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5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #sign

#small business magazine

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5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

1. Inc.

Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

  • Get Real by Jason Fried – co-founder of 37 Signals (software company that created Basecamp) and author of Rework pens this column that normally appears between pages 35 and 40
  • Crunching the Numbers – I love the charts and graphs that are included in this section. For instance, did you know that the cities that experienced the greatest increase in the number of jobs at companies with fewer than 100 employees from August 10 to August 11 were Orlando, Atlanta and Greensboro, North Carolina (who would have guessed these cities?)
  • Tech Trends­­ – John Brandon does a great job with this column. He reviews all the latest gadgets and new technology that make your life as a small business owner easier.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

2. Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

  • Lead Gen ­– Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs.com and Co-Author of Content Rules authors this column that speaks to the power of great content and how to reach your customers through online content.
  • Linked – Chris Brogan. Founder of Human Business Works and co-author of Trust Agents is one of the preeminent experts in relationship and digital marketing. If you have enough time to read only one column in this magazine each month, read his.

iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

3. Fast Company

Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

  • Tech Edge­ – authored by Farhad Manjoo, this column is very similar to Tech Trends in Inc. just with a little more irreverence.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

4. Wired

Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

  • Dear Mr. Know-it-all – this is an awesome column where Mr. Know it All fields questions from those looking to navigate their issues in the 21st century. Some questions may surprise you, but you’ll find the answers even more interesting.
  • Test – they test everything from Universal remotes to solar charges to ultrabooks – very neat column.

iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

5. Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

About Jim Armstrong

Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

Comments

I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.





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What It Takes to Be a Small-Business Owner (Infographic) #business #website

#small business owner

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What It Takes to Be a Small-Business Owner (Infographic)

Former Staff Writer

Being a small-business owner isn t easy, but an overwhelming majority of entrepreneurs wouldn t have it any other way.

While small-business owners cite having to wear so many hats and finding new customers as their biggest concerns, according to the below infographic courtesy of online marketing company Constant Contact. a whopping 84 percent said that, if given the opportunity, they would start up all over again. The ability to pursue their passion and the freedom that an entrepreneurial lifestyle allows are their biggest motivators, they said.

And that s a good thing, because small business continues to contribute to the global economy in huge ways. Roughly half of all U.S. jobs are provided by companies of less than 500 employees, and 54 percent of U.S. sales happen at small businesses. Additionally, small businesses donate 250 percent more than larger corporations to nonprofits and other charities.

For additional stats, check out the infographic below.





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Accounting Software Can Be Fun #internet #businesses

#small business accounting

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Too many people are frustrated with the software they use. Why is that? Small business accounting software has been unintuitive and difficult to use for years. Business owners often find themselves chained to an old desktop in the back room labouring over the finances. With a system like that, it becomes obvious why people don’t have good visibility of their accounts.

Five ways cloud software makes accounting fun

  1. When statement lines from your bank account are fed into your accounting software automatically, you can see your cashflow in real-time.
  2. Being able to see bank balances, invoices, bills and expenses at a glance gives you a clear picture of your finances.
  3. View your accounts in the cloud so you can access them when you want, where you want, on any device.
  4. You’re free to be mobile – not chained to your desktop. When you can work on the same data as your advisors at the same time, there’s no need to share a computer or exchange files.
  5. Small business accounting software with free updates means there’s no need for installations or maintenance.

Accounting can be fun and addictive

Software that makes doing business a pleasure, can only be a good thing. Making money and seeing how your business is doing should be fun. If your software is intuitive, it can be addictive to use.

What this means for small business

When business owners use software that’s intuitive and easy, they are much more in tune with their financial situation. This means they can avoid problems and take action when it matters, not after the fact, when it’s too late. Adding to that, accountants and financial advisors are able to give them much better insight and advice, spotting future opportunities for growth.

When you get excited about using your accounting software, you’ll notice the positive effect it has on your business.





