Tag: English

How to Write a Business Report for English Learners #business #school

#business report

#

How to Write a Business Report for English Learners

By Kenneth Beare. English as 2nd Language Expert

Kenneth is an ESL teacher, trainer, and content developer. He provides consulting services for English language learning projects through Englishfeed. You can follow Kenneth on Twitter. on his Google profile: Kenneth Beare. or on Facebook to stay up to date on his latest English learning materials.

Updated July 28, 2015.

If you would like to learn how to write a business report in English follow these tips and use the example report as a template on which to base your own business report. First of all, business reports provide important information for management that is timely and factual. English learners writing business reports need to make sure that the language is precise and concise. The writing style used for business reports should present information without strong opinions, but rather as direct and accurately as possible.

Continue Reading Below

Linking language should be used to connect ideas and sections of the business report. This example business report presents the four essentials that every business report should include:

Terms of reference refer to the terms on which the business report is written.

The procedure describe the method that was used to collect data for the report.

The findings describe the data or other important information the report produced.

Conclusions are drawn on the findings which provide reasons for recommendations.

The recommendations are specific suggestions made based on the conclusions of the report.

Read the short example business report and follow the tips below. Teachers can print this examples for use in class in lessons using sound teaching writing strategies .

Reports: Example Report

Margaret Anderson, Director of Personnel has requested this report on employee benefits satisfaction. The report was to be submitted to her by 28 June.

A representative selection of 15% of all employees were interviewed in the period between April 1st and April 15th concerning:

Continue Reading Below

  1. Overall satisfaction with our current benefits package
  2. Problems encountered when dealing with the personnel department
  3. Suggestions for the improvement of communication policies
  4. Problems encountered when dealing with our HMO
  1. Employees were generally satisfied with the current benefits package.
  2. Some problems were encountered when requesting vacation due to what is perceived as long approval waiting periods.
  3. Older employees repeatedly had problems with HMO prescription drugs procedures.
  4. Employees between the ages of 22 and 30 report few problems with HMO.
  5. Most employees complain about the lack of dental insurance in our benefits package.
  6. The most common suggestion for improvement was for the ability to process benefits requests online.
  1. Older employees, those over 50, are having serious problems with our HMO s ability to provide prescription drugs.
  2. Our benefits request system needs to be revised as most complaints concerning in-house processing.
  3. Improvements need to take place in personnel department response time.
  4. Information technology improvements should be considered as employees become more technologically savvy.
  1. Meet with HMO representatives to discuss the serious nature of complaints concerning prescription drug benefits for older employees.
  2. Give priority to vacation request response time as employees need faster approval in order to be able to plan their vacations.
  3. Take no special actions for the benefits package of younger employees.
  4. Discuss the possibility of adding an online benefits requests system to our company Intranet.

Important Points to Remember

  • A report is divided into four areas:
    • Terms of Reference – This section gives background information on the reason for the report. It usually includes the person requesting the report.
    • Procedure – The procedure provides the exact steps taken and methods used for the report.
    • Findings – The findings point out discoveries made during the course of the report investigation.
    • Conclusions – The conclusions provide logical conclusions based on the findings.
    • Recommendations – The recommendations state actions that the writer of the report feels need to be taken based on the findings and conclusions.
  • Reports should be concise and factual. Opinions are given in the conclusions section. However, these opinions should be based on facts presented in the findings .
  • Use simple tenses (usually the present simple) to express facts.
  • Use the imperative form (Discuss the possibility. Give priority. etc.) in the recommendations section as these apply to the company as a whole.

Continue learning about other types of business documents using these resources:





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Business strategy Business strategy business studies and business english #business #bankruptcy

#business strategy

#

Strategy theory

Business strategy

A business strategy is the means by which it sets out to achieve its desired ends (objectives). It can simply be described as a long-term business planning. Typically a business strategy will cover a period of about 3-5 years (sometimes even longer).

