Tag: Are

Grants for starting a business: What small business grants are available?: Starting a business

#loans for starting a business

#

Grants for starting a business: What small business grants are available?

If you’re a small business owner or thinking of starting a business, finance is probably your biggest concern. You may be wondering if there is any funding available for start-ups.

The simple answer is yes, but getting your hands on it can be a complicated and rather stressful process. There are countless schemes, each with their own set of criteria, which you can apply for when you’re on the verge of starting a business.

Action point: Need a loan to start a business of your own? See how we can help here and here

Start-up funding is out there to be claimed, yet every year we receive stories of piles of cash sitting in accounts and not being invested. It’s not because you don’t need the cash, but it’s because navigating through the grants jungle can leave you wishing you were still employed.

Types of business support

All publicly funded schemes are designed to encourage new and growing businesses, to bring wealth and ultimately create jobs. To help achieve this the government makes available a portion of taxpayers’ money to help and encourage enterprise through small business grants.

This cash gets distributed through a variety of ministries, departments, agencies and quangos on a national and local basis. Most businesses are eligible at any one time to apply for a number of different business start-up grants and support schemes which are distributed in a wide variety of forms.
s
Government grant resource the business finance support finder is a great tool to help those starting a business find relevant funding to suit their needs and you are able to customise your search by your business location, size, and type of business activity.

Want to read more on grants?

Government business grants available

Direct grant

This is a cash award, which is usually given out for activities such as training, employment, export development, recruitment and capital investment projects. With a direct grant most schemes usually require the company involved to put up around 50% of the cost.

The government s ‘business finance support finder’ directory has over 300 direct grants agencies listed such as UK business “innovation” organisation the Technology Strategy Board. The directory also features various local grants providers which are facilitated by the government’s £3.2bn Regional Growth Fund. such as Catalyst for Growth which has direct grants of £5,000 to £500,000 available for chemical start-ups launching in the North West of England.

Soft loan

A soft loan is a special type of grant where the terms and conditions of repayment are more generous (or softer) than they would be under normal financial circumstances. So, for example, the interest rates may be less, or there may be no interest to pay at all, and the repayment terms could also be for a longer period.

There are hundreds of organisations that offer soft loans and guarantees but the most notable is government-funded scheme Start Up Loans which offers new businesses loans of up to £25,000 for 6% interest with a 12 month repayment “holiday”. To date it has helped to fund over 10,000 start-ups with over £50m invested. You can find out more about the Start Up Loans scheme here. (If you need a higher value business loan, fill out our business loans form and we may be able to put you in touch with the right people).

If you’re starting a social enterprise or charity there are organisations such as Big Issue Invest. the investment arm of the Big Issue, which has soft loans from £50,000 to £1m available for positive impact, socially-driven entrepreneurs and also operates ‘participation loans’ where repayment is linked to future performance of the enterprise.

For young entrepreneurs aged between 18-30, The Prince s Trust provides soft loans of up to £4,000, as well as support for your business idea, with interest capped at 3% and repayments spread over a period of two to five years.

Equity finance

With equity finance a capital sum is injected into the business and the provider of the funds takes an equity share of the enterprise. When the value of the firm increases the stake can then be returned. However, unlike venture capitalists, the expectations and requirements of the providers of public funds are usually less demanding.

It is also worth noting the government Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS) and Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme (SEIS) which help companies raise finance by providing tax relief to investors who buy a share in your business.

Free or subsidised consultancy

Start-ups can often find themselves in the situation where they are lacking a particular set of skills and there are some specially run schemes which provide this knowledge either for free or at subsidised rates. For instance, the Welsh government runs a business support service offering free, independent advice on starting a business and operates an instant hotline for business queries.

Access to resources

As with a lack of skills, it can be the case that start-ups do not possess the physical resources or facilities they need in order to develop particular projects. In the same way there are a number of initiatives, particularly incubator and accelerator schemes, that can help overcome these concerns by providing access to publicly owned facilities. One such initiative is the department for business, innovation and skills’ (DBIS) GrowthAccelerator which provides advice and coaching to fast-growth businesses with fewer than 250 employees.

