Tag: Economics

Law doctorate #law #and #economics, #jd/phd, #jd/phd #economics, #vanderbilt #jd/phd #economics, #phd/jd, #microeconomics, #joint

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Ph.D. Program in Law Economics

Joint-degree students pursue a Ph.D. in law and economics and a J.D. concurrently in a fully integrated law and economics curriculum. The program is based in the Law School. Students are fully funded by a competitive package of fellowship support covering tuition and stipend for both degrees.

Our principal fields include law and economics, risk and environmental regulation, labor markets and human resources, and behavioral law and economics.

The Ph.D. Program in Law and Economics was featured in the Summer 2015 edition of Vanderbilt Law Magazine. Program co-directors, Joni Hersch and W. Kip Viscusi, and program graduate, Caroline Cecot, were interviewed for the article, available here .

Research Highlights

On July 20, 2017 Professor W. Kip Viscusi presented his keynote address, “Pricing Lives,” at the Economic Society of Australia 2017 Annual Conference of Economists in Sydney, Australia. His presentation was based on his forthcoming Princeton University Press book, Pricing Lives: Guideposts for a Safer Society.

Professor Paige Marta Skiba and 2017 graduate Jean Xiao ‘s paper “Consumer Litigation Funding: Just Another Form of Payday Lending? ” was published in June 2017 in Law and Contemporary Problems.

Professor Joni Hersch and Professor Jennifer Bennett Shinall ‘s article, “Something to Talk About: Information Exchange Under Employment Law ,” was published in the December 2016 issue of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. This article provides the first ever evidence that concealing personal information lowers female applicants’ hiring prospects and has received international media attention including New York Times. Bloomberg. Slate. NPR On Point. The Economic Times. Daily Mail. Business Standard. Business News Daily. Glamour. Marie Claire. and Science Daily .

Professor Kathryn Anderson and 2017 Vanderbilt Economics graduate Kai Hong ‘s paper “Do Selective High Schools Improve Student Achievement? Effects of Exam Schools in China .” China Economic Review 40 (September 2016) 121-134. Doi: 10.1016/j.chieco.2016.06.002.

Professors Andrew Daughety and Jennifer Reinganum ‘s paper, “Settlement and Trial ,” was published in The Oxford Handbook of Law and Economics (Oxford University Press, 2017). The handbook is edited by Francesco Parisi.

Professor Joni Hersch provides a synthesis of the legal and economic consequences of workplace sexual harassment in her 2015 IZA World of Labor article, “Sexual Harassment in the Workplace .” Her research on this topic is frequently cited in the media including The Guardian , Huffington Post. and CBS News.





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Meth user-turned-advocate: Drug addicts need medical attention, not prison #, #arielle #claypool, #oil #boom,

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Meth user-turned-advocate: Drug addicts need medical attention, not prison

mommy is not with her right now…

On April 14, 26-year-old Arielle Claypool emailed The Dickinson Press, in addition to countless other media groups, attorneys, judges and prosecutors. She joined numerous Facebook groups, both in North Dakota and across the country, to post her message: Drug addicts should receive more medical attention and counseling rather than prison time.

Claypool moved to Dickinson from Wanatah, Indiana, in 2012 for work during the oil boom. In November 2014, she tried methamphetamine for the first time. She was drinking and partying with some friends one night and someone laid out a line of meth. Alcohol served as the gateway drug, she said. She would get drunk, do a line of meth and sober up so she could drink more. Over time, she started drinking less and using meth more.

For a lot of people, meth suppresses the pain — it gets you so high that you forget everything that is going on around you, she said. At the height of her drug use — which spanned more than two years — she was using about a gram of meth a day. While this is a lot for a single person to use, she said she knows people who use a ball a day, which is 3.5 grams.

She ate it and smoked it, but her favorite method was snorting it. She developed a deviated septum as a result. The pain from snorting it over time caused her to miss the initial rush of the drug because of the throbbing in her nose. That pain helped her slow down for a while before she turned to smoking meth instead, which requires more of the drug. But addicts are always in pursuit of that initial high.

“You’re always going to chase it. You’re chasing that dragon, always chasing the dragon,” Claypool said.

