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Doing business as, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


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Boeing Suppliers – Doing Business with Boeing, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


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Doing Business with Boeing

Welcome

Since The Boeing Company s inception over 100 years ago, the partnership between Boeing and its global suppliers has created a legacy of aerospace excellence. In today s global economy, the relationships we forge with suppliers are key to our team s agility, integrity and competitiveness and our ability to meet our customers needs. We work as one team, with one future.

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Business – definition of business by The Free Dictionary, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


business

These nouns apply to forms of activity that have the objective of supplying products or services for a fee. Business pertains broadly to commercial, financial, and industrial activity, and more narrowly to specific fields or firms engaging in this activity: a company that does business over the internet; went into the software consulting business; owns a dry-cleaning business. Industry entails the production and manufacture of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale: the computer industry. Commerce and trade refer to the exchange and distribution of goods or commodities: laws regulating interstate commerce; involved in the domestic fur trade. Traffic pertains in particular to businesses engaged in the transportation of goods or passengers: renovated the docks to attract shipping traffic. The word may also suggest illegal trade: discovered a brisk traffic in stolen goods.

busi ness

Business

  1. As oxygen is the disintegrating principle of life, working night and day to dissolve, separate, pull apart and dissipate, so there is something in business that continually tends to scatter, destroy and shift possession from this man to that. A million mice nibble eternally at every business venture Elbert Hubbard
  2. Business is like a man rowing a boat upstream. He has no choice; he must go ahead or he will go back Lewis E. Pierson
  3. Business is like oil. It won t mix with anything but business J. Grahame
  4. Business is very much like religion: it is founded on faith William McFee
  5. Business policy flows downhill from the mountain, like water Anon
  6. A business without customers is like a computer without bytes Anon

As the entries that follow show, this concept lends itself to many additional twists.

Playwrights Ernst and Lindley wrote this simile to be spoken by a judge in their 1930 s play Hold Your Tongue.

The first two words are transposed from Computer companies to generalize the comparison.

business

Business is the work of making, buying, and selling goods or services.

When you use business in this sense, don’t say ‘a business’. Don’t say, for example, ‘ We’ve got a business to do ‘. You say ‘We’ve got some business to do’.

You can talk about a particular area of business using the followed by a noun followed by business.

A business is a company, shop, or organization that makes and sells goods or provides a service.


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Boeing Suppliers – Doing Business with Boeing, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


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Digital Product Definition

Other Quality Requirements

Global Routing Guide

C-TPAT Security Guidelines for International Suppliers/Shippers

Importer Security Filing (for ocean shipments)

Commercial Invoice Requirements

BCA Terms Conditions

BDS Terms Conditions

Shared Services Group (SSG) Terms Conditions

International Terms Conditions

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing business as

Doing Business with Boeing

Welcome

Since The Boeing Company s inception over 100 years ago, the partnership between Boeing and its global suppliers has created a legacy of aerospace excellence. In today s global economy, the relationships we forge with suppliers are key to our team s agility, integrity and competitiveness and our ability to meet our customers needs. We work as one team, with one future.

Utilities

Categories

Popular Links

Follow Boeing

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Copyright 1995 – 2016 Boeing. All Rights Reserved.


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Sears – s History Predicts Almost Everything Amazon – s Doing – The Atlantic,

The History of Sears Predicts Nearly Everything Amazon Is Doing

One hundred years ago, a retail giant that shipped millions of products by mail moved swiftly into the brick-and-mortar business, changing it forever. Is that happening again?

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    • Company. Sears might seem like a zombie today, but it’s easy to forget how transformative the company was exactly 100 years ago, when it, too, was capitalizing on a mail-to-consumer business to establish a physical retail presence.

      To understand Amazon—its evolution, its strategy, and perhaps its future—look to Sears.

      Mail was an internet before the internet. After the Civil War, several new communications and transportations systems—the telegraph, rail, and parcel delivery—made it possible to shop at home and have items delivered to your door. Americans browsed catalogues on their couches for jewelry, food, and books. Merchants sent the parcels by rail.

      From its founding in the late 19th century to its world-famous catalog, the history of Sears, Roebuck Company is well known. Less storied is its magnificently successful transition from a mailing company to a brick-and-mortar giant. Like Amazon among its online-shopping rivals, Sears was not the country’s first mail-order retailer, but it became the largest of its kind. Like Amazon, it started with a single product category—watches, rather than books. But, like Amazon, the company grew to include a range of products, including guns, gramophones, cars, and even groceries.

