Tag: Corporate

Business Travel Company, Corporate Travel Management Services – CT Business Travel #t #shirt #business

#business travel

#

Welcome to CT Business Travel

CT Business Travel has become one of the UK’s leading corporate travel management companies. providing outstanding service is at the company’s core and this is reflected in our impressive portfolio of clients who continue to use and value our services year in, year out.

At CT Business Travel we continuously invest in our teams and technology to allow us to provide an unparalleled Corporate Travel Service. Your account is closely monitored by a dedicated account manager and travel consultant team leader to ensure that your travel policy and expectations are met down to the last detail. Regular review meetings are held between you and our team to ensure you are getting the service and savings you require.

Our ethos for a
Modern Traveller

We don’t ask you for contracts

We source the best fares and give you the choice

We focus on personal service and account management

What We Offer

Specialists in global business travel management

Account based bookings – with no tie in

Negotiated rates with airlines and hotels on your behalf

Management reporting included as standard

Enforcement of your travel policies

Free online booking portal with customised staff controls, reporting and built approval process





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7-Eleven, Volkswagen cases show why we should push back on – corporate ethics #free #business #plans

#business ethics articles

#

7-Eleven. Volkswagen cases show why we should push back on ‘corporate ethics’

Professor of Management and Organization Studies, Macquarie University

Disclosure statement

Carl Rhodes does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

The Conversation’s partners

The Conversation UK receives funding from Hefce, Hefcw, SAGE, SFC, RCUK, The Nuffield Foundation, The Ogden Trust, The Royal Society, The Wellcome Trust, Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and The Alliance for Useful Evidence, as well as sixty five university members.

Republish this article

We believe in the free flow of information. We use a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence, so you can republish our articles for free, online or in print.

Chairman and major shareholder of 7-Eleven Russ Withers sits in a Senate Committee hearing in Melbourne. Julian Smith/AAP

There is perhaps no phrase more hackneyed in the corporate world than: “good ethics is good business”. Against the image of the ruthless business baron who will stop at nothing in the pursuit of wealth and power, the slogan tells us there is no friction between being good and being successful.

As luck should have it (for corporations that is) it is argued organisations can stand up and be righteous about their do-gooding, and this will actually lead to the achievement of self-interested business results. The cake can be had and eaten.

But does this ethical catch phrase really hold sway in the corporate world? Events this September suggest not.

The month of the corporate scandal

September 2015 was mired in corporate scandal. German car manufacturer Volkswagen was raked over the coals for installing software in its cars that ensured it falsely passed emission tests. Eleven million cars were involved over a period of seven years. VW’s CEO Martin Winterkorn resigned over the affair and now faces possible criminal charges .

American corporation Turing Pharmaceuticals was publicly vilified for its predatory pricing when it raised the price of the drug Daraprim by 4000%. This is a drug used to treat infections associated with HIV and AIDS. Turing’s CEO Martin Shkreli was described by the Washington Post as “the most hated man in America”.

In Australia trouble arrived at convenience store chain 7-Eleven when the ABC’s documentary series Four Corners revealed its use of exploitative and illegal work practices to reduce its labour costs. Employees were being paid less than half the legal minimum wage. Young and foreign workers were especially targeted. The scandal saw the resignations of 7-Eleven’s chairman Russ Withers, and its CEO Warren Wilmot.

Bad ethics is good business

Each of these scandals has been scrutinised in terms of business ethics. We are not talking here about contentious and nuanced debates about the nature of morality. In these cases the ethical issues relate to cheating, lying, deception, law breaking, exploitation, and merciless profiteering. As far as any common understanding of ethics is concerned these things are on the far side of the thick and grey line that separates right from wrong.

What do these cases have in common? Each one suggests there was an ethos in place in these corporations that held that “bad ethics is good business”. Seven years of highly orchestrated cheating at VW meant increased sales. In 2009 VW became the world’s biggest car manufacturer .

