Tag: Bankruptcy:

Business Debt and Bankruptcy, business bankruptcy.#Business #bankruptcy


Business Debt and Bankruptcy

Most businesses will incur some form of debt as a necessary part of operations, whether it’s the use of credit cards or bank loans. However, problems arise when the debt load is unsustainable and out of balance with revenues, sometimes leading to bankruptcy. This section contains information and resources to help a financially troubled business, including personal liability and what to expect when filing for bankruptcy. Also included are government resources to help businesses better understand debt and bankruptcy.

Good Debt vs. Bad Debt

Most people are not exactly thrilled about owing people money. But there is a distinction among different kinds of debt, as some debts are held in a much better esteem than others. More to the point, good debt refers to debt on assets that earn your business more income than the cost of that debt. The cost of any debt is the interest charged. In contrast, bad debt — such as emergency loans meant to keep a business afloat during hard times — doesn’t contribute to the company’s growth and may hurt the company’s overall value.

You may have to incur some bad debt from time to time, but the key is to pay it off as quickly (and painlessly) as possible.

Prioritizing Debts: Which to Pay Off First

Deciding which debts to pay down first can be overwhelming when your company’s revenue is less than your debt obligations and monthly payments. Since you can’t satisfy all debts at the same time, it’s best to prioritize these obligations in a strategic way. For instance, certain debts must be paid in full — taxes, for instance — while other debts can be paid down gradually or even negotiated.

Your unique situation and business needs will dictate how you repay your debts, but the following debts generally should take priority (this is not a comprehensive list):

  • Payroll and payroll taxes – While it may be tempting to use money withheld from employee paychecks to plug financial holes, it could lead to problems come tax time; also, you likely will face steep penalties if you fail to pay your workers on time or in full.
  • Utilities and communications – Resources and services such as electricity, water, telephones, and Internet are absolutely critical to most businesses; and if you fall behind, you may lose these vital services.
  • Loans with personal liability – Partners and sole proprietors are personally liable for business debts, although officers of corporations and LLCs also may be liable for debts they personally guaranteed.
  • Court Judgments – Creditors that have won court judgments against you or your business may legally seize property or even garnish wages.
  • Secured Loans – Many small business owners put up personal property, including their private home, as collateral for a loan; a default could lead to losing one’s home, or home office.

If you’re unable to secure additional funding or otherwise find yourself without options to revive your struggling business, bankruptcy may be the next step. Businesses that have a shot at a turnaround typically file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. This allows businesses to have certain debts forgiven while they reorganize, with limited protections for the its suppliers and vendors as well. But generally, the type of bankruptcy available to your business depends on your legal structure, amount (and type) of debts, plans for the future, and your personal liability for these debts.

Other types of business bankruptcy — those which are more common for small businesses — include Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. You will want to file Chapter 7 if you are a sole proprietor and therefore liable for all business debts, which involves the liquidation of most assets and the eventual winding-down of operations. Another option for sole proprietorships or partnerships is Chapter 13, which allows you to keep your assets while reorganizing and paying off your debts.

Click on a link below for more detailed information about business debt and bankruptcy.

Business bankruptcy


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Small Business Bankruptcy vs, business bankruptcy.#Business #bankruptcy


How Do Personal Bankruptcy and Business Bankruptcy Differ?

Business bankruptcy

Business bankruptcy

Question: What’s the difference between personal bankruptcy and business bankruptcy?

Answer:

When we talk about small business bankruptcy, there s not much difference between personal bankruptcy and that of a small business if the business is not a corporation. Generally speaking, bankruptcy is a legal avenue for corporations or individuals to pursue relief from unpayable levels of debt.

Once an application for bankruptcy is filed a stay of proceedings goes into effect which prevents unsecured creditors from starting or continuing legal action against the creditor to recover debts (see The Difference Between Secured Debts and Unsecured Debts).

In the case of personal bankruptcy, the stay of proceedings prevents (for example) a creditor from garnishment of wages of the debtor.

For unsecured creditors, the stay of proceedings levels the playing field so that one creditor does not gain an advantage over others in terms of repayment of debt. Note that bankruptcy proceedings can be initiated by unsecured creditors – a creditor may file a petition to place a debtor into bankruptcy if it is owed more than $1000 and the debtor has recently committed acts of bankruptcy, such as failing to pay liabilities, committing acts of payment fraud, avoiding creditors, secretly disposing or hiding assets, etc.

