in your cleaning business could give you a competitive edge.

    Note: Also watch for the commercialization of virtually waterless cleaning. Researchers at the University of Leeds have developed a new way of cleaning clothes using less than 2% of the water and energy of a conventional washing machine.

    4) Help them find it locally.
    Local Eco-alternatives

    Books like the 100-Mile Diet have inspired many people to think carefully about where their food is grown and the negative environmental effects of consuming products that may be shipped from thousands of miles away.

    People want local eco-friendly alternatives to the products they ve been using. To service this need farm markets have been proliferating in North America, selling everything from locally raised beef, pork or poultry to locally made soaps and cleaning materials. Talk to your local farm market association or butcher store about selling your product locally. (And of course you should read How to Make a Bundle at the Farmers Market before you set up your stall.)

    5) Show them what needs to be done.
    Green Consulting

    As the price of energy goes up and being green becomes increasingly popular, more individuals and businesses want to become greener but don t know what the best course of action is. So green consulting is a business idea whose time has come.

    Green consultants put together an action plan for their clients by examining their client s environment and analyzing their environmental strengths and weaknesses. For instance, a home or business may be using a lot more energy than necessary for heating or cooling because of a lack of weather-stripping, insulation, or improperly installed HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) systems.

    Some green consulting businesses also offer event management. The green business idea is that the consulting company will see to it that every aspect of the event, from advertising through waste management, is handled in the most environmentally friendly way.

    6) Help them get there.
    Scooters and Bikes

    Transportation is another venue of change for many people, whose need to go green is strengthened by increasingly high prices at the pump. Scooters and bikes are a very appealing all-in-one solution; as a scooter or bike rider you get to save money, be environmentally friendly, and, if you get the kind of bike that needs pedaling, improve your health, too!

    I have to admit that s not the kind that appeals to me; my favourites are the Vespa and the three-wheeled Piaggio MP3. Becoming a dealer might be the business idea you ve been looking for.

    All kinds of electric and gas scooters and electric bikes are going to increase in popularity though. Daymak Canada has a good range of green vehicles, including mopeds, scooters and electric bikes and offers franchises.

    If you live in an urban area, renting out bikes and scooters might be a profitable green business.

    7) Help them build green.
    Green Building

    Green building is a trend rife with possibilities for starting new green businesses. Construction companies, architects, designers and contractors can specialize in green building. For instance, a contractor might become a LEED certified professional; a designer might focus on elements and materials that are the least environmentally destructive.

    And green building calls for all kinds of green products that could become the foundation of your new small business, from water-saving toilets through salvaged wood (and solar water heating systems).

    Learn more about LEED Canada (the environmental rating system used as a standard for new construction and major renovations) at the Canada Green Building Council website.

    Green Businesses Deliver More Than Profits

    Hopefully these green business ideas have got you excited about the possibilities. You may not get rich, and to be honest, you probably won t. But you will have the pleasure of running a business that helps people lead greener lives and combining what you do with what you believe in.

    Where to From Here

    For even more business ideas, visit the Business Ideas section of this website.





    Tags : , , , ,

    11 Most Profitable Agricultural Business Ideas for Young Entrepreneurs – Insider Monkey #business #license

    #profitable business ideas

    #

    Dear Valued Visitor,

    We have noticed that you are using an ad blocker software.

    Although advertisements on the web pages may degrade your experience, our business certainly depends on them and we can only keep providing you high-quality research based articles as long as we can display ads on our pages.

    To view this article, you can disable your ad blocker and refresh this page or simply login .

    We only allow registered users to use ad blockers. You can sign up for free by clicking here or you can login if you are already a member.

    Published on June 17, 2015 at 5:53 am by Soma Dutta in Lists

    If you are looking to for opportunities in the agriculture industry, the most profitable agricultural business ideas for young entrepreneurs are some of the best options to choose from! Traditional agriculture might not sound too appealing to the youngsters of today, but the modern agriculture has diversified into many areas which make for lucrative avenues that just might be their thing. And, contrary to popular belief agriculture is one of the most remunerative business which can also be a glamorous one.

    For starters the investment costs are generally low, and the payouts are decent. While, with organic farming coming into vogue, the opportunities have grown manifold. Agriculture might actually prove to be a way of life, away from the cut-throat competition and stressful corporate life, for the driven young Turks who aren t afraid to tread the offbeat path.