Institutionalised wage fraud and labour exploitation at 7-Eleven kept store costs down, increasing profits both for franchisees and (especially) for the parent company. 7-Eleven has twice been names Australia’s “franchisor of the year”. Price gouging at Turing meant a drug listed on The World Health Organization’s essential medicines list could bolster the company’s profits by exploiting the sick and vulnerable.

Just don’t get caught

The “bad ethics is good business” approach was going well for these businesses until they got caught. These three cases have triggered debates still raging in all sectors of society. Heads have rolled and bottom lines are jeopardised.

Does this really confirm that “bad ethics is bad business”? Of course not. There is no doubt many other corporations are profiting handsomely from deceit, lies, fraud and exploitation. The scandals of September 2015 show that “bad ethics is good business … unless you get caught”.

It’s not just about not getting caught. It is also about the political, legal, social and economic implications of being found out. In the cases of VW, 7-Eleven and Turing there has been a massive public and media outcry about their reprehensible and selfish behaviour.

Bringing these corporations to justice was not the work of one heroic individual, nor the result of government action. It was a collective effort that involved NGOs, scientists, academics, politicians, the media and the general public. This was a victory of civil society and democratic dissent.

So, we can reformulate our proposal: “Bad ethics is good business … unless you get caught … and as long as you aren’t the subject of a public outcry”.

Democratic business ethics

When corporations speak of business ethics their idea is that they can keep it all in house. The ethics of business is largely seen as a matter of corporate self-regulation so that pesky outsiders won’t stick their noses into corporate affairs. The September scandals suggest an entirely different ethics.

If we want ethics in business, what we need is more corporations being caught and more public outcry. For business ethics to be effective they must be pushed onto corporations against their will. Business ethics is democratic, not corporate.

What we can learn from the business events of September is that ethics cannot be left to corporations themselves. Business ethics requires a vigilant democracy where the public and its institutions will hold corporations to account for their actions.

Business ethics, to borrow a phrase, is about keeping the bastards honest.





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What are business ethics? Business ethics and corporate social responsibility – Anglo American #franchise #businesses

#business ethics

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Business ethics and corporate social responsibility
An Anglo American case study

Page 2: What are business ethics?

Business ethics are moral principles that guide the way a business behaves. The same principles that determine an individual s actions also apply to business.

Acting in an ethical way involves distinguishing between right and wrong and then making the right choice. It is relatively easy to identify unethical business practices. For example, companies should not use child labour. They should not unlawfully use copyrighted materials and processes. They should not engage in bribery.

However, it is not always easy to create similar hard-and-fast definitions of good ethical practice. A company must make a competitive return for its shareholders and treat its employees fairly. A company also has wider responsibilities. It should minimise any harm to the environment and work in ways that do not damage the communities in which it operates. This is known as corporate social responsibility.

Codes of behaviour

The law is the key starting point for any business. Most leading businesses also have their own statement of Business Principles which set out their core values and standards. In Anglo American s case, this is called Good Citizenship .

A business should also follow relevant codes of practice that cover its sector. Many companies have created voluntary codes of practice that regulate practices in their industrial sector. These are often drawn up in consultation with governments, employees, local communities and other stakeholders. Anglo American has played an active part in initiatives such as the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative.

Anglo American has also contributed to the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights. This code sets out principles and practices for ensuring that a company s need to ensure the security of its employees and operations in volatile countries does not adversely impact upon the local population. Thus the Principles provide guidance on how both private and public security forces assigned to protect a mining operation or an oil and gas facility should be vetted, trained in human rights, monitored and controlled.

Anglo American also aims to ensure that it plays a role in protecting the human rights of its employees and local people in countries in which it operates. The company supports the principles set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

All companies need to make a profit. However, Anglo American recognises that this objective must take account of ethics as shown in its statement on corporate responsibility: Though providing strong returns for our shareholders remains our prime objective, we do not believe that these can or should be achieved at the expense of social, environmental and moral considerations. Indeed a long-term business such as ours will only thrive if it also takes into account the needs of other stakeholders such as governments, employees, suppliers, communities and customers.