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5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #ethics

#small business magazine

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5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

1. Inc.

Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

  • Get Real by Jason Fried – co-founder of 37 Signals (software company that created Basecamp) and author of Rework pens this column that normally appears between pages 35 and 40
  • Crunching the Numbers – I love the charts and graphs that are included in this section. For instance, did you know that the cities that experienced the greatest increase in the number of jobs at companies with fewer than 100 employees from August 10 to August 11 were Orlando, Atlanta and Greensboro, North Carolina (who would have guessed these cities?)
  • Tech Trends­­ – John Brandon does a great job with this column. He reviews all the latest gadgets and new technology that make your life as a small business owner easier.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

2. Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

  • Lead Gen ­– Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs.com and Co-Author of Content Rules authors this column that speaks to the power of great content and how to reach your customers through online content.
  • Linked – Chris Brogan. Founder of Human Business Works and co-author of Trust Agents is one of the preeminent experts in relationship and digital marketing. If you have enough time to read only one column in this magazine each month, read his.

iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

3. Fast Company

Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

  • Tech Edge­ – authored by Farhad Manjoo, this column is very similar to Tech Trends in Inc. just with a little more irreverence.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

4. Wired

Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

  • Dear Mr. Know-it-all – this is an awesome column where Mr. Know it All fields questions from those looking to navigate their issues in the 21st century. Some questions may surprise you, but you’ll find the answers even more interesting.
  • Test – they test everything from Universal remotes to solar charges to ultrabooks – very neat column.

iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

5. Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

About Jim Armstrong

Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

Comments

I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.





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How Do I Know If I – m Qualified to Be a Business Analyst?

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How Do I Know If I m Qualified to Be a Business Analyst?

Are you exploring a career in as a business analyst? Do you find yourself wondering if your skills and experience are relevant to a business analyst role? Would you be interested in learning about how qualified you are to be a business analyst?

We re going to talk about how to know if you are qualified to be a business analyst, but first I m going to share a funny story with you.

(Before I forget, I want to be sure you know about my step-by-step BA career planning course (it’s free) that’s designed to help you, the mid-career professional, kick-start your business analysis career. The course will help you dig deeper into each of the concepts outlined below.)

Just last week, the night before my birthday, I walked down the short flight of stairs after putting our daughter to bed. I smiled at my husband. He was making an odd expression. I continued to look more deeply at him to figure out why.

I walked over to where he was sitting and said, What s that goofy face for?

He says, You didn t see it, did you?

Me: See what?

He shifts his eyes back toward the stairs. On the ledge we have right in front of our stairway were a dozen yellow roses laying out in plain sight.

I couldn t believe I had completely missed them. For a split second, I even starting thinking that just maybe my husband tele-ported them there, but then I remembered the laws of physics and found my own eyes to be the culprit.

I was looking at my husband and his funny expression instead of what was right in front of me.

This same sort of thing happens to all of us, all of the time. We often don t see what can be obvious to other people or even what other people expect we should obviously be seeing. In all the work I do with professionals transitioning into the BA profession, the most prevalent problem I see is that they overlook significant relevant and transferable skills from their own career background.

As a result, their answer to the question, Am I qualified to be a business analyst? is a resounding no when it should be a yes or at least a some of the time . (And as we ll see in a bit, some of the time can be a very effective path to business analysis.)

Today, I d like to help you see the bouquet of roses waiting for you on the ledge at the bottom of the stairs. And to do that we need to look at the concept of transferable skills.

What are Transferable Business Analyst Skills?

Transferable skills are skills that you’ve built through experiences in your past roles. In the context of business analysis, transferable skills are BA techniques you’ve used in non-BA jobs or soft skills you’ve developed in perhaps unrelated roles.

Transferable skills can help you skip past entry-level business analyst positions. This is especially important because there tend to be very few entry-level business analyst positions. And those savored few entry-level positions tend to favor recent college graduates without the salary requirements of an experienced professional.

If you do have even a few years of professional experience, and a fair amount of the 42 reasons to become a business analyst resonate with you, then you have transferable skills. Getting clear and confident about them is part of your path to success as a business analyst and figuring out what roles you qualify for.

But What Business Analyst Qualifications Are Transferable?

When transitioning to business analysis, there are many areas in which to look for your business analyst qualifications. A good first step is to review our list of core business analysis skills that are important for a new business analyst and start mapping your experience to these skill areas.

