Tag: Elements

The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan #business #lending


#new business plan

#

The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan

The job of an agency new business professional is akin to organizing chaos dictated by demanding pitch schedules. Compounding this, Q4 often brings a flurry of pitch activity known to ruin many a Thanksgiving or Christmas holiday.

And while all this activity helps to fill the pipeline, the timing is unfortunate because it distracts you from the type of reflection and planning that are so important to setting you up for success for the next year or quarter.

I know. It’s tough to add another project to your already overwhelming to-do list, but I urge you to make time to write your new business and marketing plan for 2016. Here are some reasons why it’s well worth squeezing it into your 12-hour days:

  • It’s the best way to measure your success. And I’m referring to the collective “you” here because it takes the entire agency to make new business efforts effective. An annual plan not only sets expectations for you but also for others at the agency who need to contribute to the agency’s success.
  • You’ll learn a lot! It gives you an opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months and accurately set projections for the year ahead.
  • It sheds some light on what the heck you do at your agency. For those who are not routinely involved in new business, it can seem like a black hole of mystery. Sharing your plan — whether to an executive committee, department heads, or even the entire staff — adds clarity and gives everyone something to aim for.
  • Your boss will be impressed. Don’t wait to be asked. Get on your CEO’s schedule to review your outline and discuss your intentions for putting this plan together.

Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, so I’m going to get the ball rolling for you by giving you a basic outline to follow.

8 Elements to Include in Your New Business Plan

1) Executive Summary

This has to be written last, but it should always come first. By starting with a smart, concise summary, you’re showing the same kind of respect for your audience’s time and attention as you would if this were a RFP response.

2) The Team

Define the new business and marketing ecosystem at your agency. Who’s on your team, and what do they do? How did you grow this year, and how are you planning to grow next year? Do you need to hire to achieve your new goals? What kind of operational efficiencies did you introduce?

3) Performance

Analyzing the past year will help you better forecast the year ahead. Where are your opportunities coming from? How many pitches did you participate in? Were they the right ones (in terms of revenue, cultural fit, creative opportunity, etc.)? Did you wait for requests to come to you, or were you more proactive? As you answer these, you’ll start to see a profile emerge that will help you make better decisions about what to pursue and what to decline next year.

4) The Marketplace

What kind of trends are you seeing? Think about things like the trend towards project work versus AOR assignments. How does your agency need to adjust to stay competitive? Who are your competitors now? What agencies do you want to be competing against a year from now?

5) Revenue Goals

Crunch the numbers. Based on your historical win rate, how many pitches do you need to be in to meet your numbers? How much can you rely on organic growth? How much do you need to focus on proactive prospecting? Don’t do this in a vacuum; spend time with your CFO and CEO to make sure you are managing their expectations as well as integrating corporate financial goals into your plan.

6) Meeting Those Goals

This is a biggie and probably where you’ll need to sink most of your time. Dust off your selection criteria, and start doing your research. You want to determine the categories you’re best suited to pursue (and why) or refine your ideal client profile. and then use that to define a super-targeted list of prospects. Another important point to include in this section is the level of support you expect from your colleagues in other departments such as strategy, research, and design. What’s it going to take to make a compelling pitch to your prospects?

7) New Business Tools

What tools are you lacking to meet your goals? If you’re planning on doing a ton of personal outreach, you’ll want to invest in a good contact management database or CRM. an email program, a marketing automation tool, or other solutions. Maybe this is the year for a website redesign. Or, if you’re getting invited to the pitch but not making it past the first round, maybe you need to learn how to tell your story better and invest in rewriting your case studies and credentials.

8) PR and Marketing

How will your agency’s positioning serve you? Is it strong enough to differentiate you from your competition? Is it meaningful enough to inform your messaging? What kind of events should you attend? Speak at? Or do you create your own event? What kind of awards shows should you enter? Besides getting you mentioned in the usual suspects such as Ad Age and Adweek. what can your PR team do to get you exposure in vertical trade publications or at conferences?

This may seem like a daunting amount of work. That’s why you need to start planning it out now. It’s a little more daunting if this is the first time you’ve ever created a plan so know that it gets easier and easier each year.

I can’t promise a last-minute RFP won’t ruin your holiday season, but now it’s a lot less likely that your new business plan will.


Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan #stock #market


#new business plan

#

The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan

The job of an agency new business professional is akin to organizing chaos dictated by demanding pitch schedules. Compounding this, Q4 often brings a flurry of pitch activity known to ruin many a Thanksgiving or Christmas holiday.

And while all this activity helps to fill the pipeline, the timing is unfortunate because it distracts you from the type of reflection and planning that are so important to setting you up for success for the next year or quarter.

I know. It’s tough to add another project to your already overwhelming to-do list, but I urge you to make time to write your new business and marketing plan for 2016. Here are some reasons why it’s well worth squeezing it into your 12-hour days:

  • It’s the best way to measure your success. And I’m referring to the collective “you” here because it takes the entire agency to make new business efforts effective. An annual plan not only sets expectations for you but also for others at the agency who need to contribute to the agency’s success.
  • You’ll learn a lot! It gives you an opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months and accurately set projections for the year ahead.
  • It sheds some light on what the heck you do at your agency. For those who are not routinely involved in new business, it can seem like a black hole of mystery. Sharing your plan — whether to an executive committee, department heads, or even the entire staff — adds clarity and gives everyone something to aim for.
  • Your boss will be impressed. Don’t wait to be asked. Get on your CEO’s schedule to review your outline and discuss your intentions for putting this plan together.

Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, so I’m going to get the ball rolling for you by giving you a basic outline to follow.

8 Elements to Include in Your New Business Plan

1) Executive Summary

This has to be written last, but it should always come first. By starting with a smart, concise summary, you’re showing the same kind of respect for your audience’s time and attention as you would if this were a RFP response.

2) The Team

Define the new business and marketing ecosystem at your agency. Who’s on your team, and what do they do? How did you grow this year, and how are you planning to grow next year? Do you need to hire to achieve your new goals? What kind of operational efficiencies did you introduce?

3) Performance

Analyzing the past year will help you better forecast the year ahead. Where are your opportunities coming from? How many pitches did you participate in? Were they the right ones (in terms of revenue, cultural fit, creative opportunity, etc.)? Did you wait for requests to come to you, or were you more proactive? As you answer these, you’ll start to see a profile emerge that will help you make better decisions about what to pursue and what to decline next year.

4) The Marketplace

What kind of trends are you seeing? Think about things like the trend towards project work versus AOR assignments. How does your agency need to adjust to stay competitive? Who are your competitors now? What agencies do you want to be competing against a year from now?

5) Revenue Goals

Crunch the numbers. Based on your historical win rate, how many pitches do you need to be in to meet your numbers? How much can you rely on organic growth? How much do you need to focus on proactive prospecting? Don’t do this in a vacuum; spend time with your CFO and CEO to make sure you are managing their expectations as well as integrating corporate financial goals into your plan.

6) Meeting Those Goals

This is a biggie and probably where you’ll need to sink most of your time. Dust off your selection criteria, and start doing your research. You want to determine the categories you’re best suited to pursue (and why) or refine your ideal client profile. and then use that to define a super-targeted list of prospects. Another important point to include in this section is the level of support you expect from your colleagues in other departments such as strategy, research, and design. What’s it going to take to make a compelling pitch to your prospects?

7) New Business Tools

What tools are you lacking to meet your goals? If you’re planning on doing a ton of personal outreach, you’ll want to invest in a good contact management database or CRM. an email program, a marketing automation tool, or other solutions. Maybe this is the year for a website redesign. Or, if you’re getting invited to the pitch but not making it past the first round, maybe you need to learn how to tell your story better and invest in rewriting your case studies and credentials.

8) PR and Marketing

How will your agency’s positioning serve you? Is it strong enough to differentiate you from your competition? Is it meaningful enough to inform your messaging? What kind of events should you attend? Speak at? Or do you create your own event? What kind of awards shows should you enter? Besides getting you mentioned in the usual suspects such as Ad Age and Adweek. what can your PR team do to get you exposure in vertical trade publications or at conferences?

This may seem like a daunting amount of work. That’s why you need to start planning it out now. It’s a little more daunting if this is the first time you’ve ever created a plan so know that it gets easier and easier each year.

I can’t promise a last-minute RFP won’t ruin your holiday season, but now it’s a lot less likely that your new business plan will.


Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Online Course: Chemistry 101 – Learn the Fundamentals #online #college #chemistry, #online #course #class

#

Online Class: Chemistry 101

Course Description

At a minimum, a basic understanding of chemistry is needed for it offers a foundation for comprehending the inner workings of biology (how cells function and the behavior of organisms), as well as, the ecological relationships that exist between organisms and their environment.

