Tag: culture

Research center for arts and culture #research #center #for #arts #and #culture

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Research

Environmental science major Avery Palardy ’15 and Earth and Environmental Sciences department assistant professor Vasilii Petrenko examine a carbon 14 extraction line used to study methane found in ancient ice samples.

The University of Rochester has been a pioneer in fields as diverse as geology, optics, medicine, economics, political theory, and human behavior.

A compact campus works to our advantage. All units of the University are within a 10-minute walk or drive, facilitating a highly collaborative, multidisciplinary research environment.

Research at the University of Rochester Medical Center famous for its role in developing three vaccines now used worldwide is a $232 million enterprise involving thousands of scientists, and more than 1,100 individual clinical research projects.

A Blue Gene Q supercomputer. capable of more than 200 trillion calculations a second. An Omega 60-beam laser that can deliver up to 40,000,000,000,000 watts of power onto a target less than 1 millimeter in diameter for approximately one-billionth of a second.

Tools like these are crucial assets for faculty and student research.

Rochester’s historic tradition as a center of manufacturing excellence, especially in optics and photonics, has helped it transition to a knowledge-based economy. And as the city’s leading employer. the University has been a key catalyst.

212 inventors from 51 University departments and units filed invention disclosures in fiscal year 2012. When measured against its peers, the University of Rochester is one of the most productive institutions in the nation in terms of royalty generation.

For more than 150 years. the University has been a pioneer in fields as diverse as geology, optics, medical education, economics, political theory, and human behavior.

Research Strategic Plan 2013-2018

“The committee identified four broad areas of research synergy across the University: Data Science, Research Foundations for a Healthier Society, Light and Sound, and Energy and the Environment. In addition, we identified an emerging emphasis on community engagement and the translation of research discoveries into practical benefits for society.”
Read / download the complete plan

Big Data at the University of Rochester

Data science is a defining discipline of the 21st century, and the top priority in the 2013-2018 research strategic plan.

Research at a Glance

10:1
Student-to-faculty ratio provides a highly collegial research environment.

Top 50
In federally financed research and development expenditures to academic institutions. (National Institutes of Health, 2015)

Top 20
Among U.S. institutions for relative citation impact.

$361 million
Research funding received in FY2016.

77%
Percentage of undergraduate students within Arts, Sciences & Engineering who engage in research.

FY 2016 Research Profile

Proposals submitted: 1,929

Sponsored research expenditures: $351 million

Invention disclosures: 142, from 201 inventors in 48 departments with 44 collaborators from 27 outside institutions

Copyright registrations filed: 3

Patents: 48 U.S. and 21 foreign granted, covering 56 different technologies

Licensing agreements: 31 new agreements

Licensing revenue: $22.0 million

Research

Research Sites by School or Division


UR Ventures: We’ll help make your idea a reality. Technology commercialization at the University of Rochester.


Futurity.org: Discover the future with news from leading research universities

River Campus (mailing address): 500 Joseph C. Wilson Blvd. Rochester, NY 14627

River Campus (GPS/maps): 252 Elmwood Ave. Rochester, NY

Medical Center: 601 Elmwood Ave. Rochester, NY 14642

Eastman School: 26 Gibbs St. Rochester, NY 14604





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Britain s ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize? #,

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Britain s ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

As soon as I have written this, I shall nominate all of the Top 10 Horrible Buildings which I compiled recently for The Independent on Sunday’s magazine. As well as Sir Basil’s gruesome legacy, I listed Preston bus station (“concrete lasagne”), the University of York’s Central Hall (“the spaceship”, in the middle of “the largest plastic-bottomed lake in Europe”), the Southbank Centre in London – and Buckingham Palace, just to prove that old buildings can be ugly, too.

I could easily have compiled a Top 100. There are so many not well-known buildings which perhaps have even more of a lowering effect on the quality of life of the people who cannot avoid them. Council estates such as Thamesmead in south-east London or Southwyck House in Brixton, or Brunel University in Uxbridge.

York University’s Central Hall (Alamy)

I admit my selection was biased: most of them are not just in Britain but in London. The Dead Prize is worldwide in scope – it was launched in Dubai – but I stick to what I know. It helps if you see these things week in and week out. Sometimes time softens the shock and can even turn it into affection. The ArcelorMittal Orbit, for example. I could not believe how bad that was when I saw the plans. Now, though, I think the twisted red metal tower is beautiful.