She drew the line at shooting meth — injecting the drug directly into her bloodstream. A lot of people turn to using needles when the other methods start proving less effective, but she is grateful she never did. That was always the one thing she was able to pride herself on, she said.

She had battled depression throughout her life, but was always able to climb her way out of these “funks,” she said. But she had never turned to drugs, something that she now feels ashamed of.

“I’m surprised I kind of fell into being an addict because I had to grow up with it,” she said. “It was awful watching my parents not prioritize me or my brothers, and I’ve always resented them for it until it happened to me.”

She was homeless for a year, moving from house to house with her boyfriend — both always looking for a couch to crash on and more drugs. She lost her job. Her daughter’s father took her 3-year-old child and moved to Portland. Her friends abandoned Claypool, leaving her with only her “drug friends.” She found herself using more and more.

“Drug addicts, they get a bad name, but really we’re not bad people, we’re just (in a) bad situation,” she said. “We put ourselves in it, yes, but addiction is hard because you lose everyone around you, and really that’s what an addict needs is someone, like a good support system to help pull them out of it. But when everyone just kind of abandons an addict, that’s when they find themselves getting deeper into addiction. That’s kind of what happened to me.”

A consistent problem

Dickinson Police Capt. David Wilkie said his department deals with meth-related crimes on a weekly basis, noting that he puts meth and meth-related paraphernalia into evidence every week.

“Part of the reason why meth has been a consistent problem is with a little bit of research on the internet and supplies that you can get just about anywhere, you can make meth yourself,” Wilkie said. “You have to plant and harvest and cultivate and everything else marijuana, or buy it from somebody else. Same with heroin. Same with any of the opiates. … Any knucklehead can make meth.”

The area also does not have any long-term facilities, he said. Every facility is outpatient. There have been efforts to get resources to the area, but in the meantime people have to go to Bismarck, Fargo or even other states to find long-term treatment.

Though Dickinson is the main hub in the eight-county region, it’s still not large enough to attract the resources to combat the problem, Wilkie said. For example, Dickinson has a hospital, but it’s not large enough to have a full-time treatment center or housing for addicts. It is also difficult to attract full-time mental health specialists such as psychiatrists, who are also important to combating drug addiction.

“Not only is drug addiction just an addiction, but there’s also mental health issues that go with that,” Wilkie said. “So you’re not really treating a person holistically when you’re just treating one element, because there’s some reason that they became a drug addict. People don’t just wake up when they’re 5 years old and go, ‘I’m going to be a drug addict.’ People want to be firemen, people want to be an airplane pilot, people want to be somebody in the Army. Nobody wants to be a meth addict.”

Badlands Human Service Center and other privately-owned clinics in the area offer outpatient addiction counseling and services to help addicts and their family members.

Jan Kuhn, licensed addiction counselor at Sacajawea Substance Abuse Counseling in Dickinson, said she creates individual therapy plans for each addict. Patients usually work with them for an average of about eight weeks. She also offers consultation for family members.

“An addict or an alcoholic who is currently and mindfully using and wants to continue, there’s really no advice for that because they will continue doing what they’re doing,” Kuhn said. “But the people who love them don’t know what to do, and I encourage those people to call us because we can certainly intervene. We offer all kinds of interventions, family interventions, and there’s really no need to not do anything.”

A new purpose

Claypool has been sober for the last three months and is working to acclimate back into society. Since deciding to become sober, she returned to Indiana to stay with family for a few weeks and now avoids the people she used to hang out with and any situation that may tempt her to use again in Dickinson.

After two or three years of her life revolving around drugs, returning back to normal is scary. Even basic things such as waking up at a normal hour and going to bed at a normal time took time to relearn, she said. After quitting the drug, she slept for two weeks. Even leaving the house for short periods of time was taxing.

Now she is working a few odd jobs mowing lawns, cleaning and gardening.

Over the last few months, Claypool has devoted much of her time toward spreading awareness about the need to treat addiction as a medical problem more so than a criminal problem.

“Addicts need help, not prison,” she said. “In prison, you’re just sitting there staring at four walls all day. You’re not learning how to channel your energy into something else. I mean, you have to pretty much learn how to relive your life after an addiction.”