In short, chemistry offers us a way of understanding the world in which we live.

Chemistry provides us with insights into how our bodies function; the ingredients that are contained within the foods we eat; the reason cars, planes and trains are able to run as efficiently as they do; the manner in which computers are built and operate; and the materials used to construct our homes and buildings within our communities.

Basically, chemistry is a part of almost everything we do for everything is comprised of chemical compounds. The claim that chemistry is everywhere is, thus, entirely accurate.

Chemistry encompasses a multitude of specialized sub-disciplines which have proven highly useful to chemistry as they have provided for the following: the production and testing of stronger materials, creation of pharmaceuticals to treat disease, and the study of life processes.

Lesson 1. Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

The ordination of who was the true “father” of modern chemistry is a disputed point.

  • Lesson 2. Chemical Foundations

    In chemistry the accepted measurement system for mass (m) or volume (v) is the metric system, also known as the System International (SI) system.

  • Lesson 3. Stoichiometry

    Stoichiometry is the field of chemistry used to determine the quantities both for the required reactants of a chemical reaction and the predicted product of said reactions.

  • Lesson 4. Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry

    Most chemical reactions require a catalyst, a certain condition external to the reactants themselves that facilitates or causes the molecules to react with one another.

  • Lesson 5. Gases

    Matter in gaseous form does not have an absolute density. In order to determine the density of any volume of gas, we must first determine the pressure under which the gas is being held.

  • Lesson 6. Thermochemistry

    There are two types of energy, potential (the amount of energy possible given a certain circumstance) and kinetic (the amount of energy being expended).

  • Lesson 7. Atomic Structure and Periodicity

    Electromagnetic radiation refers to the wavelengths on which energy travels through the Universe.

  • Lesson 8. Bonding. General Concepts

    Hydrogen bonds are the bonds established between hydrogen and elements with a high level of electronegativity.

  • Lesson 9. Valence Bond Theory

    Atoms form a bond when both of these two conditions occur 1) There is an “orbital overlap” between two atoms and 2) only two electrons, both of opposite spin, are present in the overlap.

  • Lesson 10. Properties and Solutions

    Solutions are a combination of solutes and solvents, which are not necessarily composed of the same forms of matter.

  • Lesson 11. Chemical Kinetics

    Chemical kinetics is concerned with the rates of chemical reactions.

  • Lesson 12. Chemical Equilibrium

    The first thing to understand about equilibrium in chemistry is that it is a dynamic state.

  • Lesson 13. Spontaneity, Entropy, and Free Energy

    Spontaneous processes occur without outside intervention. Some of these occur very quickly, such as combustion, whereas others like the formation of diamonds occur very slowly over millions if not billions of years.

  • Lesson 14. The Nucleus, A Chemist’s View

    The nucleus of an atom is not always stable.

  • Lesson 15. Transition Metals and Coordination Chemistry

    Many transition metals commonly form more than one form of oxidized compound depending on the conditions of formation.

  • Lesson 16. Organic Chemistry

    Organic chemistry is the study of carbon based chemistry in the realm of living things.

  • Additional Course Information

    • Document Your Lifelong Learning Achievements
    • Earn an Official Certificate Documenting Course Hours and CEUs
    • Verify Your Certificate with a Unique Serial Number Online
    • View and Share Your Certificate Online or Download/Print as PDF
    • Display Your Certificate on Your Resume and Promote Your Achievements Using Social Media

    Course Title: Chemistry 101

    Course Number: 8900109

    Learning Outcomes

    By successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Define atoms, molecules, and ions.
    • Describe chemical foundations and stoichiometry.
    • Identify gases and thermochemistry.
    • Describe atomic structure and periodicity.
    • Describe bonding and the Valence Bond Theory.
    • Know properties and solutions.
    • Describe chemical equilibrium.
    • Know spontaneity, entropy, and free energy.
    • Know the nucleus, a chemist’s view.
    • Know transition metals and coordination chemistry.
    • Know organic chemistry, and
    • Demonstrate mastery of lesson content at levels of 70% or higher.

    Student Testimonials

    • “I am satisfied with the course I want to continue on.” — Viera V.
    • “She was prompt with all grading and any questions I had. It was a 101 course and offered a well rounded experience. It gave me more background on how I was using chem. in my wastewater, water operations.” — Tim M.
    • “The instructor was very helpful and available. She is very knowledgeable. This was an EXCELLENT course.” — Donna N.