Video: ‘The creation of The Orbit’ – Time lapse video

However, there is one building that I see nearly every week which I grow to dislike more each time. I cannot believe that I left it out of my Top 10. Now, I can put right my omission, by nominating it for the Dead Prize. I hereby name the Walkie-Talkie, a tower block in the City of London that is hideous, out of scale, wrong, a stupid shape, bigger at the top. It has a ridiculous white border around its unattractive outline.

Sinclair says he doesn’t want to “name and shame”, although I don’t see how he can do one without the other, and the Walkie-Talkie is certainly a crying shame. deadprize.org





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TransferWise launches international money transfers via Facebook #australia,canada,united #kingdom,united #states,max #r. #levchin,peter #a #thiel,richard

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TransferWise launches international money transfers via Facebook

The Facebook logo is displayed on their website in an illustration photo taken in Bordeaux, France, February 1, 2017. Regis Duvignau

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Money transfer company TransferWise has launched a new service that allows users to send money internationally through Facebook Inc’s chat application, as competition in the digital payments landscape intensifies.

The London-based startup said on Tuesday that it had developed a Facebook Messenger “chatbot”, or an automated program that can help users communicate with businesses and carry out tasks such as online purchases.

TransferWise’s chatbot enables customers to send money to friends and family to and from the United States, Britain, Canada, Australia and Europe from Facebook Messenger. It can also be used to set up exchange rate alerts.

Facebook already allows its users to send money domestically in the United States via its Messenger app, but has not yet launched similar services internationally. TransferWise said its service will be the first to enable international money transfers entirely within Messenger.

Facebook opened up its Messenger app to developers to create chatbots in April in a bid to expand its reach in customer service and enterprise transactions.

Chatbots have become a hot topic in enterprise technology over the past year because recent advances in artificial intelligence have made them better at interacting. Businesses, including banks, are hoping that they can be used to improve and reduce the cost of their customer service operations.

One of Europe’s most well-known fintech companies, TransferWise was launched in 2011 by Estonian friends Taavet Hinrikus and Kristo Käärmann out of frustration with the high fees they were being charged by banks for international money transfers.

The company, which is valued at more than $1 billion, is backed by several high profile investors including Silicon Valley venture fund Andreessen Horowitz, Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson, and PayPal co-founders Max Levchin and Peter Thiel, through his fund Valar Ventures.

Customers in more than 50 countries send roughly $1 billion through its website every month.

While the TransferWise chatbot is now only available in Facebook Messenger it can be adapted to work with other popular chat services, Scott Miller, head of global partnerships for TransferWise said. He said the service would eventually be extended to work in other countries and money transfer routes that the company operates in.

The launch comes as competition in the mobile payments and international money transfer sectors intensifies. Earlier this month PayPal Holdings Inc announced its U.S. payments application Venmo would be available within popular chat service Slack.

While in January. Ant Financial Services, an affiliate of Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba Group Holding Ltd, said it would acquire U.S. money-transfer company MoneyGram, in a deal that is expected to shake up the international payments landscape.

Reporting by Anna Irrera; Editing by Sandra Maler





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Perils of a Broken Corporate Culture #business #invoices

#business ethics articles

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Ethics & Compliance Matters

Reputation Damage and Tone at the Top: Uber Scandal Underscores How Corporate Culture can Bring a Company to its Knees

Reputation Damage and Tone at the Top: Uber Scandal Underscores How Corporate Culture can Bring a Company to its Knees

Uber has had its share of public relations problems lately, and is now known as yet another company having to deal with current business ethics issues. From the taxi-alternative start-up’s drivers claiming they don’t make nearly as much money as they originally promised to none-the-wiser customers getting stuck with hefty price surges at the ends of rides. As if this weren’t enough to land Uber an F rating from the Better Business Bureau (in fact, this and a few other Uber business practices were), Senior Vice President Emil Michael’s comments at a recent dinner have pushed this company into a full-on PR disaster.

Creating Culture One (Wrong) Word at a Time

The nutshell: At a dinner attended by a Buzzfeed reporter, Michael suggested Uber would embark on a smear campaign against journalists who criticized the company. In this conversation, Michael said Uber could spend millions of dollars to hire investigators to dig into the journalists’ personal data and use the information they found about their critics to threaten and/or publicly embarrass them. Although Michael claims he thought the conversation was off the record, according to the Buzzfeed reporter, it wasn’t. And he ran with the story .

