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Articles about Business #financing #for #business

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Business

February 17, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik

A few days ago the Public Broadcasting Service announced it was returning a $3.5-million grant it had received from a Texas billionaire to fund a series of documentaries about the “pension peril” — the costs to cities and states of their public employee retirement obligations. PBS took the action after a report in the tech news website PandoDaily exposed the conflict of interest underlying the original donation. That was the good news. The bad news was that PBS had accepted the funding from a self-interested billionaire in the first place.

ARTICLES BY DATE

April 27, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and David Undercoffler

Toyota Motor Corp. plans to move large numbers of jobs from its sales and marketing headquarters in Torrance to suburban Dallas, according to a person familiar with the automaker’s plans. The move, creating a new North American headquarters, would put management of Toyota’s U.S. business close to where it builds most cars for this market. North American Chief Executive Jim Lentz is expected to brief employees Monday, said the person, who was not authorized to speak publicly. Toyota declined to detail its plans.

May 11, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER

Sue Herera and Maria Bartiromo are two of the best-known faces in financial journalism, a world once dominated by white men in suits. Both women, in recent interviews, expressed their thoughts on the stock market, the booming demand for business news and their ever-busier lives. Sue Herera, 41, grew up in Brentwood. Her father was a shoe wholesaler and her mother a homemaker.

April 24, 2014 | Times Editorial Board

Something stinks in Irwindale. In recent months, officials in the largely industrial San Gabriel Valley city have appeared to be on a crusade to shut down Huy Fong Foods, the company that makes a wildly popular Sriracha sauce, for emitting chili and garlic odors that bother some neighbors. While a city should protect residents from harmful and/or unpleasant fumes, Irwindale’s aggressive and unreasonable tactics have threatened to drive a home-grown enterprise out of state and bolstered California’s unfortunate reputation as a bad place to do business.

April 24, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER

Pots were boiling, pastries were baking and bodies were moving Wednesday as students at Aliso Niguel High School prepared a special luncheon to announce the start of an internship program to teach students the restaurant business. Students spend 15 hours a week working at local restaurants as part of their Culinary Arts Department curriculum. They also may receive community college credit.

December 15, 2009

IMac delays blamed on its popularity Apple Inc. said the popularity of its new iMacs has led to shipment delays, causing two-week waits for customers ordering a 27-inch version of the desktop computer through the company’s website. Apple started selling updated versions of its all-in-one iMac computer in October. The Apple fan site AppleInsider.com, citing resellers, said some buyers of the 27-inch models have complained about flickering screens and yellow-tinged displays — problems that Apple may be delaying production to fix. Users also have reported screen malfunctions on the iMac discussion board at Apple’s website.

April 24, 2014 | By Richard Verrier

It’s the question on the minds of many in Los Angeles’ film community: Does Gov. Jerry Brown get how badly the state’s film and TV industry has been squeezed by runaway production? Kish Rajan, director of the Governor’s Office of Business & Economic Development, offered some reassuring words to film commissioners and industry executives who gathered in Hollywood on Thursday for an annual breakfast hosted by the California Film Commission. Rajan stopped short of saying whether Brown would rally behind a bill winding through the Assembly that would significantly expand California’s film and TV tax credit program, which allocates $100 million annually but is due to run out of funds next year.

April 22, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez

Swiss pharmaceutical titan Novartis AG on Tuesday announced an overhaul of its operations that involved several multibillion-dollar deals with GlaxoSmithKline intended to allow Novartis to focus on its oncology business and boost profitability, the companies said. The spate of deals follows recent consolidations in the pharmaceutical industry with large price tags, including the $5.6-billion acquisition of an Anaheim specialty drug firm by Irish pharmaceutical company Mallinckrodt this month.

April 19, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan

The six brothers and sisters, with a gap of 31 years from eldest to youngest, gathered in the winter near the first anniversary of their father’s death to discuss some problems about the family business. It’s also the city’s treasured sports team – the Lakers. The team was nose-diving in the standings, losing the interest of fans, and grinding toward its worst season since the team moved to Los Angeles in 1960. So Jeanie Buss posed an elementary question to her siblings: What was going on with the Lakers?