Stakeholders

An important process used by Anglo American is that of stakeholder engagement. This enables it better to understand the perspectives and priorities of external groups that are affected by its activities and to factor them into its decision-making processes. To support this work at a local level, Anglo American has developed a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox or SEAT process.

This toolbox helps managers to measure the impact of activities on the company and communities. It also helps to improve a mine s contribution to development through, for example, using its supply chain needs to generate new businesses or to improve the water or electricity infrastructure. They use this toolbox to engage with stakeholders including community representatives.

Sometimes communities have to be resettled, with government sanction, in order for important mineral deposits to be accessed. This can cause controversy and divisions in the communities concerned. International best practice sets out a number of key stages in such a process including the need for structured consultation, fair compensation and the importance of restoring and enhancing the livelihoods of people in their new locations.

Recently Anglo American has had to undertake two such relocations in South Africa at the villages of Ga Pila and Motlhotlo. These were undertaken with the support of the provincial government and local tribal leadership and after consultation with local people lasting for several years leading to agreement with each householder. New villages have been built with better houses and infrastructure and more land for farming. The relocation programme was voluntary. The relocation programme at Motlhotlo is still under way but at Ga Pila 98% of those living in the old village took up the offer to move to the new village.

Anglo American | Business ethics and corporate social responsibility





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Corporate event invitations – Paperless Post #business #names #available

#business invitations

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Planning your company’s next get-together? Set the agenda with our online corporate event invitations. You’ll find designs perfect for key meetings (and maybe a few office holiday parties) with tools to help you keep your plans running smoothly.

Whether your business communicates on stately letterhead or with a more creative approach, you’ll find invitations from leading designers that match your needs. You’ll have plenty of room for a personal touch—just use the online design tool to adapt the invitation’s fonts and backdrop to match your business’ brand identity or to upload your logo. If you’re in need of a bit of assistance, our Personal Design Services team will be happy to help design a custom invitation that meets your organization’s high standards. They can start from scratch, or integrate your company’s logo and branding into an existing design.

If you’ve taken care of the entire design in-house, we won’t stand in your way. Upload your own invitation design to one of our corporate event templates, and you’ll be able to make use of our convenient delivery and tracking tools. You can use the Paperless Post address book to import and organize contacts from your business’ webmail accounts or from a predetermined guest list. Once you’ve sent out the invitation, we’ll keep track of not only who’s RSVP’d, but who’s received or not yet opened your delivery. You can send messages targeted to these specific groups as well, should you need to make a reminder.

For major events like shareholder meetings, corporate anniversaries, and yearly company holiday parties, paper invitations are a fittingly grand way to begin the festivities. Many of our in-house and partner designs are available on paper, and any design you or our design specialists team create can be sent on printed cards. With a final order of pre-addressed envelopes, sending your paper invitations is as simple as dropping them at the mailroom.

2016 Paperless Post





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An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy #austin #business #journal

#business bankruptcy

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An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

If a company you’ve got a stake in files for bankruptcy, chances are you’ll get back pennies to the dollar. Different bankruptcy proceedings or filings generally give some idea as to whether the average investor will get back all or a portion of his investment, but even that is determined on a case-by-case basis. There is also a pecking order of creditors and investors of who get paid back first, second and last. In this article, we’ll explain what happens when a public company files for protection under U.S. bankruptcy laws and how it affects investors.

Two Major Types of Bankruptcy
Chapter 7
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission states that under Chapter 7 of U.S. Bankruptcy Code “the company stops all operations and goes completely out of business. A trustee is appointed to liquidate (sell) the company’s assets, and the money is used to pay off debt”. The investors, or creditors, who take the least risk are paid first.

For example, investors who take a relatively reduced risk in the company by purchasing corporate bonds must forgo the potential of seeing any excess profits the company may earn in the future. For the higher safety of the bonds, the investors agree to receive, at most, their specified interest payments. Equity holders, however, have the full potential of seeing their share of the company’s retained earnings. which would be reflected in the stock’s price. But the tradeoff for this possibility of boosted returns is the risk that the stock may lose value. As such, in the case of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, equity holders may not be fully compensated for the value of their shares. In light of the risk-return tradeoff. it seems fair (and logical) that shareholders are second in line to bondholders when a bankruptcy does occur.