Technology and Best Practice transfer

The transfer of technological advances and new best practice initiatives can often take a long time filtering down to smaller businesses. The government has set up schemes which aim to overcome this through business support networks and there is now a number of well-established best practice initiatives such as Investors in People (IIP), which specialises in business tools and resources.

Cost sharing

When it comes to research and development, the costs involved can prevent small firms from taking part. However, by sharing the costs with other businesses, and then sharing the expertise, this problem can be avoided.

To find out more about grants for starting a business, visit our dedicated small business grants channel here .

Useful business start up tools

Forum post of the week

Want to run a more profitable business?

More from Startups





Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

What are some good home-business ideas for a stay-at-home Indian woman? #unsecured #business #loan

#at home business ideas

#

There are many things you can do. Plus, you have the advantage of being more educated than your peers.

Firstly, I d suggest you to try and build an audience for yourself. The best way to get started with that would be to write a blog.

Do you have a hobby? Do you have a particular skill? You could help others pursue that hobby or learn that skill and make some profit from it too.

More often, we tend to have gained some skills by doing something, skills which complement the main thing. So, if you were a teacher, you d also to need to have good communication, crowd control and problem solving skills in addition of having the skill to teach. Try to explore these hidden skills of yours.

You mentioned that you had a child, did you pull off some clever skills or hacks while you were pregnant or your baby was growing up? Chances are many other women will also be in the same problem as you were in, write a book (eBook will be a good option here) detailing the problems and solutions you came up with. Sell it to the audience you have created. Initially, the money will not be that great, but if you keep coming up with good content and market yourself, there should be no problem in being able to run earn the money you want to.

Try reading new books, they help a lot. I recommend The $100 Startup. This book specifically profiles people who have earned around $50,000 a year doing things they love. Almost all the businesses mentioned here are not skill intensive and can be operated by anyone. Plus, the author also gives actionable advice on how and where to get started and what can you do to enjoy freedom and earn money.

Here s a list of what all you can do, according to me. Although, it would have been easier to answer this if you would have told, in which city you live and how much investment can you do. Still, I will try to do my best.

1. Teach what you know the best: Investment Banking — Apply in schools to teach commerce students of higher grades or apply in colleges. With industry exposure and experience I am sure you will easily get a job. Later, you can earn some extra money by giving tuitions in the evening. A teacher, teaching in a college and then giving tuitions can easily earn around 50,000.

2. Start Blogging: [ A lot of people below have listed blogging to earn money through Ads or affiliate marketing, but this will take time, it takes atleast 3 to 4 years to start earning a healthy amount through blogging and that too if you are regular blogger and understand lot many complexities like SEO, coding etc.]. Write about things that you understnad, you are at home, so you have time to research and read. Write your own articles and analysis about various mergers, economic trends, stock advices, etc etc. Publicise your blog through facebook and linkedin. Now use this as your customer base. Then start a separate consultancy and advisory. The way Google earns money. Give some services for free like research and analysis, in your case, and then earn from the presence of people. Later, with high traffic you will also be able to earn money from Ads. Also, if you will have a set of audience reading you per day, later you can also start writing for newspapers or magazines.

3. Start an Activity Centre: [ This is the reason, I asked how much investment you have. In both the options mentioned above, you will not need any investment but for this one, you will need an initial investment ]. Take a space on rent, or better if you have a hall and one room vacant in your home. Put 2 Pool tables, some table chair, an LCD or a Music system will also work, Free Wifi and provide some snacks. All this will cost around 2 lakhs of investment. Charge around Rs. 20 per person/per hour for the pool table. 8 people = Rs. 160. Assume that the shop remains operational for around 10 hours, our of which people play pool for say 5 hours, or for 5 hours the tables remain occupied. This will amount to Rs. 800. [Some times it may happen the tables are not fully occupied, that s why I decreased no of hours of occupancy. ] Provide snacks like, Masala Cola, Soda Lemon, Juice, French Fries, Burgers etc etc. They have high margin and it doesn t takes much expertise to make them. The free wifi and these snacks will make it a fun chill out and hang out place. People will come and spend time. Even if you will be able to make Rs. 400 from the snacks vertical. In aggregate you will be able make around Rs. 36,000 to Rs. 40,000 per month. Later you can expand to have a gym on the next floor or something.