      From the start, Sears’s genius was to market itself to consumers as an everything store, with an unrivaled range of products, often sold for minuscule profits. The company’s feel for consumer demand was so uncanny, and its operations so efficient, that it became, for many of its diehard customers, not just the best retail option, but the only one worth considering.

      By building a large base of fiercely loyal consumers, Sears was able to buy more cheaply from manufacturers and wholesalers. It managed its deluge of orders with massive warehouses, like its central facility in Chicago, in which messages to various departments and assembly workers were sent through pneumatic tubes. In the decade between 1895 and 1905, Sears’s revenue grew by a factor of 50, from about $750,000 to about $38 million, according to Alfred D. Chandler Jr.’s 1977 book The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business. (By comparison, in the last decade, Amazon’s revenue has grown by a factor of 10.)

      Then, after one of the most successful half-centuries in U.S. corporate history, Sears did something really crazy. It opened a store.

      In the early 1920s, Sears found itself in an economy that was coming off a harsh post-World War recession, according to Daniel M. G. Graff and Peter Temin’s essay “Sears, Roebuck in the Twentieth Century.” The company was also dealing with a more lasting challenge: the rise of chain stores. To guide their corporate makeover, the company tapped a retired World War I general named Robert Wood, who turned to the U.S. Census and Statistical Abstract of the United States as a fount of marketing wisdom. In federally tabulated figures, he saw the country moving from farm to city, and then from city to suburb. His plan: Follow them with stores.

      The first Sears stores opened in the company’s existing mail-order warehouses, for convenience’s sake. But soon they were popping up in new locations. Not satisfied with merely competing with urban department stores like Macy’s, Wood distinguished new Sears locations by plopping them into suburbs where land was cheap and parking space was plentiful.

      Sears’s aesthetic was unadorned, specializing in “hard goods” like plumbing tools and car parts. Wood initially thought that young shoppers would prefer a cold, no-frills experience—he likened the first stores to “military commissaries.” This was a rare misstep; Sears ultimately redesigned their stores to appear more high-end.

      The company’s brick-and-mortar transformation was astonishing. At the start of 1925, there were no Sears stores in the United States. By 1929, there were 300. While Montgomery Ward built 90 percent of its stores in rural areas or small cities, and Woolworth focused on rich urban areas, Sears bet on everything—rural and urban, rich and poor, farmers and manufacturers. Geographically, it disproportionately built where the Statistical Abstract showed growth: in southern, southwestern, and western cities.

      Sears was not content to be a one-stop-shop for durable goods. Like Amazon today, the company used its position to enter adjacent businesses. To supplement its huge auto-parts business, Sears started selling car insurance under the Allstate brand. One might say the shift from selling products to services is analogous to the creation of Amazon Web Services—or even Amazon’s television shows. Analysts have wondered, why would Amazon want to sell books, diapers, and TV? But even the company’s seemingly eccentric decisions are centered on Sears’s old expertise: becoming an inextricable part of consumers’ lives.

      It’s remarkable how Sears’s rise anticipates Amazon’s. The growth of both companies was the result of a focus on operations efficiency, low prices, and a keen eye on the future of American demographics.

      So how might Sears’s experience predict Amazon’s future?

      First, Sears showed that physical retail doesn’t necessarily cannibalize the mailing business. So far, Amazon’s online sales have actually grown in regions where it has a physical store presence, according to CNBC.

      Second, it’s important to remember that, although Sears eventually became a dominant physical retailer, the transition was bumpy. Sears initially assumed that its blue-collar customers would appreciate a no-frills shopping experience. But it eventually beautified its stores to lure the whole family. The spartan design of Amazon’s bookstores already has its detractors, and the company may learn that even a logistics behemoth needs an interior decorator.

      Third, Amazon may find, like Sears, that size can be both an advantage and a bull’s-eye. Sears evolved to become a microcosm of the American economy, with its corporate operations spanning retailing, manufacturing, marketing, and transportation. Warehouses filled 100,000 orders a day, 16 Sears-operated manufacturing plants built name-brand kitchenware and furniture, and a New York branch concentrated in apparel marketing. Amazon is already on this very road; in fact, on Thursday, the company announced that it is adding several thousand marketing jobs in its New York office. But just as Sears attracted the ire of displaced merchants, particularly in rural areas, Amazon will find—and has already found—it impossible to expand without garnering animosity from retailers or regulators.