Secured creditors. who are even more risk-averse than regular bondholders, accept very low interest rates in exchange for the added safety of corporate assets being pledged against the company’s debt. Therefore, when a company does go under, secured creditors receive priority and are paid back before any regular bondholders begin to see their share of the pie. This principle is referred to as absolute priority. (For more insight, read the Stocks Basics Tutorial .)

Chapter 11
This proceeding of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code involves the reorganization of the debtor ‘s business affairs and assets. The company undergoing Chapter 11 expects to return to normal business operations and sound financial health in the future. It’s generally filed by corporations that need time to restructure debt that has become unmanageable. Chapter 11 gives the debtor a fresh start, which depends on the debtor’s fulfillment of obligations under the reorganization plan. A Chapter 11 reorganization is the most complex and, generally, the most expensive of all bankruptcy proceedings. It is therefore undertaken only after the company has carefully analyzed and considered all alternatives.

Chapter 11: The Drink of Choice
Public companies tend to try to file under Chapter 11 rather than Chapter 7 because it allows them to still run their businesses and control the bankruptcy process. Rather than simply turning over its assets to a trustee, a company undergoing Chapter 11 has the opportunity to restructure its financial framework and be profitable again. If it fails, all assets are liquidated and stakeholders are paid off according to absolute priority.

Keep in mind that Chapter 11 isn’t a get-out-of-jail-free card. When a company files for Chapter 11, that company is assigned a committee that represents the interests of creditors and stockholders. This committee works with the company to develop a plan to reorganize the company and to get it out of debt, reshaping it into a profitable entity. Shareholders may be given a vote on the plan, but as their priority is second to all creditors, this is never guaranteed. If no suitable reorganization plan can be prepared by the committee and confirmed by the courts, shareholders may not be able to stop their company’s assets from being sold off to pay creditors. (For related reading, check out Finding Profit In Troubled Stocks .)

How It Affects Investors
As an investor, you are between a rock and a hard place if your company faces bankruptcy. Clearly, nobody invests money into a company, whether through its stock or its debt instruments. expecting the company to declare bankruptcy. However, when you venture outside of the risk-free realm of government-issued securities, you are accepting this added risk.

When a company is going through bankruptcy proceedings, its stocks and bonds usually continue trading, albeit at extremely low prices. Generally, if you are a shareholder. you will usually see a substantial decline in the value of your shares in the time leading up to the company’s bankruptcy declaration. Bonds for near bankrupt companies are usually rated as junk.

When your company goes bankrupt, there is a very good chance you will not get back the full value of your investment. In fact, there is a chance you won’t get anything back. Here is how the SEC summarizes what may happen to stock- and bondholders during Chapter 11:

“During Chapter 11 bankruptcy, bondholders stop receiving interest and principal payments, and stockholders stop receiving dividends. If you are a bondholder. you may receive new stock in exchange for your bonds, new bonds or a combination of stock and bonds. If you are a stockholder, the trustee may ask you to send back your stock in exchange for shares in the reorganized company. The new shares may be fewer in number and worth less. The reorganization plan spells out your rights as an investor and what you can expect to receive, if anything, from the company.”

Basically, once your company files under any type of bankruptcy protection, your opportunities and rights as an investor change to reflect the bankrupt status of the company. While some companies do indeed make successful comebacks after undergoing restructuring, you need to realize that the risks you accepted when you invested in the company can become reality. And if your stake in the pre-Chapter 11 company ends up being worth anything in the restructured firm, chances are it won’t be as much as it was when you first entered your position and it won’t be in the same form.