The system is now set up for failure, she said. People get hooked on drugs, get arrested and charged with felonies, and then are sent to prison to serve their time. When they get out, they have trouble finding a job because of the felony on their record, and even if they try to stay clean, they may end up helping sell drugs just to support themselves and then fall back into using again — a vicious cycle, she said.

Wilkie agreed that addiction does need to be dealt with, but noted that possession of meth is still against the law and therefore still has consequences.

Claypool’s daughter is one of the main driving forces behind her renewed sobriety. Her goal is to one day see her again.

“My biggest regret would probably be the fact that I didn’t prioritize what I needed to, like my daughter,” she said. “I prioritized my high. That was my biggest concern, but with any addict that normally is. Nothing else matters except for the next time you’ll get a cigarette or that cup of coffee or that drink or that fix.”





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New York Governor Proposes – Free Tuition – For Public Universities #zero #hedge,zerohedge,finance,economics,markets,politics,analysis,bernie #sanders,free

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New York Governor Proposes Free Tuition For Public Universities

There is little doubt that easy access to federally subsidized student loans has contributed to the astronomical increase in the cost of attending college in the United States. After all, what 18 year old would turn down $200,000 in free money to party for 4 years? As an added bonus, when you figure out upon graduation that your degree in anthropology if fairly worthless, you can always just move back in with mom and force taxpayers to pick up your debt burden. Anything less would be a substantial “triggering” event and we just can’t have that.

As we noted roughly a year ago, the amount of student debt outstanding is on track to reach nearly $17 trillion by 2030. which is clearly enough artificial demand to send the price of almost any commodity product soaring.

Well, apparently New York’s Governor doesn’t think that misinformed government policies are doing nearly enough to drive up college tuition costs. As a result, he has decided to jump on the Bernie Sanders bandwagon with a new proposal that would provide free tuition at public state and city colleges to any student whose parents earn less than $125,000.

As the New York Times notes, Cuomo’s plan could apply to as many as 1 million New York families though it was not “immediately clear how the program would be paid for”. which is just a minor detail anyway.

Mr. Cuomo hopes for a quick start for his idea, with a three-year rollout beginning in the fall, though it will require legislative approval, a potential snag when the governor and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have been at odds over a pay raise and other issues.

It was not immediately clear how the program would be paid for. though the administration said the state already provided nearly $1 billion in support through its tuition assistance program; those awards are capped at $5,165, and many of the grants are smaller.

If the plan is approved, the Cuomo administration estimates the program would allow nearly a million New York families with college-age children, or independent adults, to qualify.

Current tuition at four-year State University of New York schools for state residents is $6,470; at two-year community colleges the cost is $4,350. Costs for City University of New York schools are approximately the same.

Of course, “free tuition” isn’t really free and is estimated to cost New York taxpayers roughly $163mm by the time it’s fully implemented in 2019.

Oh well, we guess this is just a simplification in the process. why go through the bother of underwriting student loans just to have taxpayers pick up the bill later anyway? With the governor’s plan, you just go straight to taxpayers for a handout upon enrollment. Moreover, taxpayers save on the interest costs associated the defaulted student loans so this is really a win for everyone.

Holy hand grenade of Antioch (not verified) Draybin Deffercon III Jan 3, 2017 5:35 PM

Those are not FACTS, they are a mishmash of ‘hopes’

– Bitcoin is not illegal to own (I acknowledge)

– Bitcoin does not need to be reported (I ‘semi acknowledge’ because they haven’t YET bothered with the pissant community of users)

– There are no “Gains” to be reported with BITCOIN

Capital Gains MUST be reported in most Federal Taxation Jurisdictions. Canadian Laws stipulate that 50% of capital gains, in most asset classes, save for a few ‘stipulated’ expemptions, such as real estate, are subject to taxation)

Instead of trying to produce lame arguments with me. Why don’t you do the following:

Why don’t you just write to your Canadian taxation legislation authorities and ASK them whether or not you’ve avoided paying capital gains taxes on your bitcoins.

See what THEY have to say. After all, it’s pretty silly to argue with a ‘stupid moron’ like me.





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PhD in Economics #business #economics #phd

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PhD in Economics

Offered by the Economics Department of Rutgers-Newark, this program prepares students for scholarly research and teaching. Primary areas of interest are labor, gender and migration economics, international trade, development economics, urban and transportation economics, and applied microeconomics.