A business strategy is concerned with major resource issues e.g. raising the finance to build a new factory or plant. Strategies are also concerned with deciding on what products to allocate major resources to – for example when Coca-Cola launched Pooh Roo Juice in this country.

Strategies are concerned with the scope of a business’ activities i.e. what and where they produce. For example, BIC’s scope is focused on three main product areas – lighters, pens, and razors, and they have developed superfactories in key geographical locations to produce these items.

Two main categories of strategies can be identified:

1. Generic (general) strategies, and

2. Competitive strategies.

The main types of generic strategies that organisations can pursue are:

1. Growth i.e. the expansion of the company to purchase new assets, including new businesses, and to develop new products. The Inland Revenue has expanded from being just a tax collector, to other functions such as collecting student loan repayments and paying tax credits.

2. Internationalisation/globalisation i.e. moving operations into more and more countries. For example companies like Gillette, Coca-Cola, Kellogg’s, and Cadbury Schweppes are major multinationals with operations across the globe.

3. Retrenchment involves cutting back to focus on your best lines. The Americans refer to this as ‘sticking to the knitting’ – i.e. concentrating on what you do best.

Competitive advantage

Competitive strategies are also important. Competitive strategies are concerned with doing things better than rivals. To be competitive a firm shouldn’t just copy the ideas of rivals. They should seek to out compete rivals. There are two main ways of being competitive.

1. By selling goods at lower prices than rivals. This is possible when a firm is the market leader and benefits from economies of scale.

2. By differentiating your product from those of rivals – which enables you to charge a higher price if desired.

The airline industry is divided into two main segments. At one end of the market are the premium price category firms such as British Airways that concentrate on differentiation. They offer better service to passengers, more legroom, in flight entertainment, and more individualised attention. At the other end of the market the emphasis is on being the low cost producer and is exemplified by ‘no frills’ airlines such as Ryanair. Ryanair focuses on short haul destinations and keeping its planes in the air as frequently as possible in a 24 hour period.

Economies of scale – The advantages that large firms have from producing large volumes of output enabling them to spread their costs over more units of output.

Differentiation – Making a product different from rival offerings e.g. through packaging and labelling, customer care, additional extra features, etc.





Tags : , , , ,

Business English Seminars #business #health #insurance

#business seminars

#

Business English Seminars

Our Business English Seminars are for professionals who want to keep up to date with the international language of business and improve their communication skills in the workplace.

Each two-hour seminar includes a variety of activities designed to maximise participation. Home study is not required.

Seminar programme

The programme consists of eight two-hour seminars:

  • Language Profiling
    Assess your English language skills against the levels of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) using our Aptis testing tool.
  • Language for Presentations
    Learn how to deliver powerful presentations in the workplace.
  • Improve your Εmails
    Enhance your written communication with our email writing tips.
  • Business Report Writing
    Learn how to structure reports more effectively.
  • Working with Data
    Learn how to describe and present trends, facts and figures clearly and effectively.
  • Powerful Networking
    Practise and further develop the language skills needed for effective client relations and meetings, as well as for socialising and small talk.
  • Express Business Views
    Learn how to put forward suggestions, support proposals, present facts and offer clarifications.
  • Address Your Needs
    Address specific needs identified during previous sessions such as pronunciation, language for conference calls, CV writing etc.

Participants will receive a certificate of completion at the end of the seminar programme.

Course information

Levels

Lower, Advanced, Proficiency

Please note that we observe both Greek and British public holidays. A list of dates will be made available at the beginning of the seminar programme. For further information, please see our Kolonaki Teaching Centre page.

How to register

You can register for the seminar programme in one of two ways:

  • Visit our Athens office (Monday to Friday, 09.00–14.30) and see one of our Customer Services Assistants on the ground floor to register and pay the fee in person. You can pay in cash, by credit card or cheque.
  • Step 1: Pay the fee by direct deposit/bank transfer to the British Council account at Citibank :

Please quote your name followed by BUSENG in the ‘Αιτιολογία’ field on the deposit
slip (e.g. N. Papanikolaou, BUSENG).