During Chapter 7 bankruptcy, investors are considered especially low on the ladder. Usually, the stock of a company undergoing Chapter 7 proceedings is usually worthless, and investors lose the money they invested. If you hold a bond, you might receive a fraction of its face value. What you receive depends on the amount of assets available for distribution and where your investment ranks on the priority list on the first page.

Secured creditors have the best chances of seeing the value of their initial investments come back to them. Unsecured creditors and shareholders must wait until secured creditors have been adequately compensated before they receive any compensation for the loss of their higher-yielding investments. Because equity owners are last in line, they usually receive little, if anything.

Conclusion
From an investor’s point of view, there isn’t much good to say about bankruptcy. No matter what type of investment you made in a company, once it goes bankrupt you are probably going to get a lower return on your investment than you once expected. As an individual investor, you don’t have any more say in a company’s restructuring plan than you do in any other corporate actions on which shareholders vote.

In general, Chapter 11 is better than Chapter 7, but in either case you shouldn’t expect much of your investment back. Relatively few firms undergoing Chapter 11 proceedings are able to be profitable again after a reorganization; even if they do become profitable again, it is not a quick process. As an investor, you should react to a company’s bankruptcy the same way you would if one of your stocks took an unexpected dive: recognize and accept the dramatically reduced prospects of the company, and ask yourself whether you still want to be invested in the company. If the answer is no, let go of your failed investment – holding on while the company undergoes bankruptcy proceedings will only lead to sleepless nights and perhaps even greater losses in the future.





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7-Eleven, Volkswagen cases show why we should push back on – corporate ethics #online #businesses

#business ethics articles

#

7-Eleven. Volkswagen cases show why we should push back on ‘corporate ethics’

Professor of Management and Organization Studies, Macquarie University

Disclosure statement

Carl Rhodes does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

The Conversation’s partners

The Conversation UK receives funding from Hefce, Hefcw, SAGE, SFC, RCUK, The Nuffield Foundation, The Ogden Trust, The Royal Society, The Wellcome Trust, Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and The Alliance for Useful Evidence, as well as sixty five university members.

Republish this article

We believe in the free flow of information. We use a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence, so you can republish our articles for free, online or in print.

Chairman and major shareholder of 7-Eleven Russ Withers sits in a Senate Committee hearing in Melbourne. Julian Smith/AAP

There is perhaps no phrase more hackneyed in the corporate world than: “good ethics is good business”. Against the image of the ruthless business baron who will stop at nothing in the pursuit of wealth and power, the slogan tells us there is no friction between being good and being successful.

As luck should have it (for corporations that is) it is argued organisations can stand up and be righteous about their do-gooding, and this will actually lead to the achievement of self-interested business results. The cake can be had and eaten.

But does this ethical catch phrase really hold sway in the corporate world? Events this September suggest not.

The month of the corporate scandal

September 2015 was mired in corporate scandal. German car manufacturer Volkswagen was raked over the coals for installing software in its cars that ensured it falsely passed emission tests. Eleven million cars were involved over a period of seven years. VW’s CEO Martin Winterkorn resigned over the affair and now faces possible criminal charges .

American corporation Turing Pharmaceuticals was publicly vilified for its predatory pricing when it raised the price of the drug Daraprim by 4000%. This is a drug used to treat infections associated with HIV and AIDS. Turing’s CEO Martin Shkreli was described by the Washington Post as “the most hated man in America”.

In Australia trouble arrived at convenience store chain 7-Eleven when the ABC’s documentary series Four Corners revealed its use of exploitative and illegal work practices to reduce its labour costs. Employees were being paid less than half the legal minimum wage. Young and foreign workers were especially targeted. The scandal saw the resignations of 7-Eleven’s chairman Russ Withers, and its CEO Warren Wilmot.

Bad ethics is good business

Each of these scandals has been scrutinised in terms of business ethics. We are not talking here about contentious and nuanced debates about the nature of morality. In these cases the ethical issues relate to cheating, lying, deception, law breaking, exploitation, and merciless profiteering. As far as any common understanding of ethics is concerned these things are on the far side of the thick and grey line that separates right from wrong.