Secured creditors are usually not affected by bankruptcy as they have the right to recover collateral posted by the individual or corporation as security for debts, such as a mortgage on the debtor s property or liens on business equipment.

Personal or Non-incorporated Bankruptcy

If a person s business is a sole proprietorship or a partnership, legally, they are their business, so when they face the prospect of bankruptcy, all their assets are involved and the bankruptcy procedures are the same. In other words, the assets of the business cannot be held separate from their personal assets, so a small business bankruptcy is in effect a personal bankruptcy.

Incorporated Business Bankruptcy

Small business bankruptcy is different for incorporated businesses, because corporations are independent legal entities. Running an incorporated business gives a small business owner liability protection; it is the business assets that are forfeit, not the individual s. The exception to this is when (as is required in many cases to secure debt financing) the business owners(s) have pledged personal assets as security for the debt (such as mortgages on personal property, etc.).

Otherwise the bankruptcy procedures are essentially the same as for personal bankruptcy – the company is forced into or voluntarily seeks bankruptcy protection; all of the company s assets are turned over to the Trustee in Bankruptcy who sells them and distributes the funds to the creditors.

Note that if your business is incorporated and unable to remit taxes and is forced to file for bankruptcy the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has first priority on the company assets over all other secured creditors.

Note also that company directors can also be held liable if there are unremitted source deductions (income tax, employment insurance, CPP) or unpaid sales taxes such as GST/HST.

Bankruptcy Statistics

According to the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada there were 121,609 personal bankruptcies in Canada in 2015, an increase of 3.0% over 2014.

Of these, 58,203 were Consumer Proposals. Total assets for all bankruptcies in 2015 at the time of filing was $10,474,489,079 and total liabilities $14,125,879,957.

There were 4,107 insolvencies filed by businesses in 2015, a decrease of 2.7% from 2014. Of these, 1,018 were proposals. Total assets for all business bankruptcies in 2015 at the time of filing was $680,664,124 and total liabilities $5,944,924,099.

Alternatives to Declaring Bankruptcy

A Consumer Proposal involves negotiating a partial payment of your debts in return for your creditors forgiving the remaining amount. A Consumer Proposal has a major advantage for sole proprietors and partners in that unlike declaring bankruptcy, your personal assets are not liable for seizure.

From a creditor standpoint a Consumer Proposal is preferable to bankruptcy in that it allows them to at least recover a percentage of the outstanding debt – in a bankruptcy proceeding they may lose 100%.

See The Bankruptcy Process in Canada for a more detailed explanation of bankruptcy procedures.

To The main page of Bankruptcy in Canada FAQs


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Business Debt and Bankruptcy #business #supplies


#business bankruptcy

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Business Debt and Bankruptcy

Most businesses will incur some form of debt as a necessary part of operations, whether it’s the use of credit cards or bank loans. However, problems arise when the debt load is unsustainable and out of balance with revenues, sometimes leading to bankruptcy. This section contains information and resources to help a financially troubled business, including personal liability and what to expect when filing for bankruptcy. Also included are government resources to help businesses better understand debt and bankruptcy.

Good Debt vs. Bad Debt

Most people are not exactly thrilled about owing people money. But there is a distinction among different kinds of debt, as some debts are held in a much better esteem than others. More to the point, good debt refers to debt on assets that earn your business more income than the cost of that debt. The cost of any debt is the interest charged. In contrast, bad debt — such as emergency loans meant to keep a business afloat during hard times — doesn’t contribute to the company’s growth and may hurt the company’s overall value.

You may have to incur some bad debt from time to time, but the key is to pay it off as quickly (and painlessly) as possible.

Prioritizing Debts: Which to Pay Off First

Deciding which debts to pay down first can be overwhelming when your company’s revenue is less than your debt obligations and monthly payments. Since you can’t satisfy all debts at the same time, it’s best to prioritize these obligations in a strategic way. For instance, certain debts must be paid in full — taxes, for instance — while other debts can be paid down gradually or even negotiated.