For further information, call Customer Services on 210 369 2333 or 801 500 3692* (Monday to Friday, 08.00–17.00).

* Calls from anywhere in Greece are charged at local rate.

Entry requirements

  • be aged 18 or over
  • have at least a B2 level of English in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) or equivalent competency level.

Conditions of payment

  • Fees can be paid in cash, by credit card, by cheque or by direct deposit/bank transfer.
  • Fees must be paid at the time of registration.
  • Refunds are not available.

General conditions

  • We reserve the right not to open a class with fewer than 12 students.
  • Normally the maximum number of students in a class will not exceed 20.

Downloads

Want to register for the seminar programme?





Tags : , ,

Business English Course #business #week

#business english

#

Business English Courses

Whether you are the CEO, a manager, or other business professional looking to advance your career, you can choose to take a Business English course at ELC. Our Business English courses have been designed for all business professionals seeking a specialized English education with professional and experienced teachers. We offer a full range of Business English courses at our Boston center. Individual Business English courses are also available in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara.

BENEFITS OF BUSINESS ENGLISH AT ELC

  • Pre-course Needs Assessment
    An extensive pre-course needs assessment is sent with each course confirmation to ensure that we are meeting each student’s specific needs and goals.
  • Personal Attention
    The School Director and the Director of Courses meet with each Business English student upon arrival at the school and then arrange regular meetings with the student during their program to make sure that all aspects of their program are meeting their expectations.
  • Contemporary, Comprehensive Curriculum
    ELC’s Business English curriculum was recently updated to provide students with the most up-to-date resources, including new textbooks, and new supplemental materials that reflect the ever-evolving global workplace.
  • Small Class Size
    Our maximum class size for Group 5 courses is five students, which allows instructors to focus on each individual student and provide personalized instruction and feedback.
  • Qualified Instructors
    All Business English instructors have a university degree and specialized training in Teaching English as a Second Language. In addition, they all have experience in business and/or an MBA.
  • Presentation Practice
    Students improve their presentation and speaking skills by presenting a topic to their class and the administrative staff at the end of their course. Students also receive a Business English certificate upon completion of their presentation.
  • Flexibility and Variety
    We offer a number of different business English courses (part-time, full-time, group instruction, and individual instruction), to ensure that we have a course that meets your time constraints and English needs.
  • Business English Student Calendar
    ELC publishes a special activities calendar for Business English students, which gives students the opportunity to apply the English skills that they are learning in the classroom to an informal setting outside the classroom.
  • Ideal Location
    ELC Boston is located in downtown (Beacon Hill), the center of commerce and government in Boston.
  • Business English Lounge
    Access to a private Business English student lounge, where students can meet their classmates, peruse business journals, check email with free wifi, chat with their instructor, or review new material before class.
  • Daily Comforts
    Enjoy complimentary coffee, tea, and snacks daily as well as daily subscriptions to the leading business journals and newspapers.
  • Lunch with Teachers and Staff
    Catered lunch with teachers and staff at the end of the course.

    CHOOSE YOUR BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSE

    GROUP 5 INTENSIVE ENGLISH

    35 lessons per week of Business English in mini groups of no more than five students. This course is available at ELC Boston only.





Business English Course #car #wash #business

#business english

#

Business English Courses

Whether you are the CEO, a manager, or other business professional looking to advance your career, you can choose to take a Business English course at ELC. Our Business English courses have been designed for all business professionals seeking a specialized English education with professional and experienced teachers. We offer a full range of Business English courses at our Boston center. Individual Business English courses are also available in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara.