      Growing inequality in the U.S. may offer new challenges to building a truly national retailer. But once again, Sears offers a lesson. The company thrived as long as it used U.S. demographics as a guide—following Americans to the suburbs of the South and West, and selling parts for their favorite new toy, the automobile. Amazon, too, will thrive as long as it uses American demographics as a roadmap and takes advantage of new personal technology, like mobile phones for shopping and AI assistants for the home. In the last six months, Amazon has spent $13 billion to buy Whole Foods and its upscale urban locations. At the same time, it has offered discounts for low-income shoppers to become Prime subscribers. Perhaps Sears’s descendant can become an everything store for everyone.

      Latest Video

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      Bianca Valenti reveals how female big wave surfers are changing the tides.


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    Video Prank at Domino’s Taints Brand, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


    The New York Times

    A Video Prank at Domino’s Damages Its Brand

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    April 15, 2009

    When two Domino’s Pizza employees filmed a prank in the restaurant’s kitchen, they decided to post it online. In a few days, thanks to the power of social media, they ended up with felony charges, more than a million disgusted viewers, and a major company facing a public relations crisis.

    In videos posted on YouTube and elsewhere this week, a Domino’s employee in Conover, N.C., prepared sandwiches for delivery while putting cheese up his nose, nasal mucus on the sandwiches, and violating other health-code standards while a fellow employee provided narration.

    The two were charged with delivering prohibited foods.

    By Wednesday afternoon, the video had been viewed more than a million times on YouTube. References to it were in five of the 12 results on the first page of Google search for “Dominos,” and discussions about Domino’s had spread throughout Twitter.

    As Domino’s is realizing, social media has the reach and speed to turn tiny incidents into marketing crises. In November, Motrin posted an ad suggesting that carrying babies in slings was a painful new fad. Unhappy mothers posted Twitter complaints about it, and bloggers followed; within days, Motrin had removed the ad and apologized.

    On Monday, Amazon.com apologized for a “ham-fisted” error after Twitter members complained that the sales rankings for gay and lesbian books seemed to have disappeared — and, since Amazon took more than a day to respond, the social-media world criticized it for being uncommunicative.

    According to Domino’s, the employees told executives that they had never actually delivered the tainted food. Still, Domino’s fired the two employees on Tuesday, and they were in the custody of the Conover police department on Wednesday evening, facing felony charges.

    But the crisis was not over for Domino’s.

    “We got blindsided by two idiots with a video camera and an awful idea,” said a Domino’s spokesman, Tim McIntyre, who added that the company was preparing a civil lawsuit. “Even people who’ve been with us as loyal customers for 10, 15, 20 years, people are second-guessing their relationship with Domino’s, and that’s not fair.”

    In just a few days, Domino’s reputation was damaged. The perception of its quality among consumers went from positive to negative since Monday, according to the research firm YouGov, which holds online surveys of about 1,000 consumers every day regarding hundreds of brands.

    “It’s graphic enough in the video, and it’s created enough of a stir, that it gives people a little bit of pause,” said Ted Marzilli, global managing director for YouGov’s BrandIndex.

    The Domino’s experience “is a nightmare,” said Paul Gallagher, managing director and a head of the United States crisis practice at the public relations firm Burson-Marsteller. “It’s the toughest situation for a company to face in terms of a digital crisis.”

    Mr. McIntyre was alerted to the videos on Monday evening by a blogger who had seen them. In the most popular video, a woman who identifies herself as Kristy films a co-worker, Michael, preparing the unsanitary sandwiches.

    “In about five minutes it’ll be sent out on delivery where somebody will be eating these, yes, eating them, and little did they know that cheese was in his nose and that there was some lethal gas that ended up on their salami,” Kristy said. “Now that’s how we roll at Domino’s.”

    On Monday, commenters at the site Consumerist.com used clues in the video to find the franchise location in Conover, and told Mr. McIntyre about the videos. On Tuesday, the Domino’s franchise owner fired the employees, identified by Domino’s as Kristy Hammonds, 31 and Michael Setzer, 32. The franchisee brought in the local health department, which advised him to discard all open containers of food, which cost hundreds of dollars, Mr. McIntyre said.

    Ms. Hammonds apologized to the company in an e-mail message Tuesday morning. “It was fake and I wish that everyone knew that. ” she wrote. “I AM SOO SORRY!”