Your unique situation and business needs will dictate how you repay your debts, but the following debts generally should take priority (this is not a comprehensive list):

  • Payroll and payroll taxes – While it may be tempting to use money withheld from employee paychecks to plug financial holes, it could lead to problems come tax time; also, you likely will face steep penalties if you fail to pay your workers on time or in full.
  • Utilities and communications – Resources and services such as electricity, water, telephones, and Internet are absolutely critical to most businesses; and if you fall behind, you may lose these vital services.
  • Loans with personal liability – Partners and sole proprietors are personally liable for business debts, although officers of corporations and LLCs also may be liable for debts they personally guaranteed.
  • Court Judgments – Creditors that have won court judgments against you or your business may legally seize property or even garnish wages.
  • Secured Loans – Many small business owners put up personal property, including their private home, as collateral for a loan; a default could lead to losing one’s home, or home office.

If you’re unable to secure additional funding or otherwise find yourself without options to revive your struggling business, bankruptcy may be the next step. Businesses that have a shot at a turnaround typically file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. This allows businesses to have certain debts forgiven while they reorganize, with limited protections for the its suppliers and vendors as well. But generally, the type of bankruptcy available to your business depends on your legal structure, amount (and type) of debts, plans for the future, and your personal liability for these debts.

Other types of business bankruptcy — those which are more common for small businesses — include Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. You will want to file Chapter 7 if you are a sole proprietor and therefore liable for all business debts, which involves the liquidation of most assets and the eventual winding-down of operations. Another option for sole proprietorships or partnerships is Chapter 13, which allows you to keep your assets while reorganizing and paying off your debts.

Click on a link below for more detailed information about business debt and bankruptcy.


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Business Debt and Bankruptcy #business #networking


#business bankruptcy

#

Business Debt and Bankruptcy

Most businesses will incur some form of debt as a necessary part of operations, whether it’s the use of credit cards or bank loans. However, problems arise when the debt load is unsustainable and out of balance with revenues, sometimes leading to bankruptcy. This section contains information and resources to help a financially troubled business, including personal liability and what to expect when filing for bankruptcy. Also included are government resources to help businesses better understand debt and bankruptcy.

Good Debt vs. Bad Debt

Most people are not exactly thrilled about owing people money. But there is a distinction among different kinds of debt, as some debts are held in a much better esteem than others. More to the point, good debt refers to debt on assets that earn your business more income than the cost of that debt. The cost of any debt is the interest charged. In contrast, bad debt — such as emergency loans meant to keep a business afloat during hard times — doesn’t contribute to the company’s growth and may hurt the company’s overall value.

You may have to incur some bad debt from time to time, but the key is to pay it off as quickly (and painlessly) as possible.

Prioritizing Debts: Which to Pay Off First

Deciding which debts to pay down first can be overwhelming when your company’s revenue is less than your debt obligations and monthly payments. Since you can’t satisfy all debts at the same time, it’s best to prioritize these obligations in a strategic way. For instance, certain debts must be paid in full — taxes, for instance — while other debts can be paid down gradually or even negotiated.

Your unique situation and business needs will dictate how you repay your debts, but the following debts generally should take priority (this is not a comprehensive list):

  • Payroll and payroll taxes – While it may be tempting to use money withheld from employee paychecks to plug financial holes, it could lead to problems come tax time; also, you likely will face steep penalties if you fail to pay your workers on time or in full.
  • Utilities and communications – Resources and services such as electricity, water, telephones, and Internet are absolutely critical to most businesses; and if you fall behind, you may lose these vital services.
  • Loans with personal liability – Partners and sole proprietors are personally liable for business debts, although officers of corporations and LLCs also may be liable for debts they personally guaranteed.
  • Court Judgments – Creditors that have won court judgments against you or your business may legally seize property or even garnish wages.
  • Secured Loans – Many small business owners put up personal property, including their private home, as collateral for a loan; a default could lead to losing one’s home, or home office.

If you’re unable to secure additional funding or otherwise find yourself without options to revive your struggling business, bankruptcy may be the next step. Businesses that have a shot at a turnaround typically file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. This allows businesses to have certain debts forgiven while they reorganize, with limited protections for the its suppliers and vendors as well. But generally, the type of bankruptcy available to your business depends on your legal structure, amount (and type) of debts, plans for the future, and your personal liability for these debts.

Other types of business bankruptcy — those which are more common for small businesses — include Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. You will want to file Chapter 7 if you are a sole proprietor and therefore liable for all business debts, which involves the liquidation of most assets and the eventual winding-down of operations. Another option for sole proprietorships or partnerships is Chapter 13, which allows you to keep your assets while reorganizing and paying off your debts.