BENEFITS OF BUSINESS ENGLISH AT ELC

  • Pre-course Needs Assessment
    An extensive pre-course needs assessment is sent with each course confirmation to ensure that we are meeting each student’s specific needs and goals.
  • Personal Attention
    The School Director and the Director of Courses meet with each Business English student upon arrival at the school and then arrange regular meetings with the student during their program to make sure that all aspects of their program are meeting their expectations.
  • Contemporary, Comprehensive Curriculum
    ELC’s Business English curriculum was recently updated to provide students with the most up-to-date resources, including new textbooks, and new supplemental materials that reflect the ever-evolving global workplace.
  • Small Class Size
    Our maximum class size for Group 5 courses is five students, which allows instructors to focus on each individual student and provide personalized instruction and feedback.
  • Qualified Instructors
    All Business English instructors have a university degree and specialized training in Teaching English as a Second Language. In addition, they all have experience in business and/or an MBA.
  • Presentation Practice
    Students improve their presentation and speaking skills by presenting a topic to their class and the administrative staff at the end of their course. Students also receive a Business English certificate upon completion of their presentation.
  • Flexibility and Variety
    We offer a number of different business English courses (part-time, full-time, group instruction, and individual instruction), to ensure that we have a course that meets your time constraints and English needs.
  • Business English Student Calendar
    ELC publishes a special activities calendar for Business English students, which gives students the opportunity to apply the English skills that they are learning in the classroom to an informal setting outside the classroom.
  • Ideal Location
    ELC Boston is located in downtown (Beacon Hill), the center of commerce and government in Boston.
  • Business English Lounge
    Access to a private Business English student lounge, where students can meet their classmates, peruse business journals, check email with free wifi, chat with their instructor, or review new material before class.
  • Daily Comforts
    Enjoy complimentary coffee, tea, and snacks daily as well as daily subscriptions to the leading business journals and newspapers.
  • Lunch with Teachers and Staff
    Catered lunch with teachers and staff at the end of the course.

    CHOOSE YOUR BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSE

    GROUP 5 INTENSIVE ENGLISH

    35 lessons per week of Business English in mini groups of no more than five students. This course is available at ELC Boston only.





How to Write a Business Report for English Learners #business #list

#business report

#

How to Write a Business Report for English Learners

By Kenneth Beare. English as 2nd Language Expert

Kenneth is an ESL teacher, trainer, and content developer. He provides consulting services for English language learning projects through Englishfeed. You can follow Kenneth on Twitter. on his Google profile: Kenneth Beare. or on Facebook to stay up to date on his latest English learning materials.

Updated July 28, 2015.

If you would like to learn how to write a business report in English follow these tips and use the example report as a template on which to base your own business report. First of all, business reports provide important information for management that is timely and factual. English learners writing business reports need to make sure that the language is precise and concise. The writing style used for business reports should present information without strong opinions, but rather as direct and accurately as possible.

Continue Reading Below

Linking language should be used to connect ideas and sections of the business report. This example business report presents the four essentials that every business report should include:

Terms of reference refer to the terms on which the business report is written.

The procedure describe the method that was used to collect data for the report.

The findings describe the data or other important information the report produced.

Conclusions are drawn on the findings which provide reasons for recommendations.

The recommendations are specific suggestions made based on the conclusions of the report.

Read the short example business report and follow the tips below. Teachers can print this examples for use in class in lessons using sound teaching writing strategies .

Reports: Example Report

Margaret Anderson, Director of Personnel has requested this report on employee benefits satisfaction. The report was to be submitted to her by 28 June.

A representative selection of 15% of all employees were interviewed in the period between April 1st and April 15th concerning:

Continue Reading Below

  1. Overall satisfaction with our current benefits package
  2. Problems encountered when dealing with the personnel department
  3. Suggestions for the improvement of communication policies
  4. Problems encountered when dealing with our HMO
  1. Employees were generally satisfied with the current benefits package.
  2. Some problems were encountered when requesting vacation due to what is perceived as long approval waiting periods.
  3. Older employees repeatedly had problems with HMO prescription drugs procedures.
  4. Employees between the ages of 22 and 30 report few problems with HMO.
  5. Most employees complain about the lack of dental insurance in our benefits package.
  6. The most common suggestion for improvement was for the ability to process benefits requests online.
  1. Older employees, those over 50, are having serious problems with our HMO s ability to provide prescription drugs.
  2. Our benefits request system needs to be revised as most complaints concerning in-house processing.
  3. Improvements need to take place in personnel department response time.
  4. Information technology improvements should be considered as employees become more technologically savvy.
  1. Meet with HMO representatives to discuss the serious nature of complaints concerning prescription drug benefits for older employees.
  2. Give priority to vacation request response time as employees need faster approval in order to be able to plan their vacations.
  3. Take no special actions for the benefits package of younger employees.
  4. Discuss the possibility of adding an online benefits requests system to our company Intranet.

Important Points to Remember

  • A report is divided into four areas:
    • Terms of Reference – This section gives background information on the reason for the report. It usually includes the person requesting the report.
    • Procedure – The procedure provides the exact steps taken and methods used for the report.
    • Findings – The findings point out discoveries made during the course of the report investigation.
    • Conclusions – The conclusions provide logical conclusions based on the findings.
    • Recommendations – The recommendations state actions that the writer of the report feels need to be taken based on the findings and conclusions.
  • Reports should be concise and factual. Opinions are given in the conclusions section. However, these opinions should be based on facts presented in the findings .
  • Use simple tenses (usually the present simple) to express facts.
  • Use the imperative form (Discuss the possibility. Give priority. etc.) in the recommendations section as these apply to the company as a whole.

Continue learning about other types of business documents using these resources:





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Business strategy Business strategy business studies and business english #new #business #grants

#business strategy

#

Strategy theory

Business strategy

A business strategy is the means by which it sets out to achieve its desired ends (objectives). It can simply be described as a long-term business planning. Typically a business strategy will cover a period of about 3-5 years (sometimes even longer).

A business strategy is concerned with major resource issues e.g. raising the finance to build a new factory or plant. Strategies are also concerned with deciding on what products to allocate major resources to – for example when Coca-Cola launched Pooh Roo Juice in this country.

Strategies are concerned with the scope of a business’ activities i.e. what and where they produce. For example, BIC’s scope is focused on three main product areas – lighters, pens, and razors, and they have developed superfactories in key geographical locations to produce these items.

Two main categories of strategies can be identified:

1. Generic (general) strategies, and

2. Competitive strategies.

The main types of generic strategies that organisations can pursue are:

1. Growth i.e. the expansion of the company to purchase new assets, including new businesses, and to develop new products. The Inland Revenue has expanded from being just a tax collector, to other functions such as collecting student loan repayments and paying tax credits.

2. Internationalisation/globalisation i.e. moving operations into more and more countries. For example companies like Gillette, Coca-Cola, Kellogg’s, and Cadbury Schweppes are major multinationals with operations across the globe.

3. Retrenchment involves cutting back to focus on your best lines. The Americans refer to this as ‘sticking to the knitting’ – i.e. concentrating on what you do best.

Competitive advantage

Competitive strategies are also important. Competitive strategies are concerned with doing things better than rivals. To be competitive a firm shouldn’t just copy the ideas of rivals. They should seek to out compete rivals. There are two main ways of being competitive.

1. By selling goods at lower prices than rivals. This is possible when a firm is the market leader and benefits from economies of scale.

2. By differentiating your product from those of rivals – which enables you to charge a higher price if desired.

The airline industry is divided into two main segments. At one end of the market are the premium price category firms such as British Airways that concentrate on differentiation. They offer better service to passengers, more legroom, in flight entertainment, and more individualised attention. At the other end of the market the emphasis is on being the low cost producer and is exemplified by ‘no frills’ airlines such as Ryanair. Ryanair focuses on short haul destinations and keeping its planes in the air as frequently as possible in a 24 hour period.

Economies of scale – The advantages that large firms have from producing large volumes of output enabling them to spread their costs over more units of output.

