Tag: Be

Canadian Business May Be Shut Down: Sources #stock #markets

#canadian business magazine

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Canadian Business May Be Shut Down: Sources

Canadian Business, the country’s oldest publication of its kind, may be on the verge of closing its doors after 87 years.

Rogers Media Inc. which owns Canadian Business, is looking at shuttering the publication, several company sources told The Huffington Post Canada.

Canadian Business is losing subscribers and “there is no money to be had,” Phil Lind, the vice-chairman of the board at Rogers Communications told HuffPost on Monday.

The company’s venture into Texture, the re-named magazine ap p first launched as Next Issue, hasn’t been as profitable as expected, he added, and Rogers’ television stations are also struggling.

Maclean’s Magazine — Rogers’ national current affairs publication — is “not yet” on the chopping block, Lind said.

Rumours of Maclean’s demise have been percolating for over a decade. “It could be a year away, or it could be five years away,” another source said.

Last month, Rogers announced it was slashing approximately 200 jobs. or four per cent of its workforce. Pink slips in conventional television, radio, publishing and back-office positions are already going out the door, and more are expected to follow.

In a memo to staff. Rogers cited a “softening advertising market, fierce competition from global players, and shifting audience consumption habits” among its reasons for reducing headcount.

“This was not an easy decision, but it was right for our business long-term,” the memo read. “While difficult, these changes are essential to delivering on our Rogers 3.0 plan and to position us for continued success and future growth while helping us effectively manage costs.”

It’s unclear whether the company will seek a new buyer for Canadian Business or will “run the publication into the ground,” as another executive put it.

“We do not comment on rumours or speculation.”

Canadian Business editor-in-chief James Cowan expressed surprise when first contacted two weeks ago about his magazine’s future. Cowan said he had not heard any talk about “shuttering” the publication.

In an unsolicited email, Rogers Media’s senior director of communications Andrea Goldstein wrote: “We do not comment on rumours or speculation.”

On Tuesday, Goldstein said “there are no plans at this time” to close any of Rogers’ 57 publications.

Canadian Business is a multiple award-winning magazine. With a posted circulation of 85,027, Rogers says the outlet has approximately 335,000 unique visitors monthly — a count that refers to the number of times a device, app, smartphone or desktop, visits the publication online.

Founded in Montreal in 1928 as the official newsletter of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Business became available to the general public two years later. Two ownership changes later, Rogers took over the publication when it made a hostile takeover bid for Maclean Hunter in 1994. At the time, writer George Garneau noted that analysts predicted the company’s newspaper and magazine holdings were likely candidates for sale “because of their poor financial performance.”

The cuts at Rogers were just the latest in a wave of bad news on the Canadian media front. Several publications closed or announced staff layoffs in recent weeks.

The Guelph Mercury ended its 149-year-old print edition, laying off 23 full-time and three part-time employees on Jan. 29. That same day, the 141-year-old Nanaimo Daily News also closed its doors.

On Jan. 19, Canada’s largest newspaper chain Postmedia announced it was eliminating 90 newsroom positions across the country.


Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey recently announced layoffs across Canada. (Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

A memo from Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said the company was consolidating newsrooms between its broadsheet newspapers and Sun Media tabloids in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver, and merging sports coverage to help find at least $80 million in savings before the end of fiscal 2017.

Reporters would be writing in an “agnostic” voice, Godfrey said and a new “rewrite” desk will be charged with editing stories to have the “right voice” for specific brands and platforms.

“We will continue to operate our broadsheet newspapers and our tabloid newspapers in their current formats and with the features and focus that our readers have come to expect from their favourite news brands,” read the memo.

Last year, Bell Media cut hundreds of its local news employees mostly in Toronto and Montreal despite announcing it had made a slight profit in a recent quarter.

— With files from Zi-Ann Lum





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So you want to be a business development manager? #business #savings #account

#business development manager

#

So you want to be a business development manager?

Business development managers are the cornerstone of any successful organisation because they ultimately generate new revenue and help a company grow. But what does the job involve on a day-to-day basis? We explore in more detail.

What are the main responsibilities?

The primary objective is to identify new business opportunities. What form this takes will depend on the exact nature of the company. But you ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets. And then you ll be expected use these opportunities to bring in more revenue.