Click on a link below for more detailed information about business debt and bankruptcy.


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California Repossession Law: What To Expect And How To Avoid It #california #bankruptcy #law


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California Repossession Law: What To Expect And How To Avoid It

Last updated April 15, 2016.

When a creditor comes to repossess your car. boat, or other property, do you know what to do? Here s what you need to know about California repossession law.

When can a creditor repossess my property in California?

Creditors generally retain the right to repossess the property you acquire with a purchase money loan. The most common example is an auto loan. so we’ll use that throughout the article. Keep in mind that the same applies to any property that is collateral for a loan. So, you borrow money to buy a car and the car secures the debt. If you stop paying, the lender can reclaim the property. It may choose to sue and get a judgment against you, but it’s not required as long as the repossession is peaceful.

In California, the lender may repossess your car as soon as you default on the loan, even if the payment is just one day late. The specific terms of your loan agreement may give you a grace period, so read it carefully. West’s Ann. Cal. Com. Code §§ 9601, 9609. In addition, the lender is entitled to repossess after default of any kind on the loan agreement. That means that not only is your car at risk if you miss a payment or pay late, but if you break another term of the loan agreement. For example, auto loans require that you keep the car insured. If you allow your insurance to lapse, your lender has the right to repossess.

You don’t have to be present for the lender to repossess your car. They can take the property from any publicly accessible area, including your driveway. However, a repossession agent can’t break into your house or into a locked or fenced area without permission from the legal owner of the property (you or your landlord).

Of course, just because the lender has the right to repossess doesn’t necessarily mean that it will do so. It’s much easier and cheaper for the lender if you simply continue to make your payments. They’ll only act to repossess if they believe that you’re not going to pay or that you’ll destroy the collateral.

Who can repossess property?

In California, two different types of individuals may repossess your car. First, your lender may hire a repossession agency. Repossession agencies must be licensed by the California Department of Consumer Affairs’ Bureau of Security and Investigative Services (BSIS). They must show you a BSIS ID if you ask for it. You can verify the license online or call BSIS at (916) 322-4000. An employee of the legal owner (probably the bank or the dealership) may also repossess the property; they don’t have to be licensed by BSIS.

After repossession, you ll have to pay for the storage of any personal items left in the car and some lone agreements may require you to pay the costs of repossession and storage of the car itself.

How can I avoid repossession?

If you honor the all of the terms of your loan agreement, the lender cannot repossess your car. If you default on one or more terms, you are at risk for repossession. There are, however, steps you can take to prevent it.

Reinstate the Loan

If you’ve missed one or more payments, the best option is pay all of the missed payments and all applicable late fees at once. This is called “reinstating the loan” or “curing the default.” Your loan agreement may or may not include provisions for reinstatement, but California law protects your right to reinstate the loan even after repossession, until the property is sold or otherwise disposed of. If you falsified information on your loan agreement, hid the car, used it to commit a crime, damaged the vehicle, or threatened violence against the repossession agent, you lose the right to reinstate the loan. In addition, you can only reinstate a loan once every 12 months and a maximum of twice over the course of the loan.

Contact Your Lender

If you can’t afford to pay all of your missed payments and late fees at once, you may reach out to your lender to ask for other options. Repossession is time consuming and expensive and many lenders will be willing to work with you to avoid that option. You may be able to negotiate a longer grace period or a lower interest rate, which will make payments easier.

Sell the Property

You may choose to sell the car yourself. If your car is repossessed, the lender will dispose of it at auction. If the car sells for less than you owe, you’re liable for the difference. If you organize a private sale, you’ll probably get a better price than you would at auction. Selling the car may be difficult, though. It will require the approval of your lender and they can refuse the sale for any reason or no reason at all. However, you may be able to use the lender’s refusal to protect yourself from liability for the deficiency if they receive less at auction than your private buyer offered.

Surrender the Property

You can also choose to surrender the car. You still lose it, but you may be able to negotiate a surrender as full payment of the loan. Then you won’t have to worry about a deficiency after the auction.

Refinance Your Loan

You can offer to refinance through the original lender or through a different lender. A refinanced loan will usually have a longer term, which means you’ll be paying more interest overall. If you choose to refinance, make sure that you can afford your new loan. Make sure it has a lower interest rate than your current one and don’t forget to check the fees. Consider also whether it’s worth refinancing. A new loan may last three to five years or more. If your car is already older, it may not be worth refinancing.

