Tag: Canada

Government grants and financing – Canada Business Network #business #loans #for #bad #credit


#business grants

#

Government grants and financing

Government departments and agencies provide financing such as grants, contributions, subsidies, and loan guarantees. Find out what type of government financing may be available for your business. Use the search tool or browse by type of financing.

Browse government financing by type

Explore opportunities to receive public funds to help springboard your business venture.

Examine these loans and other borrowing possibilities for your new or existing business.

Having trouble securing a loan for your business? A government-backed loan guarantee could help you attract creditors.

Looking for more return on your business expenditures? Browse potential tax benefits that could help reduce overhead.

Are high wage expectations making you reluctant to put up that Help Wanted sign? A wage subsidy program can put the perfect employee within your reach.

Searching for a long-term financial solution for your business? An equity investor may be willing to bank on your potential.

Date modified: 2016-05-05

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Promoting and advertising your business – Canada Business Network #business #games


#advertise your business

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Promoting and advertising your business

Promoting your business is an ongoing activity that involves everything from word of mouth, to trade shows, to paid advertisements in the media. Once you have developed your marketing plan and are ready to choose your promotional techniques, the resources below may be helpful.

General resources

Choose the type of advertising that matches your marketing budget and follow some of BDC ‘s best practices for advertising.

Build your road map for finding and keeping customers with this free marketing plan template.

Learn how to measure the results of your advertising so you know which styles, methods and media to use.

Learn how to create a website so you can attract more customers to your business.

Online marketing techniques like social networking, emailing and blogging are useful and involve little to no direct costs.

This free guide can help you develop a social media strategy for your business to attract, engage, and retain customers.

Increase your visibility among domestic and foreign buyers by registering on this free promotional database of over 50,000 Canadian companies.

Become a certified Aboriginal or minority-owned supplier or register to access these suppliers and benefit from inclusive supply chain practices.

Handing out promotional material is an important marketing activity, even in an online world.

Applies only to: Ontario

Find out how you can set up a business improvement area and the possible benefits for your business.

Learn how to spread the word about your business.

Participating in trade shows can be worthwhile if you choose the right ones, prepare well, and follow up.

Discover the advantages of marketing your business with email.

Find out what signs mean for your business, and how to use them to your advantage.

Find out about business solutions that could help your small business manage shipping, e-commerce, marketing and more.

Industry-specific resources

Applies only to: New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Nova Scotia Prince Edward Island

Learn how to attract customers to your tourism business through Internet and social media marketing.

Register your business as a potential supplier of goods and services for the shipbuilding industry.

Applies only to: New Brunswick Nova Scotia Prince Edward Island Newfoundland and Labrador

Find out how to become a supplier to the shipbuilding industry in the Atlantic provinces. This also includes building and repairing ships.

Applies only to: Newfoundland and Labrador

Promote your high-quality, distinctive Newfoundland and Labrador craft, gift and apparel products through this provincial branding program.

Applies only to: Newfoundland and Labrador

Are you looking to develop wholesale markets for your business’ craft, gift and apparel products? This program could help your venture’s sales growth.

Applies only to: Nova Scotia

Learn how to identify tourism opportunities in your region and how to develop and market your new business.

If your Canadian tourism business provides a unique experience for travellers, you could get a chance to market your product for free to key countries.

Applies only to: Ontario

Find out how to market your product or service under the Ontario brand and how to reach key tourism markets.

Applies only to: Ontario

You may be eligible for funding to help you cover some the costs of commercializing your interactive digital media content.

Applies only to: Ontario

You could get financing to help your business consortium market an Ontario tourist destination to tourists outside Ontario or Canada.

Applies only to: New Brunswick Nova Scotia Prince Edward Island Newfoundland and Labrador

Obtain up to $8,000 in financial assistance for the translation of your promotional materials, if your business is located in Atlantic Canada.

Date modified: 2016-08-30

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Buying a business – Canada Business Network #sell #your #business


#buying a business

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Buying a business

Buying a business can take time, energy and a fair bit of research. It can be less risky and more affordable to purchase an existing business than to start one from scratch, but it is important that you do your homework to ensure that you buy the right business for you, and that you pay a fair price for it.

On this page:

Where to find a business to buy

Businesses for sale are often advertised in print media and online, but sometimes business opportunities can be misleading. Make sure to do your due diligence before you take action. Try trade publications or commercial investment magazines, or talk to a broker who specializes in a specific industry. Networking at business events can help get the word out that you are looking to buy.

Find buyers or find a business to buy based on algorithms allowing you to find the best match based on skills and goals.

