Tag: Canadian

Richest people in Canada 2014 – Canadian Business – Your Source For Business News,

Richest people in Canada 2014

CB s annual ranking of our wealthiest

Nov 26, 2013 CB Staff

Canadian business magazineFor Roy Thomson, it all started with a $500 investment in a northern Ontario radio station during the Great Depression. For Fred DeGasperis, it was a truck he purchased with his brother to do construction jobs around Toronto in the 1950s. For Terry Matthews, it was an ill-fated plan to build hotel fire alarms. The creation myth for each member of the Rich 100 usually begins in the same humble, unassuming manner and ends with the same result: wealth, and a lot of it. And because these people have been at it for decades, they keep getting fabulously, obscenely, gloriously richer.

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Collectively, the individuals on the Rich 100 are worth $230 billion, more than the total gross domestic product of many countries in the world, including New Zealand, Ireland and Portugal. And this year has been one of their best ever. Their combined net worth surged by more than 15%, the biggest increase since 2000. The reward for the wealthy is partly a result of a worldwide market rally—the S P 500 Index rose more than 16%, while the Nasdaq increased 17%. The S P/TSX composite, which is more heavily skewed toward commodities, is up just over 6%. While the actual economies of Canada and the U.S. aren’t faring particularly well, so long as the U.S. Federal Reserve maintains its stimulus program, stock markets will tick higher.

They may not always look like titans of industry (Onex CEO Gerry Schwartz and Indigo CEO Heather Reisman were spotted at one of her stores one recent weekend in decidedly non-business attire—he wore track pants, her hair was pulled back with a red scrunchie), but the individuals on this list are particularly good at ensuring they come out on top.

Canadian business magazine

The retail and grocery sectors in Canada have been under siege from Target and Walmart, and yet retailers and grocers typically enjoyed double-digit increases in their fortunes. The Westons and the Sobeys, for example, took aggressive defensive measures to stay competitive. Loblaw snagged Shoppers Drug Mart, and Sobeys bought Safeway Canada. Investors are loving the strategy and sent shares in both companies soaring higher.

As for the Westons and the Sobeys themselves, their net worths shot up by $2.1 billion and $598 million, respectively—gains of roughly 25%. Dollarama founder Larry Rossy has found himself growing richer ever since the recession, when cashstrapped Canadians flocked to his stores in search of cheap goods. Rossy’s net worth bumped up $143 million—an 11% surge. Convenience-store magnate Alain Bouchard, meanwhile, looked beyond Canada and scooped up a European chain last year, combining it with his company, Alimentation Couche-Tard. Investors rewarded the stock. As a major shareholder, Bouchard’s net worth skyrocketed by 48%—almost $500 million.

Canadian business magazine

Few members actually decreased in net worth. Anyone tied to mining, which is undergoing a global rout, suffered badly, however. Gold bug Eric Sprott was dealt a huge blow, falling 17% (more than $200 million). Silver-tongued mining promoter Robert Friedland dropped 14% ($42 million). Rob McEwen’s mining company is struggling so badly he tumbled off the Rich List entirely.

But overall, it’s been a banner year for the super rich. The cutoff for making the list in 2013 was $728 million, compared to $309.6 million in 1999. In a few years the Rich List will likely consist entirely of billionaires. Increasingly the Rich 100 is becoming a class of its own—sailing farther away not only from most of us, but from most multimillionaires, too. Newcomers don’t appear very often, and when they do, it’s often simply because they have managed to dodge the spotlight until now. That’s the case with this year’s new addition, Vancouver’s Aquilini family, which had consistently flown under the radar until an acrimonious divorce proceeding revealed massive wealth and diverse holdings, spanning real estate and agriculture.

Canadian business magazine

More than a quarter of the list is made up of families like the Aquilinis, and while it may be hard to feel sympathy for the pecadilloes of the rich, it’s worth pointing out that being a member of a dynasty comes with its own set of burdens. Roy Thomson, who built a multi-billion-dollar conglomerate, noted in his autobiography that his son, Ken, and his grandsons would have no choice but to manage the family business. “These Thomson boys are not going to be able to, even if they want to, shrug off these responsibilities,” he wrote. Grandson David, a chairman of the family holding company today, felt the full weight of the Thomson name growing up. “I learned at a very early age that people did not give a shit about me, and when they did, they wanted something,” he said in a 1993 oral history of the private school he attended in Toronto. “Now I am extremely self-sufficient and rather overly aggressive, I suppose.”

Such an insightful comment by David Thomson, or any of the nation’s ultra rich, is rare. They tend to be private individuals. The topic they’re particularly loath to discuss, as any researcher on this project can tell you, is their net worth. We, on the other hand, just can’t get enough.