Here s a rundown of what you can expect to find during this process:

  • The core business analyst skills. those you might find mapped out in the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK®). will help you get past the screening process for a business analyst role. Any given hiring manager tends to have a checklist of key qualifications they absolutely want to have met by a potential candidate. And even if your experience is informal. it s likely that you can map it to a more formal deliverable or analysis technique. Use the BA terms (appropriately) in your resume and in a job interview and you ll increase your chances of qualifying yourself for a business analyst role.
  • Although managers screen for a specific set of core business analyst skills, they often hire for soft skills. such as relationship-building and the ability to communicate with a diverse set of stakeholders from the business and technical communities. Understanding the key soft skills you bring to the table is critical. Being able to speak to specific experiences where you used those soft skills in a BA context (or close to BA context) can increase the number of BA jobs you ll qualify for.
  • Then there will be skills that set you apart as a candidate and qualify you for specific types of BA positions. These vary widely from technical skills, to specific business domain knowledge, to experience with specific types of business applications.

What Do I Do with My List of Business Analyst Qualifications?

Even with a list of transferable business analyst qualifications in hand, a transitioning BA can get understandably frustrated. What business analyst roles do these skills qualify you for? It can often seem as if the grass is greener on the other side of the proverbial fence .

  • If you don t have an IT background, it can seem as if every possible BA job you look at requires some obscure technical skill you have no interest in building.
  • If you do have an IT background, but no business experience, it can see as if every possible BA job you look at requires business domain experience.

While you will most likely find that the number of roles you aren t qualified for outweigh the number of roles you do qualify for, your career background will qualify you very strongly for a specific set business analyst jobs .

  • If you have a technical background. consider BA roles that include systems analysis responsibilities or blend selected IT duties with a business analyst role. Your experience with specific technologies could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have a business background from a specific functional area (such as customer service, human resources, or finance), consider BA roles working on the business applications with which you are familiar or supporting this area of the company. Your familiarity with the terminology and processes for that functional area could qualify you for specific BA roles.
  • If you have deep experience in a specific industry. consider business analyst roles in that industry. Your understanding of the industry environment, terminology, and core processes could qualify you for specific BA roles.

To sum things up, the answer to the question about whether or not you are qualified to be a business analyst requires a bit of analysis. First, you must discover your business analyst skills. Then you want to map them to the types of roles you see in your local job market. Most likely, you will find yourself to be very qualified for some roles, partially qualified for others, and not at all qualified for still others (and this last set will most likely be the biggest, and that s true even for BAs with formal experience).

With this information in hand, you can decide how and if to move forward in your BA career. And keep in mind, just like those I work with on their career transitions, it s quite possible and actually very likely that you have more relevant experience than you think, and you won t realize what those qualifications are until you go through a skills discovery process .

Find Your Path Into a Business Analyst Career

After reading and working through the exercises in How to Start a Business Analyst Career. you’ll know how to assess and expand your business analysis skills and experience.

This book will help you find your best path forward into a business analyst career. More than that, you will know exactly what to do next to expand your business analysis opportunities.

Click here to learn more about How to Start a Business Analyst Career

Stay informed about new articles and course offerings.




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Be a Journeyman Plumber: Training and Career Information #plumbing #journeyman, #be #a #journeyman #plumber:

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Be a Journeyman Plumber: Training and Career Information

Should I Become a Journeyman Plumber?

A journeyman plumber. or journey worker, is an individual who has completed the 4- or 5-year apprenticeship program required to work alone. These professionals work with water and drainage systems in residential and commercial settings. This includes installing and maintaining sewage disposal and gas lines, as well as kitchen, bathroom and laundry fixtures or appliances.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the rate of injuries for plumbers is higher than the national average. These professionals must take precautions to prevent burns from hot pipes and cuts from sharp tools. Many plumbers work evenings or weekends and are on-call for emergencies. Self-employment opportunities are available, and overtime is common. The median annual salary for plumbers, pipe fitters and steam fitters, as reported by the BLS in 2015, was $50,620.

Career Requirements

Career Requirements

None; apprenticeship or trade school required

Licensure and Certification

Most states require licensure

Apprenticeship programs of 4-5 years (provides on-the-job training)

Solid customer service, managerial, troubleshooting and mechanical skills; expertise with plumbing tools such as drain and pipe cleaning equipment, pipe and tube cutters, pressure gauges and wrenches; physical strength; an understanding of accounting, cost estimating, business data, word processing, and computer-aided design (CAD) software

Median Salary (2015)*

$50,620 (for plumbers, pipefitters and steam fitters)

Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics*, O*Net OnLine.