April 19, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire

Saku Koivu saw his retiring teammate, friend and Finnish countryman Teemu Selanne skate around the arena bathed in cheers last week in the Ducks’ final regular-season home game. Moved, of course, Koivu quickly set aside the moment that’s so close to home. Because there are still games to win. Koivu, 39, could be just as close to retirement as Selanne, but the 18-year NHL veteran center hasn’t officially announced his intentions. “Very private guy, very unselfish – been like that a long time,” Koivu’s linemate Andrew Cogliano said.

April 18, 2014 | By Chris Lee and Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times

INDIO, Calif. – Dee Dee Penny, lead singer of the Dum Dum Girls, is no stranger to performing at giant summer musical events. At the first of the two-weekend Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival events last Friday, her retro-rock act played before thousands of ecstatic fans. She was just one of an eclectic roster of female artists who galvanized Coachella audiences. Teenage provocateur Lorde dazzled amid a howling dust storm in her summer music festival debut. R
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Everything You Need to Know about Minority Business Grants – Small Business Blog #minority

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Everything You Need to Know about Minority Business Grants

Minorities are choosing entrepreneurship in leaps and bounds. The pool of minority-owned business includes members of the African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American ethnic groups. According to the SBA, this number rose to 14.6 percent in 2012 in part because of the growing Hispanic population in the U.S.

As with their non-minority counterparts, proper access to funding is crucial for the creation, growth, and sustainability of their businesses. Although minority business ownership is growing, there continues to be great disparities in their access to business funding. In their effort to even the playing field, minority business owners continue to search for various funding resources.

Grants for Minority Business

Federal Grants

As part of their quest for funding, the first choice for minority business owners is to seek out grants. The belief that there are federal grants available for the start up and growth phases for small businesses is a myth. The federal government does not provide grants to businesses for start up, expansion, to cover operational expenses, or to pay off debts. However there are federal grants available in the areas of research in the fields of medicine, scientific research, education, and technology development. Here are a few such grants.

  1. Small Business Innovation Research(SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) – This grant is for the purpose of funding small business projects that are research related. Research areas include the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). See a full list of program descriptions and research topics allowed on their site.
  2. The USDA Rural Business Enterprise Grant (RBEG) Program – The purpose of this grant is to finance the development of small and emerging businesses in rural areas. The amount of the award ranges from $10,000 to $50,000.

You can search additional federal grants at grants.gov .

Corporate Grants

We have included a list of some grants available to black and minority owned businesses.

  1. FedEx Small Business Grant Contest The FedEx Small Business Grant awards 10 different grants to small business owners in the following amounts: (1) grand prize grant of $25,000, (1) grant of $10,000, and (8) grants of $5,000. Deadline is January 12, 2015. To enter, the applicants must share their business story including their motivation and plans for growth. Winners will be announced April 21, 2015.
  2. The National Association for the Self Employed (NASE) Growth Grant Program This grant allows business owners to apply for financing for a particular business need. Each grant is worth up to $5,000. To apply visit nase.org, create an account, become a member, and click on the link apply today. Grants are awarded on a quarterly basis.
  3. MillerCoors Urban Entrepreneurs Series – This grant supports urban entrepreneurs by awarding up to $150,000 in business grants to five entrepreneurs annually.
  4. Huggies MomInspired Grant Program – Grant proposals are accepted from businesses that nurture the relationship between mother and child either through a product or service. The amount of the award is $15,000 plus additional business resources for further development.

Organizations that Provide Minority Business Grants

The Role of the SBA

While the SBA has the authority to provide grants to certain non-profit and educational organizations, it is not permitted to provide grants to small businesses, including minority owned businesses. However, minority business owners can take advantage of the SBA (8) a Business Development Program. The program assists qualifying minority-owned businesses develop and growth through one on one counseling, training workshops, management, and technical assistance.