Not surprisingly, a media storm ensued, leaving Uber CEO Travis Kalanick no other choice but to respond. But Kalanick’s “apology” appeared less than sincere. Rather than fire Michael for insinuating Uber would engage in such unethical business practices, he posted 14 tweets on his personal Twitter account, essentially saying his senior executive’s comments were “terrible.” Uber’s latest situation clearly speaks to what some see as the end of the old tech genre that was focused on changing the world and the move to self-enrichment.

Textbook Case for the Need for Strong “Tone at the Top”

It’s safe to say that Uber is in hot PR water, and it may be very difficult for the company to climb out. Why is that? Because the laundry list of reputation-damaging unethical business practices at Uber has experienced in the past several months may be indicative of a deeper, more critical issue: poor tone at the top, a broken organizational culture and possibly bad business ethics.

What do we mean when we talk about tone from the top? A successful ethics and compliance program must be built on a solid foundation of business ethics that are fully and openly endorsed by senior management. Otherwise, the program may amount to little more than a hollow set of internal rules and regulations. There should be an unambiguous, visible and active commitment to compliance.

For start-ups and some companies in the tech sector, culture-related wrongdoing isn’t new. In fact, it was a journalist’s report against Uber for what she believed were unethical business practices that prompted Michael’s comments at that dinner. Rather than take steps to investigate or address the bad behavior it was being accused of, Uber resorted to threats against the reporter and other critics of the company. This response underscores how problematic its culture seems to be.

A Broken Corporate Culture Will Come Back to Bite You—and Not Just Through Bad Press

While Uber may think this issue will disappear with time, it won’t. If there is an underlying issue with the company’s culture, or if it is truly one of the many companies with ethical issues, it will rear its head again in the future—it’s only a matter of time.

The same may be true for other companies in the tech space if The Wall Street Journal reporter Christopher Mims ‘ concerns play out. In his recent article, “Uber and a Fraught New Era for Tech ” he writes, “The emphasis of the tech companies being built now is much more zero-sum. Whom do we need to destroy in an effort to enrich ourselves and our investors, and what is the best vehicle for creating a consumer need that will facilitate that quest?”

Uber is at a critical crossroads and their next steps could ultimately determine their long-term success. If the company doesn’t take the time needed now to establish a strong culture. it runs the risk of losing key partnerships, employees and drivers, and so much more.

If they are nurturing an environment that prohibits or discourages employees or others from speaking up, business risks alone (i.e. safety, etc.) could significantly hamper this thriving, innovative organization.

If that happens, we all lose.





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First Drive: 2017 Chevrolet Camaro 1LE #road #test, #automotive #reviews, #brembo #spa, #cars #and

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First Drive: 2017 Chevrolet Camaro 1LE

Chevrolet started working on variations of the 1LE in 1988, to improve the then third-generation Camaro’s racetrack handling, for events like the Player’s Challenge Series, which ran from 1986 to 1992. Race teams had asked the folks at Chevy to improve the car, and they in turn installed larger calipers from the Caprice, and bolted on Corvette rotors and suspension components, among a few other handling-enhancing items. Thus the 1LE was born, and by 1989 it was available through Chevy dealers.

The company followed up with a 1LE package for the fourth-generation Camaro throughout the 1990s, installing Koni shocks and further enhancing its handling. The fifth-generation Camaro 1LE was introduced in 2010 and was criticized for its excessive understeer, which prompted Chevy engineers to retort two years later by introducing the highest-performance Camaro to date, the 580-hp ZL1, which borrowed parts heavily from the Corvette ZR1.

2017 Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE

The Camaro 1LE returns for 2017, though there’s a new twist to this track-ready muscle car: For the first time since its introduction, there will be a V6-powered 1LE available alongside the traditional V8 model. The 1LE package is available with the 1LS and 2LS 3.6-litre V6 models, and with the 1SS V8 model. If you’re averse to using both feet when driving, though, you’ll be disappointed to learn that the 1LE is available only with a manual gearbox — everyone else can rejoice! The six-speed manual is operated conventionally in the V6, while the V8-powered SS incorporates no-lift shift (permits full-throttle, clutch-less gear changes) and rev-matching functions (automatic throttle blips on downshifts).

Externally there are a couple of styling cues giving away the 1LE’s enhanced handling package, including the addition of a front splitter and rear spoiler, and matte-black hood wrap, though the SS 1LE has hood vents, hinting at its more muscular powerplant beneath. The V6 and the SS roll on 20-inch wheels, though the latter uses 1.5-inch wider wheels (9.5 in. front; 11 in. rear) and also rolls on stickier Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar tires, as opposed to the V6’s run-flats.