Course work, the qualifying examination, and the dissertation

A total of 72 credits is required for the doctoral degree. These must include:

  • at least 18 credits in dissertation research.
  • at least 36 credits in degree courses. (This can be reduced only if some course requirements are waived.)
  • 6 credits in the early research requirements.

Additional enrollments may also be required:

  • Students are sometimes required to enroll in non-degree courses to improve their English or their writing. They may also need to enroll in the non-degree course Teacher Training Seminar as part of their preparation for teaching. These enrollments require payment of tuition, but they do not count towards the 72 credits required for the degree.
  • Students must enroll in 26:220:689 every semester until they have defended a dissertation proposal. This registration requires their attendance in the Economics Department’s weekly seminar. A grade is given, but the enrollment is for zero credits and no tuition is charged. Applicants and potential applicants are also welcome in the weekly departmental seminar.

During the first two years, students are expected to take at least three courses for degree credit each semester. They should then take the qualifying examination in May at the end of their second academic year. The last two years of the program should be devoted primarily to completing the dissertation, though students may be advised to take some additional courses. For more details concerning rules and requirements that apply to all doctoral students in the Ph.D. in Management Program, see Policies and Procedures .

Methodology requirement (4 courses)

  • 26:220:551 or 26:711:561 Mathematics for Economists
  • 26:220:507 or 26:223:554 Econometrics
  • 26:223:655 Advanced Econometrics
  • 26:960:575 Introduction to Probability

Students may substitute other methodology courses for courses in this list that can be waived on the basis of previous work.

Major (5 courses)

  • 26:220:501 Microeconomic Theory
  • 26:220:502 Macroeconomic Theory
  • 26:223:685 Game Theory

Two additional doctoral courses in economics approved by the adviser, doctoral coordinator, and program director.

Minor (3 courses)

The minor must include at least three additional doctoral courses approved by the adviser, departmental coordinator, and program director. Normally they should be chosen to form a coherent program of study that supports the student’s dissertation. Some possible areas of concentration for the minor, together with some appropriate courses, are listed below.

  • 26:220:518 International Trade
  • 26:220:519 International Economics II
  • 26:220:685 Development Economics
  • 26:390:571 Investments
  • 26:390:572 Corporate Finance
  • 26:390:685 Floating Finance Seminar
  • 26:198:621 Electronic Commerce
  • 26:960:685 Modern Statistics
  • 26:960:577 Introduction to Statistical Linear Models
  • 26:198:622 Machine Learning
  • 26:198:644 Data Mining
  • 26:620:685 Survey Research
  • 26:834:609 Qualitative Methods
  • 26:830:545 Research Design

First early research requirement (equivalent to one course): Write a paper (usually a literature review) with a faculty member, to be presented to the department during the fall semester.

Second early research requirement (equivalent to one course): Write a paper (ideally a dissertation proposal) with a faculty member, to be presented to the department during the fall semester.

Preparation to teach: Students who enter the program with financial support may need to be ready to teach an undergraduate course in their specialty in order to be sure of having an employment opportunity during the Summer. Those who do not already have teaching experience may want to consider the non-degree course in Teacher Training Seminar that is offered each spring semester.

Other rules and requirements: For details of rules and requirements that apply to all doctoral students in the Ph.D. in Management Program, see Policies and Procedures .





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International Journal of Economics and Business Research (IJEBR) – Inderscience Publishers #business #startup #loans

#business research

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Inderscience Publishers

International Journal of Economics and Business Research

Editor in Chief

  • Kantarelis. Demetri, Assumption College, USA
    (dkan besiweb.com)

    Associate Editors

    • Belak. Vinko, University of Zagreb, Croatia
    • Carter. Steve, Leeds Beckett University, UK
    • Josifidis. Kosta, University of Novi Sad, Serbia
    • Matsumoto. Yasumi, Waseda University, Japan
    • Teachout. Mark S. University of the Incarnate Word, USA