Rankings

Canadian business magazine

Canadian Business magazine’s Rich 100 list is now in its fifteenth year, but those on our roster have been getting wealthy for much longer.


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Canadian Economy News, Articles – Images, Financial Post, canadian business magazine.#Canadian #business #magazine


Canadian Economy

Canadian business magazine

Tough for fixed income manager to find good news ahead

Inflation is not as mysterious as you think, says Bank of Canada defending target

Which Big 5 Canadian Bank Stock is a Better Buy?

Why JPMorgan thinks you should buy the Canadian dollar now

Somebody forgot to tell employers that Canada’s economy is slowing down

Why is Canada’s job market so hot when the economy is leaving us cold?

Canada s economy blows past expectations with gain of 35,300 jobs

Bank of Canada caution on rates a mistake as debt swells, Dodge warns

Canada’s economy just came back to earth — with a bump

Canada s shrinking economy signals slowdown could be worse than feared

It’s all downhill from here for the Canadian economy — for the next five years, PBO warns

TSX breaks through 16,000 for first time but headwinds remain for Canadian equities

Canadian dollar sheds almost half a cent as chance of rate hike this year fades

Four reasons why the Canadian dollar is going to go down

Canadian business magazine

Little for fiscal, monetary policymakers to do but plan, wait, repeat

Loonie dives after Bank of Canada leaves key rate unchanged

Five things you should know before you start your work day on Oct. 25

Canadian business magazine

Ottawa trims deficit amid rosy economic figures, but analysts warn that growth won t last forever

Retail drop, subdued inflation put Bank of Canada rates on hold

Canada’s inflation is up, but retail sales are down

Big week of data could signal where Canada’s economy — and interest rates — are headed

Canadian business magazine

Business sentiment slips from strong summer high, Bank of Canada survey finds

Canada s indebted households vulnerable to shock, Bank of Canada official warns

Signs of Canada s economic slowdown are no longer just a one-off blip

Canadian business magazine

Pace of home construction, especially condos, slows in Canada

IMF hikes Canada’s growth forecast to lead the G7 this year, No. 2 in 2018

Canadian business magazine

Calgarians are in a foul mood. And that could spell trouble for Naheed Nenshi

Canada gains jobs for 10th month in a row with boost in full-time work

Canada s trade deficit widens as exports tumble

World’s two biggest fund managers say Bank of Canada is done hiking this year

Growth has been strong, but productivity still low, Bank of Canada deputy says

Canadian business magazine

Strong September boosts returns, but outlook remains clouded for investors

The recession hawks are circling as our economic expansion turns 10

Exporters, traders feel dollar pain as Bank of Canada skirts guidance

Canada’s GDP stall shows housing is becoming drag on the economy

Canadian business magazine

Canadians get rich at a faster pace than Americans, gaining 11% more millionaires

Canadian business magazine

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Canadian Media Producers Association, canadian business magazine.#Canadian #business #magazine


TV series Mohawk Girls drives major economic growth in Greater Montreal communities

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Canadian producers, actors and directors commend Minister Joly on rejection of CRTC decision

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Canadian Business May Be Shut Down: Sources #business #careers


#canadian business magazine

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Canadian Business May Be Shut Down: Sources

Canadian Business, the country’s oldest publication of its kind, may be on the verge of closing its doors after 87 years.

Rogers Media Inc. which owns Canadian Business, is looking at shuttering the publication, several company sources told The Huffington Post Canada.

Canadian Business is losing subscribers and “there is no money to be had,” Phil Lind, the vice-chairman of the board at Rogers Communications told HuffPost on Monday.

The company’s venture into Texture, the re-named magazine ap p first launched as Next Issue, hasn’t been as profitable as expected, he added, and Rogers’ television stations are also struggling.

Maclean’s Magazine — Rogers’ national current affairs publication — is “not yet” on the chopping block, Lind said.

Rumours of Maclean’s demise have been percolating for over a decade. “It could be a year away, or it could be five years away,” another source said.

Last month, Rogers announced it was slashing approximately 200 jobs. or four per cent of its workforce. Pink slips in conventional television, radio, publishing and back-office positions are already going out the door, and more are expected to follow.

In a memo to staff. Rogers cited a “softening advertising market, fierce competition from global players, and shifting audience consumption habits” among its reasons for reducing headcount.

“This was not an easy decision, but it was right for our business long-term,” the memo read. “While difficult, these changes are essential to delivering on our Rogers 3.0 plan and to position us for continued success and future growth while helping us effectively manage costs.”

It’s unclear whether the company will seek a new buyer for Canadian Business or will “run the publication into the ground,” as another executive put it.

“We do not comment on rumours or speculation.”

Canadian Business editor-in-chief James Cowan expressed surprise when first contacted two weeks ago about his magazine’s future. Cowan said he had not heard any talk about “shuttering” the publication.