Looking to buy or sell an existing business in Ontario? Use this online marketplace to find available businesses that match your search criteria.

What kind of business should I buy?

If you buy an existing business, you have two choices: franchise, or traditional (independent) business. There are advantages and disadvantages to both.

  • Proven track record This is an established business with a proven concept; there is less risk and less initial capital required than with starting something brand new. Similarly, when it comes time to sell, you may have an easier time finding prospective buyers for a known entity.
  • Built-in customer base People know what to expect from your business because they know the brand, and trust the product or service.
  • Setup, support and training Having a parent company means having the infrastructure and processes in place, from equipment to uniforms to corporate advertising, rather than having to develop them on your own. Other franchisees can also be a source of support.
  • Set of rules and regulations to follow When you operate a franchise, you have less control over the operations than if you own an independent business; you also have to pay a percentage of your revenues to the parent company, which reduces overall earnings.
  • More control and responsibility You have the autonomy to set your own rules, but the success or failure of the business rests solely on your shoulders.
  • No fees or royalties You keep all of your earnings without sharing any of the profits.
  • More opportunity and risk You can sometimes find a business that may not be doing well but has potential. If you are willing to do the work, you may reap the rewards; you must be prepared if things don t turn out as planned.

Evaluating a business

Before deciding to buy a business, you should evaluate its condition and potential. Think about the following things:

  • What is the physical location of the business like? Is the office, warehouse, plant or retail space in good shape? What about any equipment or inventory?
  • If it s an online business, how well-designed is the website? Is it secure? Are there any metrics to study?
  • Does the business have a good reputation? You can check online for customer reviews.
  • How visible and easily accessible is the business? Is it located in an urban or rural area? You will have to consider expenses like increased shipping costs if you are farther away from your suppliers and customers.
  • Are the products or services generating revenue? Are sales increasing, decreasing or are they flat?
  • Does the business have a good working relationship with its suppliers and bank?

If a business is doing poorly, examine what the potential causes are. It may be a case of poor management, or inadequate resources. If you think you can turn it around and make it profitable, you could stand to gain from your investment; on the flip side, you are taking a big risk if it doesn t work out.

If a deal seems too good to be true, chances are, it probably is. Learn how to determine what type of business you should buy.

Know your options when buying a business. Consider the pros and cons of each business type, situation and stage.

If you need to know the value of your business, learn about the different approaches to business valuation.

What is a fair price to pay for a business? Read this article to learn how to estimate the value of a business.

Protect yourself when buying a business. This article outlines the steps you need to take before signing on the dotted line.

Determining how much to pay for the business

As a buyer, it all comes down to knowing what you can afford before negotiations start. You should be flexible in your negotiations, but also keep your budget and the value of the business in mind.

What is the value of the business?

  • You will have to determine the value of assets such as the building, equipment and products.
  • Further factors to consider are the business financial statements, annual reports and intellectual property (for example, patents and trade-marks).
  • Other valuable assets to any business are its reputation, customer lists, and quality of personnel.

Talk to clients who buy directly from the business. It is better to find out the reputation of a business before you sign on the dotted line. Banks are more receptive to a business that has a proven track record.

Find out how to access funding for your business.

Final considerations

  • Take your time and verify all of the information you are given before you commit yourself.
  • Buy a business in an industry you know well and with products or services you are comfortable selling.
  • Buy based on the return on investment and not only the price. You don t want to leave yourself short of funds for future expenses.
  • Investigate suppliers, clients and the reputation of the business before you buy.

If you are buying a business and its inventory and assets, learn about some of the requirements, changing ownership and GST/HST considerations.

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Government grants and financing – Canada Business Network #government #grants


#business grants

#

Government grants and financing

Government departments and agencies provide financing such as grants, contributions, subsidies, and loan guarantees. Find out what type of government financing may be available for your business. Use the search tool or browse by type of financing.

Browse government financing by type

Explore opportunities to receive public funds to help springboard your business venture.

Examine these loans and other borrowing possibilities for your new or existing business.

Having trouble securing a loan for your business? A government-backed loan guarantee could help you attract creditors.

Looking for more return on your business expenditures? Browse potential tax benefits that could help reduce overhead.

Are high wage expectations making you reluctant to put up that Help Wanted sign? A wage subsidy program can put the perfect employee within your reach.

Searching for a long-term financial solution for your business? An equity investor may be willing to bank on your potential.