    Editorial Board Members

    • Allen. David E. Edith Cowan University, Australia
    • Asadoorian III. Malcolm O. Lynn University, USA
    • Barac. Zeljana Aljinovic, University of Split, Croatia
    • Beck. Charles E. University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, USA
    • Bergami. Roberto, Victoria University, Australia
    • Borrmann. J rg, University of Vienna, Austria
    • Bradley. Lisa, University of Ulster, Austria
    • Daskou. Sofia, Plymouth University, UK
    • Efstathiades. Andreas, European University Cyprus, Cyprus
    • Eibel-Spanyi. Katalin, Eastern Connecticut State University, USA
    • Elkin. Graham, University of Otago, New Zealand
    • Gentzoglanis. Anastassios, Universit de Sherbrooke, Canada
    • Gospodarek. Tadeusz, Walbrzych School of Management and Entrepreneurship, Poland
    • Gutierrez. Pedro J. Universidad de Valladolid, Spain
    • Halicioglu. Ferda, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey
    • Hart. Neil, University of New South Wales, Australia
    • Kolakovic. Marko, University of Zagreb, Croatia
    • K�nya. L szl�, La Trobe University, Australia
    • Laouisset. Djamel Eddine, Alhosn University, United Arab Emirates
    • Leit o. Nuno Carlos, Escola Superior de Gesto e Tecnologia de Santarm, Portugal
    • Michalski. Grzegorz, Wroclaw University of Economics, Poland
    • Palmero. Carlos R. Universidad de Valladolid, Spain
    • Peroni. Matteo, Lynn University, USA
    • Pervan. Maja, University of Split, Croatia
    • Piorkowska. Katarzyna, Wroc aw University of Economics, Poland
    • Potocan. Vojko, University of Maribor, Slovenia
    • Rao. Smriti, Assumption College, USA
    • Selymoglu. Seval, Anadolu University, Turkey
    • Shim. Eunsup “Daniel”, Sacred Heart University, USA
    • Tetik. Nil fer, Akdeniz University, Turkey
    • Thalassinos. E.I. University of Piraeus, Greece
    • Warin. Thierry, HEC Montreal, Canada

    A few essentials for publishing in this journal

    • Submitted articles should not have been previously published or be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere.
    • Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper has been completely re-written (more details available here ) and the author has cleared any necessary permissions with the copyright owner if it has been previously copyrighted.
    • All our articles go through a double-blind review process.
    • All authors must declare they have read and agreed to the content of the submitted article. A full statement of our Ethical Guidelines for Authors (PDF) �is available.
    • There are no charges for publishing with Inderscience, unless you require your article to be Open Access (OA). You can find more information on OA here .




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    University of London: The London School of Economics and Political Science #political #science #online

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    The London School of Economics and Political Science

    Founded in 1895, the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is regarded as an international centre of academic excellence and innovation in the social sciences. The 2008 HEFCE Research Assessment Exercise confirmed LSE as a world leading research university.

    The School had the highest percentage of world leading research of any UK university, topping or coming close to the top of a number of rankings of research excellence.

    LSE academics act as advisers to governments, serve on commissions and are seconded to national and international organisations. The School regularly attracts leading public figures to give lectures, attend seminars and consult staff – recent high profile visitors have included Peter Mandelson, Professor Noam Chomsky and Professor Paul Krugman. LSE‘s central location offers easy access to the vast cultural and social life that London has to offer.

    Why study with us?

    The School’s academic profile spans the broad range of social sciences and is renowned for studying ‘real world’ issues. Its research and teaching span the full breadth of the social sciences; from economics, politics and law to sociology, anthropology, accounting and finance.

    LSE offers 36 bachelor’s degree programmes, over 140 taught Masters and Diploma programmes, and PhD opportunities across the social sciences. Teaching and research are conducted through 22 Departments/Institutes and 19 Research Centres.

    LSE graduates are found in senior positions in organisations and government worldwide. Alumni and former staff include 16 Nobel Prize winners in Economics, Peace or Literature and 35 past or present Heads of State.

    LSE has students from over 150 countries worldwide making the School a very international and cosmopolitan institution in which to study.

    Facilities

    LSE’s Library is one of the largest libraries in the world devoted to the economic and social sciences. There is accommodation for around 3,400 students with all first year undergraduates guaranteed a place. Support services include Counselling Service; Medical Service; Chaplaincy; Nursery; and Careers Service.

