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Difference Between Shares and Stocks #the #difference #between #stocks #and #bonds

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Difference Between Shares and Stocks

While even speaking to a financial advisor on Wall Street may not clarify a huge difference between the terms “shares” and “stocks,” there are small distinctions, outside of the spelling, of both words. In the American financial market, stocks and shares are related to the money market and the trading and investment into various businesses, products, and corporations. When a person purchases any part of a business’s assets, they are considered to be dealing with the economic trading of that particular company. Investors who are seeking to purchase into a particular company should understand that the terms “shares” and “stocks” may be used interchangeably and that it does not indicate two different legal terms. It is here that shares and stocks become confused with one another; however, rather than a physical difference that might be had between the two there is a grammatical difference.

Shares are typically used as a reference to certain ownership certificates of any particular company that you are seeking to invest in. Even business is divided into shares, and the person who owns the most shares of a company is essentially the person who is heading up that corporation. The more money that is invested into a corporation or business, the more shares from that company a person owns. A shareholder is anyone who even owns the smallest percentage of shares of a particular company. That person also has income received from the shares they own. Shares can be translated into a percentage of what the company has and what percentage your shares represent from the company entirely.

Stock is the overall ownership and investment into a business. A person can say they own stock in a particular company; however, this is in no way explains how many shares a person owns. “Stock” can be used as a generalization of the person’s involvement in the money market. Stocks can be used in referring to investments in more than one company where there are shares of ownership in more than one. However, the term “stocks” is fading for the more “modern” word “shares.”
In essence, stocks and shares are referring to the same thing merely different contexts in which either word should appropriately be used.

1.Shares and stocks both have reference to the financial and investment market that involves businesses, products, and large corporation investment opportunities. Investors must buy into these companies in order to obtain part of the profit from their financial increases.

2.A “share” refers to the certain amount of ownership certificates that a person has purchased for a particular company. The more shares purchased, the more ownership you take in a company.

3.A “stock” refers to the ownership in general of a certain company speaking outside of the number of shares that you specifically own. Stock is used to refer to the investment in multiple companies as well.

4.The words “stocks” and “shares” are used interchangeably, and there is no real legal or technical difference in the two.

Now explain the difference between share and stock that exists to this day in Britain (and in India, as well as some other parts of the former empire). Since the mid-19th century in the UK, a company with a share capital could convert fully paid-up shares into stock and later reconvert stock back into shares, if it chose. The UK Companies Act 2006 repealed such initial conversion (effective in 2009), but companies that already have stock are not required to reconvert it. Thus, a company s share capital can still consist of shares or stock or a mix of both, and holdings of shares are different from holdings of stock. Both are equity holdings in the company, but in this context the words are NOT interchangeable.

The practical difference seems to be minor: shares could be transferred only in whole-number quantities, whereas stock could be transferred in any fractional amount.

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Written by. Victoria. and updated on October 12, 2011

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The Difference Between Sales and Business Development #business #analyst #salary

#business development

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The Difference Between Sales and Business Development

Almost daily, I run into the misconception that the function of sales and business development are interchangeable, from co-workers to industry peers. This stems primarily, I believe, from the shift in titles of salespeople to business development — which has been done in an effort to avoid the negative connotation that surrounds it.

In reality, the two are very different. Hence, this tweet.

If you use the terms Business Development and Sales interchangeably, you’re doing it wrong.

But 140 characters just isn’t enough to explain of the subtleties, so here we are.

When you think about the function of business development, it should be thought of as a marketing function. Yes, there are some soft sales skills (qualification, negotiation, etc.) that are necessary to become a good business development professional, but at the end of the day, it’s a marketing function.

If you were to think about it on a sliding scale between a pure function of sales or marketing, it would wind up somewhere around here.

The reason behind this, is that typical goals of business development include brand placement, market expansion, new user acquisition, and awareness — all of which are shared goals of marketing. The slight slide towards sales is simply because of the tactics business development employs to achieve those goals.