    By Wednesday evening, the video had been removed from YouTube because of a copyright claim from Ms. Hammonds. Neither Ms. Hammonds nor Mr. Setzer were available for comment on Wednesday evening, said Conover’s chief of police, Gary W. Lafone.

    As the company learned about the video on Tuesday, Mr. McIntyre said, executives decided not to respond aggressively, hoping the controversy would quiet down. “What we missed was the perpetual mushroom effect of viral sensations,” he said.

    In social media, “if you think it’s not going to spread, that’s when it gets bigger,” said Scott Hoffman, the chief marketing officer of the social-media marketing firm Lotame. “We realized that when many of the comments and questions in Twitter were, ‘What is Domino’s doing about it’ ” Mr. McIntyre said. “Well, we were doing and saying things, but they weren’t being covered in Twitter.”

    By Wednesday afternoon, Domino’s had created a Twitter account, @dpzinfo, to address the comments, and it had presented its chief executive in a video on YouTube by evening.

    “It elevated to a point where just responding isn’t good enough,” Mr. McIntyre said.


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    Home, Business Victoria, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


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    Sears – s History Predicts Almost Everything Amazon – s Doing – The Atlantic,

    The History of Sears Predicts Nearly Everything Amazon Is Doing

    One hundred years ago, a retail giant that shipped millions of products by mail moved swiftly into the brick-and-mortar business, changing it forever. Is that happening again?

    Doing business as

    Most Popular

    ‘These Are Not The Actions of an Innocent Man’

    • David Frum
    • 12:42 PM ET
  • How America Lost Its Mind

    • Kurt Andersen
    • Aug 7, 2017
  • The Digital Ruins of a Forgotten Future

    • Leslie Jamison
    • Nov 10, 2017
  • What Donna Brazile’s New Book Really Reveals

    • David A. Graham
    • 7:00 AM ET
  • How to Hire Fake Friends and Family

    • Roc Morin
    • Nov 7, 2017
    • Derek Thompson
    • Sep 25, 2017
    • Business
    • Share
    • Tweet
    • Company. Sears might seem like a zombie today, but it’s easy to forget how transformative the company was exactly 100 years ago, when it, too, was capitalizing on a mail-to-consumer business to establish a physical retail presence.

      To understand Amazon—its evolution, its strategy, and perhaps its future—look to Sears.

      Mail was an internet before the internet. After the Civil War, several new communications and transportations systems—the telegraph, rail, and parcel delivery—made it possible to shop at home and have items delivered to your door. Americans browsed catalogues on their couches for jewelry, food, and books. Merchants sent the parcels by rail.

      From its founding in the late 19th century to its world-famous catalog, the history of Sears, Roebuck Company is well known. Less storied is its magnificently successful transition from a mailing company to a brick-and-mortar giant. Like Amazon among its online-shopping rivals, Sears was not the country’s first mail-order retailer, but it became the largest of its kind. Like Amazon, it started with a single product category—watches, rather than books. But, like Amazon, the company grew to include a range of products, including guns, gramophones, cars, and even groceries.

      From the start, Sears’s genius was to market itself to consumers as an everything store, with an unrivaled range of products, often sold for minuscule profits. The company’s feel for consumer demand was so uncanny, and its operations so efficient, that it became, for many of its diehard customers, not just the best retail option, but the only one worth considering.

      By building a large base of fiercely loyal consumers, Sears was able to buy more cheaply from manufacturers and wholesalers. It managed its deluge of orders with massive warehouses, like its central facility in Chicago, in which messages to various departments and assembly workers were sent through pneumatic tubes. In the decade between 1895 and 1905, Sears’s revenue grew by a factor of 50, from about $750,000 to about $38 million, according to Alfred D. Chandler Jr.’s 1977 book The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business. (By comparison, in the last decade, Amazon’s revenue has grown by a factor of 10.)

      Then, after one of the most successful half-centuries in U.S. corporate history, Sears did something really crazy. It opened a store.

      In the early 1920s, Sears found itself in an economy that was coming off a harsh post-World War recession, according to Daniel M. G. Graff and Peter Temin’s essay “Sears, Roebuck in the Twentieth Century.” The company was also dealing with a more lasting challenge: the rise of chain stores. To guide their corporate makeover, the company tapped a retired World War I general named Robert Wood, who turned to the U.S. Census and Statistical Abstract of the United States as a fount of marketing wisdom. In federally tabulated figures, he saw the country moving from farm to city, and then from city to suburb. His plan: Follow them with stores.