4. Open up a Coaching Centre. This is similar to the 1st point. Education is the best business in India these days. One can easily earn Rs. 20,000 to 30,000 just by giving home tuitions in the evening, 4 to hours thats it. So you obviously will not give home tuitions, but open up your own coaching centre. Hire a teacher in the start, to teach subjects in which you are not very good. Preferably hire a college student as, they will be more enthusiastic and eager to teach and will charge less money, all they are concerned about is to make some extra bucks. Start with teaching commerce students, teach subjects that you know. May be 1st year you will not make much, but yes second year onwards you will have a decent income. And trust me this will rise exponentially. May be in 3 or 4 years, you will be earning much more than what you have expected above in the description, provided you give some good results and better branding.

5. Start Investing — You understand companies and you understand market. Start with a decent amount of Rs. 2 lakhs. Have a varied portfolio. With some technical analysis and a good knowledge, it wont be hard to make 20% return. And obviously later you will earn compounded returns. You will be able to make much more money after 2 or 3 years.

I hope some of these points will help and If any of these do work, then give me some tips on Investment Banking, or preferably teach me. P As, I want to be an Investment Banker and currently working in the same field. )





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

29 Cool Business Cards That Are Unforgettable – Awesome Business Cards #own #business #ideas

#best business cards

#

How many business cards have you kept and remembered after meeting someone new? A few? One? None? More than likely, you have thrown away or stored most of the business cards you were handed without giving them more thought. It would impossible to do that with these 29 business cards. They are all so delightfully creative and memorable, it’s hard to imagine them anywhere but lying on your desk or tacked to a bulletin board.

1.) A business card that’s also a cheese grater

2.) Mini plungers, complete with the plumber’s contact information.

3.) LEGO agents for a business

4.) These unique wine Sommelière cards

5.) A mini yoga mat card for a yoga studio

6.) A landscaping business card that’s an investment in their own future

7.) An empty picture frame business card

8.) A yoga trainer’s business card that encourages you to stretch

9.) This adorable seed packet business card





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

#cincinnati business courier

#

Where are They Now? Patrick Donnelly in Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 Retrospective

June 20th 2016 at 3:13PM

Twenty years ago, Patrick Donnelly, then associate principal and director of client services at BHDP, was recognized in the Forty Under 40 class of 1996 from the Cincinnati Business Courier. In a rare retrospective of all winners from this highly motivated class, the Business Courier reports on the current standings of each nominee.

Today, Patrick Donnelly continues his work at BHDP, now as an owner and client leader.

As the article reports:

A lot has changed since 1996. The Forty Under 40 awards were only in their second year and the Business Courier received 120 nominations. (This year, we received 426 nominations.) However, the focus was the same: We were seeking up-and-coming business leaders making a difference in the community.

The emphasis is on leadership and potential leadership – whether it is in business, finance, politics, nonprofits, education or public service. Focus is also placed on the nominee’s community involvement. Most of our honorees have made good on the early promise they showed. Among them we count 14 company presidents, nine sitting CEOs, three business owners, two law partners and one judge.

2016 BHDP Architecture. All rights reserved.





Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

What are business ethics? Business ethics and corporate social responsibility – Anglo American #business

#business ethics

#

Business ethics and corporate social responsibility
An Anglo American case study

Page 2: What are business ethics?

Business ethics are moral principles that guide the way a business behaves. The same principles that determine an individual s actions also apply to business.

Acting in an ethical way involves distinguishing between right and wrong and then making the right choice. It is relatively easy to identify unethical business practices. For example, companies should not use child labour. They should not unlawfully use copyrighted materials and processes. They should not engage in bribery.

However, it is not always easy to create similar hard-and-fast definitions of good ethical practice. A company must make a competitive return for its shareholders and treat its employees fairly. A company also has wider responsibilities. It should minimise any harm to the environment and work in ways that do not damage the communities in which it operates. This is known as corporate social responsibility.

Codes of behaviour

The law is the key starting point for any business. Most leading businesses also have their own statement of Business Principles which set out their core values and standards. In Anglo American s case, this is called Good Citizenship .

A business should also follow relevant codes of practice that cover its sector. Many companies have created voluntary codes of practice that regulate practices in their industrial sector. These are often drawn up in consultation with governments, employees, local communities and other stakeholders. Anglo American has played an active part in initiatives such as the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative.