How that happens exactly depends on the industry. It can be a combination of attending events and networking, taking stands at exhibitions and conferences, cold calling, and responding to incoming leads. You will also more than likely be expected to identify partner opportunities to cross and up sell services.

What will I be doing on a day-to-day basis?

While it can be difficult to generalise, most business development managers will be expected to:

  • Generate leads and cold calling prospective customers
  • Develop opportunities in target markets with support of marketing
  • Nurturing and developing relationships with key customer accounts
  • Attending face-to-face meetings with clients
  • Providing specialist advice on the products and/or services you re selling

What are the other aspects involved in the job?

You ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets.

You ll need to negotiate pricing with clients in line with internal guidelines. You ll also need to keep your superiors updated on both your progress and timeline, providing them with accurate forecasting of anticipated sales.

This being a sales role, you will be subject to sales and KPI targets; this is a crucial part of the role. With face-to-face client meetings key, you ll be expected to travel although the extent to which this is the case will depend on where the job is based. If you re based in London, you may find that the majority of your meetings are in the capital. But if your employer is based elsewhere in the South-East, Midlands or the North, you may be required to travel a substantial amount.

How much can I expect to earn?

Our Salary Survey shows that salaries vary depending on sector and location. For example, an IT business development manager can expect to earn 50 70k in the North of the UK and 50 75k in the South-East. Similarly, a B2B business development manager can expect to earn 30 45k in the North and 35 50k in London and the South-East. But all these figures are basic salary exclusive of benefits/bonuses. Actual earning potential will be far higher than this.

What knowledge and experience is required?

To secure a business development manager job, you ll need a strong sales track record. Specifically, hiring companies look for a proven ability to hit targets, a consistent background of winning new business and often relevant sector experience. A good book of contacts is also looked upon favourably.

In terms of personality traits, employers generally look for people who are articulate, polished and professional who have a good telephone manner. A self-motivated and disciplined approach is essential.





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5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #loan #application

#small business magazine

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5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

1. Inc.

Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

  • Get Real by Jason Fried – co-founder of 37 Signals (software company that created Basecamp) and author of Rework pens this column that normally appears between pages 35 and 40
  • Crunching the Numbers – I love the charts and graphs that are included in this section. For instance, did you know that the cities that experienced the greatest increase in the number of jobs at companies with fewer than 100 employees from August 10 to August 11 were Orlando, Atlanta and Greensboro, North Carolina (who would have guessed these cities?)
  • Tech Trends­­ – John Brandon does a great job with this column. He reviews all the latest gadgets and new technology that make your life as a small business owner easier.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

2. Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

  • Lead Gen ­– Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs.com and Co-Author of Content Rules authors this column that speaks to the power of great content and how to reach your customers through online content.
  • Linked – Chris Brogan. Founder of Human Business Works and co-author of Trust Agents is one of the preeminent experts in relationship and digital marketing. If you have enough time to read only one column in this magazine each month, read his.

iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

3. Fast Company

Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

  • Tech Edge­ – authored by Farhad Manjoo, this column is very similar to Tech Trends in Inc. just with a little more irreverence.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

4. Wired

Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

  • Dear Mr. Know-it-all – this is an awesome column where Mr. Know it All fields questions from those looking to navigate their issues in the 21st century. Some questions may surprise you, but you’ll find the answers even more interesting.
  • Test – they test everything from Universal remotes to solar charges to ultrabooks – very neat column.

iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

5. Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

About Jim Armstrong

Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

Comments

I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.





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So you want to be a business development manager? #business #english

#business development manager

#

So you want to be a business development manager?

Business development managers are the cornerstone of any successful organisation because they ultimately generate new revenue and help a company grow. But what does the job involve on a day-to-day basis? We explore in more detail.

What are the main responsibilities?

The primary objective is to identify new business opportunities. What form this takes will depend on the exact nature of the company. But you ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets. And then you ll be expected use these opportunities to bring in more revenue.

How that happens exactly depends on the industry. It can be a combination of attending events and networking, taking stands at exhibitions and conferences, cold calling, and responding to incoming leads. You will also more than likely be expected to identify partner opportunities to cross and up sell services.

What will I be doing on a day-to-day basis?