Date modified: 2016-05-05

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Business Administration – Entrepreneurship and Small Business – Seneca – Toronto, Canada #new #businesses


#small business admin

#

Business Administration – Entrepreneurship and Small Business

Program Description

The Business Administration – Entrepreneurship and Small Business program adds entrepreneurial and small business know-how to a powerful foundation of business knowledge and skills. The skills learned in this program are essential to business owners and established businesses and organizations.

360° Virtual Tours

You will spend the first four semesters building a practical grounding in contemporary management theory. In the final two semesters, you will develop the skills required for the planning, start–up, management and expansion of successful small businesses. But it’s not all classroom learning as you will be exposed to stories of challenges faced by prominent business owners. Instructors will guide you and your colleagues through the process of identifying innovative and promising venture ideas for your own business plan.

At our “Shark’s Pond” event, you’ll present and defend these ideas, sink or swim, to industry leaders. Your learning experience is rounded out through seminars, case analysis and online business simulations.

After completing the program, you will have the tools to develop and present a finished business plan to Futurpreneur Canada (futurpreneur.ca ) and be considered for a $15,000 loan. You’ll also benefit from Seneca’s many partnerships with outside organizations, such as receiving free membership into the Association of Chinese Canadian Entrepreneurs (ACCE.ca ).

Start Up Canada

Startup Canada recognized Seneca as the most entrepreneurial college in Ontario, demonstrating the largest commitment and impact in advancing entrepreneurship. Seneca was the only college recognized in Canada.

Admission Requirements

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent with:
    • Grade 12 English: ENG4(C) or ENG4(U)
    • Grade 12 Mathematics: (C) or (U) or Grade 11 Mathematics: (U) or (M)
  • OR Mature Student Status (age 19 or older) with the above prerequisite course(s), their equivalent(s), or appropriate Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) Certificate program credits (see Academic Upgrading ).

Fees

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Please note: All costs are approximate, may vary by campus and are subject to change at any time without notice. Parking, locker and some mandatory incidental fees are among the charges not included in the figures above.

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Your Career

Canada boasts close to 2.5 million entrepreneurs who, as small business owners, combine to contribute over 30% of its GDP. Entrepreneurs drive job creation, productivity and economic growth. With statistics like these, it’s clear that small ventures can add up to big business. Graduate from this program and you will have acquired the skills necessary to research, develop and manage a small business, grow an existing business or virtually anything else related to successful entrepreneurship.

Professional Certification

Certificate in Management and Administration (C.I.M.):

In 2009, Seneca became the first institution in Canada to have full–time programs accredited by the Canadian Institute of Management (CIM).

Upon graduation from the Business Administration – Entrepreneurship and Small Business program you will have met all the requirements for the Certified in Management (C.I.M.) designation once you have completed two years of managerial work experience and made appropriate application to the Canadian Institute of Management.

Canadian Professional Sales Association (CPSA):

Graduates will have completed all educational requirements and can submit an application to the Canadian Professional Sales Association to receive a Professional Sales Certificate (PSC). Graduates will have also met all the educational requirements for the CPSA’s professional designation Certified Sales Professional (CSP).

Transfer Credit/Pathways

The Degree and Credit Transfer Office provides a number of services for students continuing their education at Seneca, and for graduating students considering degree transfer options.

Through transfer agreements and institution partnerships, graduates of this Seneca College program may be eligible for credit at various post-secondary institutions. Please refer to the Degree Transfer Guide for more information.

Transfer Credit may be granted for courses deemed equivalent to courses at Seneca that have been completed at recognized postsecondary institutions. Additional information is available online .

Important Academic Dates

Please take a few moments to view Important Academic Dates for your relevant term.

Courses

Please select the curriculum from the Academic Year in which you started (or will be starting) your studies. An Academic Year begins in September and ends in August of the following year.

2016/2017 Academic Year


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Canada s Top Small & Medium Employers (2016) #women #business #grants


#small companies

#

About the Competition


PolyCello employees inspecting equipment and product quality in the company’s blown film extrusion lines

Background

Now entering its 4 th year, Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers is an editorial competition that recognizes the small and medium enterprises (SMEs) that offer the nation’s best workplaces and forward-thinking human resources policies. Canada’s SME sector is tremendously important to the nation and is responsible for:

  • over half of the nation’s gross domestic product;
  • almost 90% of the private-sector labour force; and
  • over three-quarters of the new jobs created in the past decade.

Our 2016 winners were announced in a special magazine published in The Globe and Mail on March 29, 2016. Read the press release issued the same day, announcing this year’s winners.