The SS 1LE uses a 455-horsepower/455-lb.-ft. 6.2-litre V8, while the V6 model produces 335 hp and 284 lb.-ft. The engines in the 1LE models are identical in spec to the non-1LE cars; the differences are hidden within the undercarriage.

The V6 1LE utilizes front suspension components from the Camaro SS, with performance-tuned shocks all around. It also uses a mechanical limited-slip differential with a shorter ratio than the standard V6, and it’s equipped with four-piston Brembo calipers up front.

The SS 1LE gets its chassis components from the Camaro ZL1, including the adjustable FE4 Magnetic Ride suspension, six-piston calipers and larger discs up front, and four-piston calipers in the rear. An electronically controlled limited-slip differential is also part of its standard equipment. To keep you planted firmly due to the added grip of its wider, stickier tires, it also has form-fitting Recaro front seats.

To prolong lapping sessions, both cars are equipped with engine, transmission and differential oil coolers, and both cars have dual-mode exhaust systems. There’s a very short list of available options: The Recaro seats are an extra-cost option on the V6 1LE, and you can add a performance data recorder to either car, which records lapping info and also has an on-board camera to record your track sessions.

RELATED

Our lapping session begins in a V6 model, though we alternate through both models throughout the day. Although we’re granted only seven laps per session, the track measures 3.8 kilometres around and has 11 turns, providing ample opportunity to tax both cars’ handling. Both cars were set to Track mode (three modes in the V6, four, including Race Mode, in the SS), which loosens up the electronic safety net enough to get sideways without going all the way around.

The V6 has a bit more understeer than the SS, partially due to its less grippy tires, but also because its suspension is a bit softer and induces a bit more body roll, though both cars feel remarkably tight through corners. Steering effort is lighter in the V6, and due to the lower terminal speeds at the end of the straights, it requires you try to carry more momentum into and through corners for quick laps. It’s also more difficult to make up lost ground if you make a mistake.

The SS, on the other hand, requires more focus to drive, as this one will sink you into the driver’s seat at corner exit. It steers quicker and responds more faithfully to driver input, and is almost completely void of understeer — if you want to push the front through corners, you have to do it deliberately, otherwise it steers exactly where it is pointed. It’s also considerably faster; the only car making the passes during the lapping sessions, almost regardless of who’s behind the wheel, is the SS. Its larger brakes are more responsive and the pedal is firmer, though both cars maintained the same brake feel from the first lap to the last.

Despite sharing platforms, the two 1LE models are completely different in character. The Camaro V6 1LE is the more affordable option, and can be regarded as more of a street car that you can take to the track. And you can easily improve on its racetrack performance by installing stickier tires. The Camaro SS 1LE is more of a track car that you can drive on the street. It’s faster, louder, and stiffer, and, of course, it has that luscious roar lacking in the V6 model.

The 1LE package adds $5,195 over the base $29,295 V6, while the SS 1LE package adds $7,495 over the SS base price of $43,200.





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Boston Business Journal: The importance of workplace culture #business #technology

#boston business journal

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The importance of workplace culture

​The importance of workplace culture

An employer’s perspective, as shared by William K. Bacic. New England managing partner, Deloitte LLP

It’s no secret that workplace culture has become one of 2016’s hottest topics for business leaders. Research shows that workplace culture drives not only behavior, but also plays a major role in innovation, and customer service. In terms of specific numbers, 82 percent of the respondents to the Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016 survey believe that culture is a potential competitive advantage for employers. Equipped with that knowledge, it is nearly impossible to overstate culture’s importance, especially when thinking about not only recruiting and retaining talent, but also in meeting business goals.

Knowing just how crucial of a role culture plays, we, as business leaders, should consider doing all that we can to help foster a culture where professionals thrive. A step in the right direction may require that business leaders recognize the importance of culture, and give it the attention and investment it deserves. Executives should consider working with HR to help take responsibility for culture, and support it through both a measurement process and infrastructure.

However, that challenge, like many others, is often easier said than done. To start, we leaders should visibly prioritize culture in our organizations. That means clearly understanding the values of our companies, and how they affect business strategy. We should help shape the company’s value and make sure that we are leading by example, and reinforcing the desired culture. For example, at Deloitte, we are committed to making an impact that matters in the communities where we live and work. I enjoy taking an active role in my community, whether that is serving on nonprofit boards, hosting events in our office, or volunteering.