While it can be difficult to generalise, most business development managers will be expected to:

  • Generate leads and cold calling prospective customers
  • Develop opportunities in target markets with support of marketing
  • Nurturing and developing relationships with key customer accounts
  • Attending face-to-face meetings with clients
  • Providing specialist advice on the products and/or services you re selling

What are the other aspects involved in the job?

You ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets.

You ll need to negotiate pricing with clients in line with internal guidelines. You ll also need to keep your superiors updated on both your progress and timeline, providing them with accurate forecasting of anticipated sales.

This being a sales role, you will be subject to sales and KPI targets; this is a crucial part of the role. With face-to-face client meetings key, you ll be expected to travel although the extent to which this is the case will depend on where the job is based. If you re based in London, you may find that the majority of your meetings are in the capital. But if your employer is based elsewhere in the South-East, Midlands or the North, you may be required to travel a substantial amount.

How much can I expect to earn?

Our Salary Survey shows that salaries vary depending on sector and location. For example, an IT business development manager can expect to earn 50 70k in the North of the UK and 50 75k in the South-East. Similarly, a B2B business development manager can expect to earn 30 45k in the North and 35 50k in London and the South-East. But all these figures are basic salary exclusive of benefits/bonuses. Actual earning potential will be far higher than this.

What knowledge and experience is required?

To secure a business development manager job, you ll need a strong sales track record. Specifically, hiring companies look for a proven ability to hit targets, a consistent background of winning new business and often relevant sector experience. A good book of contacts is also looked upon favourably.

In terms of personality traits, employers generally look for people who are articulate, polished and professional who have a good telephone manner. A self-motivated and disciplined approach is essential.





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Business Required to be Registered and Application for Business Registration #small #business #insurance

#business registration

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“Business” Required to be Registered and Application for Business Registration

“Business” Required to be Registered

  • any form of trade, commerce, craftsmanship, profession, calling or other activity carried on for the purpose of gain;
  • any club which provides facilities, services and exclusive club premises to its members for social intercourse or recreation; and
  • every company incorporated in Hong Kong under the Companies Ordinance or non-Hong Kong company that has established a place of business in Hong Kong, regardless of whether it is actually carrying on any business in Hong Kong.
  • every non-Hong Kong company that has a representative or liaison office in Hong Kong, or has let out its property situated in Hong Kong, regardless of whether it has established a place of business in Hong Kong.

However, a person who is only holding an office or employment is not regarded as carrying on any business and is not required to apply for business registration.

  • Business carried on by Sole-proprietorship, Partnership and Unincorporated body of persons, Non-Hong Kong company, and Branch business
    • Within one month from its date of commencement of business.
  • A company incorporated/registered under the Companies Ordinance
    • Please refer to One-stop Company and Business Registration .

Applications for Registration of Business which has not commenced business will not be accepted

Business Registration Ordinance (Cap. 310) provides that any person carrying on sole proprietorship or partnership business shall apply for business registration within one month of the commencement of such business. The Inland Revenue Department (IRD) will not accept any applications for registration of businesses which have never existed or have yet to commence operation.

Recently, IRD has received a large number of new applications for registration of businesses of which non-residents are sole proprietors or partners. However, many of them fail to prove that they did commence their businesses in Hong Kong. Such applications are not accepted.

Given that persons who land in Hong Kong as visitors are normally not allowed to establish or join in any business during their stay in Hong Kong, IRD will require businesses with non-resident sole proprietor or partners to provide further information (see Sample Questions ) with a view to ensuring that the particulars, including the date of commencement, stated in the relevant application form are correct. Please note that any person who submits false information shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of $5,000 and to imprisonment for 1 year under the Business Registration Ordinance.

As a related measure, upon receipt of Notification of Change of Partners (Form IRBR64) for admission of non-resident(s) as partner(s), IRD will ask the business concerned to provide further information (see questions (1) and (2) of Sample Questions) in support of the admission.