Which is where we get into the meat of it.

Regardless of the company, business development tends to hold the same structure, which I sketched up quickly below.

Simply stated, the function of sales is to sell directly to the end customer. The function of business development is to work through partners to sell to the end customer, in a scalable way.

That last part is key.

Scalability is the differentiator. It allows a company to use pre-existing sales teams or communities that a partner has developed to reach new audiences. Sales is very much an equation of capacity, which is why sales teams tend to grow so large. Business development teams, on the other hand, are typically very small, maintaining their small size by working through existing partner infrastructures. The art of business development comes in identifying partners that fit that description, while finding a way to provide value to the partner’s end customer and business.

You can see this relationship in a few of the examples I laid out in a previous post on the role of business development at a startup.

Now, all of this isn’t meant to de-value the function of sales. Truth be told, I really respect good salespeople. It’s an extremely difficult career, one with constant denial and pressure to succeed. Sales is hard, and should be respected when it’s done at a high level.

But the two are very different, despite their apparent overlap.

P.S. Want to learn more about Business Development at a startup? Check out my course, it’s $10 off with this link .





Tags : , , , , , ,

The Difference Between Sales and Business Development #best #business #to #start

#business development

#

The Difference Between Sales and Business Development

Almost daily, I run into the misconception that the function of sales and business development are interchangeable, from co-workers to industry peers. This stems primarily, I believe, from the shift in titles of salespeople to business development — which has been done in an effort to avoid the negative connotation that surrounds it.

In reality, the two are very different. Hence, this tweet.

If you use the terms Business Development and Sales interchangeably, you’re doing it wrong.

But 140 characters just isn’t enough to explain of the subtleties, so here we are.

When you think about the function of business development, it should be thought of as a marketing function. Yes, there are some soft sales skills (qualification, negotiation, etc.) that are necessary to become a good business development professional, but at the end of the day, it’s a marketing function.

If you were to think about it on a sliding scale between a pure function of sales or marketing, it would wind up somewhere around here.

The reason behind this, is that typical goals of business development include brand placement, market expansion, new user acquisition, and awareness — all of which are shared goals of marketing. The slight slide towards sales is simply because of the tactics business development employs to achieve those goals.

Which is where we get into the meat of it.

Regardless of the company, business development tends to hold the same structure, which I sketched up quickly below.

Simply stated, the function of sales is to sell directly to the end customer. The function of business development is to work through partners to sell to the end customer, in a scalable way.

That last part is key.

Scalability is the differentiator. It allows a company to use pre-existing sales teams or communities that a partner has developed to reach new audiences. Sales is very much an equation of capacity, which is why sales teams tend to grow so large. Business development teams, on the other hand, are typically very small, maintaining their small size by working through existing partner infrastructures. The art of business development comes in identifying partners that fit that description, while finding a way to provide value to the partner’s end customer and business.

You can see this relationship in a few of the examples I laid out in a previous post on the role of business development at a startup.

Now, all of this isn’t meant to de-value the function of sales. Truth be told, I really respect good salespeople. It’s an extremely difficult career, one with constant denial and pressure to succeed. Sales is hard, and should be respected when it’s done at a high level.

But the two are very different, despite their apparent overlap.

P.S. Want to learn more about Business Development at a startup? Check out my course, it’s $10 off with this link .





Tags : , , , , , ,

The Difference Between Sales and Business Development #stock #market #info

#business development

#

The Difference Between Sales and Business Development

Almost daily, I run into the misconception that the function of sales and business development are interchangeable, from co-workers to industry peers. This stems primarily, I believe, from the shift in titles of salespeople to business development — which has been done in an effort to avoid the negative connotation that surrounds it.

In reality, the two are very different. Hence, this tweet.

If you use the terms Business Development and Sales interchangeably, you’re doing it wrong.