As executives, we should also consider examining the current culture at our organization, and determining whether or not that is the culture we desire.

That means taking a close look at our organizations and not only identifying those practices that align with the desired goals, but also taking note of practices that may require some change.

From there, it is up to leaders to help ensure this new culture becomes permanent. We should serve as an example of the new culture, and become cultural ambassadors for our organizations. Whether that means volunteering in your free time, avoiding email on weekends, or remaining offline while on vacation, leaders should consider embodying the culture of the workplace.

I encourage you to embrace the culture challenge, and own it at the highest level. Our actions tend to drive culture, just as they do other issues that reinforce business strategy. For more information on workplace culture, including tools for measurement, take a look at Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends Report .

© 2016. See Terms of Use for more information.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to Deloitte LLP, the US member firm of DTTL, and its subsidiaries where certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.





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Boston Business Journal: The importance of workplace culture #business #development #plan

#boston business journal

#

The importance of workplace culture

​The importance of workplace culture

An employer’s perspective, as shared by William K. Bacic. New England managing partner, Deloitte LLP

It’s no secret that workplace culture has become one of 2016’s hottest topics for business leaders. Research shows that workplace culture drives not only behavior, but also plays a major role in innovation, and customer service. In terms of specific numbers, 82 percent of the respondents to the Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016 survey believe that culture is a potential competitive advantage for employers. Equipped with that knowledge, it is nearly impossible to overstate culture’s importance, especially when thinking about not only recruiting and retaining talent, but also in meeting business goals.

Knowing just how crucial of a role culture plays, we, as business leaders, should consider doing all that we can to help foster a culture where professionals thrive. A step in the right direction may require that business leaders recognize the importance of culture, and give it the attention and investment it deserves. Executives should consider working with HR to help take responsibility for culture, and support it through both a measurement process and infrastructure.

However, that challenge, like many others, is often easier said than done. To start, we leaders should visibly prioritize culture in our organizations. That means clearly understanding the values of our companies, and how they affect business strategy. We should help shape the company’s value and make sure that we are leading by example, and reinforcing the desired culture. For example, at Deloitte, we are committed to making an impact that matters in the communities where we live and work. I enjoy taking an active role in my community, whether that is serving on nonprofit boards, hosting events in our office, or volunteering.

As executives, we should also consider examining the current culture at our organization, and determining whether or not that is the culture we desire.

That means taking a close look at our organizations and not only identifying those practices that align with the desired goals, but also taking note of practices that may require some change.

From there, it is up to leaders to help ensure this new culture becomes permanent. We should serve as an example of the new culture, and become cultural ambassadors for our organizations. Whether that means volunteering in your free time, avoiding email on weekends, or remaining offline while on vacation, leaders should consider embodying the culture of the workplace.

I encourage you to embrace the culture challenge, and own it at the highest level. Our actions tend to drive culture, just as they do other issues that reinforce business strategy. For more information on workplace culture, including tools for measurement, take a look at Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends Report .

© 2016. See Terms of Use for more information.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to Deloitte LLP, the US member firm of DTTL, and its subsidiaries where certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.





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Perils of a Broken Corporate Culture #business #idea

#business ethics articles

#

Ethics & Compliance Matters

Reputation Damage and Tone at the Top: Uber Scandal Underscores How Corporate Culture can Bring a Company to its Knees

Reputation Damage and Tone at the Top: Uber Scandal Underscores How Corporate Culture can Bring a Company to its Knees

Uber has had its share of public relations problems lately, and is now known as yet another company having to deal with current business ethics issues. From the taxi-alternative start-up’s drivers claiming they don’t make nearly as much money as they originally promised to none-the-wiser customers getting stuck with hefty price surges at the ends of rides. As if this weren’t enough to land Uber an F rating from the Better Business Bureau (in fact, this and a few other Uber business practices were), Senior Vice President Emil Michael’s comments at a recent dinner have pushed this company into a full-on PR disaster.

Creating Culture One (Wrong) Word at a Time

The nutshell: At a dinner attended by a Buzzfeed reporter, Michael suggested Uber would embark on a smear campaign against journalists who criticized the company. In this conversation, Michael said Uber could spend millions of dollars to hire investigators to dig into the journalists’ personal data and use the information they found about their critics to threaten and/or publicly embarrass them. Although Michael claims he thought the conversation was off the record, according to the Buzzfeed reporter, it wasn’t. And he ran with the story .