The 8(a) program has been designed for some minority groups that are considered socially and economically disadvantaged. Those groups include: African American, Hispanic American, Native Americans, Asian Pacific Americans, and Subcontinent Asian Americans. A business must be at least 51% owned by a minority of the group listed. Other groups can apply for this program if they can prove that they have been discriminated against or are at an economic disadvantage. Those groups include: Alaska Native Corporations, Indian Tribes, Native Hawaiian Organizations, and Community Development Corporations.

To learn more about this program contact the local SBA office in your area.

The Minority Business Development Agency

Another great resource for minority business owners is the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA). MBDA maintains a national network of 44 business centers whose purpose is to assist minority businesses with access to capital, contracts, and new markets. The specialists that work at the business centers can assist with the grant application.

Minority Business Grants: The Process

Applying for a grant is not a quick process. First the application can be more than a few pages and it is normally a detailed application. Most grants have an opening date, which is the date when the grant became available for application. The deadline date is the final date you must submit your grant by. Keep in mind that the decision may take a few months.

Additional Grant Preparation Tips

  • Create a business plan – Writing a business plan is an important step. The business plan will act as the roadmap for your business. Be sure to provide specific information in the plan about your minority business and how it will improve the economy and your community.
  • Read through grant information thoroughly Once you have decided which grant you will apply for, make sure that you read through all of the information. This will ensure that you have all of your ducks in a row. Most grant synopsis’ are detailed and require a lot of specific information.
  • Keep track of the application deadline – Obviously it is important that you do not miss the deadline. So be sure to apply for the grant before the deadline. A good idea would be to create a project checklist which includes dates and milestones. It’s a good idea to submit the grant before the deadline approaches.
  • Gather all of your documents – Make sure you gather all of the documents required for the grant. Prepare a checklist, check, and double check. You do not want to have any missing documents that may cause the grant to be denied.




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Thinking About Starting #own #your #own #business #ideas

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Starting a business is an exciting proposition, but it’s also an incredibly challenging undertaking. The resources in this section will help you learn about what it takes to start a business.

What characteristics do you need to be an entrepreneur? What does it take to start and succeed in business?

Starting a business can be the most important decision you make in your life. Ask yourself these 20 questions to begin your preparation and planning.

These 10 steps can help you plan, prepare and launch your business.

To run a successful business, you need to learn about your customers, your competitors and the economic conditions in your industry.

Get access to data and statistics on your competitors, industry and target customer groups.

One of the first decisions you will make is the type of business you will open. Before making your decision, explore the opportunities that are available like a home-based or online business.

When starting a business, advice from SBA partner organizations such as SCORE Mentors, Small Business Development Centers and Women’s Business Centers can help you avoid common pitfalls.





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What You Need to About Small Business Templates #starting #own #business

#business templates

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What You Need to About Small Business Templates

There was a time, long ago, when the company opened a new process which was relatively unexplored. When you look back to the colonial times it was not very many businesses. The town Baker was not very competitive because it was probably the only baker around. Fast forward to today, and the small business has become a very big business. Small companies have already started so often that there are many small business templates available when starting a business or perform functions within the company.

There are templates out there today to help a person in the process of launching new businesses. If you look at the franchises available today, many of them are opening every store in a certain way. It help investors to rationalize certain functions and marginal costs. If you do not do something the same way every time you all can do it much faster and often save a lot of money at the same time.

Small shops, where the ownership remains in the hands of large corporations are well known to the following pattern. They are able to benefit even more from the individual store, because the corporation owns a very small store fronts. Many times they ensure the creation of new shop windows and buy in bulk. This saves even more money. Creating a cookie cutter store and perform the same function, and save a lot of time.








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Busting 5 Myths About Small-Business Lending #business #loans

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Busting 5 Myths About Small-Business Lending

Co-founder and CEO, Fundera

Like your mother and your high school history teacher likely told you over and over again, you can t believe everything you read on the Internet.

With the growing accessibility of information freely available online, modern entrepreneurs in search of funding to grow their businesses have a huge leg up on generations past. Yet for every bit of accurate and genuinely helpful advice, there is an increasing prevalence of misinformation and myths surrounding the small business lending space. Unfortunately, much of that misinformation can give business owners bad information about how small business loans work, giving them a false sense of their own eligibility.