Differentiation – Making a product different from rival offerings e.g. through packaging and labelling, customer care, additional extra features, etc.





Tags : , , , ,

7 Simple Examples of Business Email Writing in English #easy #business #loans

#business emails

#

7 Simple Examples of Business Email Writing in English

Most of us in the business world use emails as the main, and in some cases the only, means of written communication. For many students studying Business English and practising their business email writing skills is an important part of their course.

While most of us are happy to write informal emails to friends that might have grammatical mistakes in them, the same is not true when writing to colleagues and clients with whom we want to make a good impression.

Or where we need to be a bit more careful or more diplomatic than usual.

So, how can you ensure that your email writing skills are up to standard? Here are some general tips I d like to share with you:

1. Subject Line

Always have a subject line that summarises briefly and clearly the contents of the message (example: Re: Summary of Our Meeting with ABC Suppliers ).

2. Simplified Sentences

Don t make your email look overcrowded by trying to use too many technical terms or long words. It is good to use complex and compound-complex sentences, but ensure that they are easy to understand.

The most common mistake that many of our students make is to translate directly from their own language. This can often lead to confusing sentences. A popular rule that you could adapt is to use the KISS Test Keep It Short and Simple.

3. Think of who your reader is going to be

Is it a colleague, a client or your boss? Should the email be informal or formal? Most business emails these days have a neutral tone. Note the difference between Informal and Formal:

Informal Thanks for emailing me on 15th February
Formal Thank you for your email dated 15th February

Informal Sorry, I can t make it.
Formal I am afraid I will not be able to attend

Informal Can you ?
Formal I was wondering if you could .?

Some emails to colleagues can be informal if you have a long working relationship and know them well. This is the style that is closest to speech, so there are often everyday words and conversational expressions that can be used. For instance, Don t forget . Catch you later . Cheers .

The reader may also accept or overlook minor grammatical errors in informal emails. However, if the email is going to a client or senior colleague, bad grammar and an over-friendly writing style will most probably not be acceptable.

4. Be very careful of capital letters, punctuation, spelling and basic grammar

While these can be tolerated in informal emails, they are very important in business emails as they are an important part of the image you create. Give yourself time to edit what you ve written before you push that Send button.

In today s busy world, it s very easy to send out many emails without checking them thoroughly: as an English learner, you should make a conscious effort to double check before sending.

5. Think about how direct or indirect you want to be

In some cultures, it is common practice to be very direct in email correspondence. However, this can cause a problem if you re writing to someone in another country and in a language that is not your mother tongue. They might find your directness rude and possibly offensive.

Direct I need this in half an hour.
Indirect and polite Would it be possible to have this in half an hour?

Direct There will be a delay
Indirect I m afraid there may be a slight delay.

Direct It s a bad idea
Indirect To be honest, I m not sure if that would be a good idea.

By adjusting your tone, you are more likely to get a positive response from your reader.

6. Be positive!

Look at these words: helpful, good question, agreed, together, useful, I will do my best, mutual, opportunity.

Now look at these: busy, crisis, failure, forget it, I can t, it s impossible, waste, hard.

The words you use show your attitude to life, so choose your words wisely.

7. Get feedback

Try and get some feedback on the emails that you write. This could be from your English Teacher or someone you know whose English is at a good level.

Study the English in any emails you receive. If it is a well-written email, look carefully at some of the language used. Start your own phrase book by collecting a bank of phrases from what you hear or read all around you; they may be useful in the future.

Author: Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat

Shanthi graduated in Politics and International Studies from the University of Southampton, UK in 1989.
After 20 years in the world of Finance in such varied fields as life assurance, stockbroking, fund management and wealth management, she decided to re-train as an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Trainer.
She studied the CELTA at International House, London in 2009 and has since been a freelance English Language Trainer. She is also the co-owner of Language and The City .