  • To register a business, you have to:
    • complete a prescribed application form ;
    • pay the business registration fee levy ; and
    • produce your proof of identity.
  • Levy is collected for the Protection of Wages on Insolvency Fund. For details, please visit the website of Labour Department .
  • Please refer to the following table for the application form to be completed and the proof of identity required:

Business carried on by

Proof of Identity

If the owner/all partners/the principal officer is/are not residing in Hong Kong, he/she has/they have to appoint a resident individual as his/her/their agent for the purposes of business registration. In that case, please complete and submit the form IRBR177 or submit an appointment letter stating the full particulars of the agent including his/her name, Hong Kong identity card number and residential address. A copy of his/her Hong Kong identity card must also be attached to the application.

This application form is applicable to all non-Hong Kong companies irrespective of whether they are required to be registered under Part 16 of the Companies Ordinance, and body corporates formed under other legislations in Hong Kong.

  • For specimen of the application forms, please click here .
  • When you register your business, you may register a business name. You should take one of the following three choices:

(a) register a Chinese name only;

(b) register an English name only; or

(c) register both a Chinese name and an English name.

  • For a Chinese name, you may include English alphabets, but not English words. If you wish to include symbols in either a Chinese name or an English name, only the following symbols can be used:
    1. For Chinese Name
  • Please note that you may not use the following names as your business name:

    (a) a name which suggests that the business is incorporated with limited liability when it is not,

    (b) where the business is incorporated with limited liability, a name which suggests that the business is incorporated under a different name, e.g. a corporation “ABC Ltd.” cannot use a business name “XYZ Ltd.” or

    (c) a name which suggests a connection with the Government or any public body when no such connection exists or has existed.

  • Sometimes, for the same business, you may wish to register more than one business name. This is permissible. However, each registered additional business name will be treated as a branch of the business. The additional business name must also follow the rules mentioned above.
  • If you carry on more than one business, you should register each business separately. Each business may have its own business name.

How to Submit Your Application

  • Submit in person to the Business Registration Office at 4/F Revenue Tower, 5 Gloucester Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.
  • By post to P.O. Box 29015, Gloucester Road Post Office, Hong Kong. Underpaid mail will be rejected. Please pay sufficient postage.
  • Submit online via eTAX (for sole-proprietorship, partnership and branch registration only). Please refer to How to Authenticate Electronic Application For Business Registration and the Freqently Asked Questions .
    If you wish to know more about the “Online Application for Business or Branch Registration” service, please click here to view Online Demo.

How to Authenticate Electronic Application for Business Registration

  • With effect from 21 February 2011, apart from digital certificate, an applicant may use his eTAX Password or MyGovHK Password (already linked up with eTAX account) to sign the prescribed application form (Form 1(a), 1(c) or 1(d)) in making an application for business registration. Please refer to Apply for eTAX Password and the Frequently Asked Questions .
  • A person who makes the application for business registration by using his/her password or digital signature will be treated as having signed the application form and is accountable for the accuracy of the information submitted.

How to Obtain Business Registration Application Forms

Specimen of Application Forms

  • You may download a specimen of the following application forms for reference. The specimen forms are saved in pdf format which can be viewed and printed by using the Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 or above and Adobe Asian Fonts Packs which are available free at the Adobe Systems Incorporated website .
  • Download copy MUST NOT be used for submission of application. Only forms that are printed by and according to the specifications of the Department are acceptable for application purposes.
  • Application forms are available for collection at the Business Registration Office. You may also complete the form IRBR194 or write to us to obtain the application forms. Please state your name, your correspondence address and the type of application form you required in the letter. and return it either by post or fax (2824 1482). The application forms will be sent to you afterwards.

(1) Form 1(a) (PDF:1,069KB) – Application by an individual for registration of business carried on by him in Hong Kong.
(2) Form 1(b) (PDF:1,268KB) – Application by a body corporate for registration.
(3) Form 1(c) (PDF:1,290KB) – Application by partnership or by other body unincorporate for registration of business carried on by such body in Hong Kong.
(4) Form 1(d) (PDF:890KB) – Application for registration of branch business carried on in Hong Kong.

When to Collect Business Registration Certificate





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How Hard Is It to Be a Small Business Owner? Small Business Blog #stockmarket

#small business owner

#

How Hard Is It to Be a Small Business Owner?

There are a lot of misconceptions about being a small business owner. Like…

People often think that being a small business owner is easy because you get to be your own boss and set your own hours.