Don t miss out on opportunities to secure funding for your business due to false information. Let s separate fact from fiction and bust five of the most common small business lending myths we hear every day.

1. Approval takes forever.

Whether you re itching to move forward with a new business idea or you need cash quickly to cover an unexpected expense, one of the most common questions business owners have when applying for funding is, how fast can I get cash in hand?

You may hear from well-meaning friends and relatives that getting approved for a business loan can take weeks or even months, but that information is outdated. With new online loan applications, an organized business owner can complete her application in less than an hour, and it can be reviewed and approved within 24 hours of submission. Many lenders can even offer cash in hand in as little as two days.

While some borrowers may take additional time to gather financial statements or get their credit reports in better shape, once you hit submit, the approval practice is very efficient. Don t let the fear of a long approval process hold you back from seeking a loan.

2. New businesses never qualify.

The startup funding quandary is a difficult one. You need an established business to secure funding, but you need cash in hand to get your business off the ground. Seeking funding from venture capitalists or angel investors is certainly the most popular route for securing startup funding, but is it the only way?

Many startup entrepreneurs assume that they need to be in business for a few years and have established business credit before they can qualify for a loan. However, more and more lenders are specifically offering startup loans that require little or no business credit history to qualify.

Applying for a startup loan will involve more scrutiny into your personal finances than other types of business loans. Your personal credit score will be the most important part of the application. You may also be faced with less favorable rates than you would receive as an established business. But if you re committed to finding funding and open to the necessary conditions, securing a loan for your brand new business is possible.

3. Online lenders are con artists with unreasonable rates.

We get it. The online alternative lending market is relatively new, and people are skeptical of new things. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous online lenders and brokers have engaged in predatory and dangerous lending practices, giving the entire industry a bad rap.

But in reality, some alternative lenders operating online offer single-digit interest rates. Those offering higher rates often are working with borrowers who are considered risky. Online lenders regularly consider a wide variety of borrower credentials outside of just the traditional credit report and score. Business owners who were turned down by their bank can frequently find the funding they need online.

As with any financial transaction, it s critical that business owners do their due diligence about an online lender before signing the dotted line.

4. Loan officers only care about your credit score.

This myth, carried over from the outdated traditional bank model for loan approvals, can leave business owners with less-than-stellar credit feeling hopeless about their funding prospects. Luckily for these entrepreneurs, growth in the alternative lending sector has led to a larger spectrum of factors being considered in the loan approval process.

Many lenders will now give equal weight to your company s revenue history, cash flow statement and other financial documents in determining your loan eligibility. This information often paints a very different picture of a business and its owner s financial standing than what a credit score alone can convey.

Even so, before applying for a business loan, it is still important that you take steps to make your credit report and score the best possible reflection of your financial history. Always make debt payments on time, and manage your credit usage responsibly. Also frequently check your credit reports for accuracy. If you find errors, contact the reporting agencies to correct the mistakes.

5. Approval is determined by a heartless algorithm.

Once upon a time, entrepreneurs seeking small business funding could walk into their local community bank, build face-to-face relationships with managers and loan officers, and be confident they understood the whole picture behind their loan application, including both cold hard numbers as well as the more intangible elements of their qualifications as borrowers.

These days, technology has all but replaced those in-person banking relationships, creating the impression that loan approval decisions are controlled by nothing more than a few concrete variables and an algorithm saying yes or no.

But while you may have lost the ability to look your loan officer in the eye and strike a deal with a handshake, the modern funding process isn t actually as impersonal as this reputation suggests. In reality, lenders consider a wide variety of both objective, number-based factors as well as more subjective considerations, like your business and marketing plan.

If you re concerned about certain elements of your loan application, like your credit score, take the time to flesh out your business plan, fully explaining how the funds you are borrowing will be used and how this investment will lead to a successful business.

Ultimately, your lender s main consideration is whether or not you will make your loan payments on time, every time. Your loan application should, both through financial documents and through your written statements, paint the best possible picture of your future ability to repay the loan.