    The LSE Students’ Union supports over 160 student societies and runs a Student Advice Service, shop, café and bars.

    Useful links





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    BSc (Econ) (Hons) Business Economics – University of Portsmouth #business #partner

    #business economics

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    Business Economics

    Why take this course?

    Economic analysis is a core business function. It enables organisations to understand crucial factors such as efficiency and profitability in a changeable international business environment.

    This course is intended for the student who is seeking to use their understanding of economics in a business environment. The course places particular emphasis upon decisions which are taken by managers of organisations, as well as the structure and regulation of industry.

    What will I experience?

    On this course you can:

    • Use specialist software to access macroeconomics, industry and company level data
    • Opt to do a year in industry to gain meaningful work experience and build up your employability skills
    • Choose to study abroad through our links with overseas universities

    What opportunities might it lead to?

    The analytical abilities, independent skills and familiarity with group work gained on this course will make you an attractive candidate for employers once you graduate. A career as an economist in either central government or the private sector, or a role in the financial and business sector would all be potential employment options for after you finish the course.

    Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

    • the government sector
    • commercial banks
    • insurance companies
    • regulatory bodies

    I found everything I was looking for in the course at Portsmouth.

    Amy Riggs, BSc (Econ) (Hons) Business Economics student

    Year one

    This common first year among some of our economics-based courses provides you with a broad understanding of economic theory and quantitative methods.

    Core units in this year include:

    • Microeconomics
    • Macroeconomics
    • Quantitative Economics
    • Business Accounting
    • Economic Issues

    Year two

    In this year you will take your knowledge of micro-economics and macro-economics to a greater depth. Business-related themes such as managerial and decision economics will also be studied in detail and you will begin to become acquainted with popular techniques for analysing economic data.

    Core units in this year include:

    • Econometrics
    • Research Methods
    • Econometric Methods
    • Intermediate Microeconomics
    • Intermediate Macroeconomics
    • Managerial and Decision Economics

    Optional units in this year include:

    • International Economics
    • Economics of Crime and Social Issues
    • Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Market
    • Study Abroad (year long)

    Year three*

    In your final year, there is a particular focus on the world of business and industry. Several optional units allow you to concentrate on developing your knowledge in certain areas and for you to learn more advanced and specialised econometric techniques. There is also an independent study project, which requires you to work as a group with other students in order to perform in-depth research in a selected area of economics.

    Core units in this year include:

    • Labour Economics
    • Business Competition and Regulation
    • Applied Economics: Research Review and Design
    • Applied Economics: Empirical Research

    Optional units in this year include:

    • International Banking and Financial Management
    • Advanced Topics in Economics
    • Development Economics
    • Econometric Analysis
    • Financial Economics
    • Financial Statement and Data Analysis
    • Public Sector Economics

    *This course is also available as a 4-year sandwich (work placement)

    Teaching and Assessment

    We go to great lengths to ensure you will have an excellent learning experience with a high level of support. Teaching is usually undertaken in lectures supported by smaller group seminars, workshops, tutorials and practical sessions. Extensive use is also made of information technology and other teaching innovations.

    How are you assessed?

    There is a mix of formal examinations and coursework assessment throughout your course including:

    • analysis of topical case studies
    • written reports
    • essays
    • presentations
    • self-led independent study project

    Visit us more info





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    Business Economics Degree in London #business #plans

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    Business Economics (Year 2/3 Entry) BSc Honours

    Entry Requirements

    What are the entry requirements for the BSc Business Economics (year 2/3 entry)?

    Qualifications

    • We normally make offers on 260 UCAS tariff points
    • GCSE English and Maths with a minimum of Grade C are required
    • BTEC National Diploma/International Baccalaureate/Advanced Progression Diplomas are also accepted
    • We accept Access to HE Diploma
    • Applications from mature candidates without formal qualifications are welcome provided they can demonstrate appropriate levels of relevant ability and experience.

    Eligibility

    UK/EU and International students are eligible to apply for this course.

    Academic credit for previous study or experience

    If you have achieved a qualification such as a foundation degree or HND, or have gained credit at another university, you may be able to enter a Middlesex University course in year two or three. For further information please visit our Transfer students page .