The Reality : Most small business owners work harder than they used to work when they had a corporate job.

People think that being a small business owner is glamorous – you get to make big decisions, make big money, and have a carefree lifestyle.

The Reality . Most small business owners have to wear many hats – sometimes getting to be a strategic visionary, but other times having to serve as a front-line customer service person, amateur psychologist, or office janitor.

But one of the biggest misconceptions about being a small business owner is that it’s too “hard.” I recently read an article on the Naked Capitalism blog entitled Tech Titans Promoting Basic Income Guarantee as a Way to Shrink Government, Kill Social Programs , which suggested that being an entrepreneur is a raw deal for most people:

But who wants to be an entrepreneur? Seriously. If you can hold a job with any stability and you don’t mind the work and get on with your boss and co-workers, it’s a vastly better deal than running your own show…being in business for yourself is almost a roll-back for the whole rationale of advanced economies: that of specialization. In a larger organization, the really good sales guy can mainly do sales, plus the unavoidable internal politics and bureaucratic tasks. The accountant can mainly do accounting, and so on.

By contrast, starting a business requires lots of skills, including selling, negotiating, having common sense about priorities, being able to size up potential backers and employees, being able to budget and manage funds. It’s a drag if you are really good at one particular thing to have to do all that other stuff, even if you are capable of it.

The payoff curve for entrepreneurship looks a lot like that of lines of employment that most parents would tell their kids to avoid: acting, playing sports, writing novels. Remember, 90% of all new businesses fail within three years. And like J.K. Rowling, A-list Hollywood stars, and football pros, the lure of the huge payoffs at the top end masks the steep falloff after that.

First of all, it’s not true that “90% of all new businesses fail within three years” – according to statistics from the Small Business Administration. about half of small businesses survive for five years or more, and one-third survive for 10 years or more. That’s a lot longer than I’ve lasted at any corporate job.

This article also makes it sound like entrepreneurship only offers rewards to the people at the top – as if most small business owners are a bunch of low-paid losers who would be better off trying to make it as actors in Hollywood. But even if we’re not going to be the next Bill Gates, most small business owners make a decent living – according to an American Express OPEN survey on the average entrepreneur’s salary. as of 2013, small business owners paid themselves an average annual salary of $68,000 – which is significantly more than the 2013 U.S. median household income of $52,250.

But more broadly, I disagree with the premise of the argument that it’s “too hard” to be a small business owner because you don’t get to specialize in what you do best.

It’s true that when you work for a big company, there are certain “economies of scale” that enable the big company to do things faster, cheaper, and perhaps better than a smaller company could. This is a basic principle of economics. However, for small business owners today, in the age of the Internet, there are so many great online small business tools and resources that can help you be more productive! You don’t have to be a big company to get big results in 2015 – you can use business-grade tools and resources to outsource, automate, and delegate various business tasks and daily operations, whether it’s basic back-office functions like simple accounting, invoicing, or payment processing, or more advanced skills like marketing, building customer relationships, and business inventory management .

As a small business owner today, you’re in business “for” yourself, but not “by” yourself. You can get help with almost any business topic imaginable online. You can connect with other entrepreneurs on LinkedIn for advice and ideas. You can get free business mentoring from SCORE, the Small Business Administration’s mentoring program. Even if you’re a solo entrepreneur or small business owner with only a few employees, there are many ways to make your business seem “bigger” without the bigger costs.

It’s simplistic (and wrong) to think that it’s too hard to be an entrepreneur, so no one should want to do it. I think it s actually the opposite – while it s never easy to run your own business – there are always financial risks and stresses, and lots of hard work – the Internet is making it easier than ever before to run a business. Not everyone has the right combination of ambition, hustle, vision, and sheer willpower that makes for a successful small business owner – but if you do, the rewards (and the daily sense of freedom) make it all worthwhile.

Ideally, as a small business owner, you should get to specialize more than ever before in doing what you do best every day. Use some of these cheap (or free) online business tools and mobile apps to outsource or automate the daily tasks that you don t like to do or aren t as good at. Being an entrepreneur helps you unleash your productive, creative potential like nothing else!