Not surprisingly, a media storm ensued, leaving Uber CEO Travis Kalanick no other choice but to respond. But Kalanick’s “apology” appeared less than sincere. Rather than fire Michael for insinuating Uber would engage in such unethical business practices, he posted 14 tweets on his personal Twitter account, essentially saying his senior executive’s comments were “terrible.” Uber’s latest situation clearly speaks to what some see as the end of the old tech genre that was focused on changing the world and the move to self-enrichment.

Textbook Case for the Need for Strong “Tone at the Top”

It’s safe to say that Uber is in hot PR water, and it may be very difficult for the company to climb out. Why is that? Because the laundry list of reputation-damaging unethical business practices at Uber has experienced in the past several months may be indicative of a deeper, more critical issue: poor tone at the top, a broken organizational culture and possibly bad business ethics.

What do we mean when we talk about tone from the top? A successful ethics and compliance program must be built on a solid foundation of business ethics that are fully and openly endorsed by senior management. Otherwise, the program may amount to little more than a hollow set of internal rules and regulations. There should be an unambiguous, visible and active commitment to compliance.

For start-ups and some companies in the tech sector, culture-related wrongdoing isn’t new. In fact, it was a journalist’s report against Uber for what she believed were unethical business practices that prompted Michael’s comments at that dinner. Rather than take steps to investigate or address the bad behavior it was being accused of, Uber resorted to threats against the reporter and other critics of the company. This response underscores how problematic its culture seems to be.

A Broken Corporate Culture Will Come Back to Bite You—and Not Just Through Bad Press

While Uber may think this issue will disappear with time, it won’t. If there is an underlying issue with the company’s culture, or if it is truly one of the many companies with ethical issues, it will rear its head again in the future—it’s only a matter of time.

The same may be true for other companies in the tech space if The Wall Street Journal reporter Christopher Mims ‘ concerns play out. In his recent article, “Uber and a Fraught New Era for Tech ” he writes, “The emphasis of the tech companies being built now is much more zero-sum. Whom do we need to destroy in an effort to enrich ourselves and our investors, and what is the best vehicle for creating a consumer need that will facilitate that quest?”

Uber is at a critical crossroads and their next steps could ultimately determine their long-term success. If the company doesn’t take the time needed now to establish a strong culture. it runs the risk of losing key partnerships, employees and drivers, and so much more.

If they are nurturing an environment that prohibits or discourages employees or others from speaking up, business risks alone (i.e. safety, etc.) could significantly hamper this thriving, innovative organization.

If that happens, we all lose.





Tags : , , , , ,

Boston Business Journal: The importance of workplace culture #business #development #manager

#boston business journal

#

The importance of workplace culture

​The importance of workplace culture

An employer’s perspective, as shared by William K. Bacic. New England managing partner, Deloitte LLP

It’s no secret that workplace culture has become one of 2016’s hottest topics for business leaders. Research shows that workplace culture drives not only behavior, but also plays a major role in innovation, and customer service. In terms of specific numbers, 82 percent of the respondents to the Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016 survey believe that culture is a potential competitive advantage for employers. Equipped with that knowledge, it is nearly impossible to overstate culture’s importance, especially when thinking about not only recruiting and retaining talent, but also in meeting business goals.

Knowing just how crucial of a role culture plays, we, as business leaders, should consider doing all that we can to help foster a culture where professionals thrive. A step in the right direction may require that business leaders recognize the importance of culture, and give it the attention and investment it deserves. Executives should consider working with HR to help take responsibility for culture, and support it through both a measurement process and infrastructure.

However, that challenge, like many others, is often easier said than done. To start, we leaders should visibly prioritize culture in our organizations. That means clearly understanding the values of our companies, and how they affect business strategy. We should help shape the company’s value and make sure that we are leading by example, and reinforcing the desired culture. For example, at Deloitte, we are committed to making an impact that matters in the communities where we live and work. I enjoy taking an active role in my community, whether that is serving on nonprofit boards, hosting events in our office, or volunteering.

As executives, we should also consider examining the current culture at our organization, and determining whether or not that is the culture we desire.

That means taking a close look at our organizations and not only identifying those practices that align with the desired goals, but also taking note of practices that may require some change.