ONE-TO-ONE SKYPE LESSONS WITH AN AMERICAN OR BRITISH ENGLISH TEACHER

Other schools teach you grammar rules
MyEnglishTeacher.eu helps you to become a confident English speaker

Written by: Anastasia Koltai

Founder of MyEnglishTeacher.eu. Ana is a fan of giving away free and useful materials both for English learners and teachers. In her free time she loves biking and playing with her dog.





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Business English Courses- Cursus Zakelijk Engels BSN Language Centre #sba #grants

#business english

#

Business English

Business English courses are aimed at working professionals or those seeking employment in which English is a requirement or is desired.

Evening courses

The evening courses are offered at the BSN Language Centre at upper intermediate and advanced levels and are held once a week. Similar to our general English courses, they cover grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation and all four skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking but the contexts all relate to the business world. Our teachers use both commercially produced and authentic materials, and whenever appropriate we incorporate students’ real-life tasks.

The face-to-face lessons last for 2 hours. The courses are designed to fit into a busy work schedule and offer a more flexible solution to improve your English at work.

There are no specific starting dates. The courses run all year round. Students are tested and if there is a suitable course running, they can join from 1 week after the registration process has been completed.

English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI): a new course for university lecturers

The BSN Language Centre is the first to offer the EMI Skills Course, recently developed by Cambridge English, in the Netherlands. This course is especially developed for lecturers working within higher education who deliver international programmes in English. For further information visit our EMI Skills Course page

Levels
  • B2 Upper Intermediate and C1 Advanced
Lessons per week




Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Business English Seminars #atm #business

#business seminars

#

Business English Seminars

Our Business English Seminars are for professionals who want to keep up to date with the international language of business and improve their communication skills in the workplace.

Each two-hour seminar includes a variety of activities designed to maximise participation. Home study is not required.

Seminar programme

The programme consists of eight two-hour seminars:

  • Language Profiling
    Assess your English language skills against the levels of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) using our Aptis testing tool.
  • Language for Presentations
    Learn how to deliver powerful presentations in the workplace.
  • Improve your Εmails
    Enhance your written communication with our email writing tips.
  • Business Report Writing
    Learn how to structure reports more effectively.
  • Working with Data
    Learn how to describe and present trends, facts and figures clearly and effectively.
  • Powerful Networking
    Practise and further develop the language skills needed for effective client relations and meetings, as well as for socialising and small talk.
  • Express Business Views
    Learn how to put forward suggestions, support proposals, present facts and offer clarifications.
  • Address Your Needs
    Address specific needs identified during previous sessions such as pronunciation, language for conference calls, CV writing etc.

Participants will receive a certificate of completion at the end of the seminar programme.

Course information

Levels

Lower, Advanced, Proficiency

Please note that we observe both Greek and British public holidays. A list of dates will be made available at the beginning of the seminar programme. For further information, please see our Kolonaki Teaching Centre page.

How to register

You can register for the seminar programme in one of two ways:

  • Visit our Athens office (Monday to Friday, 09.00–14.30) and see one of our Customer Services Assistants on the ground floor to register and pay the fee in person. You can pay in cash, by credit card or cheque.
  • Step 1: Pay the fee by direct deposit/bank transfer to the British Council account at Citibank :

Please quote your name followed by BUSENG in the ‘Αιτιολογία’ field on the deposit
slip (e.g. N. Papanikolaou, BUSENG).

For further information, call Customer Services on 210 369 2333 or 801 500 3692* (Monday to Friday, 08.00–17.00).

* Calls from anywhere in Greece are charged at local rate.

Entry requirements

  • be aged 18 or over
  • have at least a B2 level of English in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) or equivalent competency level.

Conditions of payment

  • Fees can be paid in cash, by credit card, by cheque or by direct deposit/bank transfer.
  • Fees must be paid at the time of registration.
  • Refunds are not available.

General conditions

  • We reserve the right not to open a class with fewer than 12 students.
  • Normally the maximum number of students in a class will not exceed 20.

Downloads

Want to register for the seminar programme?





Tags : , ,