While a degree is not required, you will need some postsecondary training through an apprenticeship or trade school. An apprenticeship will usually last 4-5 years and provides on-the-job training. In addition, most states require licensure. You’ll also need solid customer service, managerial, troubleshooting and mechanical skills; expertise with plumbing tools, such as drain and pipe cleaning equipment, pipe and tube cutters, pressure gauges and wrenches; physical strength; and an understanding of accounting, cost estimating, business data, word processing and computer-aided design (CAD) software.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Building Inspection
  • Cabinetmaking
  • Carpentry
  • Concrete Finishing
  • Construction Mgmt, General
  • Construction Site Management
  • Drywall Installation
  • Electrical and Power Transmission Installers
  • Electrical Systems Lineworker
  • Electrician
  • Facilities Management
  • Furniture Making
  • Glazier
  • Home Equipment and Furnishings Installer
  • Home Improvement
  • House Painting and Wall Paper
  • Masonry
  • Metal Building Assembly
  • Pipefitting
  • Plumbing Technology
  • Property Management and Maintenance
  • Roofer
  • Well Drilling

Steps to Become a Journeyman Plumber

Let’s look over what steps are required to become a journeyman plumber.

Step 1: Complete an Apprenticeship Program

According to the BLS, most plumbers begin their training through either an apprentice program or a career-training program at a community college or vocational school. A certificate or degree program in plumbing includes courses in subjects like construction materials, domestic piping, blueprint reading, cost estimating and plumbing code. However, the journeyman plumber designation usually refers to individuals who have completed an apprenticeship program. Apprenticeship programs are usually offered through unions or private businesses as paid positions. Apprentices must be at least 18 years old, have a high school diploma or GED and pass drug screening and basic mathematics tests. It typically takes an apprentice 4 to 5 years to accumulate the required hours of hands-on training needed to take the journeyman licensing test.

The United Association of Journeymen (UA) offers a 5-year apprenticeship program that is divided into classroom and on-the-job training. The UA’s journeyman program includes a minimum of 246 classroom hours and between 1,700-2,000 paid, on-the-job training hours. After general classes in welding, science and pipefitting, apprentices can choose a specific career-training path in plumbing. Upon completion of the 5-year training program, apprentices become journeyman plumbers and are considered qualified to work independently.

Become familiar with computer concepts. Journeyman plumbers use a variety of different computer software in their work, including accounting and CAD software. If computer courses are available, it may be advantageous to enroll in them and become familiar with these software programs.

Step 2: Get Licensed

After completing their training programs, journeyman plumbers must become licensed to begin work. Requirements vary by state, but in general, you must have 2-5 years of experience and pass an examination that tests you plumbing knowledge and training. You should research the specific requirements for their states.

Step 3: Complete Continuing Education

Most states required journeyman to complete continuing education as a condition for license renewal. Some states require renewal every 12 months while other state licenses last three years. The required number of hours and specific courses needed for continued education also vary by state.

Step 4: Earn Master Plumber Status

Journeymen plumbers who would like to take on supervisory roles or provide additional services, such as the planning and design of plumbing systems, can pursue the master plumber designation. Qualifications generally include around two years of work experience as a journeyman as well as passing scores on written and/or practical exams.

To become a journeyman plumber, you need to go through an apprenticeship or complete training at a trade school, get licensed, and maintain your license.

Next: View Schools





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So you want to be a business development manager? #business #websites

#business development manager

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So you want to be a business development manager?

Business development managers are the cornerstone of any successful organisation because they ultimately generate new revenue and help a company grow. But what does the job involve on a day-to-day basis? We explore in more detail.

What are the main responsibilities?

The primary objective is to identify new business opportunities. What form this takes will depend on the exact nature of the company. But you ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets. And then you ll be expected use these opportunities to bring in more revenue.

How that happens exactly depends on the industry. It can be a combination of attending events and networking, taking stands at exhibitions and conferences, cold calling, and responding to incoming leads. You will also more than likely be expected to identify partner opportunities to cross and up sell services.

What will I be doing on a day-to-day basis?

While it can be difficult to generalise, most business development managers will be expected to:

  • Generate leads and cold calling prospective customers
  • Develop opportunities in target markets with support of marketing
  • Nurturing and developing relationships with key customer accounts
  • Attending face-to-face meetings with clients
  • Providing specialist advice on the products and/or services you re selling

What are the other aspects involved in the job?