What do these cases have in common? Each one suggests there was an ethos in place in these corporations that held that “bad ethics is good business”. Seven years of highly orchestrated cheating at VW meant increased sales. In 2009 VW became the world’s biggest car manufacturer .

Institutionalised wage fraud and labour exploitation at 7-Eleven kept store costs down, increasing profits both for franchisees and (especially) for the parent company. 7-Eleven has twice been names Australia’s “franchisor of the year”. Price gouging at Turing meant a drug listed on The World Health Organization’s essential medicines list could bolster the company’s profits by exploiting the sick and vulnerable.

Just don’t get caught

The “bad ethics is good business” approach was going well for these businesses until they got caught. These three cases have triggered debates still raging in all sectors of society. Heads have rolled and bottom lines are jeopardised.

Does this really confirm that “bad ethics is bad business”? Of course not. There is no doubt many other corporations are profiting handsomely from deceit, lies, fraud and exploitation. The scandals of September 2015 show that “bad ethics is good business … unless you get caught”.

It’s not just about not getting caught. It is also about the political, legal, social and economic implications of being found out. In the cases of VW, 7-Eleven and Turing there has been a massive public and media outcry about their reprehensible and selfish behaviour.

Bringing these corporations to justice was not the work of one heroic individual, nor the result of government action. It was a collective effort that involved NGOs, scientists, academics, politicians, the media and the general public. This was a victory of civil society and democratic dissent.

So, we can reformulate our proposal: “Bad ethics is good business … unless you get caught … and as long as you aren’t the subject of a public outcry”.

Democratic business ethics

When corporations speak of business ethics their idea is that they can keep it all in house. The ethics of business is largely seen as a matter of corporate self-regulation so that pesky outsiders won’t stick their noses into corporate affairs. The September scandals suggest an entirely different ethics.

If we want ethics in business, what we need is more corporations being caught and more public outcry. For business ethics to be effective they must be pushed onto corporations against their will. Business ethics is democratic, not corporate.

What we can learn from the business events of September is that ethics cannot be left to corporations themselves. Business ethics requires a vigilant democracy where the public and its institutions will hold corporations to account for their actions.

Business ethics, to borrow a phrase, is about keeping the bastards honest.





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Corporate Party Invitations, Business Events, Christmas – Holiday Invitations #business #loan #rate

#business invitations

#

Party – Business Parties

FineStationery is a renowned purveyor of quality paper goods sourced from celebrated designers and independent creators. We are committed to providing the stationery you need for any occasion. From gold foil save-the-dates to illustrated invitations for a Kentucky Derby soiree. FineStationery allows you to customize your stationery to match your personal taste, style, and event. In addition to correspondence notes, business cards, and wedding invitations, we also carry heartfelt gifts and journals, including exclusively-designed products by Kate Spade and Lily Pulizter.

Share photos of your graduate, newlyweds, or baby with glossy, personalized photo cards. Add your own sentiments to any style you choose. FineStationery products are not the kind you open, read, and throw away. These are keepsakes your friends and family will cherish forever – elegant, detailed pieces that have the power to transform mundanity into an appreciation for what it truly means to celebrate the milestones of life.

See Terms and Conditions for further information.





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An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy #business #tax

#business bankruptcy

#

An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

If a company you’ve got a stake in files for bankruptcy, chances are you’ll get back pennies to the dollar. Different bankruptcy proceedings or filings generally give some idea as to whether the average investor will get back all or a portion of his investment, but even that is determined on a case-by-case basis. There is also a pecking order of creditors and investors of who get paid back first, second and last. In this article, we’ll explain what happens when a public company files for protection under U.S. bankruptcy laws and how it affects investors.

Two Major Types of Bankruptcy
Chapter 7
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission states that under Chapter 7 of U.S. Bankruptcy Code “the company stops all operations and goes completely out of business. A trustee is appointed to liquidate (sell) the company’s assets, and the money is used to pay off debt”. The investors, or creditors, who take the least risk are paid first.