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Business Required to be Registered and Application for Business Registration #running #a #small #business

#business registration

#

“Business” Required to be Registered and Application for Business Registration

“Business” Required to be Registered

  • any form of trade, commerce, craftsmanship, profession, calling or other activity carried on for the purpose of gain;
  • any club which provides facilities, services and exclusive club premises to its members for social intercourse or recreation; and
  • every company incorporated in Hong Kong under the Companies Ordinance or non-Hong Kong company that has established a place of business in Hong Kong, regardless of whether it is actually carrying on any business in Hong Kong.
  • every non-Hong Kong company that has a representative or liaison office in Hong Kong, or has let out its property situated in Hong Kong, regardless of whether it has established a place of business in Hong Kong.

However, a person who is only holding an office or employment is not regarded as carrying on any business and is not required to apply for business registration.

  • Business carried on by Sole-proprietorship, Partnership and Unincorporated body of persons, Non-Hong Kong company, and Branch business
    • Within one month from its date of commencement of business.
  • A company incorporated/registered under the Companies Ordinance
    • Please refer to One-stop Company and Business Registration .

Applications for Registration of Business which has not commenced business will not be accepted

Business Registration Ordinance (Cap. 310) provides that any person carrying on sole proprietorship or partnership business shall apply for business registration within one month of the commencement of such business. The Inland Revenue Department (IRD) will not accept any applications for registration of businesses which have never existed or have yet to commence operation.

Recently, IRD has received a large number of new applications for registration of businesses of which non-residents are sole proprietors or partners. However, many of them fail to prove that they did commence their businesses in Hong Kong. Such applications are not accepted.

Given that persons who land in Hong Kong as visitors are normally not allowed to establish or join in any business during their stay in Hong Kong, IRD will require businesses with non-resident sole proprietor or partners to provide further information (see Sample Questions ) with a view to ensuring that the particulars, including the date of commencement, stated in the relevant application form are correct. Please note that any person who submits false information shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of $5,000 and to imprisonment for 1 year under the Business Registration Ordinance.

As a related measure, upon receipt of Notification of Change of Partners (Form IRBR64) for admission of non-resident(s) as partner(s), IRD will ask the business concerned to provide further information (see questions (1) and (2) of Sample Questions) in support of the admission.

  • To register a business, you have to:
    • complete a prescribed application form ;
    • pay the business registration fee levy ; and
    • produce your proof of identity.
  • Levy is collected for the Protection of Wages on Insolvency Fund. For details, please visit the website of Labour Department .
  • Please refer to the following table for the application form to be completed and the proof of identity required:

Business carried on by

Proof of Identity

If the owner/all partners/the principal officer is/are not residing in Hong Kong, he/she has/they have to appoint a resident individual as his/her/their agent for the purposes of business registration. In that case, please complete and submit the form IRBR177 or submit an appointment letter stating the full particulars of the agent including his/her name, Hong Kong identity card number and residential address. A copy of his/her Hong Kong identity card must also be attached to the application.

This application form is applicable to all non-Hong Kong companies irrespective of whether they are required to be registered under Part 16 of the Companies Ordinance, and body corporates formed under other legislations in Hong Kong.

  • For specimen of the application forms, please click here .
  • When you register your business, you may register a business name. You should take one of the following three choices:

(a) register a Chinese name only;

(b) register an English name only; or

(c) register both a Chinese name and an English name.

  • For a Chinese name, you may include English alphabets, but not English words. If you wish to include symbols in either a Chinese name or an English name, only the following symbols can be used:
    1. For Chinese Name
  • Please note that you may not use the following names as your business name:

    (a) a name which suggests that the business is incorporated with limited liability when it is not,

    (b) where the business is incorporated with limited liability, a name which suggests that the business is incorporated under a different name, e.g. a corporation “ABC Ltd.” cannot use a business name “XYZ Ltd.” or

    (c) a name which suggests a connection with the Government or any public body when no such connection exists or has existed.

  • Sometimes, for the same business, you may wish to register more than one business name. This is permissible. However, each registered additional business name will be treated as a branch of the business. The additional business name must also follow the rules mentioned above.
  • If you carry on more than one business, you should register each business separately. Each business may have its own business name.