      The first Sears stores opened in the company’s existing mail-order warehouses, for convenience’s sake. But soon they were popping up in new locations. Not satisfied with merely competing with urban department stores like Macy’s, Wood distinguished new Sears locations by plopping them into suburbs where land was cheap and parking space was plentiful.

      Sears’s aesthetic was unadorned, specializing in “hard goods” like plumbing tools and car parts. Wood initially thought that young shoppers would prefer a cold, no-frills experience—he likened the first stores to “military commissaries.” This was a rare misstep; Sears ultimately redesigned their stores to appear more high-end.

      The company’s brick-and-mortar transformation was astonishing. At the start of 1925, there were no Sears stores in the United States. By 1929, there were 300. While Montgomery Ward built 90 percent of its stores in rural areas or small cities, and Woolworth focused on rich urban areas, Sears bet on everything—rural and urban, rich and poor, farmers and manufacturers. Geographically, it disproportionately built where the Statistical Abstract showed growth: in southern, southwestern, and western cities.

      Sears was not content to be a one-stop-shop for durable goods. Like Amazon today, the company used its position to enter adjacent businesses. To supplement its huge auto-parts business, Sears started selling car insurance under the Allstate brand. One might say the shift from selling products to services is analogous to the creation of Amazon Web Services—or even Amazon’s television shows. Analysts have wondered, why would Amazon want to sell books, diapers, and TV? But even the company’s seemingly eccentric decisions are centered on Sears’s old expertise: becoming an inextricable part of consumers’ lives.

      It’s remarkable how Sears’s rise anticipates Amazon’s. The growth of both companies was the result of a focus on operations efficiency, low prices, and a keen eye on the future of American demographics.

      So how might Sears’s experience predict Amazon’s future?

      First, Sears showed that physical retail doesn’t necessarily cannibalize the mailing business. So far, Amazon’s online sales have actually grown in regions where it has a physical store presence, according to CNBC.

      Second, it’s important to remember that, although Sears eventually became a dominant physical retailer, the transition was bumpy. Sears initially assumed that its blue-collar customers would appreciate a no-frills shopping experience. But it eventually beautified its stores to lure the whole family. The spartan design of Amazon’s bookstores already has its detractors, and the company may learn that even a logistics behemoth needs an interior decorator.

      Third, Amazon may find, like Sears, that size can be both an advantage and a bull’s-eye. Sears evolved to become a microcosm of the American economy, with its corporate operations spanning retailing, manufacturing, marketing, and transportation. Warehouses filled 100,000 orders a day, 16 Sears-operated manufacturing plants built name-brand kitchenware and furniture, and a New York branch concentrated in apparel marketing. Amazon is already on this very road; in fact, on Thursday, the company announced that it is adding several thousand marketing jobs in its New York office. But just as Sears attracted the ire of displaced merchants, particularly in rural areas, Amazon will find—and has already found—it impossible to expand without garnering animosity from retailers or regulators.

      Growing inequality in the U.S. may offer new challenges to building a truly national retailer. But once again, Sears offers a lesson. The company thrived as long as it used U.S. demographics as a guide—following Americans to the suburbs of the South and West, and selling parts for their favorite new toy, the automobile. Amazon, too, will thrive as long as it uses American demographics as a roadmap and takes advantage of new personal technology, like mobile phones for shopping and AI assistants for the home. In the last six months, Amazon has spent $13 billion to buy Whole Foods and its upscale urban locations. At the same time, it has offered discounts for low-income shoppers to become Prime subscribers. Perhaps Sears’s descendant can become an everything store for everyone.

      Latest Video

      Doing business as

      ‘Our Surfing Is Revolutionary’

      Bianca Valenti reveals how female big wave surfers are changing the tides.


      Tags : , ,

    Network18 hires Zee Business Amish Devgan as executive editor #business #list


    #zee business

    #

    Network18 hires Zee Business Amish Devgan as executive editor

    MUMBAI: The game of musical chairs in the Indian news TV channel business continues unabated. Over the last couple of months there have been many a high profile resignation and reappointment amongst those delivering news to Indian viewers. The latest to also make a move is Amish Devgan who has hopped on board Network18 as executive editor.

    Devgan will closely work with Network18 news CEO and group editor in chief Rahul Joshi and consulting editor Prabal Pratap Singh. He will use his expertise to devise various strategies and plans for all the Hindi news channels under the group. Network 18 has two Hindi news channels namely IBN7 and CNBC Awaaz.