    The enterprising individuals who are not quite the outdoor kind to get down to farming and agriculture might opt for the 5 Most Profitable Online Businesses You Can Start Today. However, an agriculture business does not necessarily mean you have to get down to actual farming. Some of the suggestions and ideas we have for you can well be undertaken indoors and relate to the allied areas of agriculture. Most of them can also be undertaken with little or no training. Just some DIY guides and a keen interest can get you started. And, they might actually prove to be great avocations along with vocations.

    Intrigued? Here, check out the list of the most profitable agricultural business ideas for young entrepreneurs!





    Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Britain s Top 100 entrepreneurs #business #opportunity

    #top entrepreneurs

    #

    Britain’s Top 100 Entrepreneurs 2015

    This year’s top spot on our list goes to Simon and Bobby Arora, who’ve built their bargain homewares chain B M into a billion pound success story. They are joined by entrepreneurs in everything from aviation and drinks to soft toys and software.

    If Britain is to continue to prosper amid the spreading shockwaves of the great China economic slowdown, it’s going to need all the help it can get from its energetic army of entrepreneurs. Happily our 10th MT survey of Britain’s Top 100 Entrepreneurs and family businesses shows that in the last five years, from the depth of the downturn until last year, the nation’s self-made businessmen and women have been performing heroically, growing their operations, taking on staff and generating much-needed cash for both their local economies and the country.

    So our Top 100 have seen staff numbers shoot up by nearly 85,000 in the last five years to over 164,000. This near-107% rise is much sharper than in previous years, justifying the view that our best entrepreneurs are the economy’s real job creators. And job creation is one of the crucial measures we use in ranking our Top 100.

    The other of course is turnover growth, reflecting the economic activity they generate. This year our 100 entrepreneurs had a total turnover of 26.35bn, up from 12.898bn five years ago.

    This represents a 104.3% increase – great news for UK plc, but perhaps a note of caution should come here. This is the first time since we started doing the Top 100 that the overall growth in employment has been greater than the comparable growth figure for turnover. It may help explain why the British productivity record has been so lamentable in recent years, with an 18% lag behind our competitors. Quite simply the entrepreneurs collectively are not getting as much out of each staff member in output terms.

    But behind the macroeconomic numbers are some pretty impressive individual performances, none more so than this year’s number one – the Arora brothers (pictured) of discount homewares chain B M. Simon, the Cambridge-educated ex-McKinsey man, and his younger brother Bobby, who has a market trader’s nose for a bargain and pricing, have in the last decade built up a group that is now the envy of the discount retail world, valued by the stock market at around 3.2bn. More importantly for UK plc, in the last five years, B M’s remorseless expansion has seen its staff numbers jump by over 200% to 19,462. That must be a welcome boost in its Merseyside heartland where it has its headquarters.

    This is matched by their track record in growing sales, up by 206% in the same period. But they are not alone in this respect. Our joint second place entries, 32-year-old Nitin Passi of the Missguided online fashion group and the Coates siblings – Denise and John – through their Bet365 online gaming operation, are just as effective when it comes to expansion. Passi has invested in a new headquarters in Manchester which, with all the trappings of an internet operation, is regarded as the coolest in the city. He reckons it will motivate his growing staff to make Missguided a 1bn business in five years. Few would bet against him, or the nine others from Britain’s thriving Asian business community who make our list.

    Excellent progress this may be, but sadly we can’t say the same about the number of female entrepreneurs in the Top 100. There are 17 women listed, but only two, including Denise Coates of course, make the top 20. Last year’s celebrity winner, fashion entrepreneur Victoria Beckham. has not produced any new accounts and so cannot be considered this time around.

    There are of course some fabulous women entrepreneurs who have developed businesses of the scale to make it into the Top 100, including Chrissie Rucker of the White Company, Margaret Barbour and Vivienne Westwood. But despite having trawled Companies House for the accounts that provide the underpinning of our research, there are just not enough. Perhaps this is a deficiency which the current crop of twentysomething female entrepreneurs like Kathryn Parsons of Decoded and Smruti Sriram of Supreme Creations will address in future lists – after all, the wealth which is one of our core criteria typically takes many years to accrue.