How to Submit Your Application

  • Submit in person to the Business Registration Office at 4/F Revenue Tower, 5 Gloucester Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.
  • By post to P.O. Box 29015, Gloucester Road Post Office, Hong Kong. Underpaid mail will be rejected. Please pay sufficient postage.
  • Submit online via eTAX (for sole-proprietorship, partnership and branch registration only). Please refer to How to Authenticate Electronic Application For Business Registration and the Freqently Asked Questions .
    If you wish to know more about the “Online Application for Business or Branch Registration” service, please click here to view Online Demo.

How to Authenticate Electronic Application for Business Registration

  • With effect from 21 February 2011, apart from digital certificate, an applicant may use his eTAX Password or MyGovHK Password (already linked up with eTAX account) to sign the prescribed application form (Form 1(a), 1(c) or 1(d)) in making an application for business registration. Please refer to Apply for eTAX Password and the Frequently Asked Questions .
  • A person who makes the application for business registration by using his/her password or digital signature will be treated as having signed the application form and is accountable for the accuracy of the information submitted.

How to Obtain Business Registration Application Forms

Specimen of Application Forms

  • You may download a specimen of the following application forms for reference. The specimen forms are saved in pdf format which can be viewed and printed by using the Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 or above and Adobe Asian Fonts Packs which are available free at the Adobe Systems Incorporated website .
  • Download copy MUST NOT be used for submission of application. Only forms that are printed by and according to the specifications of the Department are acceptable for application purposes.
  • Application forms are available for collection at the Business Registration Office. You may also complete the form IRBR194 or write to us to obtain the application forms. Please state your name, your correspondence address and the type of application form you required in the letter. and return it either by post or fax (2824 1482). The application forms will be sent to you afterwards.

(1) Form 1(a) (PDF:1,069KB) – Application by an individual for registration of business carried on by him in Hong Kong.
(2) Form 1(b) (PDF:1,268KB) – Application by a body corporate for registration.
(3) Form 1(c) (PDF:1,290KB) – Application by partnership or by other body unincorporate for registration of business carried on by such body in Hong Kong.
(4) Form 1(d) (PDF:890KB) – Application for registration of branch business carried on in Hong Kong.

When to Collect Business Registration Certificate





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Your business website may be hurting your company #business #calendars

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The Best Webite Design Company in Nigeria

With today’s mad rush by every company to get a business website, it is wise to advise companies about the fact that creating a website for your business may be essentially damaging your company’s reputation.

Why? How? You may ask

Did you know that if your business website is dormant, visitors (that is if you even have any visitors at all) may erroneously believe that your company must have become dormant as well. Maybe that is why the last update on your business’ official website is 1 and half years old. Trust me nothing could present you as being unserious with your business as this. Especially if your company is the type that requires frequent update like schools, hotels, religious organizations (like churches), etc.

For example, if you retail clothing and accessories, how do you explain to your potential customers online that the exact products displayed in your online business website 1 year ago are still the same products that are still in your store today. Don’t you think it would be safe to assume that you are no longer in business?

Or how would you expect me to believe you are still in business when I send you an email via the address on your business website and I get no response from your company after 1 month. This is very common with Nigerian company websites.

What most companies do not understand is that the internet is a very dynamic world and it is either you change and adapt or you die and get forgotten.

In conclusion, I would like to advise companies that if they must own a website for business, they must be willing to establish a department for managing their online presence or simply outsource that service to a professional web and social media management consultant.





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10 Influential Business Books You Need To Read To Be Successful #small #business #admin

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10 Influential Business Books You Need To Read To Be Successful

10 Influential Business Books You Need To Read To Be Successful

Take a minute and think about some of the most successful people you know.

I d bet they re great with people, are super-productive, and think differently than most. After all, that s how they got to be where they are today.

Jealous of them? You don t have to be. You can learn these same skills by studying some of the best business books that can help you take your game to the next level. Here s 10 of my favorites.

1. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Dale Carnegie s best-selling book that helped to launch a personal growth empire should be required reading for everyone who wants to learn how to build and nurture relationships for a lifetime. Read this book and you ll learn some simple advice than can help you build popularity points within your current network and just as important, expand it to others.

2. Focal Point by Brian Tracy

Got a lot on your to-do list? Of course you do. But what separates productive people from others is their ability to focus on a singular task at a time, and getting it done before moving on to the next one.