Anglo American has also contributed to the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights. This code sets out principles and practices for ensuring that a company s need to ensure the security of its employees and operations in volatile countries does not adversely impact upon the local population. Thus the Principles provide guidance on how both private and public security forces assigned to protect a mining operation or an oil and gas facility should be vetted, trained in human rights, monitored and controlled.

Anglo American also aims to ensure that it plays a role in protecting the human rights of its employees and local people in countries in which it operates. The company supports the principles set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

All companies need to make a profit. However, Anglo American recognises that this objective must take account of ethics as shown in its statement on corporate responsibility: Though providing strong returns for our shareholders remains our prime objective, we do not believe that these can or should be achieved at the expense of social, environmental and moral considerations. Indeed a long-term business such as ours will only thrive if it also takes into account the needs of other stakeholders such as governments, employees, suppliers, communities and customers.

Stakeholders

An important process used by Anglo American is that of stakeholder engagement. This enables it better to understand the perspectives and priorities of external groups that are affected by its activities and to factor them into its decision-making processes. To support this work at a local level, Anglo American has developed a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox or SEAT process.

This toolbox helps managers to measure the impact of activities on the company and communities. It also helps to improve a mine s contribution to development through, for example, using its supply chain needs to generate new businesses or to improve the water or electricity infrastructure. They use this toolbox to engage with stakeholders including community representatives.

Sometimes communities have to be resettled, with government sanction, in order for important mineral deposits to be accessed. This can cause controversy and divisions in the communities concerned. International best practice sets out a number of key stages in such a process including the need for structured consultation, fair compensation and the importance of restoring and enhancing the livelihoods of people in their new locations.

Recently Anglo American has had to undertake two such relocations in South Africa at the villages of Ga Pila and Motlhotlo. These were undertaken with the support of the provincial government and local tribal leadership and after consultation with local people lasting for several years leading to agreement with each householder. New villages have been built with better houses and infrastructure and more land for farming. The relocation programme was voluntary. The relocation programme at Motlhotlo is still under way but at Ga Pila 98% of those living in the old village took up the offer to move to the new village.

Anglo American | Business ethics and corporate social responsibility





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #online #businesses

#small business tips

#

21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

2. Add a personal touch.

Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

3. Leverage social media.

A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

4. Write your own business bible.

Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

5. Focus on your specialty.

In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

6. Outsource the things you don t do.

Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

7. Aim high and be persistent.

Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

8. Embrace a life less frantic.

Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

9. Follow your own path.

Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

11. Harness your keystone habits .

Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

12. Practise mindfulness.

Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

14. Hire from within your networks.

When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

15. Keep it manageable.

Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

16. Know when to work for free.

Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

18. Learn to say no.

Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

20. Turn competition into inspiration.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

21. Know when to take a dream detour .

Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

What Are the Best International Bond Markets? #writing #business #plan

#bond market news

#

What Are the Best International Bond Markets?

What Are the Best International Bond Markets?

With low interest rates in the U.S. and outright negative rates in some overseas markets, the bond market probably isn’t the first thing to come to mind when investors are looking for yield.

But experts are pointing to some niches of the international bond arena that are yielding well above what can be had domestically, albeit with more risk.

Both high-quality and lower-quality bonds have been performing well in terms of price. High-quality developed market bonds have rallied with demand from risk-averse investors, such as those worried about Britain voting to leave the European Union .

But of course as bond prices rise, their yields decline. So, needing to make money, investors have also been turning to lower-quality emerging market bonds. That also drives their price up, but these bonds simply yield more because they are riskier.

It can be tempting to stay within the U.S. in terms of bonds, says Richard Lawrence, senior vice president of portfolio management at Brandywine Global Investment Management, which is a subadvisor for the Legg Mason BW Global Opportunities Bond Fund (ticker: GOBIX ). But that would be eschewing higher yields in emerging markets and some developed world bonds.

“You have to look beyond the headlines,” he says.

Emerging markets can be a good place to look for yield, but that’s because they are associated with certain risks, says Eric Stein, co-director of global income at Eaton Vance Management, which has the Global Macro Absolute Return Fund (EIGMX ), the Emerging Markets Local Income Fund (EEIAX ) and the Emerging Markets Debt Opportunities Fund (EIDOX ). The three main risks for foreign bonds are currency, interest rates and default, he says.