    If you have relevant work experience, academic credit may be awarded towards your Middlesex University qualification. For further information please visit our Accreditation of Prior Learning page.

    International entry requirements

    We accept the equivalent of the above qualifications from a recognised overseas qualification. To find out more about the qualifications we accept from your country please visit the relevant Support in your country page .

    If you are unsure about the suitability of your qualifications or would like help with your application, please contact your nearest Regional office for support.

    Visas and immigration

    You will not need a visa to study in the UK if you are a citizen of the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland. If you are a national of any other country you may need a visa to study in the UK. Please see our Visas and immigration page for further information.

    English language requirements for international students

    You must have competence in English language to study with us. The most commonly accepted evidence of English language ability is IELTS 6.0 (with minimum 5.5 in all four components). Visit our English language requirements page for a full list of accepted English tests and qualifications. If you don’t meet our minimum English language requirements, we offer an intensive Pre-sessional English course .

    Interviews, entrance tests, portfolios and auditions

    Entry onto this course does not require an interview, entrance test, portfolio or audition.

    Some of our courses are still open for applications through Clearing. See our Clearing course list to check the availability of this course. Please note, entry requirements may be different from those published on this page.

    Average starting salary

    What are the career options with a degree in Business and Economics?

    This programme provides an appropriate academic basis for students wishing to pursue a career in Business, Commerce, Finance, Economic Management and Public Administration and has proved a reliable pre- requisite for Masters level courses in Economics, Finance, Risk Management. Work placements are proven to increase your success in the job market as well as being a fantastic experience. Economics is a highly competitive field so we encourage as many students as possible to grasp this opportunity. We have a dedicated work placements service which helps you find and plan for a placement.

    Our business graduates now work for a number of prestigious companies such as oil companies, banks, merchant banks, Bank of England, The Treasury, The Home Office, the GLA’s Economic Unit, Reuters, Xerox, Glaxo, Motorola and NHS Trusts.

    Graduate employment opportunities

    Our economics graduates have been highly successful in obtaining well-paid employment and have obtained positions in the financial, commercial and public sectors working in banking, insurance, investment, oil and pharmaceutical companies and government departments such as the Home Office.

    The average salary for graduates from this course is £24,000 for those in full-time employment.

    Examples of the types of jobs that graduates from the class of 2010-11 are doing include the following:
    Data Analyst, Tax Analyst, Project Manager, Secondary School Teacher

    Our graduates are working at a wide range of organisations including the following:
    Mediacom, Statoil, TLL, SSC Project Management

    Graduate Roles

    Below are just a few career opportunities that would be open to you as a graduate:

    Trainee Business Economist: As a business economist you will identify areas that can be profitable to an organisation, develop them further and identify problem areas and transforming them into opportunities and challenges that can benefit the company. You will usually work within industries such as transportation, mining, manufacturing, investment, communications, banking, insurance, retailing, and other types of organisations.

    Trainee Actuary: Actuaries are experts in evaluating the likelihood of future events, designing creative ways to reduce the likelihood of undesirable events and decreasing the impact of undesirable events that do occur. They solve problems in the business world by analysing and managing risk.

    Trainee Financial Analyst: As a financial analyst you will write reports on the companies you cover trying to describe the businesses and your opinions of the company’s investment potential. Reports are normally summarised with a rating, such as “buy”, “sell”, “market perform”, “overweight”, “hold”, etc.

    Assistant Trade and Financial Officer: As a Trade and Finance Officer you will be involved in the business development of trade finance between an organisation and their clients. You will normally maintain client and internal business relationships and ensuring client and business needs are fulfilled in an effective and timely manner. A comprehensive knowledge of Risk and Credit skills are highly desirable with this area

    Some of our courses are still open for applications through Clearing. See our Clearing course list to check the availability of this course. Please note, entry requirements may be different from those published on this page.