From there, it is up to leaders to help ensure this new culture becomes permanent. We should serve as an example of the new culture, and become cultural ambassadors for our organizations. Whether that means volunteering in your free time, avoiding email on weekends, or remaining offline while on vacation, leaders should consider embodying the culture of the workplace.

I encourage you to embrace the culture challenge, and own it at the highest level. Our actions tend to drive culture, just as they do other issues that reinforce business strategy. For more information on workplace culture, including tools for measurement, take a look at Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends Report .

© 2016. See Terms of Use for more information.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to Deloitte LLP, the US member firm of DTTL, and its subsidiaries where certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.





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Perils of a Broken Corporate Culture #online #business #degree

#business ethics articles

#

Ethics & Compliance Matters

Reputation Damage and Tone at the Top: Uber Scandal Underscores How Corporate Culture can Bring a Company to its Knees

Reputation Damage and Tone at the Top: Uber Scandal Underscores How Corporate Culture can Bring a Company to its Knees

Uber has had its share of public relations problems lately, and is now known as yet another company having to deal with current business ethics issues. From the taxi-alternative start-up’s drivers claiming they don’t make nearly as much money as they originally promised to none-the-wiser customers getting stuck with hefty price surges at the ends of rides. As if this weren’t enough to land Uber an F rating from the Better Business Bureau (in fact, this and a few other Uber business practices were), Senior Vice President Emil Michael’s comments at a recent dinner have pushed this company into a full-on PR disaster.

Creating Culture One (Wrong) Word at a Time

The nutshell: At a dinner attended by a Buzzfeed reporter, Michael suggested Uber would embark on a smear campaign against journalists who criticized the company. In this conversation, Michael said Uber could spend millions of dollars to hire investigators to dig into the journalists’ personal data and use the information they found about their critics to threaten and/or publicly embarrass them. Although Michael claims he thought the conversation was off the record, according to the Buzzfeed reporter, it wasn’t. And he ran with the story .

Not surprisingly, a media storm ensued, leaving Uber CEO Travis Kalanick no other choice but to respond. But Kalanick’s “apology” appeared less than sincere. Rather than fire Michael for insinuating Uber would engage in such unethical business practices, he posted 14 tweets on his personal Twitter account, essentially saying his senior executive’s comments were “terrible.” Uber’s latest situation clearly speaks to what some see as the end of the old tech genre that was focused on changing the world and the move to self-enrichment.

Textbook Case for the Need for Strong “Tone at the Top”

It’s safe to say that Uber is in hot PR water, and it may be very difficult for the company to climb out. Why is that? Because the laundry list of reputation-damaging unethical business practices at Uber has experienced in the past several months may be indicative of a deeper, more critical issue: poor tone at the top, a broken organizational culture and possibly bad business ethics.

What do we mean when we talk about tone from the top? A successful ethics and compliance program must be built on a solid foundation of business ethics that are fully and openly endorsed by senior management. Otherwise, the program may amount to little more than a hollow set of internal rules and regulations. There should be an unambiguous, visible and active commitment to compliance.

For start-ups and some companies in the tech sector, culture-related wrongdoing isn’t new. In fact, it was a journalist’s report against Uber for what she believed were unethical business practices that prompted Michael’s comments at that dinner. Rather than take steps to investigate or address the bad behavior it was being accused of, Uber resorted to threats against the reporter and other critics of the company. This response underscores how problematic its culture seems to be.

A Broken Corporate Culture Will Come Back to Bite You—and Not Just Through Bad Press

While Uber may think this issue will disappear with time, it won’t. If there is an underlying issue with the company’s culture, or if it is truly one of the many companies with ethical issues, it will rear its head again in the future—it’s only a matter of time.

The same may be true for other companies in the tech space if The Wall Street Journal reporter Christopher Mims ‘ concerns play out. In his recent article, “Uber and a Fraught New Era for Tech ” he writes, “The emphasis of the tech companies being built now is much more zero-sum. Whom do we need to destroy in an effort to enrich ourselves and our investors, and what is the best vehicle for creating a consumer need that will facilitate that quest?”

Uber is at a critical crossroads and their next steps could ultimately determine their long-term success. If the company doesn’t take the time needed now to establish a strong culture. it runs the risk of losing key partnerships, employees and drivers, and so much more.

If they are nurturing an environment that prohibits or discourages employees or others from speaking up, business risks alone (i.e. safety, etc.) could significantly hamper this thriving, innovative organization.

If that happens, we all lose.





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