If you do your research, stay organized, and can clearly and concisely convey this information to lenders through your loan application, your chances of being quickly matched with the a loan to meet your business needs is tremendously greater.





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What You Need to About Small Business Templates #business #courses

#business templates

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What You Need to About Small Business Templates

There was a time, long ago, when the company opened a new process which was relatively unexplored. When you look back to the colonial times it was not very many businesses. The town Baker was not very competitive because it was probably the only baker around. Fast forward to today, and the small business has become a very big business. Small companies have already started so often that there are many small business templates available when starting a business or perform functions within the company.

There are templates out there today to help a person in the process of launching new businesses. If you look at the franchises available today, many of them are opening every store in a certain way. It help investors to rationalize certain functions and marginal costs. If you do not do something the same way every time you all can do it much faster and often save a lot of money at the same time.

Small shops, where the ownership remains in the hands of large corporations are well known to the following pattern. They are able to benefit even more from the individual store, because the corporation owns a very small store fronts. Many times they ensure the creation of new shop windows and buy in bulk. This saves even more money. Creating a cookie cutter store and perform the same function, and save a lot of time.








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17 Hard Truths About Owning A Business #investment #news

#owning your own business

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17 Hard Truths About Owning A Business

Columnist, American Express OPEN

Ever feel stuck? Erika Napoletano gets restless brands and the people brave enough to lead them UNstuck, shortening the distance between where they are and heck yeah. Business columnist, award-winning author, TEDx talker, nerd in a dress.

The reasons that anyone decides to venture down the path of business ownership vary. Maybe it’s the allure of setting our own hours. The chance to call fuzzy slippers and pajama pants “work clothes.” The opportunity to do business the way it should be done.

But for all of us, there’s one inarguable reason: the chance to finally put energy into building our dream instead of someone else’s.

With the decision to launch a business, however, come some pretty startling realities. Maybe some of these will be familiar. Others you might have just stumbled onto for the first time. They’re all, however, hefty reminders that this thing we do—owning and running a small business—is anything but easy.

It’s worth it—but definitely not easy.

1.Your target customer isn’t “everyone.” Not even Walmart has something for everyone. And sure—it’s easy to think that your product or service has widespread appeal (who wouldn’t want what you have to offer, right?). Skip the selling and attempts to convert. Find the people who will love what you do (and all the things you don’t do). Preach to the converted and they’ll share your brand with more people just like them.

2.What you do isn’t special. There are roughly a gazillion other people in this world who do what you do. What you do isn’t the magic. The real magic comes from a combination of why you do it, for whom you do it, and how you do it. What + Who + Why + How = Awesome.

3. Value lasts. Cheap is fleeting. Let me ask: How many “things” have you replaced since starting your business? Odds are, they’re the things you scrimped on in the name of “now.” Remind yourself of that the next time you’re tempted by a cheap solution and go for value—what’s best, what will last, and what’s best for your business and customers. Cheap and a great value sometimes happens, but it’s rare.

4. The customer isn’t always right. They’re not. Period. You can’t make a living without your customers, though. So where’s the middle ground when someone is unhappy, but definitely wrong? First, listen. Second, weigh the options—does it make sense to give a bit in exchange for appeasing someone who’s having a bad day? Finally, stick to your principles. Some people will just never be happy and are looking for a reason to complain. If we built our business around the complainers, we’d be broke in no time.

5. Trade sucks when you don’t treat it like a business transaction. If you remember nothing else from this article, remember to treat every trade agreement like a business transaction. Have a contract. Establish deliverables. Establish a value. Establish a deadline. If you don’t, someone’s always going to come out “feeling slighted.” Just because there’s no money changing hands doesn’t mean business isn’t being done.

6. Your business bank account isn’t a piggy bank. Get a CPA and a bookkeeper. Everything you buy once you start a business isn’t a business expense (shall we ask the IRS?). The day I was able to look at my business and run a real profit and loss (P L) statement was one of the happiest days of my life. The next happiest moment was knowing that I was actually profitable. You can’t fix your business finances if you don’t know what’s going on behind the banking curtain.