For example, investors who take a relatively reduced risk in the company by purchasing corporate bonds must forgo the potential of seeing any excess profits the company may earn in the future. For the higher safety of the bonds, the investors agree to receive, at most, their specified interest payments. Equity holders, however, have the full potential of seeing their share of the company’s retained earnings. which would be reflected in the stock’s price. But the tradeoff for this possibility of boosted returns is the risk that the stock may lose value. As such, in the case of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, equity holders may not be fully compensated for the value of their shares. In light of the risk-return tradeoff. it seems fair (and logical) that shareholders are second in line to bondholders when a bankruptcy does occur.

Secured creditors. who are even more risk-averse than regular bondholders, accept very low interest rates in exchange for the added safety of corporate assets being pledged against the company’s debt. Therefore, when a company does go under, secured creditors receive priority and are paid back before any regular bondholders begin to see their share of the pie. This principle is referred to as absolute priority. (For more insight, read the Stocks Basics Tutorial .)

Chapter 11
This proceeding of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code involves the reorganization of the debtor ‘s business affairs and assets. The company undergoing Chapter 11 expects to return to normal business operations and sound financial health in the future. It’s generally filed by corporations that need time to restructure debt that has become unmanageable. Chapter 11 gives the debtor a fresh start, which depends on the debtor’s fulfillment of obligations under the reorganization plan. A Chapter 11 reorganization is the most complex and, generally, the most expensive of all bankruptcy proceedings. It is therefore undertaken only after the company has carefully analyzed and considered all alternatives.

Chapter 11: The Drink of Choice
Public companies tend to try to file under Chapter 11 rather than Chapter 7 because it allows them to still run their businesses and control the bankruptcy process. Rather than simply turning over its assets to a trustee, a company undergoing Chapter 11 has the opportunity to restructure its financial framework and be profitable again. If it fails, all assets are liquidated and stakeholders are paid off according to absolute priority.

Keep in mind that Chapter 11 isn’t a get-out-of-jail-free card. When a company files for Chapter 11, that company is assigned a committee that represents the interests of creditors and stockholders. This committee works with the company to develop a plan to reorganize the company and to get it out of debt, reshaping it into a profitable entity. Shareholders may be given a vote on the plan, but as their priority is second to all creditors, this is never guaranteed. If no suitable reorganization plan can be prepared by the committee and confirmed by the courts, shareholders may not be able to stop their company’s assets from being sold off to pay creditors. (For related reading, check out Finding Profit In Troubled Stocks .)

How It Affects Investors
As an investor, you are between a rock and a hard place if your company faces bankruptcy. Clearly, nobody invests money into a company, whether through its stock or its debt instruments. expecting the company to declare bankruptcy. However, when you venture outside of the risk-free realm of government-issued securities, you are accepting this added risk.

When a company is going through bankruptcy proceedings, its stocks and bonds usually continue trading, albeit at extremely low prices. Generally, if you are a shareholder. you will usually see a substantial decline in the value of your shares in the time leading up to the company’s bankruptcy declaration. Bonds for near bankrupt companies are usually rated as junk.

When your company goes bankrupt, there is a very good chance you will not get back the full value of your investment. In fact, there is a chance you won’t get anything back. Here is how the SEC summarizes what may happen to stock- and bondholders during Chapter 11:

“During Chapter 11 bankruptcy, bondholders stop receiving interest and principal payments, and stockholders stop receiving dividends. If you are a bondholder. you may receive new stock in exchange for your bonds, new bonds or a combination of stock and bonds. If you are a stockholder, the trustee may ask you to send back your stock in exchange for shares in the reorganized company. The new shares may be fewer in number and worth less. The reorganization plan spells out your rights as an investor and what you can expect to receive, if anything, from the company.”

Basically, once your company files under any type of bankruptcy protection, your opportunities and rights as an investor change to reflect the bankrupt status of the company. While some companies do indeed make successful comebacks after undergoing restructuring, you need to realize that the risks you accepted when you invested in the company can become reality. And if your stake in the pre-Chapter 11 company ends up being worth anything in the restructured firm, chances are it won’t be as much as it was when you first entered your position and it won’t be in the same form.