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    The Economist – World News, Politics, Economics, Business & Finance #business #management #degree

    #business news articles

    #

    Death of a dictator

    German politics

    Latest audio and video

    Personal transportation

    France’s identity politics

    The war on Syria’s doctors

    Mexico and its northern neighbour

    Brexit and immigration

    Brazil’s new president

    Fertility and demography

    Peace talks and violence in the Philippines

    Academic freedom

    Federal Reserve symposium

    Pollution in Asian cities

    Colombia’s peace accord

    Mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    The 2016 games

    Housing in America

    Islamic education in Europe

    Data analytics

    African democracy

    Instability in Turkey

    From Aaban to Zyva

    What will we say to aliens on their “Arrival”?

    A Himalayan ascent

    Making airline safety sexy

    A cool shirt

    Donald Trump and the Catholics

    What is Africa’s “Great Green Wall”?

    The dangers of tweeting in Dubai

    The real “Narcos”

    A spot of localist bother

    The Anthropocene

    Public transport in London

    Obituary: The Reverend Roly Bain

    Politics in Karachi

    Pack your golden parachute

    The postmodern bard of Mexico

    Not so bonny

    A horror confronted

    Robots in space

    Belles of the ball game

    Screenin’ in the rain





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    International Journal of Economics and Business Research (IJEBR) – Inderscience Publishers #business #partners

    #business research

    #

    Inderscience Publishers

    International Journal of Economics and Business Research

    Editor in Chief

    • Kantarelis. Demetri, Assumption College, USA
      (dkan besiweb.com)

      Associate Editors

      • Belak. Vinko, University of Zagreb, Croatia
      • Carter. Steve, Leeds Beckett University, UK
      • Josifidis. Kosta, University of Novi Sad, Serbia
      • Matsumoto. Yasumi, Waseda University, Japan
      • Teachout. Mark S. University of the Incarnate Word, USA

      Editorial Board Members

      • Allen. David E. Edith Cowan University, Australia
      • Asadoorian III. Malcolm O. Lynn University, USA
      • Barac. Zeljana Aljinovic, University of Split, Croatia
      • Beck. Charles E. University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, USA
      • Bergami. Roberto, Victoria University, Australia
      • Borrmann. J rg, University of Vienna, Austria
      • Bradley. Lisa, University of Ulster, Austria
      • Daskou. Sofia, Plymouth University, UK
      • Efstathiades. Andreas, European University Cyprus, Cyprus
      • Eibel-Spanyi. Katalin, Eastern Connecticut State University, USA
      • Elkin. Graham, University of Otago, New Zealand
      • Gentzoglanis. Anastassios, Universit de Sherbrooke, Canada
      • Gospodarek. Tadeusz, Walbrzych School of Management and Entrepreneurship, Poland
      • Gutierrez. Pedro J. Universidad de Valladolid, Spain
      • Halicioglu. Ferda, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey
      • Hart. Neil, University of New South Wales, Australia
      • Kolakovic. Marko, University of Zagreb, Croatia
      • K�nya. L szl�, La Trobe University, Australia
      • Laouisset. Djamel Eddine, Alhosn University, United Arab Emirates
      • Leit o. Nuno Carlos, Escola Superior de Gesto e Tecnologia de Santarm, Portugal
      • Michalski. Grzegorz, Wroclaw University of Economics, Poland
      • Palmero. Carlos R. Universidad de Valladolid, Spain
      • Peroni. Matteo, Lynn University, USA
      • Pervan. Maja, University of Split, Croatia
      • Piorkowska. Katarzyna, Wroc aw University of Economics, Poland
      • Potocan. Vojko, University of Maribor, Slovenia
      • Rao. Smriti, Assumption College, USA
      • Selymoglu. Seval, Anadolu University, Turkey
      • Shim. Eunsup “Daniel”, Sacred Heart University, USA
      • Tetik. Nil fer, Akdeniz University, Turkey
      • Thalassinos. E.I. University of Piraeus, Greece
      • Warin. Thierry, HEC Montreal, Canada

      A few essentials for publishing in this journal

      • Submitted articles should not have been previously published or be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere.
      • Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper has been completely re-written (more details available here ) and the author has cleared any necessary permissions with the copyright owner if it has been previously copyrighted.
      • All our articles go through a double-blind review process.
      • All authors must declare they have read and agreed to the content of the submitted article. A full statement of our Ethical Guidelines for Authors (PDF) �is available.
      • There are no charges for publishing with Inderscience, unless you require your article to be Open Access (OA). You can find more information on OA here .




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