    In the meantime, the aforementioned Bet365 founder and co-CEO Denise Coates is our highest placed woman and flies the flag ably for women in business. A bookie’s daughter, she certainly knows a good bet when she sees one. Coates has masterminded a near doubling of profits to over 400m in the Stoke-based firm’s latest accounts. And her business acumen extends to looking after her employees, too – she plans to turn what’s left of Josiah Wedgwood’s famous Etruria Works into a children’s day nursery, a facility bound to be welcomed by the firm’s working parents.

    The north-south divide may be ever-present, but encouragingly there are a fair crop of regional entrepreneurs working to close it. The South West has 14, the North West 13 and Yorkshire 12.

    But the South East still remains top, with 33 names. Encouragingly for the government’s efforts to re-balance British business towards manufacturing, the march of the Top 100 makers is going at full tilt. Thirteen of the Top 100 are industrialists of one sort or another, with another 21 in high-tech sectors like the internet, software, telecoms and computing. They include Sir James Dyson of the ubiquitous bagless vacuum, whose firm is rapidly moving into new markets. Smaller but growing steadily are the likes of Melett, built up by Ian and Nicola Warhurst, which makes turbocharger repair kits for cars, and exports 90% of its output, with a growing market in China.

    One of our measures of how well our entrepreneurs are doing comes from a valuation of their stake in the business and other assets, based on the stock market values if quoted or in line with those values for those who run a private company. Such valuations, of course, come with many caveats but serve as a rough and ready guide. Collectively the Top 100 are, by our reckoning, worth 24.5bn, a whisker below last year’s 25bn total.

    This may reflect the general fragility of markets worldwide at present. But the one fact that unites all our 100 is their demonstrable record of success. They are the best hope for Britain to enjoy a sustained recovery with more jobs – and more prosperity – to come.

    Find The Complete List Here





    Tags : , , , ,

    Young entrepreneurs: Starting a business advice and business ideas #loan #for #small #business

    #entrepreneur ideas

    #

    Young entrepreneurs

    The young entrepreneur stories featured in this section show that you do not necessarily need years of experience to start a profitable business. Read the incredible accounts of teenage entrepreneurs such as David Carter, founder of The App Factory, and Bigger Feet creator Oliver Bridges and see how they achieved massive success at such a young age

    Key topics

    At 18, Jordan Daykin became the youngest entrepreneur to land investment in the Den. Today, his global DIY fixing business is said to be worth £14m.

    Shining a spotlight on the UK’s brightest founders aged 25 and under, Startups reveals the business owners set for entrepreneurial stardom this year

    The 25-year-old bringing a fresh, tech focused approach to digital marketing

    The impressive female entrepreneur swapped reality TV for enterprise, creating a cult jewellery brand loved by A-list celebrities and the royal family

    Determined to help people discover great things to try in London and beyond, 25 year-old Malin has built a website with thousands of daily readers…

    The 21 year-old creating slip-on shoes worn by the likes of Tinie Tempah and Ryan Reynolds

    The 17 year-old entrepreneur who’s built an online media empire from his bedroom

    The 21-year-old on a mission to change the world through entrepreneurship by nurturing the next generation of business leaders

    The 24-year-old founder of a personalised handwritten communication business on a mission to create employment for millions around the world

    The brains behind a social media business which can make anything the number one trending topic on Twitter within 30 minutes.

    The venture-backed duo helping teams, groups and charities raise money by connecting them to major brands

    From a teenage eBay business to his current ‘on-demand selling service’, meet the serial business owner aged 24 with an eye for lucrative opportunities

    Latest on Startups

    To celebrate 10 years of its Business IP Centre, on September 27 the Library is holding a free day of workshops from the likes of Julie Deane OBE.

    A professional musician who’s preformed alongside the likes of Lana del Ray and Beyoncé – Katie Sayles talks about her new pre-school members’ club

    Research from the FSB suggests the introduction of the minimum £7.20-an-hour rate has led many small firms to increase prices and reduce staff hours

    App which operates via Bluetooth connected handleba device backed by TrueStart, Seedrs, and mayor’s London Co-Investment Fund

    Purple Cow ” rel=”bookmark”>The business book you need to read this month: Purple Cow

    With a focus on ‘transforming your business by being remarkable’, entrepreneur Daniel Keighron-Foster advocates Seth Godin’s seminal book

    Useful business start up tools

    Forum post of the week

    Want to run a more profitable business?