During Chapter 7 bankruptcy, investors are considered especially low on the ladder. Usually, the stock of a company undergoing Chapter 7 proceedings is usually worthless, and investors lose the money they invested. If you hold a bond, you might receive a fraction of its face value. What you receive depends on the amount of assets available for distribution and where your investment ranks on the priority list on the first page.

Secured creditors have the best chances of seeing the value of their initial investments come back to them. Unsecured creditors and shareholders must wait until secured creditors have been adequately compensated before they receive any compensation for the loss of their higher-yielding investments. Because equity owners are last in line, they usually receive little, if anything.

Conclusion
From an investor’s point of view, there isn’t much good to say about bankruptcy. No matter what type of investment you made in a company, once it goes bankrupt you are probably going to get a lower return on your investment than you once expected. As an individual investor, you don’t have any more say in a company’s restructuring plan than you do in any other corporate actions on which shareholders vote.

In general, Chapter 11 is better than Chapter 7, but in either case you shouldn’t expect much of your investment back. Relatively few firms undergoing Chapter 11 proceedings are able to be profitable again after a reorganization; even if they do become profitable again, it is not a quick process. As an investor, you should react to a company’s bankruptcy the same way you would if one of your stocks took an unexpected dive: recognize and accept the dramatically reduced prospects of the company, and ask yourself whether you still want to be invested in the company. If the answer is no, let go of your failed investment – holding on while the company undergoes bankruptcy proceedings will only lead to sleepless nights and perhaps even greater losses in the future.





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50 Creative Corporate Business Card Design examples – Design inspiration #custom #business #cards

#business card designer

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50 Creative Corporate Business Card Design examples – Design inspiration

Corporate Business Cards

Corporate Business Cards designed in a creative manner gives a professional touch to almost all kinds of businesses. A professionally designed corporate business card can in turn boost the sales or marketing of all companies even if it’s in a small manner. It’s important to have a unique and simple corporate business card before they end up in a garbage bin. Yeah, you heard me right, boring visiting cards end up in the dust bin, keeping in mind the numerous corporate business cards which float in the market and also in your customer’s hand. The message should be short and sweet, so it gets the point across to the customer, it shouldn’t be like, What the hell is this visiting card for? save these beautiful and creative corporate business cards for the most needed inspiration or simply share them with your friends.

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Free Corporate Business Card Template (PSD) #new #business #plan

#business card template

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Free Corporate Business Card Template (PSD)

This free business card PSD template is great for any corporate business. Highest-quality business card template with two fully editable Photoshop PSD files. This free business card template is suitable for both corporate business and personal usage. Stylish business card PSD template available for free download.

All text layers can be changed with one click. All objects are in vector shape, can be resized without any quality loss. All psd files are well organized and completely free for both personal and commercial aims.

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Corporate Business Card Design Preview

Features

Fully Editable Photoshop PSD Layered Files
3.5 x 2 (3.75 x 2.25 with bleeds + Trim Mark)
300DPI CMYK Print Ready
White and Black Design Included.
Fonts Used: Nexa Slab Regular

License, Usage, and Sharing:

The business card is design by Yasir Jawaid exclusively for GDJ. The mockup is completely free for commercial and non-commercial usage. You cannot, however, claim them to be your own. You should include a link to our website when you share any where.

Recent Comments

  • Muhammad Faisal
    Hi Tammy,Unfortunately, the download has been removed from source website. So there is no other way to download these free vectors. Sorry for the in
  • Rajendra Sharma
    realy great for me.
  • Taunas Otieno
    Hi, my name is Taunas from Kenya and i was inspired by what you do some of the projects you have show cased are just inspiring.I must say i have learn
  • Charlesdof
    jQuery has made web design faster, easier and more accessible. We reveal the best jQuery plugins to save you time and effort.
  • Tural
    thanks bro,it`s usefull for us




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