In an unsolicited email, Rogers Media’s senior director of communications Andrea Goldstein wrote: “We do not comment on rumours or speculation.”

On Tuesday, Goldstein said “there are no plans at this time” to close any of Rogers’ 57 publications.

Canadian Business is a multiple award-winning magazine. With a posted circulation of 85,027, Rogers says the outlet has approximately 335,000 unique visitors monthly — a count that refers to the number of times a device, app, smartphone or desktop, visits the publication online.

Founded in Montreal in 1928 as the official newsletter of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Business became available to the general public two years later. Two ownership changes later, Rogers took over the publication when it made a hostile takeover bid for Maclean Hunter in 1994. At the time, writer George Garneau noted that analysts predicted the company’s newspaper and magazine holdings were likely candidates for sale “because of their poor financial performance.”

The cuts at Rogers were just the latest in a wave of bad news on the Canadian media front. Several publications closed or announced staff layoffs in recent weeks.

The Guelph Mercury ended its 149-year-old print edition, laying off 23 full-time and three part-time employees on Jan. 29. That same day, the 141-year-old Nanaimo Daily News also closed its doors.

On Jan. 19, Canada’s largest newspaper chain Postmedia announced it was eliminating 90 newsroom positions across the country.


Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey recently announced layoffs across Canada. (Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

A memo from Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said the company was consolidating newsrooms between its broadsheet newspapers and Sun Media tabloids in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver, and merging sports coverage to help find at least $80 million in savings before the end of fiscal 2017.

Reporters would be writing in an “agnostic” voice, Godfrey said and a new “rewrite” desk will be charged with editing stories to have the “right voice” for specific brands and platforms.

“We will continue to operate our broadsheet newspapers and our tabloid newspapers in their current formats and with the features and focus that our readers have come to expect from their favourite news brands,” read the memo.

Last year, Bell Media cut hundreds of its local news employees mostly in Toronto and Montreal despite announcing it had made a slight profit in a recent quarter.

— With files from Zi-Ann Lum


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The Daily – Canadian business counts, June 2015 #profitable #businesses


#canadian business

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Canadian business counts, June 2015

Nationally, there were 1,250,822 active businesses with employees in June.

In addition, there were 2,586,343 active businesses without employees and with annual revenues greater than $30,000.

Note to readers

Canadian business count s p reviously called Canadian business pattern s p rovide counts of active businesses by industry classification and employment-size categories for Canada and the provinces and territories. Canadian business counts are based on the same criteria that were used to calculate Canadian business patterns. Data are available in CANSIM tables 552-0002 and 553-0002.

The counts are compiled from the Business Register, Statistics Canada’s central listing of Canadian businesses. They are based on the statistical concept of ‘location ‘ that is, each operating location is separately counted, including cases where one business comprises multiple locations. For example, a retail business with 10 stores represents 10 businesses in the Canadian business counts. Generally, among Canadian businesses, 99% are single-location enterprises.

Changes to the Business Register’s methodology or business industrial classification strategies can bring about increases or decreases in the number of active businesses reported in the Canadian business counts. As a result, the data do not represent changes in the business population over time. Statistics Canada recommends users not to use the data as a time series.

Products

Custom extractions for other geographic levels can be ordered on a cost-recovery basis. Data prior to December 2011 are also available upon request on a cost-recovery basis.

Contact information

Date modified: 2015-08-06


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Canadian Business May Be Shut Down: Sources #business #plan #pdf


#canadian business magazine

#

Canadian Business May Be Shut Down: Sources

Canadian Business, the country’s oldest publication of its kind, may be on the verge of closing its doors after 87 years.

Rogers Media Inc. which owns Canadian Business, is looking at shuttering the publication, several company sources told The Huffington Post Canada.

Canadian Business is losing subscribers and “there is no money to be had,” Phil Lind, the vice-chairman of the board at Rogers Communications told HuffPost on Monday.

The company’s venture into Texture, the re-named magazine ap p first launched as Next Issue, hasn’t been as profitable as expected, he added, and Rogers’ television stations are also struggling.

Maclean’s Magazine — Rogers’ national current affairs publication — is “not yet” on the chopping block, Lind said.

Rumours of Maclean’s demise have been percolating for over a decade. “It could be a year away, or it could be five years away,” another source said.

Last month, Rogers announced it was slashing approximately 200 jobs. or four per cent of its workforce. Pink slips in conventional television, radio, publishing and back-office positions are already going out the door, and more are expected to follow.

In a memo to staff. Rogers cited a “softening advertising market, fierce competition from global players, and shifting audience consumption habits” among its reasons for reducing headcount.

“This was not an easy decision, but it was right for our business long-term,” the memo read. “While difficult, these changes are essential to delivering on our Rogers 3.0 plan and to position us for continued success and future growth while helping us effectively manage costs.”

