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Denver Business Journal warns some renewal notices aren – t legit – The Denver

#denver business journal

#

Denver Business Journal warns some renewal notices aren t legit

The Denver Business Journal has alerted subscribers that they have no connection with United Publishers Network, a company sending out renewal notices for subscriptions that have not expired.

They are not authorized to offer our subscriptions. If you received one of these notices or phone calls, we suggest you ignore it, a message left on subscribers phones said Monday morning.

United Publishers Network is accused of improperly soliciting subscription renewals for magazines and newspapers, including the Denver Business Journal and other publications in the Charlotte, N.C.- based American City Business Journals newspaper chain.

ACBJ is attempting to determine how United Publishers Network obtained its subscriber list.

American City Business Journals parent company has our in-house counsel doing the due diligence right now to figure out exactly what we need to do to get these guys to stop, Denver Business Journal publisher Pete Casillas said, adding that UPN s solicitation is more or less a scam. In the meantime, our position has been to inform our subscribers that these folks are out there and to disregard their notes.

We do know that no credit-card information has been compromised, he said.

In the past three years, the Better Business Bureau has received 875 complaints against United Publishers Network, including 153 problems with the product/service and 371 billing/collection issues.

Carol Garton, vice president of marketing for the Better Business Bureau Denver/Boulder, said that United Publishers Network has an F rating from the BBB.

Consumers allege they receive bills from this company for magazines they currently have subscriptions for, implying it is time for renewal, Garton said. However, consumers claim the subscriptions are not expired, nor did they originally order through this company.

She said consumers alleged that United Publishers Network s renewal advertisement states it has the lowest renewal fee, but subscribers find that renewing directly through the publisher costs less. They also claim that the company charges a $20 processing fee to cancel renewals.

Garton said people who are solicited by phone or letter should always call the Business Journal they are working with and check to see what they received is an actual bill.

The Denver Business Journal said legitimate renewal notices and subscription offers will always display an official logo and ask that payments be sent to the company s service center in Charlotte. People with questions about their subscriptions can call 866-853-3661.

United Publishers Network did not respond to a request for comment.





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Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress #internet #business

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren t Really Letterpress #current #stock

#letterpress business cards

#

Moo Is Now Selling Letterpress Business Cards That Aren’t Really Letterpress

p I m pleasantly surprised by a href= http://us.moo.com/products/letterpress-business-cards.html target= _blank Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts /a . /p “> I’m pleasantly surprised by Moo’s recently announced letterpress efforts .

p The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth. /p “> The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

p Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. /p “> Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

p You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards em are /em cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from a href= http://brooklynsocialcards.com/ordering-process/ target= _blank Brooklyn Social Cards /a will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. /p “> You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

p If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating. /p “> If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give it a feeling of texture and depth.

Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn’t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there’s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

You get what you pay for, and Moo’s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo.

If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card’s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress, but my guess is all but the most discerning letterpress fans won’t even notice, which has got to have some small hot metal presses sweating.

Slideshow: 5 images

I ve got to be honest. I ve never really liked Moo business cards, even after they ve been foisted upon me by half a dozen companies. Moo is a Rhode Island-based company that sells custom-printed business cards online. They get the job done, but I ve always thought Moo s efforts were just cheap and unexceptional. Except for the little stick-of-gum sized Mini Cards. of course: those are so twee, easy-to-lose, and unwieldy that the only practical use I can think to put them to is as instruments of papercut torture applied to the Moo executive who first came up with them.
There s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress.

So I m pleasantly surprised by Moo s recently announced letterpress efforts. The Moo Letterpress Cards are available in 12 different designs (most of which are surprisingly tasteful, with elegant typography and vivid ink colors) and coms printed on a thick weighted card stock (Mohawk Superfine, 32pt weight), which is then debossed on both sides to give each card a feeling of texture and depth. Moo sent me a pack of samples to see for myself, and I have to admit, they look nice, they feel great in the hand, and there isn t a Mini Card to be seen anywhere.