    With 16 years of journalistic experience, Devgan recently moved out of Zee Media after 14 years. In his last role, he was a prime time anchor and chief editor with Zee Business and hosted the highest TRP gaining show Big Story Big Debate at 8 pm daily. The show included several debates and discussions on various current day-to-day issues across politics, economy, and financial markets with high profile political, corporate guests and experts on camera.

    Devgan started his career with Hindustan Times and joined Zee News in 2002. He later moved to Zee Business in 2005. He has won several accolades in the past and has successfully created a niche for himself amongst business anchors.

    A tweet from Subhash Chandra appreciating Amish Devgan


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    Data Scientists in Demand: Salaries Rise as Talent Shortage Looms #custom #business #cards


    #business week

    #

    Help Wanted: Black Belts in Data

    A new species of techie is in demand these days—not only in Silicon Valley, but also in company headquarters around the world. “Data scientists are the new superheroes,” says Pascal Clement, the head of Amadeus Travel Intelligence in Madrid. The description isn’t exactly hyperbolic: The qualifications for the job include the strength to tunnel through mountains of information and the vision to discern patterns where others see none. Clement’s outfit is part of Amadeus IT Holding, the world’s largest manager of flight bookings for airlines, which has more than 40 data scientists on its payroll, including some with a background in astrophysics. The company recently launched Schedule Recovery, a product that tracks delays and automatically rebooks all affected passengers.

    A study by McKinsey projects that “by 2018, the U.S. alone may face a 50 percent to 60 percent gap between supply and requisite demand of deep analytic talent.” The shortage is already being felt across a broad spectrum of industries, including aerospace, insurance, pharmaceuticals, and finance. When the consulting firm Accenture surveyed its clients on their big-data strategies in April 2014, more than 90 percent said they planned to hire more employees with expertise in data science—most within a year. However, 41 percent of the more than 1,000 respondents cited a lack of talent as a chief obstacle. “It will get worse before it gets better,” says Narendra Mulani, senior managing director at Accenture Analytics.

    Many data scientists have Ph.D.s or postdoctorates and a background in academic research, says Marco Bressan, president for data and analytics at BBVA, a Spanish bank that operates in 31 countries and has a team of more than 20 data scientists. “We have nanotechnologists, physicists, mathematicians, specialists in robotics,” he says. “It’s people who can explore large volumes of data that aren’t structured.”

    So-called unstructured data can include e-mails, videos, photos, social media, and other user-generated content. Data scientists write algorithms to extract insights from these troves of information. But “true data scientists are rare,” says Ricard Benjamins, head of business intelligence and big data at Telefónica, Europe’s second-largest phone company, which employs more than 200 of them. Says Stan Humphries, chief economist at Zillow, the real estate listings site: “You can find a great developer and a great researcher who has a background in statistics, and maybe you can find a great problem solver, but to find that in the same person is hard.”

    Universities are taking note. MIT, where graduate students in physics, astronomy, and biology are fielding offers from outside their chosen fields, is in the process of setting up a dedicated data-science institute. Marilyn Wilson, the university’s associate director for career development, says the center will begin enrolling graduate degree candidates in 2016.

    In the U.K. the University of Warwick introduced a three-year undergraduate data-science program last year, which David Firth, the program’s mastermind, says may well be the first of its kind. “Big Business was complaining about the lack of people,” he says. “Finance is a major employer, but also large-scale insurers, large online commercial retailers, high-tech startups, and government, which has huge data sets.”

    Accenture’s Mulani says he’s tallied some 30 new data-science programs in North America, either up and running or in the works. The University of Virginia began offering a master’s in 2014, as did Stanford. Many of those students may be tempted to drop out before collecting their degree. “Companies are scrambling,” says Margot Gerritsen, director of Stanford’s Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering. “We have second- and third-year students getting offered salaries much higher than what I get.” Starting pay for some full-time jobs is above $200,000, she reports. Summer internships, meanwhile, pay anywhere from $6,000 to $10,000 a month. To make these stints memorable, many employers offer perks such as free meals, complimentary gym memberships, and occasionally temporary housing. “Sometimes you read about students getting abused in internships and working like slaves,” Gerritsen says. “We don’t see that.”

    The bottom line: McKinsey projects that by 2018 demand for data scientists may be as much as 60 percent greater than the supply.

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