    Related Courses


    Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan #new #business


    #new business plan

    #

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan

    The job of an agency new business professional is akin to organizing chaos dictated by demanding pitch schedules. Compounding this, Q4 often brings a flurry of pitch activity known to ruin many a Thanksgiving or Christmas holiday.

    And while all this activity helps to fill the pipeline, the timing is unfortunate because it distracts you from the type of reflection and planning that are so important to setting you up for success for the next year or quarter.

    I know. It’s tough to add another project to your already overwhelming to-do list, but I urge you to make time to write your new business and marketing plan for 2016. Here are some reasons why it’s well worth squeezing it into your 12-hour days:

    • It’s the best way to measure your success. And I’m referring to the collective “you” here because it takes the entire agency to make new business efforts effective. An annual plan not only sets expectations for you but also for others at the agency who need to contribute to the agency’s success.
    • You’ll learn a lot! It gives you an opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months and accurately set projections for the year ahead.
    • It sheds some light on what the heck you do at your agency. For those who are not routinely involved in new business, it can seem like a black hole of mystery. Sharing your plan — whether to an executive committee, department heads, or even the entire staff — adds clarity and gives everyone something to aim for.
    • Your boss will be impressed. Don’t wait to be asked. Get on your CEO’s schedule to review your outline and discuss your intentions for putting this plan together.

    Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, so I’m going to get the ball rolling for you by giving you a basic outline to follow.

    8 Elements to Include in Your New Business Plan

    1) Executive Summary

    This has to be written last, but it should always come first. By starting with a smart, concise summary, you’re showing the same kind of respect for your audience’s time and attention as you would if this were a RFP response.

    2) The Team

    Define the new business and marketing ecosystem at your agency. Who’s on your team, and what do they do? How did you grow this year, and how are you planning to grow next year? Do you need to hire to achieve your new goals? What kind of operational efficiencies did you introduce?

    3) Performance

    Analyzing the past year will help you better forecast the year ahead. Where are your opportunities coming from? How many pitches did you participate in? Were they the right ones (in terms of revenue, cultural fit, creative opportunity, etc.)? Did you wait for requests to come to you, or were you more proactive? As you answer these, you’ll start to see a profile emerge that will help you make better decisions about what to pursue and what to decline next year.

    4) The Marketplace

    What kind of trends are you seeing? Think about things like the trend towards project work versus AOR assignments. How does your agency need to adjust to stay competitive? Who are your competitors now? What agencies do you want to be competing against a year from now?

    5) Revenue Goals

    Crunch the numbers. Based on your historical win rate, how many pitches do you need to be in to meet your numbers? How much can you rely on organic growth? How much do you need to focus on proactive prospecting? Don’t do this in a vacuum; spend time with your CFO and CEO to make sure you are managing their expectations as well as integrating corporate financial goals into your plan.

    6) Meeting Those Goals

    This is a biggie and probably where you’ll need to sink most of your time. Dust off your selection criteria, and start doing your research. You want to determine the categories you’re best suited to pursue (and why) or refine your ideal client profile. and then use that to define a super-targeted list of prospects. Another important point to include in this section is the level of support you expect from your colleagues in other departments such as strategy, research, and design. What’s it going to take to make a compelling pitch to your prospects?

    7) New Business Tools

    What tools are you lacking to meet your goals? If you’re planning on doing a ton of personal outreach, you’ll want to invest in a good contact management database or CRM. an email program, a marketing automation tool, or other solutions. Maybe this is the year for a website redesign. Or, if you’re getting invited to the pitch but not making it past the first round, maybe you need to learn how to tell your story better and invest in rewriting your case studies and credentials.

    8) PR and Marketing

    How will your agency’s positioning serve you? Is it strong enough to differentiate you from your competition? Is it meaningful enough to inform your messaging? What kind of events should you attend? Speak at? Or do you create your own event? What kind of awards shows should you enter? Besides getting you mentioned in the usual suspects such as Ad Age and Adweek. what can your PR team do to get you exposure in vertical trade publications or at conferences?

    This may seem like a daunting amount of work. That’s why you need to start planning it out now. It’s a little more daunting if this is the first time you’ve ever created a plan so know that it gets easier and easier each year.