7. Tech won’t fix a crappy business model. I don’t care how many devices you have or if you’re using Silicon Valley’s latest and greatest app. Tech is a tool, nothing more. Upgrading your computer won’t make your business run better. When something’s not working, ask what’s not working with the business model.

8. You can’t do everything. You’re awesome. You’re talented. You’re motivated and the reason this whole business thing gets done each day. But you can’t do everything. And like me, I know you’ve tried. We’re small-business owners, a brand of superheroes of our own class. But when you do everything for so long, you’re bound to break.

9. You’re going to have to learn to outsource. Finding people you trust to help you run your business is paramount. And since you can’t do everything (and certainly don’t enjoy doing everything), find people who are great at and love doing all those things you loathe. We can’t all afford it when first starting out, but remind yourself that there are people to help you lighten the load and run leaner and meaner than you’ve ever run.

10.You are not the most important asset in your business. Shocking, right? You open the doors and foot the bills, but none of that happens without your customers’ permission. Your customers are, and always will be, the most important asset your business will ever have. Period.

11. Listening is the best business skill you’ll ever acquire. To your customers. To your employees. To your community and industry colleagues. If we listened half as much as we spoke, blogged, tweeted or Facebooked, I can only imagine where each of our businesses would be. Try counting to five before you chime in the next time someone shares a thought with you. And try listening when no one thinks you’re listening.

12.Infrastructure—it’s what’s for breakfast. Growth is the goal, right? More revenue, more sales, bigger and better customers. But what happens when the volume we crave comes along and we haven’t built a business that can support it? When making decisions to scale, always ask, “Do we have the infrastructure to support this move, and if not, how can we create it?” Less full speed ahead and more full attention to the most important business meal of the day—it will fuel and support everything you do as the day (and years) go on.

13.You need a great team. You can’t do everything alone. Find people who are committed to building your dream and vision. Some of your greatest ideas will come from people with the gift of being on the outside of your head looking in. This makes having an amazing, motivated team all the more important.

14.Don’t hire people you’d never empower. Again, since you can’t do everything, you need people on your team whom you trust to act in the best interests of your business. Hire wisely and invest in training and mentoring. Great employees all start off good, but they’ll need your guidance along the way. Don’t hire anyone whom you don’t feel you could ultimately trust to act in your business’s best interest.

15.There are no overnight successes. If you hear otherwise, it’s a lie—a damn lie. Success comes from an artful combination of humility, tenacity, failure, and opportunity. None of those things happen overnight—despite what some may say.

16.Don’t think like a business owner—think like a customer. Not much explanation required here. The greatest successes I’ve seen come from businesses that anticipate customer needs and meet them in delightful and unexpected ways.

17.You are your most important client every day. You know the story about the cobbler’s children and how they have no shoes? Well, that’s no way to run a business. Set time in your calendar every day to work on your business.You are your first client every day. Put it on a sticky note. Tape it to your bathroom mirror. Say it out loud. Repeat.

What’s your one hard truth you’ve learned as a business owner? Share with the community in the comments below.

Photo: Getty Images





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Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Trump University Rating #start #a #small #business

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Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Trump University Rating

The Better Business Bureau on Tuesday briskly refuted a number of statements that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made about Trump University, the now-defunct real estate seminar provider that many students allege was a scam.

In last Thursday’s Republican debate, the candidate defended Trump University despite the multiple lawsuits brought by former students and the state of New York.

Challenged by Fox News moderator Megyn Kelly about Trump University’s D-minus rating from the Better Business Bureau, Trump said that “right now it is an A.”

During a commercial break, Trump was caught on camera presenting the debate hosts with a piece of paper that he said showed that rating. “The Better Business Bureau just sent it,” Trump can be heard telling Fox News moderator Bret Baier. “This just came in, we just got it.”

“The BBB did not send a document of any kind to the Republican debate site last Thursday evening,” the nonprofit organization said on Tuesday. “The document presented to debate moderators did not come from BBB that night.”

As to Trump’s basic claim, the watchdog group said, “Trump University does not currently have an A rating with BBB. The BBB Business Review for this company has continually been ‘No Rating’ since September 2015. Prior to that, it fluctuated between D- and A+.”