Selection Process

Employers are evaluated by the editors of Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers using the same eight criteria as our national competition :

  • (1) Physical Workplace;
  • (2) Work Atmosphere & Social;
  • (3) Health, Financial & Family Benefits;
  • (4) Vacation & Time Off;
  • (5) Employee Communications;
  • (6) Performance Management;
  • (7) Training & Skills Development; and
  • (8) Community Involvement.

To determine eligibility, the Top 100 editors adopted the SME definition used by Statistics Canada, limiting the competition to private-sector commercial organizations with under 500 employees.


Fusion Learning employees looked back to the past for fashion inspiration during the summer conference

Editorial Partner

The Globe and Mail is our editorial partner on the Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers competition. Each year, the competition winners are announced in a special magazine published nationally in The Globe and Mail. Our editors’ detailed reasons for selection are published on our job search engine, Eluta.ca click an employer’s name below to read why each of this year’s winners was chosen. Publishing detailed Reasons for Selection is an important feature of our competition: it provides transparency in the selection of winners and “raises the bar” so that other employers can discover and adopt initiatives that work well at other SMEs.

Eligibility Requirements

To be considered a “Small or Medium Enterprise”, your company must: (a) have less than 500 employees worldwide, including employees at any affiliated companies; and (b) be a commercial, for-profit enterprise, i.e. non-profit organizations don’t meet the definition.

2017 Competition

Applications for our 2017 competition will be available early in 2016. Our 2017 winners will be announced in a special magazine in The Globe and Mail early in 2017. To receive an application for next year’s competition, employers should join our mailing list:

Editorial Conference

To learn more about the competition, we invite you to join us at the Top Employer Summit. our annual editorial conference on the Canada’s Top 100 Employers project. This event lets you discover the latest best practices from winners, meet competition organizers and editors, and hear inspiring stories from world-class speakers – all presented in a commercial-free format. The conference is Canada’s largest annual event for senior-level HR professionals.

Scalar Decisions employees at the company’s 10th anniversary party

The Little Engines of Growth

There are big differences working for Canada’s Top Small and Medium Employers

Jason Leung knows the difference between working for a big corporation and for a Small and Medium Employer. Really, it gets down to that little word “big”.

Leung used to work in sales, based in Vancouver, for one of the world’s largest soft-drink companies. Now he works in a smaller city for a much smaller company that makes food for small and medium sized friendly creatures.

Petcurean Pet Nutrition, which produces premium pet food in Chilliwack, B.C. is a fast growing company in a fast growing category. It has operations in many of the same countries around the world that the soft-drink company does. But it still has only 64 global employees.

Talk to Leung, who is now an Export Manager, about the workplace culture. “At my old company, it was almost a competition among employees about who was working the longest, who was working the hardest, who was doing the most out there. It was just show off, show off, show off. But here they really promote work-life balance. It feels like family.”

Then there is the challenge of getting something done. “Here, no door is closed, no one says, that’s not my department, don’t talk to me,” says Leung. “At my old company, I’d see it all the time. You’ve got to go through the ranks, talk to your senior manager, the senior manager talks to another person who talks to the person you really need. Here, I just walk into the general manager’s office myself.”

Millions of Canadians share Leung’s kind of workplace environment, although their company may not have made the list of Canada’s Top Small and Medium Employers. Some 90 per cent of the private-sector labour force is employed by a SME (commonly pronounced Smee, like Captain Hook’s sidekick). SMEs are credited with creating over 75 per cent of new jobs in Canada in the past decade.

And this little engine of growth often works on quite different principles from the big locomotives. Leung’s account of the contrasts he found between a soft-drink giant and a pet food SME is echoed 3,200 kilometres away in a tech company in the Waterloo region. “Generally people who come to us from large organizations are very familiar with structure and going through channels,” says Dan Latendre, Founder and CEO of Igloo Software, which employs just over 90 people in Kitchener, Ont. “Whereas here, we’re all about agility and innovation if that’s a great idea, why aren’t we acting on it?”

Latendre believes in a “flat”, non-hierarchical style of organization that can be surprising to people who come from big companies. “They’re very aware of chain of command,” he says. “Here it’s, hey, we’ve formed a project team, let’s get this project done. You may have me, as CEO, in the project along with other people. But we all work for the project manager, and we all have tasks to get done. Which kind of blows people’s minds, that they’re working directly with the CEO.”

To some people, notes Richard Yerema, Managing Editor for Mediacorp Canada, which compiled the SME list, working for a small company means trade-offs a more family style atmosphere and more agility, perhaps, but fewer benefits than at a big outfit. But the 100 companies on this 2016 SME list are proof that sometimes you can have it all. Benefits are often competitive with those of much larger firms.