You ll more than likely be looking to identify new markets, new partnerships, new ways to reach existing markets, or new product or service offerings to better meet the needs of existing markets.

You ll need to negotiate pricing with clients in line with internal guidelines. You ll also need to keep your superiors updated on both your progress and timeline, providing them with accurate forecasting of anticipated sales.

This being a sales role, you will be subject to sales and KPI targets; this is a crucial part of the role. With face-to-face client meetings key, you ll be expected to travel although the extent to which this is the case will depend on where the job is based. If you re based in London, you may find that the majority of your meetings are in the capital. But if your employer is based elsewhere in the South-East, Midlands or the North, you may be required to travel a substantial amount.

How much can I expect to earn?

Our Salary Survey shows that salaries vary depending on sector and location. For example, an IT business development manager can expect to earn 50 70k in the North of the UK and 50 75k in the South-East. Similarly, a B2B business development manager can expect to earn 30 45k in the North and 35 50k in London and the South-East. But all these figures are basic salary exclusive of benefits/bonuses. Actual earning potential will be far higher than this.

What knowledge and experience is required?

To secure a business development manager job, you ll need a strong sales track record. Specifically, hiring companies look for a proven ability to hit targets, a consistent background of winning new business and often relevant sector experience. A good book of contacts is also looked upon favourably.

In terms of personality traits, employers generally look for people who are articulate, polished and professional who have a good telephone manner. A self-motivated and disciplined approach is essential.





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Be a neighborhood champion – Shop Small® – American Express, Small Business Saturday #business

#small business saturday

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BRING THE DAY HOME

Looking for ideas on how you can get your community involved in your Small Business Saturday celebration? Download our Event Guides inspired by past Neighborhood Champions.

WELCOME STATION: INSPIRED BY HUTCHINSON AREA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & TOURISM, MN

The Hutchinson Area Chamber of Commerce & Tourism gave everyone a game plan for getting the most out of the day with fun treats along the way. Make Shop Small® Welcome Station shoppers’ first stop of the day! How They Did It

Includes:

Poster, Customizable Flyers, Social Posts

NIGHT OUT: INSPIRED BY THE PARTNERS FOR PROGRESS, NY

This downtown association helped make Small Business Saturday night just as big as the day. This year, help your neighborhood continue to celebrate small business into the night. How They Did It

Includes:

Poster, Table Tent, Social Posts

#SHOPSMALL SELFIE: INSPIRED BY CITY OF DOUGLAS MAIN STREET MERCHANT ASSOCIATION, GA

This association organized a Selfie Event that let people show support for small businesses with more than a purchase. Get one going in your neighborhood. How They Did It

Includes:

Signage, Social Posts

SCAVENGER HUNT: INSPIRED BY BELAIR-EDISON NEIGHBORHOODS, INC. MD

This organization encouraged people to visit more local small businesses by creating a Scavenger Hunt on the day. Set the course for one in your neighborhood. How They Did It

Includes:

Blank Map, Signage, Social Posts





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How should you pay for car insurance? #what #should #i #be #paying #for #car

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How should you pay for car insurance?

But while paying the annual premium in one go is generally the cheapest option, the good news for those struggling to raise the necessary funds is that spreading the cost over the year by paying monthly does not have to push the price up by a lot.

In fact, research from moneysupermarket.com found paying monthly for motor insurance could add as little as 5.34% to the overall cost.

And opting to pay your home insurance monthly rather than annually could push the price up by just 2.74% if you go with Endsleigh, or could even reduce the cost of a Santander policy by 2.91%.

However, the difference in cost does vary so it is vital to check how much you will pay for the privilege of spreading the cost in this way. Making monthly payments increases the cost of the average motor policy by 10.68% and could result in the total cost being 15%- 20% higher than if you paid in one instalment.

The car insurance team at moneysupermarket.com is therefore urging people keen to ease the pressure on their finances by paying for insurance monthly to identify the policies that offer the best value for this before making a choice.

Pete Harrison, car insurance expert at moneysupermarket.com, said: “The cost of car insurance can be a huge strain on your finances so paying for your car cover on a monthly basis is a good way of keeping your initial outlay for car insurance down.