So they re great. But let me be 100% clear here: these are letterpress in name only. Moo tells me there s no movable type involved here at all, which is the very definition of letterpress. Instead, Moo is still just using digital printing techniques to squirt out your business details on a pre-designed business card stock, which is the same as the company has ever done. The distinction here is that those cards come on a quality stock for a change, and get a pre-set pattern debossed on them after they are printed. You still won t be able to feel the type under your fingertips, because that part is digitally printed. It s a shame. There s a reason it s called letter press: using real movable type on high-quality card stock creates a sharp, tactile feel otherwise missing from printed text.

You get what you pay for, and Moo s cards are cheaper than real letterpress. For example, a pack of 500 two-color letterpressed business cards from Brooklyn Social Cards will cost you $500. A similar pack of fake letterpress cards will cost you $339 on Moo. If ultimate letterpress fidelity is important to you and you want to see every letter in your business details branded right into a card s skin, you might still want to spring for traditional letterpress.

Me? I m still not going to order business cards from Moo. If I m going to spend money on letterpress, I d rather give it to artisans and craftsmen, not a faceless Internet printing company. But I have to admit, Moo has me closer to making an order than ever before.

You can order Moo Letterpress business cards here .





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Denver Business Journal warns some renewal notices aren – t legit – The Denver

#denver business journal

#

Denver Business Journal warns some renewal notices aren t legit

The Denver Business Journal has alerted subscribers that they have no connection with United Publishers Network, a company sending out renewal notices for subscriptions that have not expired.

They are not authorized to offer our subscriptions. If you received one of these notices or phone calls, we suggest you ignore it, a message left on subscribers phones said Monday morning.

United Publishers Network is accused of improperly soliciting subscription renewals for magazines and newspapers, including the Denver Business Journal and other publications in the Charlotte, N.C.- based American City Business Journals newspaper chain.

ACBJ is attempting to determine how United Publishers Network obtained its subscriber list.

American City Business Journals parent company has our in-house counsel doing the due diligence right now to figure out exactly what we need to do to get these guys to stop, Denver Business Journal publisher Pete Casillas said, adding that UPN s solicitation is more or less a scam. In the meantime, our position has been to inform our subscribers that these folks are out there and to disregard their notes.

We do know that no credit-card information has been compromised, he said.

In the past three years, the Better Business Bureau has received 875 complaints against United Publishers Network, including 153 problems with the product/service and 371 billing/collection issues.

Carol Garton, vice president of marketing for the Better Business Bureau Denver/Boulder, said that United Publishers Network has an F rating from the BBB.

Consumers allege they receive bills from this company for magazines they currently have subscriptions for, implying it is time for renewal, Garton said. However, consumers claim the subscriptions are not expired, nor did they originally order through this company.

She said consumers alleged that United Publishers Network s renewal advertisement states it has the lowest renewal fee, but subscribers find that renewing directly through the publisher costs less. They also claim that the company charges a $20 processing fee to cancel renewals.

Garton said people who are solicited by phone or letter should always call the Business Journal they are working with and check to see what they received is an actual bill.

The Denver Business Journal said legitimate renewal notices and subscription offers will always display an official logo and ask that payments be sent to the company s service center in Charlotte. People with questions about their subscriptions can call 866-853-3661.

United Publishers Network did not respond to a request for comment.





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26 Creative Business Cards That Aren – t Even Cards – TwistedSifter #business #funding

#creative business cards

#

TwistedSifter

26 Creative Business Cards That Aren t Even Cards

Contact information has gone digital but that doesn t mean the traditional business card no longer serves a purpose. Business cards these days are used to make an impression. They can be great marketing tools for your services and a memorable card can lead to new opportunities.

Below you will find a collection of 26 of the most creative business cards that aren t even cards in the traditional sense. They do however, make an impression and break through the noise.