Take Petcurean. Its Human Resources Manager, Cari McClelland, joined a year ago and found a benefit plan that included prescription drugs, a maternity leave top-up, long-term disability and, after staff asked for it, vision care.

“For a company our size to carry that extensive a benefit package is not the norm,” says McClelland, an experienced HR professional. “I’ve been amazed at the willingness of our leadership to say, ‘let’s look at it if we can do it, we’ll do it’.”

Yet many such benefits are becoming the norm at Canada’s Top SMEs. Yerema says that nearly half of the employers on this year’s list provide some form of maternity leave top-up the additional payment that brings a new mother’s Employment Insurance benefit closer to her original salary for a certain number of weeks. “That is quite an accomplishment,” says Yerema. “Ten years ago, even many large companies weren’t offering it.”

At Igloo, too, Latendre offers benefits that his staff say are equivalent to those of large tech companies they’ve worked at, such as BlackBerry. They also get stock options, offering the promise that the company’s success will benefit every employee.

And that may be another part of the attraction of the Small and Medium Employer. Along with the friendly atmosphere, the quick decision-making and the pot-luck get-togethers, there’s the idea that this small upstart might one day become the most successful software company or pet food company in the world. “SMEs capture the imagination for a lot of people,” notes Yerema. “What would it have been like to be the fifth person hired at Google?”

By Berton Woodward
From the official announcement magazine for Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers, published on March 29, 2016 in The Globe and Mail.

Tags : , , ,

Canada s Top Small & Medium Employers (2016) #stock #market #info


#small companies

#

About the Competition


PolyCello employees inspecting equipment and product quality in the company’s blown film extrusion lines

Background

Now entering its 4 th year, Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers is an editorial competition that recognizes the small and medium enterprises (SMEs) that offer the nation’s best workplaces and forward-thinking human resources policies. Canada’s SME sector is tremendously important to the nation and is responsible for:

  • over half of the nation’s gross domestic product;
  • almost 90% of the private-sector labour force; and
  • over three-quarters of the new jobs created in the past decade.

Our 2016 winners were announced in a special magazine published in The Globe and Mail on March 29, 2016. Read the press release issued the same day, announcing this year’s winners.

Selection Process

Employers are evaluated by the editors of Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers using the same eight criteria as our national competition :

  • (1) Physical Workplace;
  • (2) Work Atmosphere & Social;
  • (3) Health, Financial & Family Benefits;
  • (4) Vacation & Time Off;
  • (5) Employee Communications;
  • (6) Performance Management;
  • (7) Training & Skills Development; and
  • (8) Community Involvement.

To determine eligibility, the Top 100 editors adopted the SME definition used by Statistics Canada, limiting the competition to private-sector commercial organizations with under 500 employees.


Fusion Learning employees looked back to the past for fashion inspiration during the summer conference

Editorial Partner

The Globe and Mail is our editorial partner on the Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers competition. Each year, the competition winners are announced in a special magazine published nationally in The Globe and Mail. Our editors’ detailed reasons for selection are published on our job search engine, Eluta.ca click an employer’s name below to read why each of this year’s winners was chosen. Publishing detailed Reasons for Selection is an important feature of our competition: it provides transparency in the selection of winners and “raises the bar” so that other employers can discover and adopt initiatives that work well at other SMEs.

Eligibility Requirements

To be considered a “Small or Medium Enterprise”, your company must: (a) have less than 500 employees worldwide, including employees at any affiliated companies; and (b) be a commercial, for-profit enterprise, i.e. non-profit organizations don’t meet the definition.

2017 Competition

Applications for our 2017 competition will be available early in 2016. Our 2017 winners will be announced in a special magazine in The Globe and Mail early in 2017. To receive an application for next year’s competition, employers should join our mailing list:

Editorial Conference

To learn more about the competition, we invite you to join us at the Top Employer Summit. our annual editorial conference on the Canada’s Top 100 Employers project. This event lets you discover the latest best practices from winners, meet competition organizers and editors, and hear inspiring stories from world-class speakers – all presented in a commercial-free format. The conference is Canada’s largest annual event for senior-level HR professionals.

Scalar Decisions employees at the company’s 10th anniversary party

The Little Engines of Growth

There are big differences working for Canada’s Top Small and Medium Employers

Jason Leung knows the difference between working for a big corporation and for a Small and Medium Employer. Really, it gets down to that little word “big”.