    I can’t promise a last-minute RFP won’t ruin your holiday season, but now it’s a lot less likely that your new business plan will.


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan #start #up #business #loan


    #new business plan

    #

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan

    The job of an agency new business professional is akin to organizing chaos dictated by demanding pitch schedules. Compounding this, Q4 often brings a flurry of pitch activity known to ruin many a Thanksgiving or Christmas holiday.

    And while all this activity helps to fill the pipeline, the timing is unfortunate because it distracts you from the type of reflection and planning that are so important to setting you up for success for the next year or quarter.

    I know. It’s tough to add another project to your already overwhelming to-do list, but I urge you to make time to write your new business and marketing plan for 2016. Here are some reasons why it’s well worth squeezing it into your 12-hour days:

    • It’s the best way to measure your success. And I’m referring to the collective “you” here because it takes the entire agency to make new business efforts effective. An annual plan not only sets expectations for you but also for others at the agency who need to contribute to the agency’s success.
    • You’ll learn a lot! It gives you an opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months and accurately set projections for the year ahead.
    • It sheds some light on what the heck you do at your agency. For those who are not routinely involved in new business, it can seem like a black hole of mystery. Sharing your plan — whether to an executive committee, department heads, or even the entire staff — adds clarity and gives everyone something to aim for.
    • Your boss will be impressed. Don’t wait to be asked. Get on your CEO’s schedule to review your outline and discuss your intentions for putting this plan together.

    Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, so I’m going to get the ball rolling for you by giving you a basic outline to follow.

    8 Elements to Include in Your New Business Plan

    1) Executive Summary

    This has to be written last, but it should always come first. By starting with a smart, concise summary, you’re showing the same kind of respect for your audience’s time and attention as you would if this were a RFP response.

    2) The Team

    Define the new business and marketing ecosystem at your agency. Who’s on your team, and what do they do? How did you grow this year, and how are you planning to grow next year? Do you need to hire to achieve your new goals? What kind of operational efficiencies did you introduce?

    3) Performance

    Analyzing the past year will help you better forecast the year ahead. Where are your opportunities coming from? How many pitches did you participate in? Were they the right ones (in terms of revenue, cultural fit, creative opportunity, etc.)? Did you wait for requests to come to you, or were you more proactive? As you answer these, you’ll start to see a profile emerge that will help you make better decisions about what to pursue and what to decline next year.

    4) The Marketplace

    What kind of trends are you seeing? Think about things like the trend towards project work versus AOR assignments. How does your agency need to adjust to stay competitive? Who are your competitors now? What agencies do you want to be competing against a year from now?

    5) Revenue Goals

    Crunch the numbers. Based on your historical win rate, how many pitches do you need to be in to meet your numbers? How much can you rely on organic growth? How much do you need to focus on proactive prospecting? Don’t do this in a vacuum; spend time with your CFO and CEO to make sure you are managing their expectations as well as integrating corporate financial goals into your plan.

    6) Meeting Those Goals

    This is a biggie and probably where you’ll need to sink most of your time. Dust off your selection criteria, and start doing your research. You want to determine the categories you’re best suited to pursue (and why) or refine your ideal client profile. and then use that to define a super-targeted list of prospects. Another important point to include in this section is the level of support you expect from your colleagues in other departments such as strategy, research, and design. What’s it going to take to make a compelling pitch to your prospects?

    7) New Business Tools

    What tools are you lacking to meet your goals? If you’re planning on doing a ton of personal outreach, you’ll want to invest in a good contact management database or CRM. an email program, a marketing automation tool, or other solutions. Maybe this is the year for a website redesign. Or, if you’re getting invited to the pitch but not making it past the first round, maybe you need to learn how to tell your story better and invest in rewriting your case studies and credentials.

    8) PR and Marketing

    How will your agency’s positioning serve you? Is it strong enough to differentiate you from your competition? Is it meaningful enough to inform your messaging? What kind of events should you attend? Speak at? Or do you create your own event? What kind of awards shows should you enter? Besides getting you mentioned in the usual suspects such as Ad Age and Adweek. what can your PR team do to get you exposure in vertical trade publications or at conferences?

    This may seem like a daunting amount of work. That’s why you need to start planning it out now. It’s a little more daunting if this is the first time you’ve ever created a plan so know that it gets easier and easier each year.