International bonds also move in step with the Federal Reserve and U.S. Treasurys. If the Fed raises rates, that would cause bond yields elsewhere to rise, meaning their value would fall in the short term. This would only create a headwind for international bonds if the Fed raises rates more than expected and Treasurys sell off, Stein says.

If U.S. rates rise more quickly than expected, this could strengthen the U.S. dollar and cause some emerging market currencies to weaken.

Demand from China is also a risk as many emerging market countries are commodities producers and China is a large consumer, he says. A sell off in the Chinese currency can also send shockwaves through global risk markets, he says.

Oil prices are also a risk, since many emerging market countries are oil exporters, he says.

With the top five global bond issuers – the U.S. France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Japan – all yielding low or negative rates, emerging market countries are “last bastions of yield,” says Meb Faber, a co-founder and chief investment officer of Cambria Investment Management.

Rising interest rates in the U.S. would lead to higher rates elsewhere. So in the short term, that would cause international bond prices to decline and their yield to go up, Faber says.

Whether international bonds will face a strong headwind as the Fed raises rates depends on how the market reacts to the pace of the hikes, Lawrence says.

A strong dollar acts as a headwind for investors in international bonds unless they hedge that currency exposure, he says, but this year, declines in the U.S. dollar have made it more sensible to buy securities denominated in other currencies.

Stein thinks the Fed will raise rates a little more than expected over the next two years, providing a slight headwind to some emerging market currencies.

For those looking for yield, Lawrence points to Brazil, where the 10-year bond is yielding around 12 percent. He also likes Mexico because of its correlation with the slowly improving U.S. economy and its Treasury market but much higher yield. South Africa is also attractive, with its 10-year bonds yielding about 9 percent and a slowly improving fiscal picture.

Both Lawrence and Stein point to Indonesia because of its reform agenda.

They also cite New Zealand as a niche of the developed world economies where investors can get higher yields without taking a lot of credit risk. However, Stein is bearish on the New Zealand dollar.





Tags : , , , , , ,

29 Cool Business Cards That Are Unforgettable – Awesome Business Cards #online #business #degree

#best business cards

#

How many business cards have you kept and remembered after meeting someone new? A few? One? None? More than likely, you have thrown away or stored most of the business cards you were handed without giving them more thought. It would impossible to do that with these 29 business cards. They are all so delightfully creative and memorable, it’s hard to imagine them anywhere but lying on your desk or tacked to a bulletin board.

1.) A business card that’s also a cheese grater

2.) Mini plungers, complete with the plumber’s contact information.

3.) LEGO agents for a business

4.) These unique wine Sommelière cards

5.) A mini yoga mat card for a yoga studio

6.) A landscaping business card that’s an investment in their own future

7.) An empty picture frame business card

8.) A yoga trainer’s business card that encourages you to stretch

9.) This adorable seed packet business card





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #lucrative #business #ideas

#small business tips

#

21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

2. Add a personal touch.

Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

3. Leverage social media.

A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

4. Write your own business bible.

Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

5. Focus on your specialty.

In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

6. Outsource the things you don t do.

Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

7. Aim high and be persistent.

Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

8. Embrace a life less frantic.

Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

9. Follow your own path.

Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

11. Harness your keystone habits .

Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

12. Practise mindfulness.

Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

14. Hire from within your networks.

When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

15. Keep it manageable.

Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

16. Know when to work for free.

Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

18. Learn to say no.

Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

20. Turn competition into inspiration.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

21. Know when to take a dream detour .

Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.





Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

What are some good home-business ideas for a stay-at-home Indian woman? #entrepreneurship #ideas

#at home business ideas

#

There are many things you can do. Plus, you have the advantage of being more educated than your peers.

Firstly, I d suggest you to try and build an audience for yourself. The best way to get started with that would be to write a blog.

Do you have a hobby? Do you have a particular skill? You could help others pursue that hobby or learn that skill and make some profit from it too.

More often, we tend to have gained some skills by doing something, skills which complement the main thing. So, if you were a teacher, you d also to need to have good communication, crowd control and problem solving skills in addition of having the skill to teach. Try to explore these hidden skills of yours.