Leung used to work in sales, based in Vancouver, for one of the world’s largest soft-drink companies. Now he works in a smaller city for a much smaller company that makes food for small and medium sized friendly creatures.

Petcurean Pet Nutrition, which produces premium pet food in Chilliwack, B.C. is a fast growing company in a fast growing category. It has operations in many of the same countries around the world that the soft-drink company does. But it still has only 64 global employees.

Talk to Leung, who is now an Export Manager, about the workplace culture. “At my old company, it was almost a competition among employees about who was working the longest, who was working the hardest, who was doing the most out there. It was just show off, show off, show off. But here they really promote work-life balance. It feels like family.”

Then there is the challenge of getting something done. “Here, no door is closed, no one says, that’s not my department, don’t talk to me,” says Leung. “At my old company, I’d see it all the time. You’ve got to go through the ranks, talk to your senior manager, the senior manager talks to another person who talks to the person you really need. Here, I just walk into the general manager’s office myself.”

Millions of Canadians share Leung’s kind of workplace environment, although their company may not have made the list of Canada’s Top Small and Medium Employers. Some 90 per cent of the private-sector labour force is employed by a SME (commonly pronounced Smee, like Captain Hook’s sidekick). SMEs are credited with creating over 75 per cent of new jobs in Canada in the past decade.

And this little engine of growth often works on quite different principles from the big locomotives. Leung’s account of the contrasts he found between a soft-drink giant and a pet food SME is echoed 3,200 kilometres away in a tech company in the Waterloo region. “Generally people who come to us from large organizations are very familiar with structure and going through channels,” says Dan Latendre, Founder and CEO of Igloo Software, which employs just over 90 people in Kitchener, Ont. “Whereas here, we’re all about agility and innovation if that’s a great idea, why aren’t we acting on it?”

Latendre believes in a “flat”, non-hierarchical style of organization that can be surprising to people who come from big companies. “They’re very aware of chain of command,” he says. “Here it’s, hey, we’ve formed a project team, let’s get this project done. You may have me, as CEO, in the project along with other people. But we all work for the project manager, and we all have tasks to get done. Which kind of blows people’s minds, that they’re working directly with the CEO.”

To some people, notes Richard Yerema, Managing Editor for Mediacorp Canada, which compiled the SME list, working for a small company means trade-offs a more family style atmosphere and more agility, perhaps, but fewer benefits than at a big outfit. But the 100 companies on this 2016 SME list are proof that sometimes you can have it all. Benefits are often competitive with those of much larger firms.

Take Petcurean. Its Human Resources Manager, Cari McClelland, joined a year ago and found a benefit plan that included prescription drugs, a maternity leave top-up, long-term disability and, after staff asked for it, vision care.

“For a company our size to carry that extensive a benefit package is not the norm,” says McClelland, an experienced HR professional. “I’ve been amazed at the willingness of our leadership to say, ‘let’s look at it if we can do it, we’ll do it’.”

Yet many such benefits are becoming the norm at Canada’s Top SMEs. Yerema says that nearly half of the employers on this year’s list provide some form of maternity leave top-up the additional payment that brings a new mother’s Employment Insurance benefit closer to her original salary for a certain number of weeks. “That is quite an accomplishment,” says Yerema. “Ten years ago, even many large companies weren’t offering it.”

At Igloo, too, Latendre offers benefits that his staff say are equivalent to those of large tech companies they’ve worked at, such as BlackBerry. They also get stock options, offering the promise that the company’s success will benefit every employee.

And that may be another part of the attraction of the Small and Medium Employer. Along with the friendly atmosphere, the quick decision-making and the pot-luck get-togethers, there’s the idea that this small upstart might one day become the most successful software company or pet food company in the world. “SMEs capture the imagination for a lot of people,” notes Yerema. “What would it have been like to be the fifth person hired at Google?”

By Berton Woodward
From the official announcement magazine for Canada’s Top Small & Medium Employers, published on March 29, 2016 in The Globe and Mail.

Tags : , , ,

Online zee business news, home business canada #buying #a #business


#zee business

#

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Online zee business news

Online zee business news Analysis

Zee Business channel Latest Breaking News, Pictures, Videos, and Special Reports from. Omni-channel refers to retailing through online and offline channels.Zee Business Live TV Streaming news Online Free See more about TVs, Business and News. online zee business news Get the very latest in business – Breaking News, Latest News, fast updated Current News. Read breaking business news stories from India and around the globe.Zee Business is a Hindi business news channel based in Noida, India. The channel is owned by Zee News. Contents. hide. 1 See also; 2 References.