File for Bankruptcy

If you’re having trouble with more than one loan, bankruptcy may be a good option for you. When you file for bankruptcy, you get the protection of the automatic stay. The automatic stay stops all collection actions against you – including repossession. The bankruptcy process will give you some time to organize your finances without worrying about waking up and finding your car has been repossessed. Most debtors can keep their cars and other property through bankruptcy. In addition, you may only have to repay the loan up to the value of the car rather than repaying the full amount of the loan. Bankruptcy is a serious measure for serious debt problems, so reach out to an experienced bankruptcy attorney to discuss whether it’s the right choice for you. If you car has been repossessed, but not yet sold at auction, you still can get the vehicle back through a Chapter 13 bankruptcy .

Don t let repossession take you by surprise.

Whenever you take out a loan, read the entire agreement carefully and make sure you understand everything in it. It will include details about a grace period and the steps your lender will take if you miss payments. If you are going to fall behind on your payments, start considering your options for avoiding repossession. The earlier you act, the easier it is to keep your car.

If you have missed several payments on your loan and are facing property repression, contact one of our experienced attorneys at Borowitz Clark. We have years of experience helping thousands of consumers successfully resolve their financial issues.


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Philadelphia Products Liability Attorney, Arthur Bugay, 800-222-8792, bankruptcy attorney lancaster pa.#Bankruptcy #attorney #lancaster #pa


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Pennsylvania New Jersey Personal Injury Lawyer

Arthur Bugay is a Partner in the law firm of Galfand Berger. After obtaining his Bachelor s and Master s Degrees in Economics from Temple University, he attended Temple Law School, graduating with honors. Arthur also has two Master of Law degrees from Temple University, one in Taxation and the other in Trial Advocacy. Arthur s practice areas include Products Liability, Construction Accident litigation, Personal Injury litigation, Negligent Security and Employment law.

Arthur is admitted before the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Supreme Courts, United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, the United States District Courts for the Eastern, Middle and Western Districts of Pennsylvania and the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. He is a member of the American Bar Association, the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar Associations, the Philadelphia Bar Association, the American Association for Justice, the Pennsylvania Association for Justice, and the Philadelphia Trial Lawyers Association. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Advocacy, serves on the Amicus Curiae Committee of the Pennsylvania Association for Justice, and serves on the Pennsylvania Bar Association’s Exceptional Child Committee. He is “AV” rated as an attorney by Martindale-Hubbell. Arthur is also a member of the Multi-Million Dollar Advocates’ Forum and has been selected every year since 2011 to the Pennsylvania Super Lawyers list, an honor only given to the top 5% of more than 34,000 Pennsylvania lawyers. Additionally, Arthur has been included in The National Trial Lawyers Top 100 Trial Lawyers – Pennsylvania.

In June 2012, Arthur received the George F. Douglas, Jr., Amicus award from the Pennsylvania Association for Justice. This award is given to a Pennsylvania trial attorney in recognition of his or her exceptional accomplishments and excellence in litigation and advocacy before Pennsylvania’s highest courts.

Arthur has published several articles related to his practice, including:

  • A New Era In Pennsylvania Products Liability Law Tincher v. Omega-Flex, Inc.: The Death of Azzarello, Pennsylvania Bar Association Quarterly, (January 2015)
  • Tincher v. Omega Flex, Inc.: A Lightning Strike On Pennsylvania Products Liability Law, 64 A.3d 626 Pennsylvania Bar Association Quarterly, (January 2014)
  • Minority Shareholder Freeze-Out Litigation In Pennsylvania: Remedies provided At Common Law And By Section 1767 Of The Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law1, Pennsylvania Bar Quarterly, (July 2013)
  • The Future of Pennsylvania Products Liability As Applied by Federal and State Courts:Covell v. Bell Sports, Inc. , Pennsylvania Bar Quarterly, (October 2012)
  • Pennsylvania Products Liability at the Crossroads: Bugosh, Barrier and the Restatement (Third) of Torts, 81 Pa.B.Q. 1 (January 2010)
  • Bugay, Adrianensen, Document Retention and Destruction in Pennsylvania (2008)
  • Product Liability Developments Under the New Pennsylvania Evidence Rules and Recent Litigation , 77 Pennsylvania Bar Quarterly, (January 2006)
  • Protecting Your Child s Educational and Civil Rights , Exceptional Child Conference, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, October 15, 2004
  • Civil Prosecution For Criminal Harm: Apportionment of Fault in Inadequate Security Cases , Chapter in Pennsylvania Premises Liability: Law and Forms (PaAJ) and 74 Pennsylvania Bar Quarterly 93 (July 2004)
  • Residential Construction Defect Claims in Pennsylvania , Lorman Group, March 26, 2004
  • Bankruptcy and Personal Injury Law: When Worlds Collide , PBI, October 2003
  • Construction Payment Remedies in Pennsylvania , National Business Institute, February 2003
  • Pennsylvania Construction Law: What do You do When ? National Business Institute, March 2001
  • Evidence Law Update in Pennsylvania Products Liability Actions , PaAJ, May 1999
  • The Pennsylvania Statutory Employer Defense: a Plaintiff s Perspective , 69 Pennsylvania Bar Quarterly 29 (January1998)

In addition to his work in the firm s Personal Injury Department, Arthur is an advocate for disabled and injured children and for the elderly, the latter focusing upon nursing home negligence. He is an active volunteer for the indigent and has been honored with the Award for Outstanding Service by the Consumer Bankruptcy Assistance Project. He provides volunteer legal services for the Legal Clinic for the Disabled. Arthur also has taught economics at Temple University and economics and business law at Moravian College. Arthur currently teaches Products Liability law at Temple University’s Beasley School of Law. Arthur has served on the Board of Directors for the Disabilities Rights Network of Pennsylvania, a non-profit statewide public interest civil rights law firm that provides legal assistance and other services to individuals with disabilities.

Arthur is a member of the Shawmont Running Club. He has run several marathons to raise money for the American Diabetes Association, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and for the ALS Association of Philadelphia. In 2009, he was Pennsylvania s regional top fundraiser for the American Diabetes Association and completed the Lake Placid Ironman, a 140.6 mile triathlon, as a charitable event for this non-profit charity. In 2012, Arthur created “Miles for Melissa” as part of his fundraising efforts for the ALS Association and to track his training for the “Chesapeake Man,” another 140.6 mile triathlon event for non-profit fundraising.


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ATGF Colorado Utah Minnesota North Dakota Title Insurance #bankruptcy #attorney #denver #co


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Recent Announcements

  • Attorneys Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. Adds Brian Phillips to Team For Immediate Release Denver, Colorado March 27, 2017 Eric Morgan, President of Attorneys Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. (ATGF) of Denver, Colorado, is pleased to announce that the company has named.
    Posted Mar 29, 2017, 1:21 PM by web admin
  • ATGF Reports Record Profits For Immediate Release Denver, Colorado March 3, 2017Eric Morgan, President of Attorneys Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. (ATGF) is pleased to announce the 2016 annual statement reports a net profit.
    Posted Mar 6, 2017, 1:37 PM by web admin
  • ATGF Added to the Approved Master Title Underwriter List of Wells Fargo Mortgage Banker Finance Group January 18, 2017 I’m pleased to announce that Attorneys Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. has been added to the Approved Master Title Underwriter List of Wells Fargo Mortgage Banker Finance.
    Posted Jan 25, 2017, 5:48 AM by web admin

About ATGF

With more than 50 years of experience serving Colorado, Minnesota, Utah and North Dakota. ATGF is uniquely suited to provide title insurance guidance to its agents and to consumers.

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Become an Agent

Apply to become an ATGF agent and learn how our level of service, support and technology helps independent agents in Colorado, Utah, Minnesota and North Dakota.


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Arrow Law Group PLLC #bankruptcy #law #group


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Hire a lawyer who will speak to you like a human being. Compassionate representation. That’s us.

Minh Tran is a very knowledgeable attorney with an excellent staff. His firm handled my difficult debt relief case very satisfactorily and my case breezed right through the court system without any problems. Highly recommended.

After two of the very worst years of my life, I contacted Arrow Law group out of a last act of desperation before everything fell apart. I expected recrimination, lawyer-speak, chastisement. What I got was true compassion.