    More from Startups





    Tags : , , , , , , ,

    Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #online #businesses

    #small business tips

    #

    21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

    STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

    Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

    1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

    Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

    2. Add a personal touch.

    Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

    3. Leverage social media.

    A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

    Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

    4. Write your own business bible.

    Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

    5. Focus on your specialty.

    In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

    6. Outsource the things you don t do.

    Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

    7. Aim high and be persistent.

    Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

    Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

    8. Embrace a life less frantic.

    Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

    9. Follow your own path.

    Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

    10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

    Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

    11. Harness your keystone habits .

    Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

    Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

    12. Practise mindfulness.

    Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

    13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

    Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

    14. Hire from within your networks.

    When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

    15. Keep it manageable.

    Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

    Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

    16. Know when to work for free.

    Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

    17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

    SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

    18. Learn to say no.

    Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

    Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

    If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

    20. Turn competition into inspiration.

    Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

    21. Know when to take a dream detour .

    Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.





    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #lucrative #business #ideas

    #small business tips

    #

    21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

    STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

    Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

    1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

    Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

    2. Add a personal touch.

    Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

    3. Leverage social media.

    A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

    Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

    4. Write your own business bible.

    Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

    5. Focus on your specialty.

    In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

    6. Outsource the things you don t do.

    Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

    7. Aim high and be persistent.

    Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

    Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

    8. Embrace a life less frantic.

    Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

    9. Follow your own path.

    Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

    10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

    Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

    11. Harness your keystone habits .

    Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

    Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

    12. Practise mindfulness.

    Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

    13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

    Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

    14. Hire from within your networks.

    When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

    15. Keep it manageable.

    Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

    Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

    16. Know when to work for free.

    Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

    17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

    SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

    18. Learn to say no.

    Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

    Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

    If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

    20. Turn competition into inspiration.

    Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

    21. Know when to take a dream detour .

    Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.





    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    Young Entrepreneurs: 14 Small Business Ideas for Teens and Kids #mobile #business #ideas

    #business ideas for kids

    #

    14 Fun Business Ideas for Kids and Teens to Encourage Entrepreneurship

    Should you encourage your children to start a business? Are there good business ideas for teens and kids? With police routinely shutting down kids lemonade stands for being unlicensed businesses, you might wonder if they should just put their entrepreneurial urges on hold until they get older.

    But there are good reasons to let young people make some money on their own, and to let them start early. Billionaire CEO of Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett says :

    There was a study many years ago questioning how to predict business success later in life. The answer to the study wasthe age you started your first business impacted how successful you were later in life.Teaching kids sound financial habits at an early age gives all kids the opportunity to be successful when they are an adult. [emphasis added]

    Buffett s own childhood was full of investments and businesses. At age 11, he bought his first stock. By the age of 14, he used $1,200 he earned from paper routes to purchase 40 acres of land, which he then leased out to farmers. In high school, he and a friend bought a used pinball machine for $25 and set it up in a barber shop. They later put machines in other locations and eventually sold the business.

    Of course, your child doesn t have to be the next Warren Buffett to benefit from a small venture or two. Here are some of the best business ideas for kids.

    1. Dog Walking

    Busy people need help keeping their dogs fit, and this is a job most kids can handle and enjoy. Dog walkers charge either for a set fee or an hourly rate, and the kids can even expand their business to include dog washing and pet sitting .

    Kids can approach neighbors to offer their services (you may want to tag along if they’re young) or advertise their business online. Care.comsays their dog walkers average almost $10 per hour, and it s free to open a basic account. Care.com’s policy for teens requires adult-supervised accounts (parents receive email notifications of all activity), and the kids have to be at least 14 to sign up.

    2. Websites

    Many kids are more Internet savvy than their parents, so it makes sense to consider online businesses, including various types of websites. It costs very little to register a domain name and buy web hosting, and by relying on easy advertising revenue (like Google AdSense), kids don t even have to sell anything.

    For example, Forbes reports that Ashley Qualls started Whateverlife.com at age 14 as a personal portfolio with pictures and graphics she created. Later, she added tutorials on creating graphics and other content for teens. Before long she needed a dedicated server, and she added Google AdSense to the site to monetize the traffic.

    Now, her website brings in as much as $70,000 a month, according to Fast Company. Qualls bought a $250,000 home with her profits while still a teenager, and turned down a $1.5 million offer for her business.