Home business approved by bbb my internet isnt working what should i do

Company”greatClipsJobs. Find your next opportunity on Simply Hired. New jobs are posted every day.The official YouTube page for GreatClips — the world’s largest salon brand.

What is the job opportunity in civil engineering

US Traders Accepted. NO
Civil Engineering. IntroductionStep-by-StepStart EarlyIs it the Right Career for Me?What would it Cost Me?Funding/ScholarshipJob ProspectsPay. Civil Engineers. Career, Salary and Education Information. Go to What They Do Work Environment How to Become One Salary Job Outlook Related.

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Government job opportunity

Jobs. public service jobs. public service careers, careers in government, Saskatchewan jobs. careers. The State of Ohio offers a wide range of career opportunities. A career in public service is an honorable choice. The work we do impacts the lives of the people in.

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Put a price tag on your business: A guide to business valuation – Canada

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Put a price tag on your business: A guide to business valuation

If you want to sell all or part of your business, you need to have an idea of its value. This information will help you understand the different approaches to business valuation, but you may want to seek professional guidance and advice. Prospective investors will also assess its value when they consider your proposal.

The process of determining the value is called valuation. You and the buyer or investor need to determine what you feel is an appropriate business valuation because it will be the basis for negotiating:

  • How much of your business the investor or buyer will purchase
  • How much the buyer or investor will pay (the price of the business or of its shares)
  • The return the buyer or investor can expect to earn

Ways of valuing a business

Valuation is not an exact science, and there are different ways of valuing a business. Each of these methods is based on different assumptions and financial information, which typically results in a different value for each method. For instance, you could base a valuation on the assets of a business (how much it owns) or by taking into account projected revenues or cash flows. Investors generally prefer methods based on cash flows. It s important to know about a variety of methods because they can be useful as benchmarks to check the validity of the value and the price you determine.

Earnings and cash flow-based methods:

  • Discounted cash flow
  • Going-concern value

Discounted cash flow

From the investor s perspective, this is usually the most accurate and effective way to estimate a business value because it is based on future cash flows. These cash flow figures reflect the amount of money that is estimated to come into the business and will ultimately determine the investor s return on investment. The discounted cash flow method is used to answer three critical questions:

  • Value: How much is your business worth today, based on what it will earn in the future?
  • Rate of return: What is the buyer s or investor s expected rate of return, given the amount invested and your business financial projections?
  • Equity share: How much equity will the buyer or investor receive for their investment?

The discounted-cash-flow method is often preferred because it can be more accurate than other methods. Its accuracy and complexity are due to the fact that it:

  • Uses cash flows: It takes into account the projected ups and downs of revenue over a period of time.
  • Discounts the cash flows: It adjusts the cash flows by a rate that is acceptable to the investor to account for risk and the time the investor must wait for a return.
How it works

In this method, cash flow predictions are discounted, or reduced, to adjust for the risk the investor faces and to make up for the fact that the investor could invest their money in something else.

Investors are looking to be compensated for their risk, and their benchmark rate or “discount rate” will adjust for the value of money over time. They will choose a discount rate and compare your proposal against that rate.

Advantages and disadvantages

The discounted cash flow method allows values to be estimated even when your cash flow is fluctuating. A start-up or new venture may expect to lose money in the first years and then make money in later years. These changes in cash flow are taken into account by the discounted cash flow method.

If you use this method, keep in mind that:

  • Its accuracy depends on the accuracy of your cash flow projections. That is why your financial data and assumptions are critical.
  • It is a complex process, so you may require professional guidance.
  • It can give you detailed estimates, but it is important to remember that business valuation is not an exact science your numbers will be based on assumptions and predictions of future performance.
Value: How much is your business worth today?

Let s say financiers are considering an investment in your business, but plan to take their money out in five years. To them, your business is worth today what it can earn during those five years, plus their share of the value of the business at the end of the five years. However, future cash flow numbers and the future value of the business are unknown. The discounted cash flow method applies adjustments or “discounts” to account for those unknowns.

Using this method, the value is the total of the cash flows, adjusted or discounted, plus the value remaining (or residual value), also discounted.

Rate of return: What rate of return will the investor expect?

Investors want to calculate their rate of return. To do that they must compare the amount of the investment to the amount they will earn at the end of the investment period. But how can they know what they will earn in the future? Again, they must use the discounted cash flow projections to estimate the future value of their investment. To do so, they will need to:

  • Estimate the cash flow in the final year
  • Estimate the value of the business based on the cash flow
  • Calculate the final value of their share in the business
  • Determine their rate of return
Value, return and exit strategy

The method used to calculate values and rates of return depends on the specific exit strategy used. Commonly-used methods include going-concern value, book value, and liquidation value.