But 140 characters just isn’t enough to explain of the subtleties, so here we are.

When you think about the function of business development, it should be thought of as a marketing function. Yes, there are some soft sales skills (qualification, negotiation, etc.) that are necessary to become a good business development professional, but at the end of the day, it’s a marketing function.

If you were to think about it on a sliding scale between a pure function of sales or marketing, it would wind up somewhere around here.

The reason behind this, is that typical goals of business development include brand placement, market expansion, new user acquisition, and awareness — all of which are shared goals of marketing. The slight slide towards sales is simply because of the tactics business development employs to achieve those goals.

Which is where we get into the meat of it.

Regardless of the company, business development tends to hold the same structure, which I sketched up quickly below.

Simply stated, the function of sales is to sell directly to the end customer. The function of business development is to work through partners to sell to the end customer, in a scalable way.

That last part is key.

Scalability is the differentiator. It allows a company to use pre-existing sales teams or communities that a partner has developed to reach new audiences. Sales is very much an equation of capacity, which is why sales teams tend to grow so large. Business development teams, on the other hand, are typically very small, maintaining their small size by working through existing partner infrastructures. The art of business development comes in identifying partners that fit that description, while finding a way to provide value to the partner’s end customer and business.

You can see this relationship in a few of the examples I laid out in a previous post on the role of business development at a startup.

Now, all of this isn’t meant to de-value the function of sales. Truth be told, I really respect good salespeople. It’s an extremely difficult career, one with constant denial and pressure to succeed. Sales is hard, and should be respected when it’s done at a high level.

But the two are very different, despite their apparent overlap.

P.S. Want to learn more about Business Development at a startup? Check out my course, it’s $10 off with this link .





Tags : , , , , , ,

The Difference Between Sales and Business Development #stock #market #info

#business development

#

The Difference Between Sales and Business Development

Almost daily, I run into the misconception that the function of sales and business development are interchangeable, from co-workers to industry peers. This stems primarily, I believe, from the shift in titles of salespeople to business development — which has been done in an effort to avoid the negative connotation that surrounds it.

In reality, the two are very different. Hence, this tweet.

If you use the terms Business Development and Sales interchangeably, you’re doing it wrong.

But 140 characters just isn’t enough to explain of the subtleties, so here we are.

When you think about the function of business development, it should be thought of as a marketing function. Yes, there are some soft sales skills (qualification, negotiation, etc.) that are necessary to become a good business development professional, but at the end of the day, it’s a marketing function.

If you were to think about it on a sliding scale between a pure function of sales or marketing, it would wind up somewhere around here.

The reason behind this, is that typical goals of business development include brand placement, market expansion, new user acquisition, and awareness — all of which are shared goals of marketing. The slight slide towards sales is simply because of the tactics business development employs to achieve those goals.

Which is where we get into the meat of it.

Regardless of the company, business development tends to hold the same structure, which I sketched up quickly below.

Simply stated, the function of sales is to sell directly to the end customer. The function of business development is to work through partners to sell to the end customer, in a scalable way.

That last part is key.

Scalability is the differentiator. It allows a company to use pre-existing sales teams or communities that a partner has developed to reach new audiences. Sales is very much an equation of capacity, which is why sales teams tend to grow so large. Business development teams, on the other hand, are typically very small, maintaining their small size by working through existing partner infrastructures. The art of business development comes in identifying partners that fit that description, while finding a way to provide value to the partner’s end customer and business.

You can see this relationship in a few of the examples I laid out in a previous post on the role of business development at a startup.

Now, all of this isn’t meant to de-value the function of sales. Truth be told, I really respect good salespeople. It’s an extremely difficult career, one with constant denial and pressure to succeed. Sales is hard, and should be respected when it’s done at a high level.

But the two are very different, despite their apparent overlap.

P.S. Want to learn more about Business Development at a startup? Check out my course, it’s $10 off with this link .





Tags : , , , , , ,