It’s unclear whether the company will seek a new buyer for Canadian Business or will “run the publication into the ground,” as another executive put it.

“We do not comment on rumours or speculation.”

Canadian Business editor-in-chief James Cowan expressed surprise when first contacted two weeks ago about his magazine’s future. Cowan said he had not heard any talk about “shuttering” the publication.

In an unsolicited email, Rogers Media’s senior director of communications Andrea Goldstein wrote: “We do not comment on rumours or speculation.”

On Tuesday, Goldstein said “there are no plans at this time” to close any of Rogers’ 57 publications.

Canadian Business is a multiple award-winning magazine. With a posted circulation of 85,027, Rogers says the outlet has approximately 335,000 unique visitors monthly — a count that refers to the number of times a device, app, smartphone or desktop, visits the publication online.

Founded in Montreal in 1928 as the official newsletter of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Business became available to the general public two years later. Two ownership changes later, Rogers took over the publication when it made a hostile takeover bid for Maclean Hunter in 1994. At the time, writer George Garneau noted that analysts predicted the company’s newspaper and magazine holdings were likely candidates for sale “because of their poor financial performance.”

The cuts at Rogers were just the latest in a wave of bad news on the Canadian media front. Several publications closed or announced staff layoffs in recent weeks.

The Guelph Mercury ended its 149-year-old print edition, laying off 23 full-time and three part-time employees on Jan. 29. That same day, the 141-year-old Nanaimo Daily News also closed its doors.

On Jan. 19, Canada’s largest newspaper chain Postmedia announced it was eliminating 90 newsroom positions across the country.


Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey recently announced layoffs across Canada. (Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

A memo from Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said the company was consolidating newsrooms between its broadsheet newspapers and Sun Media tabloids in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver, and merging sports coverage to help find at least $80 million in savings before the end of fiscal 2017.

Reporters would be writing in an “agnostic” voice, Godfrey said and a new “rewrite” desk will be charged with editing stories to have the “right voice” for specific brands and platforms.

“We will continue to operate our broadsheet newspapers and our tabloid newspapers in their current formats and with the features and focus that our readers have come to expect from their favourite news brands,” read the memo.

Last year, Bell Media cut hundreds of its local news employees mostly in Toronto and Montreal despite announcing it had made a slight profit in a recent quarter.

— With files from Zi-Ann Lum


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PrefInfo – from Hymas Investment Management Inc #james #hymas, #james #i. #hymas, #hymas, #pfd,

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Information on this website is provided by Hymas Investment Management as a public service. Only certain information regarding each issue is reported here and important information regarding the issues may be available in the prospectus for the issue and not reported here. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information on this site is accurate, but accuracy is not guaranteed. If you find an error, let me know and get a free copy of PrefLetter. Some information may have been simplified [see, for example, the discussion of Retraction ] for analytical convenience; users are urged to verify the summary information provided on this site with the prospectus prior to taking investment action. Nothing in this website should be taken as a recommendation for the purchase or sale of any securities; please consult your personal financial advisors. Hymas Investment Managment and/or its clients may from time to time have long or short positions in the securities discussed on this website.

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    College golf programs, golf schools, golf management programs online, golf management courses in Canada,

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    The golf industry is growing rapidly with over 30,000 international clubs looking for trained managers to help their businesses run smoothly. Our Golf Club Operations Certificate puts you at the top of the hiring list and gives you maximum career potential.

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    If you have successfully completed a course at another accredited post secondary institution that is substantively the same in terms of learning outcomes and course content, you can apply for advance credit. If you have completed such a course, send us a copy of your official transcript and a course description so we may make an assessment as to course content similarities. If credit is granted, the course in question would count toward the Selkirk College certificate program and there would be no fees charged for that course. Credits obtained through institutional course transfers can reduce the amount of time and expense needed to earn your certificate, as such, they are strong incentives to continue your post secondary education. Selkirk College has a progressive policy about PLAs that recognizes the wisdom of reducing needless duplication.

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    Canadian Business Magazine #business #ideas #for #women


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    Canadian Business Magazine

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    Published in Canada, in English.
    Digital edition:instructions for accessing digital editions will be provided by email following your order.
    Print edition: your first issue should arrive in 4 to 6 weeks.
    Canadian Businessoccasionally publishes combined, expanded or premium issues.

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    Publié au Canada, en anglais.
    Édition numérique :les instructions d’accès à la version numérique vous seront envoyées par courriel après votre commande.
    Édition imprimée : votre premier numéro en version imprimée devrait vous parvenir dans quatre à six semaines.
    Des numéros combinés, augmentés ou supplémentaires sont occasionnellement publiés par
    Canadian Business .

    Plus tax


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