Going-concern value

The going-concern value method calculates your business value based on its capacity to produce a stream of cash flow in the future. The greater the cash flow your business generates in the future, the higher your business value today.

How it works

The going concern value, like discounted cash flow, compares the current investment to the future receipts (cash inflows). This method uses the revenues of previous years to project future revenues, and it assumes those revenues will not change.

Book Value

This value is the net worth, or shareholders equity, of your business as shown in its financial statements. At its most simplified, subtracting your liabilities from your assets will give you your business net worth or book value. Book value can be described as the historical value of an asset that, at a given time (the day it was purchased), represented the economic or market value of the asset, less its accumulated depreciation.

How it works

To determine the book value, subtract your liabilities from the value of your assets. The difference gives you your net worth or shareholders equity. In practice, book value is seldom used in the process of securing venture capital, although it can be a realistic approach to measuring a small business net worth.

Liquidation value

A liquidation value is assigned to a business being sold in order to satisfy its creditors. Tangible assets, such as land, usually have a liquidation value close to their market value. Inventories and accounts receivable, on the other hand, are usually valued at less than what is shown in the books.

How it works

To determine the liquidation value, all assets are assigned distressed values, and all debts are totalled at book value. Most assets sold under duress are discounted from their fair market value. The difference between the distressed value of the assets and the actual or book value of the liabilities is referred to as the liquidation value.

The liquidation value doesn t reflect the real worth of an asset or a business; in most cases, it is substantially less than the market and book values. This method is typically used only if a business is in serious financial trouble.

Should I seek a financial advisor for help with valuation?

Business valuation is a complex task, and a financial advisor with experience in business valuation can be an invaluable asset.

A professional valuator can:

  • Provide the experience needed to accurately determine the value of your business
  • Offer an objective view of your business worth
  • Give investors more confidence in the credibility of your valuation

Conclusion

There is a saying in the venture capital industry: “The value of a business is only what someone is willing to pay for it.” In other words, the market, and your ability to attract investors and negotiate with them will determine the value or selling price.

Remember that many factors affect the value of your business. Seeking professional assistance can help you calculate an accurate value for your business.

Learn how to determine the value of your business and find ways to increase it.

What is a fair price to pay for a business? Read this article to learn how to estimate the value of a business.

Enlist the help of an expert who can quantify the worth of all, or part, of your business or its securities.

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Home-based business – Canada Business Network #online #business #schools


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Home-based business

When you are your own boss, working from home may seem like an appealing prospect, but before you decide to start a home-based business, there are a few things to consider. Launching a business in your home could be ideal, depending on the space you require and the nature of your work. You should make sure that this arrangement suits both your personal and professional needs.

You may be drawn to the advantages of working from your home. It can be less expensive than renting or buying commercial space, there may be possible tax deductions you can claim, (for example, a portion of property taxes, utilities, repairs and maintenance, home insurance and a portion of your mortgage interest or rent) and you may have more flexibility with your hours.

Ask yourself a few questions to determine whether having a home-based business is right for you:

  • Will working on your own suit your personality? Some people prefer to be in the company of colleagues.
  • Do you have the self-discipline to motivate yourself, even when business is quiet?
  • Might you have difficulty setting boundaries between your personal life and your business role? Will you face interruptions from family and friends?
  • Is there enough room for the resources you need, like special equipment or employees?
  • If your business is successful, will there be room to expand? How will you address this when the time comes?

When you decide you are ready to launch your home-based business, consider the following suggestions:

  • Review provincial and federal health, safety and taxation regulations related to your business.
  • Check municipal by-laws and determine whether your area is zoned for operating a business, particularly if you plan to deal with the public or have non-family-members working out of your home.
  • Designate a specific area of your residence as your workspace (as removed as possible from the ebb and flow of your household activities).
  • Try not to let chores or other distractions take you away from your work and interrupt your productivity.
  • Avoid letting the less formal setting interfere with your professionalism.
  • Be available to your clients by keeping a consistent schedule and getting back to them in a timely fashion.
  • Be aware that some home-based business opportunities may be fraudulent.

Beware of home business opportunities that seem too good to be true!

When you work from home, it’s important to have a space that is comfortable and functional. Take the time to ensure your home office meets your needs.

If you operate a small business from your home, discover ways insurance can help mitigate your risk of potential losses.


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