Following the debate on Thursday, Trump tweeted what he said was the official A rating for the Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, a later name for Trump University.

On Tuesday, the Better Business Bureau said, “The document posted on social media on Thursday night was not a current BBB Business Review of Trump University. It appeared to be part of a Business Review from 2014.”

Furthermore, the nonprofit stated, “Trump University has never been a BBB Accredited Business. The document handed to the debate moderators on Thursday night could not have been an actual ‘Better Business Bureau accreditation notice’ for this business.”

Here’s the current review of the Trump Entrepreneur Initiative.

Better Business Bureau

Not only did the Better Business Bureau refute Trump’s claims about Trump University’s current grade; it also refuted his claim that the enterprise has “a 98 percent approval rating from the people who took the course [because] people like it. many did tremendously well, and made a lot of money.”

Here’s how the bureau tells it: “During the period when Trump University appeared to be active in the marketplace, BBB received multiple customer complaints about this business. These complaints affected the Trump University BBB rating, which was as low as D- in 2010.”

How did it ever have an A rating?

The company closed in 2011, and after that, the Better Business Bureau said, “no new complaints were reported.” Complaints that are more than three years old “automatically rolled off of the Business Review, [and] over time, Trump University’s BBB rating went to an A in July 2014 and then to an A+ in January 2015.”

Trump, however, claimed the opposite was true. He said the Better Business Bureau simply hadn’t had enough information about Trump U, and that’s why it received a D-minus. “Before they had the information,” the program scored poorly, he said, but “once they had the information. it is right now an A.”

More than 5,000 people are suing Trump and Trump University in California, where a class action suit alleges that many students spent more than $30,000 on what they were told would be a real estate investment mentorship, personally designed and overseen by Trump.

Watch the real estate mogul’s promotional video for Trump University:

In fact, the former students allege that Trump played no part in designing the course, choosing the teachers or mentoring students.

A second case brought by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman was cleared by an appeals court to move forward last week. This means voters are likely to hear a lot more about Trump University in the coming months.

The candidate tried to play down the seriousness of the allegations on Thursday, yelling, “It’s just a minor case! It’s a minor case!” over the voices of debate moderators.

On Monday, Trump also released a video (see below ) in which he singled out two people who asserted they’d been scammed by his seminar company. He accused them of saying “horrible things” and warned “we’re looking” for a third person.

A spokeswoman for Trump’s campaign and a lawyer for Trump’s business both declined to comment on the Better Business Bureau’s statement.





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11 Grants for Women-Owned Businesses You Need to Know About #personalized #business #cards

#small business grants

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11 Grants for Women-Owned Businesses You Need to Know About

In 2014, there were close to 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the United States, a 68 percent increase since 1997, according to The 2014 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report from American Express. This percentage increase exceeded the national average of small business growth by 1.5 times.

It also illustrated what we already know: Women entrepreneurs are having a tremendous impact on the small business landscape nationwide.

Yet to continue to be competitive and grow, these entrepreneurs have to find funding for their ventures. And, alarmingly, women entrepreneurs are increasingly being turned away by banks for small business loans. Thankfully, they still have other options, given the rise of technology-driven financial lending sources — such as online loans, peer-to-peer loans and crowdfunding.

Then there are government grants. While not widely known or used, these grants are another great option for women seeking extra funding for their business ventures. They just take a little more work.

Understanding grants

Business owners often turn to grants because they are not required to pay them back; essentially, you can look at grants as free money, but they come with stipulations. Also, understanding and navigating the grant process can be complex.

First, you have to research and find a grant for which you re eligible. Then, you have to understand the strict application and compliance guidelines you must meet, to be eligible. Third, you have to compete with other businesses for the same pool of money. Fourth, if you re awarded a grant, you must report on how you used it. Finally, you must devote time and energy to the lengthy application process, then wait for approval. In a nutshell, you need to have all of your ducks in a row, up-front and afterward.