    I can’t promise a last-minute RFP won’t ruin your holiday season, but now it’s a lot less likely that your new business plan will.


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan #creative #business #cards


    #new business plan

    #

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan

    The job of an agency new business professional is akin to organizing chaos dictated by demanding pitch schedules. Compounding this, Q4 often brings a flurry of pitch activity known to ruin many a Thanksgiving or Christmas holiday.

    And while all this activity helps to fill the pipeline, the timing is unfortunate because it distracts you from the type of reflection and planning that are so important to setting you up for success for the next year or quarter.

    I know. It’s tough to add another project to your already overwhelming to-do list, but I urge you to make time to write your new business and marketing plan for 2016. Here are some reasons why it’s well worth squeezing it into your 12-hour days:

    • It’s the best way to measure your success. And I’m referring to the collective “you” here because it takes the entire agency to make new business efforts effective. An annual plan not only sets expectations for you but also for others at the agency who need to contribute to the agency’s success.
    • You’ll learn a lot! It gives you an opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months and accurately set projections for the year ahead.
    • It sheds some light on what the heck you do at your agency. For those who are not routinely involved in new business, it can seem like a black hole of mystery. Sharing your plan — whether to an executive committee, department heads, or even the entire staff — adds clarity and gives everyone something to aim for.
    • Your boss will be impressed. Don’t wait to be asked. Get on your CEO’s schedule to review your outline and discuss your intentions for putting this plan together.

    Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, so I’m going to get the ball rolling for you by giving you a basic outline to follow.

    8 Elements to Include in Your New Business Plan

    1) Executive Summary

    This has to be written last, but it should always come first. By starting with a smart, concise summary, you’re showing the same kind of respect for your audience’s time and attention as you would if this were a RFP response.

    2) The Team

    Define the new business and marketing ecosystem at your agency. Who’s on your team, and what do they do? How did you grow this year, and how are you planning to grow next year? Do you need to hire to achieve your new goals? What kind of operational efficiencies did you introduce?

    3) Performance

    Analyzing the past year will help you better forecast the year ahead. Where are your opportunities coming from? How many pitches did you participate in? Were they the right ones (in terms of revenue, cultural fit, creative opportunity, etc.)? Did you wait for requests to come to you, or were you more proactive? As you answer these, you’ll start to see a profile emerge that will help you make better decisions about what to pursue and what to decline next year.

    4) The Marketplace

    What kind of trends are you seeing? Think about things like the trend towards project work versus AOR assignments. How does your agency need to adjust to stay competitive? Who are your competitors now? What agencies do you want to be competing against a year from now?

    5) Revenue Goals

    Crunch the numbers. Based on your historical win rate, how many pitches do you need to be in to meet your numbers? How much can you rely on organic growth? How much do you need to focus on proactive prospecting? Don’t do this in a vacuum; spend time with your CFO and CEO to make sure you are managing their expectations as well as integrating corporate financial goals into your plan.

    6) Meeting Those Goals

    This is a biggie and probably where you’ll need to sink most of your time. Dust off your selection criteria, and start doing your research. You want to determine the categories you’re best suited to pursue (and why) or refine your ideal client profile. and then use that to define a super-targeted list of prospects. Another important point to include in this section is the level of support you expect from your colleagues in other departments such as strategy, research, and design. What’s it going to take to make a compelling pitch to your prospects?

    7) New Business Tools

    What tools are you lacking to meet your goals? If you’re planning on doing a ton of personal outreach, you’ll want to invest in a good contact management database or CRM. an email program, a marketing automation tool, or other solutions. Maybe this is the year for a website redesign. Or, if you’re getting invited to the pitch but not making it past the first round, maybe you need to learn how to tell your story better and invest in rewriting your case studies and credentials.

    8) PR and Marketing

    How will your agency’s positioning serve you? Is it strong enough to differentiate you from your competition? Is it meaningful enough to inform your messaging? What kind of events should you attend? Speak at? Or do you create your own event? What kind of awards shows should you enter? Besides getting you mentioned in the usual suspects such as Ad Age and Adweek. what can your PR team do to get you exposure in vertical trade publications or at conferences?

    This may seem like a daunting amount of work. That’s why you need to start planning it out now. It’s a little more daunting if this is the first time you’ve ever created a plan so know that it gets easier and easier each year.

    I can’t promise a last-minute RFP won’t ruin your holiday season, but now it’s a lot less likely that your new business plan will.


    Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan #cool #business #cards


    #new business plan

    #

    The 8 Essential Elements of an Annual New Business Plan

    The job of an agency new business professional is akin to organizing chaos dictated by demanding pitch schedules. Compounding this, Q4 often brings a flurry of pitch activity known to ruin many a Thanksgiving or Christmas holiday.

    And while all this activity helps to fill the pipeline, the timing is unfortunate because it distracts you from the type of reflection and planning that are so important to setting you up for success for the next year or quarter.

    I know. It’s tough to add another project to your already overwhelming to-do list, but I urge you to make time to write your new business and marketing plan for 2016. Here are some reasons why it’s well worth squeezing it into your 12-hour days:

    • It’s the best way to measure your success. And I’m referring to the collective “you” here because it takes the entire agency to make new business efforts effective. An annual plan not only sets expectations for you but also for others at the agency who need to contribute to the agency’s success.
    • You’ll learn a lot! It gives you an opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months and accurately set projections for the year ahead.
    • It sheds some light on what the heck you do at your agency. For those who are not routinely involved in new business, it can seem like a black hole of mystery. Sharing your plan — whether to an executive committee, department heads, or even the entire staff — adds clarity and gives everyone something to aim for.
    • Your boss will be impressed. Don’t wait to be asked. Get on your CEO’s schedule to review your outline and discuss your intentions for putting this plan together.

    Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, so I’m going to get the ball rolling for you by giving you a basic outline to follow.

    8 Elements to Include in Your New Business Plan

    1) Executive Summary

    This has to be written last, but it should always come first. By starting with a smart, concise summary, you’re showing the same kind of respect for your audience’s time and attention as you would if this were a RFP response.

    2) The Team

    Define the new business and marketing ecosystem at your agency. Who’s on your team, and what do they do? How did you grow this year, and how are you planning to grow next year? Do you need to hire to achieve your new goals? What kind of operational efficiencies did you introduce?

    3) Performance

    Analyzing the past year will help you better forecast the year ahead. Where are your opportunities coming from? How many pitches did you participate in? Were they the right ones (in terms of revenue, cultural fit, creative opportunity, etc.)? Did you wait for requests to come to you, or were you more proactive? As you answer these, you’ll start to see a profile emerge that will help you make better decisions about what to pursue and what to decline next year.

    4) The Marketplace

    What kind of trends are you seeing? Think about things like the trend towards project work versus AOR assignments. How does your agency need to adjust to stay competitive? Who are your competitors now? What agencies do you want to be competing against a year from now?

    5) Revenue Goals

    Crunch the numbers. Based on your historical win rate, how many pitches do you need to be in to meet your numbers? How much can you rely on organic growth? How much do you need to focus on proactive prospecting? Don’t do this in a vacuum; spend time with your CFO and CEO to make sure you are managing their expectations as well as integrating corporate financial goals into your plan.

    6) Meeting Those Goals

    This is a biggie and probably where you’ll need to sink most of your time. Dust off your selection criteria, and start doing your research. You want to determine the categories you’re best suited to pursue (and why) or refine your ideal client profile. and then use that to define a super-targeted list of prospects. Another important point to include in this section is the level of support you expect from your colleagues in other departments such as strategy, research, and design. What’s it going to take to make a compelling pitch to your prospects?

    7) New Business Tools

    What tools are you lacking to meet your goals? If you’re planning on doing a ton of personal outreach, you’ll want to invest in a good contact management database or CRM. an email program, a marketing automation tool, or other solutions. Maybe this is the year for a website redesign. Or, if you’re getting invited to the pitch but not making it past the first round, maybe you need to learn how to tell your story better and invest in rewriting your case studies and credentials.

    8) PR and Marketing

    How will your agency’s positioning serve you? Is it strong enough to differentiate you from your competition? Is it meaningful enough to inform your messaging? What kind of events should you attend? Speak at? Or do you create your own event? What kind of awards shows should you enter? Besides getting you mentioned in the usual suspects such as Ad Age and Adweek. what can your PR team do to get you exposure in vertical trade publications or at conferences?

    This may seem like a daunting amount of work. That’s why you need to start planning it out now. It’s a little more daunting if this is the first time you’ve ever created a plan so know that it gets easier and easier each year.

    I can’t promise a last-minute RFP won’t ruin your holiday season, but now it’s a lot less likely that your new business plan will.


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