“However, while this may be a more convenient and manageable way to pay for your cover, it’s crucial to make sure you’re aware of the additional costs involved. It is also important to scour the whole market to ensure you find the most reasonably priced deal.”

Are there any other options?

Splitting your annual insurance premium, whether for motor or home cover, into monthly instalments is not the only way to avoid paying the whole amount in one go.

You could also take advantage of one of the great 0% credit card deals available at the moment to spread the cost over 12 months, without incurring any interest charges or extra premium costs.

Harrison added: “By putting the cost of the premium on to a 0% purchase credit card, drivers can pay the annual price for their policy in monthly instalments without paying interest.”

Suitable credit cards include the Marks Spencer Credit Card. which offers 15 months at 0% on all purchases, as well as access to a generous M S rewards scheme.

Other great options include the Tesco Clubcard Credit Card. which also gives you 15 months interest-free on purchases, plus nine months at 0% on balance transfers and Clubcard rewards on your spending.

If you would like to make further savings by earning 0.5% cashback on your spending, it is also worth considering the Capital One Purchase Plus Card, which offers 0% on purchases until September 2012.

However, you need to be disciplined if you use a credit card, and aim to pay off the balance before the end of the promotional period, and within 12 months if the promotion is longer.

Otherwise you will still be paying it off this year’s insurance after you’ve had to take out another policy next year and will also run the risk of being hit with hefty interest charges once the representative APRs kick in.

The representative APR on the M S card, for example, is 15.9% (variable), while the Tesco card charges 16.9% (variable) and the Capital One card is 16.8% (variable).

How else can I keep my insurance costs down?

If the rising cost of motor insurance makes you wince even if you are paying it over the course of a year, then it may be time to think about taking some steps to bring it down.

The car you drive has a massive impact on the cost of your cover, so next time you change your vehicle bear in mind that a smaller, less powerful model will prove a lot cheaper to insure than a fast, sporty car, for example.

Other ways to keep your car cover costs down include taking your Pass Plus test and, of course, avoiding getting involved in accidents so that you can build up your no claims discount.

When it comes to home insurance, meanwhile, you can keep your premiums to a minimum by fitting an alarm system that is recognised by insurers and will result in a discount and by avoiding add-ons such as personal possessions cover.

Save money on your car insurance

Contact moneysupermarket.com at Moneysupermarket House, St David’s Park, Ewloe, Flintshire, CH5 3UZ. © Moneysupermarket.com Ltd 2013

Moneysupermarket.com Limited is an appointed representative of Moneysupermarket.com Financial Group Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA FRN 303190).
Moneysupermarket.com Financial Group Limited, registered in England No. 3157344. Registered Office: Moneysupermarket House, St. David’s Park, Ewloe, CH5 3UZ. Telephone 01244 665700

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5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #funding

#small business magazine

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5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

1. Inc.

Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

  • Get Real by Jason Fried – co-founder of 37 Signals (software company that created Basecamp) and author of Rework pens this column that normally appears between pages 35 and 40
  • Crunching the Numbers – I love the charts and graphs that are included in this section. For instance, did you know that the cities that experienced the greatest increase in the number of jobs at companies with fewer than 100 employees from August 10 to August 11 were Orlando, Atlanta and Greensboro, North Carolina (who would have guessed these cities?)
  • Tech Trends­­ – John Brandon does a great job with this column. He reviews all the latest gadgets and new technology that make your life as a small business owner easier.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

2. Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

  • Lead Gen ­– Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs.com and Co-Author of Content Rules authors this column that speaks to the power of great content and how to reach your customers through online content.
  • Linked – Chris Brogan. Founder of Human Business Works and co-author of Trust Agents is one of the preeminent experts in relationship and digital marketing. If you have enough time to read only one column in this magazine each month, read his.

iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

3. Fast Company

Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

  • Tech Edge­ – authored by Farhad Manjoo, this column is very similar to Tech Trends in Inc. just with a little more irreverence.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

4. Wired

Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

  • Dear Mr. Know-it-all – this is an awesome column where Mr. Know it All fields questions from those looking to navigate their issues in the 21st century. Some questions may surprise you, but you’ll find the answers even more interesting.
  • Test – they test everything from Universal remotes to solar charges to ultrabooks – very neat column.

iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

5. Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

About Jim Armstrong

Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

Comments

I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.





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