You mentioned that you had a child, did you pull off some clever skills or hacks while you were pregnant or your baby was growing up? Chances are many other women will also be in the same problem as you were in, write a book (eBook will be a good option here) detailing the problems and solutions you came up with. Sell it to the audience you have created. Initially, the money will not be that great, but if you keep coming up with good content and market yourself, there should be no problem in being able to run earn the money you want to.

Try reading new books, they help a lot. I recommend The $100 Startup. This book specifically profiles people who have earned around $50,000 a year doing things they love. Almost all the businesses mentioned here are not skill intensive and can be operated by anyone. Plus, the author also gives actionable advice on how and where to get started and what can you do to enjoy freedom and earn money.

Here s a list of what all you can do, according to me. Although, it would have been easier to answer this if you would have told, in which city you live and how much investment can you do. Still, I will try to do my best.

1. Teach what you know the best: Investment Banking — Apply in schools to teach commerce students of higher grades or apply in colleges. With industry exposure and experience I am sure you will easily get a job. Later, you can earn some extra money by giving tuitions in the evening. A teacher, teaching in a college and then giving tuitions can easily earn around 50,000.

2. Start Blogging: [ A lot of people below have listed blogging to earn money through Ads or affiliate marketing, but this will take time, it takes atleast 3 to 4 years to start earning a healthy amount through blogging and that too if you are regular blogger and understand lot many complexities like SEO, coding etc.]. Write about things that you understnad, you are at home, so you have time to research and read. Write your own articles and analysis about various mergers, economic trends, stock advices, etc etc. Publicise your blog through facebook and linkedin. Now use this as your customer base. Then start a separate consultancy and advisory. The way Google earns money. Give some services for free like research and analysis, in your case, and then earn from the presence of people. Later, with high traffic you will also be able to earn money from Ads. Also, if you will have a set of audience reading you per day, later you can also start writing for newspapers or magazines.

3. Start an Activity Centre: [ This is the reason, I asked how much investment you have. In both the options mentioned above, you will not need any investment but for this one, you will need an initial investment ]. Take a space on rent, or better if you have a hall and one room vacant in your home. Put 2 Pool tables, some table chair, an LCD or a Music system will also work, Free Wifi and provide some snacks. All this will cost around 2 lakhs of investment. Charge around Rs. 20 per person/per hour for the pool table. 8 people = Rs. 160. Assume that the shop remains operational for around 10 hours, our of which people play pool for say 5 hours, or for 5 hours the tables remain occupied. This will amount to Rs. 800. [Some times it may happen the tables are not fully occupied, that s why I decreased no of hours of occupancy. ] Provide snacks like, Masala Cola, Soda Lemon, Juice, French Fries, Burgers etc etc. They have high margin and it doesn t takes much expertise to make them. The free wifi and these snacks will make it a fun chill out and hang out place. People will come and spend time. Even if you will be able to make Rs. 400 from the snacks vertical. In aggregate you will be able make around Rs. 36,000 to Rs. 40,000 per month. Later you can expand to have a gym on the next floor or something.

4. Open up a Coaching Centre. This is similar to the 1st point. Education is the best business in India these days. One can easily earn Rs. 20,000 to 30,000 just by giving home tuitions in the evening, 4 to hours thats it. So you obviously will not give home tuitions, but open up your own coaching centre. Hire a teacher in the start, to teach subjects in which you are not very good. Preferably hire a college student as, they will be more enthusiastic and eager to teach and will charge less money, all they are concerned about is to make some extra bucks. Start with teaching commerce students, teach subjects that you know. May be 1st year you will not make much, but yes second year onwards you will have a decent income. And trust me this will rise exponentially. May be in 3 or 4 years, you will be earning much more than what you have expected above in the description, provided you give some good results and better branding.

5. Start Investing — You understand companies and you understand market. Start with a decent amount of Rs. 2 lakhs. Have a varied portfolio. With some technical analysis and a good knowledge, it wont be hard to make 20% return. And obviously later you will earn compounded returns. You will be able to make much more money after 2 or 3 years.

I hope some of these points will help and If any of these do work, then give me some tips on Investment Banking, or preferably teach me. P As, I want to be an Investment Banker and currently working in the same field. )





Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,