What We Do

Family Law

  • Dissolution/Divorce
  • Legal Seperation
  • Parenting Plan
  • Support Order
  • Enforcement of Order
  • Custody and Adoption

Bankruptcy

  • Chapter 7 fresh start
  • Chapter 13 or 11 debt restructuring
  • Stop garnishments
  • Stop foreclosure
  • Mitigate loss Foreclosure Fairness Act
  • Foreclosure defense
  • Electronic Bankruptcy Filing

Personal Injury

  • Brain Damage
  • Personal Injury
  • Auto Accident
  • Assault & Battery
  • Slip & Fall
  • Police Brutality
  • Bicycle Accident
  • Wrongful Death
  • Malpractice
  • Defamation

Criminal Defense

  • Driving under the influence or while impaired (DUI/DWI)
  • Felonies
  • Misdemeanors
  • Theft and shoplifting
  • Assault & battery
  • Federal and State Charges
  • Trespassing and disorderly conduct
  • Drug-related offenses

Real Estate

  • Real Estate Transaction
  • Landlord/Tenant
  • Shortsales Negotiation

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New Jersey Lawyers – Find a New Jersey Lawyer at NJ Lawsite #new #jersey

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If you need to choose a New Jersey lawyer by County, view our County Directory. Simply choose the County you need and you will be taken to the appropriate County Directory of Law Firms, which also states their areas of expertise.

If you prefer choosing an attorney by practice area, then view our Practice Area Directory. Choose the New Jersey law practice area you are interested in and you will be taken a Directory of Law Firms showing all of their contact information and a hyperlink to their website.

If you know the NJ lawyer you are searching for, then click Onsite Search . Our powerful on-site search engine allows you to search by keyword, name, or town.

Read about our New Jersey Lawyers making headline News!

Choose a New Jersey Lawyer by Practice Area:

Would you like an in-depth look at your lawyer before hiring them?
Visit our New Jersey Lawyer Blogs where we interview members on their law practice.

This Month’s Featured Firm

Proudly serving the New Jersey
legal community since 1996

Disclaimer – New Jersey LawSite and/or AJIS.com make no endorsements as to the professional qualifications of the new jersey lawyers listed in our Directory. We do not assume responsibility for any services provided by our participants. The information contained in our Websites does not constitute legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship will exist following a consultation and entering into a written agreement.

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Divorce Lawyer New York #bankruptcy #lawyer #nyc, #bankrutpcy #lawyer #new #york, #bankruptcy #attorney #nyc,

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The Law offices of Boris Nikhman PC have been successfully aiding the citizens of New York, and the surrounding areas, in many diverse areas of legal expertise. As a supporting figure in the community, for the past 12 years, Boris Nikhman has reciprocated greatly to the neighborhood and has now expanded the business to a Manhattan office. He has successfully represented clients from all avenues of life in countless legal issues. Mr. Nikhman is well known in his community as the considerate neighborhood attorney yet he maintains a high profile in the New York court system with a stellar reputation for courtroom skills and professionalism. For the best representation for any legal matter call the office of Boris Nikhman PC and get an attorney whose foremost concern is for you and your well being.

For a Brooklyn New York attorney call us today at 646-727-5016
We will represent all your legal needs.

The Law Offices of Boris Nikhman PC have experience and proficiency in a broad array of practice areas with special focus on bankruptcy, divorce, immigration issues and real estate. They are here for any legal issues that may arise in your personal life or business and handle each case as if it was their most important, while maintaining a close and personal relationship, with every client, by keeping the lines of communication open at all times.

The expertise areas of practice include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Divorce. Contested or uncontested, by publication, separation agreements, annulment and name change.
  • Bankruptcy. Personal including Chapters 7 and 13. Business including Chapter 11
  • Immigration Law. Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Visa issues. Deportation defense. Illegal detainment.
  • Tax and Corporate Law.
  • Non-Profit Organizations
  • Real Estate Law
  • Will Probate
  • Wills, Trusts and Estates
  • Elder Law
  • Matrimonial. Pre-nuptial agreements
  • 1031 Exchange

Legal issues arise sooner or later in everyone’s life, without exception, and when they do it is best to have an attorney that is already in place and poised to aggressively represent you while at the same time having your rights, protection and defense as his primary motivations.

Do not wait until you need a lawyer. Have us on your team, ready for when the inevitable day arrives.
Call the Law Offices of Boris Nikhman PC, your front line attorneys.


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