    3. Paper Routes

    Paper routes helped Warren Buffett get his start in business, and although most newspapers now rely on adults with cars for delivery, there are still a few places where kids deliver papers on foot or by bicycle. In Carroll, Iowa, for example, The Daily Times Herald still has 80% of its papers delivered by kids aged 9 to 17, according to NPR .

    One of the best things about modern paper delivery is that the kids no longer have to knock on doors to collect for subscriptions that s all done by credit card billing.

    4. Crafts and Jewelry

    If your kids are creatively inclined, they can make crafts and jewelry to sell online. There s no need to set up a website for this. Platforms like Etsy provide a great way to keep it simple. Vendors pay 20 cents to list a product and then a commission of 3.5% on each sale. The policy for kids is that the Etsy Shop must be managed by a parent or legal guardian.

    How much could your child earn on Etsy? By the time he was 11 years old, Mo Bridges had brought in more than $30,000 selling bow ties through his Etsy shop.

    Other Businesses for Kids

    Don t underestimate the potential for big success from small starts. Fraser Doherty started making and selling jam from home at age 14 and before long had over $1 million in annual sales. At age 10, Juliette Brindak drew pictures of Cool Girls, and, at age 16, used those characters to launch a social networking site called Miss O and Friends . The site is valued at $15 million today.

    The types of businesses started by some kids might surprise you too. Who would have thought that BizChair.com. started by Sean Belnicks at age 14, would be selling $24 million in office chairs by the time its founder was 20? Or that 17-year-old Nick D’Aloisio would sell his news-aggregator app, called Summly, for $30 million?

    Any kind of business activity teaches kids valuable lessons. As a child, Tyler Dikman had lemonade stands, mowed lawns and did magic shows. He parlayed that business experience into launching CoolTronics. a comprehensive computer sales and service solution, when he was just 15. The company went on to make millions of dollars.

    What else can kids or teens do to make money? Here are a few more possibilities:

    1. Help companies with social media marketing
    2. Babysit
    3. Help seniors set up and use computers
    4. Wash cars
    5. Do garden maintenance
    6. Have garage sales
    7. Make greeting cards
    8. Recycle soda cans
    9. Tutor younger kids
    10. Shovel snow

    Your Turn: Do you encourage your children s entrepreneurial plans? What good business ideas could you add to the list?

    by Steve Gillman
    Contributor for The Penny Hoarder

    Top Articles

    Want a Free $20 in Cash?

    How to Earn $60/Hour Working From Home as a Bookkeeper

    Work From Home

    29 Smart Ways

    The 12 Best Ways

    100 Places Will Give You

    Get Free Money

    10 Ways You Can Make Money

    Top 5 Mystery Shopping

    Easy $750 Per Month

    32 Legitimate Ways

    Have a Costco or Sam’s Club Membership?

    12 Mobile Apps

    The Krazy Coupon Lady

    9 Best Survey Sites





    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    Facebook s Mark Zuckerberg says the most successful entrepreneurs share 3 traits #creative #business

    #top entrepreneurs

    #

    Facebook s Mark Zuckerberg says the most successful entrepreneurs share 3 traits

    In a live Q A in Rome on Monday, Mark Zuckerberg was asked to name three traits of people who make it to the top.

    First and foremost, successful entrepreneurs have a specific vision , the Facebook co-founder and CEO said. They pinpoint the exact problem that they’re trying to solve.

    “If you want to build something great, you should focus on what the change is that you want to make in the world,” Zuckerberg said. “I see too many entrepreneurs who decide that they want to start a company before they actually know what it is that they want to build. To me, that seems backwards.”

    Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

    Secondly, they surround themselves with other highly successful and motivated people.

    “No one does it alone,” Zuckerberg said. “When you look at most big things that get done in the world, they’re not done by one person, so you’re going to need to build a team.”

    To build the strongest team possible, look for people who excel in the areas where you’re weaker or less experienced. “You’re going to need people that have complementary skills,” he emphasized. “No matter how talented you are, there are just going to be things that you don’t bring to the table.”

    Finally, the entrepreneurs who make it big are persistent. “Nothing ever goes the way you want it to,” he said. “People talk about overnight success, and that’s not the way it works.”

    The ones who come out on top are the ones who refuse to give up despite the inevitable trials and tribulations they face throughout the process.

    Zuckerberg concluded: “The biggest things that have gotten done in the world tend to be done by people who primarily believe in a mission and are not trying to build a company; by teams, not by individuals; and by people who just don’t give up.”





    Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,