Sounds simple in theory, but this can be extremely difficult in practice. In Focal Point Brian Tracy offers tips to help build discipline and organization into your day so you can get more stuff done.

3. Purple Cow by Seth Godin

Creating a me-too product can be easy at the start but can doom you to business failure. That s why marketing maverick Seth Godin recommends creating a product that is truly different from anything already available in the marketplace.

In essence by making the product different you ll be building the marketing into the actual product development which just makes your actual marketing a helluva lot easier.

4. Magic of Thinking Big by David Schwartz

If you ve struggled with procrastination or small thinking, this is the book for you. In it Schwartz offers practical advice that can help you get inspired and motivated to create a bigger life for yourself. And with it can be a more lucrative and rewarding career.

5. Man s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankel

It can be difficult for lots of people to keep things in perspective, especially when working on high priority and urgent projects at work. Man s Search for Meaning can be a life-changing book in the sense that it can open your eyes to a first-hand experience of one of the greatest atrocities in the history of mankind, while also teaching a valuable lesson about having purpose.

6. 4 Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss

Solo-entrepreneurs can learn a ton from the guy who made lifestyle design popular. But guess what? The 4HWW isn t just for guys and girls who want to start a small online business.

Smart moves like outsourcing, following the 80/20 rule, and automating processes should be made by entry-level workers and established executives alike.

7. Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

I remember sitting on a couch and opening this book on a Saturday morning, thinking I d get through a chapter and then get on with my day. Instead, about 12 hours later, I was finished with the book. The concepts in it were mind-blowing to me.

To think that thoughts can create your reality sounded a little far-fetched at first. But after going through the book and understanding that your thoughts create your beliefs, which lead to actions, which then lead to habits .well you can get where I m going with this.

If you focus your thoughts on success, achieving it will be much more likely than thinking about obstacles, failures and everything else that can get in your way.

8. One Minute Manager by Kenneth Blanchard

If you re going to read one management book in your life, this should be it. It s simple. You can read it in an afternoon. And the advice works.

9. Lean Start-Up by Eric Ries

Before you create any sort of business you ll want to give Lean Start-Up a read through. Doing so can save you money, time and other resources you could have potentially wasted otherwise.

10. The Monk and the Riddle by Randy Komisar

The story Randy Komisar shares in the Monk and the Riddle offers advice about not just about how you need to think when starting a new business, but also about how to build a life you re passionate about.

Understanding the technical aspects of launching a start-up is great, but if you don t have the staying power to stick with it when the going gets tough then it s not likely to work. This book can help you understand this lesson before you spend blood, sweat and tears on a project that you re heart isn t into.

Set a Goal For Yourself





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5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #simulation

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5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

1. Inc.

Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

  • Get Real by Jason Fried – co-founder of 37 Signals (software company that created Basecamp) and author of Rework pens this column that normally appears between pages 35 and 40
  • Crunching the Numbers – I love the charts and graphs that are included in this section. For instance, did you know that the cities that experienced the greatest increase in the number of jobs at companies with fewer than 100 employees from August 10 to August 11 were Orlando, Atlanta and Greensboro, North Carolina (who would have guessed these cities?)
  • Tech Trends­­ – John Brandon does a great job with this column. He reviews all the latest gadgets and new technology that make your life as a small business owner easier.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

2. Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

  • Lead Gen ­– Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs.com and Co-Author of Content Rules authors this column that speaks to the power of great content and how to reach your customers through online content.
  • Linked – Chris Brogan. Founder of Human Business Works and co-author of Trust Agents is one of the preeminent experts in relationship and digital marketing. If you have enough time to read only one column in this magazine each month, read his.

iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

3. Fast Company

Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

  • Tech Edge­ – authored by Farhad Manjoo, this column is very similar to Tech Trends in Inc. just with a little more irreverence.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

4. Wired

Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

  • Dear Mr. Know-it-all – this is an awesome column where Mr. Know it All fields questions from those looking to navigate their issues in the 21st century. Some questions may surprise you, but you’ll find the answers even more interesting.
  • Test – they test everything from Universal remotes to solar charges to ultrabooks – very neat column.

iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

5. Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

About Jim Armstrong

Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

Comments

I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.





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