1. LEGO employees have the best business cards

2. Bike tool that fits in your wallet

3. For Personal Trainers

4. Business card caliper

5. The Cardapult : Business card catapult

6. Business card coins

7. Business cards for plumbers

8. Beef jerky business card is good for a year

9. Music to your eyes

10. T Make a seat

11. Jack of all trades

12. Cheese grater for cheese shop

13. Business card skateboard deck

14. Musical business card comb

15. Lavender sachet business card

16. Frame of mind

17. Delivery box business card

18. Problem solving business card

19. Fabric business card

20. Stand up for creativity

21. Business card ring sizer for Jewellers

22. Yoga mat business card

23. Business card chocolates

24. Lock pick business card

25. For growing businesses

26. This business card plays Tetris

If you enjoyed this post, the Sifter
highly recommends:

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Denver Business Journal warns some renewal notices aren – t legit – The Denver

#denver business journal

#

Denver Business Journal warns some renewal notices aren t legit

The Denver Business Journal has alerted subscribers that they have no connection with United Publishers Network, a company sending out renewal notices for subscriptions that have not expired.

They are not authorized to offer our subscriptions. If you received one of these notices or phone calls, we suggest you ignore it, a message left on subscribers phones said Monday morning.

United Publishers Network is accused of improperly soliciting subscription renewals for magazines and newspapers, including the Denver Business Journal and other publications in the Charlotte, N.C.- based American City Business Journals newspaper chain.

ACBJ is attempting to determine how United Publishers Network obtained its subscriber list.

American City Business Journals parent company has our in-house counsel doing the due diligence right now to figure out exactly what we need to do to get these guys to stop, Denver Business Journal publisher Pete Casillas said, adding that UPN s solicitation is more or less a scam. In the meantime, our position has been to inform our subscribers that these folks are out there and to disregard their notes.

We do know that no credit-card information has been compromised, he said.

In the past three years, the Better Business Bureau has received 875 complaints against United Publishers Network, including 153 problems with the product/service and 371 billing/collection issues.

Carol Garton, vice president of marketing for the Better Business Bureau Denver/Boulder, said that United Publishers Network has an F rating from the BBB.

Consumers allege they receive bills from this company for magazines they currently have subscriptions for, implying it is time for renewal, Garton said. However, consumers claim the subscriptions are not expired, nor did they originally order through this company.

She said consumers alleged that United Publishers Network s renewal advertisement states it has the lowest renewal fee, but subscribers find that renewing directly through the publisher costs less. They also claim that the company charges a $20 processing fee to cancel renewals.

Garton said people who are solicited by phone or letter should always call the Business Journal they are working with and check to see what they received is an actual bill.

The Denver Business Journal said legitimate renewal notices and subscription offers will always display an official logo and ask that payments be sent to the company s service center in Charlotte. People with questions about their subscriptions can call 866-853-3661.

United Publishers Network did not respond to a request for comment.





Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , ,

26 Creative Business Cards That Aren – t Even Cards – TwistedSifter #franchise #opportunities

#creative business cards

#

TwistedSifter

26 Creative Business Cards That Aren t Even Cards

Contact information has gone digital but that doesn t mean the traditional business card no longer serves a purpose. Business cards these days are used to make an impression. They can be great marketing tools for your services and a memorable card can lead to new opportunities.

Below you will find a collection of 26 of the most creative business cards that aren t even cards in the traditional sense. They do however, make an impression and break through the noise.

1. LEGO employees have the best business cards

2. Bike tool that fits in your wallet

3. For Personal Trainers

4. Business card caliper

5. The Cardapult : Business card catapult

6. Business card coins

7. Business cards for plumbers

8. Beef jerky business card is good for a year

9. Music to your eyes

10. T Make a seat

11. Jack of all trades

12. Cheese grater for cheese shop

13. Business card skateboard deck

14. Musical business card comb

15. Lavender sachet business card

16. Frame of mind

17. Delivery box business card

18. Problem solving business card

19. Fabric business card

20. Stand up for creativity

21. Business card ring sizer for Jewellers

22. Yoga mat business card

23. Business card chocolates

24. Lock pick business card

25. For growing businesses

26. This business card plays Tetris

If you enjoyed this post, the Sifter
highly recommends:

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Next

Random

Related

Trending on TwistedSifter





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