Finding federal and state grants

Many business owners think that federal grants are just a click away. We have all seen the ads promoting free federal money to start businesses. But this is a huge misconception. While there are federal grants available in the areas of medical research, science, education and technology development, no such grants exist specifically for women-owned businesses. You may find grants that fund projects that empower women, but such funding is often set aside for nonprofit corporations, not for-profit businesses.

When researching grants specifically for a woman-owned business, start at the state level. Most states offer grants for women-owned businesses in some capacity. Each state website has a business section where you can find grant and funding opportunities for women and minority-owned businesses. A good example of this is the business section for the state of New York. which lists incentives and programs for businesses. Check out your state s site to find out what is available for your business.

Another great resource to use in your research is the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA). The MBDA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce that assists minorities and women in establishing and growing their businesses. On its site, you can research grants and access links to state agencies that work with women-owned businesses for funding opportunities. Click here to view all of the state agencies across the country.

Private grants for women

To help in your search, we gathered information on these private grants for women entrepreneurs started:

  1. The Eileen Fisher Women-Owned Business Grant Program. Five grants are awarded annually. The businesses must be 100 percent women-owned and have founding principles of social consciousness, sustainability and innovation, plus be ready to move to the next phase of development. In 2014, the program awarded $125,000 in grants.
  2. Huggies Brand — Mom Inspired Grants. The grant awards up to $15,000 to advance the development of innovative products inspired by the joys of motherhood. The awardees also receive resources to further develop their products and startup businesses.
  3. FedEx Think Bigger — Small Business Grant Program. Applicants are encouraged to share their visions to receive a portion of the $75,000 awarded in grants. Part of the judging involves the general public voting for the finalists, so participants may promote their businesses while garnering votes.
  4. Idea Caf Small Business Grant. The Idea Caf is a free gateway that hosts different grants on its site. Its current grant is the 16 th Small Business Cash Grant. which awards one $1,000 grand prize to a business with the most innovative idea.
  5. InnovateHER: 2015 Innovating for Women Business Challenge. This business challenge is sponsored by the Small Business Administration (SBA) Office of Women s Business Ownership. The challenge awards three winners $30,000 in prize money for businesses that have an impact on the lives of women. However, be aware of the recent fraud news around the SBA .
  6. Chase Google — Mission Main Street Project. Chase and Google have partnered to award $3 million in grants. In 2014, recipients were awarded $150,000 to help take their businesses to the next level. Recipients also received a trip to Google headquarters, a Google Chromebook laptop and a $2,000 coupon toward a market research study with Google Consumer Surveys.
  7. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR): Eleven different federal agencies participate in this awards-based program, which incentivizes and enables small businesses to explore their technological potential.
  8. Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR). The STTR program reserves a specific percentage of federal research and development funding to provide funding opportunities in research and development.
  9. Women Veteran Entrepreneur Corp (WVEC) Small Business Competition. This competition, organized by Capitol One and Count Me In for Women s Economic Independence. allows participants to present two-minute pitches for a chance to participate in a nine-month business accelerator program.
  10. Wal-Mart Women s Economic Empowerment Initiative (WEE). As part of a huge Wal-Mart initiative, sourcing opportunities for U.S. and international companies will increase to $40 billion over five years.
  11. Zions Bank — Smart Women Smart Money. This Utah-based bank s grant annually awards $3,000 across six different categories, including business.

Applying for a grant

Once you find a funding opportunity, there are steps required to apply. A few tips to assist you:

  • Make sure that your business is eligible for the grant: Read the grant synopsis guidelines and eligibility requirements.
  • Create a checklist for all of the documents required.
  • Follow the rules. Grant applications can be very technical. It wouldn t hurt to have a second (or even third) set of eyes when reviewing the application to ensure that you have provided all accompanying documents.
  • Start early. Since the application process can be long in some cases, it doesn t hurt to get a jump on things.

If you find the grant application process too daunting or lengthy for your small business, Kabbage is committed to supporting small business loans for women business owners. Because our application process is fully automated and online, we can quickly provide small business loans of up to $100,000. We use simple, meaningful revenue data from your business to approve your business — not elaborate documentation that takes extensive time to gather. To learn more, visit Kabbage.com.





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What You Need to About Small Business Templates

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