Tag: 33

One Woman Built A Cupcake Empire With Just $33 #at #home #business

#cupcake business

#

How One Woman Built A Multimillion-Dollar Cupcake Business With Just $33 To Her Name

Gigi Butler was a cleaning lady with just $33 to her name when she opened her first cupcake shop in Nashville, Tennessee, almost seven years ago.

“People thought I was crazy, and they laughed at the idea,” she told Business Insider. “But I just had this feeling that I had to do it.”

After securing a location, whipping up a few recipes, and hiring two employees off the street, Butler opened the doors of Gigi’s Cupcakes on February 21, 2008.

“I had no investors and literally not a cent to spend on advertising,” she says. “So I just hoped and prayed people would come.”

Today there are 92 Gigi’s Cupcakes locations in 23 states, and this year she expects $35 million in annual sales across all stores. I t’s safe to say Butler’s bank account balance is no longer in the double-digits.

“I’m so happy with how things have turned out, but I never thought my success would stem from cupcakes,” she tells us. “I always thought it would be music.”

Butler was born in Oklahoma and grew up on a farm in a small desert town in California, about an hour outside of Los Angeles. Since age 7, she dreamed of becoming a country singer. “Nothing else was even an option. I was going to be a country star, end of story,” she says.

But at 15 she needed a job, and she really wasn’t interested in working for anyone else. “I decided to buy some mops and buckets, and I went from door to door, ringing doorbells, offering to clean people’s homes.”

That’s how Gigi’s Cleaning Company was born.

She cleaned homes, offices, and construction sites (and sang in a band on the side) in California for five years before deciding she was ready to take the next step in her music career.

So, in 1994, she dropped out of college and moved to Nashville with $500, no job, no friends, and no place to live.

“When I got there, I continued cleaning. So I’d do that all day, then come home and nap, then I’d go sing at bars at night until 3 a.m. – and do it all over again the next day,” she says. “But when I turned 31, I got tired of getting my butt pinched and passing the tip jar around. I felt like I was failing since my dream was to sing. But I knew it just wasn’t working anymore.”

After giving up her dream of becoming a country star in 2005, Butler focused on building her cleaning business in Nashville.

“I was making pretty good money and learning how to be a boss, manage a team, and run a business, all without having to be in the corporate world, which was great since I never really wanted to sit in front of a computer screen in high heels, pantyhose, and a skirt,” she says.

Though content, Butler said she knew she wasn’t being challenged enough, “and something was still missing.”

In 2007, while cleaning a bathroom in a client’s home, Butler got a call from her brother.

“He was in New York for Labor Day Weekend and said, ‘You won’t believe this, but people are waiting in line for hours for cupcakes. And they’re not even as good as yours.”

Butler grew up surrounded by bakers. Her aunts, grandmothers, and mother were all talented in the kitchen – and she “inherited the gene.”

“It’s in my blood, but I never thought about pursuing it as a career or a business.”

She hung up the phone and looked at herself in the mirror and thought, I’m not afraid to fail, so I’m going to do this. I am going to open a cupcake shop.

A month later she was in Texas visiting her great aunt Bennie who owned a bakery. “I had no idea what I was doing, so I went there to learn.”

When she got back to Tennessee, she went to the bank to ask for a loan. “I had great credit and no debt, but they literally laughed in my face and said, ‘Seriously? A cupcake shop?'”

So, instead, she took $100,000 in cash advance loans from her credit cards.

After finding a location for the store – which she refers to as “the sweet spot,” since it’s near three universities, six hospitals, and right off Music Row – Butler’s parents came out to help her launch her new business. “My mom helped me develop recipes, and my dad did the store design. They also gave me some money, which I really needed.”

Before opening the shop, Butler used up all of the $100,000 in loans, plus the money her parents gifted her, and all of her savings – and she still had $6,500 in bills to pay ($4,500 in rent; $1,000 for ingredients; and $1,000 for her first two employees). She had just $33 in her bank account.

“I literally cleaned three houses the day before we opened the store to pay the plumber,” she says. “And then that same day, my contractor came in with a $15,000 dry wall bill he ‘forgot’ to give me. I literally fell to the floor and had a melt down.”

Butler had exactly one week to pay the $6,500 to her landlord, food supplier, and two employees – and told the contractor she’d need some time to pay off his bill.

“I didn’t know how I was going to do it,” she tells Business Insider. “I remember looking up, saying, ‘Please, just let the people come. Make them like my cupcakes. They have to like my cupcakes.'”

They didn’t like them; they loved them, she says.

Butler recalls an encounter with one customer that first week. “I was walking around greeting people, and one woman said, ‘I’m going to order a Scarlett’s Red Velvet flavor cupcake.’ So I told her we didn’t have that particular flavor that day, and she started screaming at me, ‘I’ve been waiting in line for that cupcake! You’re telling me you don’t have it. Are you some kind of idiot ?’ And you’d think I’d be offended, but I walked away and thought to myself, ‘Oh my god, people are yelling over my cupcakes because they want them! Cha-ching!'”

By March 1, 2008, a week after opening, Butler was able to pay off the $6,500 in bills. “And I still had $300 left,” she says proudly.

A few months later, Butler’s landlord, Alan Thompson, suggested she franchise her concept. “I said, ‘What’s franchising?'”

So together with Thompson, her parents, and her brother Randall, who was eventually appointed as chief operating officer of the company, Butler began franchising the Gigi’s Cupcakes brand in November 2008.

“I thought I’d open one shop and make $50,000 a year, and that’s it,” she says. “In fact, I didn’t even stop cleaning until I had 15 franchises.”

Today, 90 of the 92 Gigi’s Cupcakes stores are owned by franchisees.

She believes her brand has had so much success because the products – cupcakes, cookies, muffins, cakes, pies, and other baked goods – are “delicious and unique. Each flavor has a story,” she explains.

The other reason: “I was never afraid to fail, so I gave it my all.”

Butler, a single mom to her 3-year-old daughter, says her biggest challenge has been accepting the fact that she “no longer wears all the hats.”

“At the beginning, I did a little bit of everything. I’d be whipping up a batch of frosting, then have to run to a meeting, and then do paperwork. Now we have a great team to do all of those jobs, and my role is to be the face of the brand. But I still want to be everywhere, all at once, making sure everything is perfect, because this business is my baby – it has my name on it.”

Butler says she plans to grow the business to 250 stores by 2019.

“But no matter how big we get, I’ll always make time to put on my apron and whip up a batch of frosting, because that’s what I love to do.”

SEE ALSO: Here’s Why One CEO Asks New Hires To Sing Their Favorite Song In Front Of The Entire Office





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One Woman Built A Cupcake Empire With Just $33 #business #law

#cupcake business

#

How One Woman Built A Multimillion-Dollar Cupcake Business With Just $33 To Her Name

Gigi Butler was a cleaning lady with just $33 to her name when she opened her first cupcake shop in Nashville, Tennessee, almost seven years ago.

“People thought I was crazy, and they laughed at the idea,” she told Business Insider. “But I just had this feeling that I had to do it.”

After securing a location, whipping up a few recipes, and hiring two employees off the street, Butler opened the doors of Gigi’s Cupcakes on February 21, 2008.

“I had no investors and literally not a cent to spend on advertising,” she says. “So I just hoped and prayed people would come.”

Today there are 92 Gigi’s Cupcakes locations in 23 states, and this year she expects $35 million in annual sales across all stores. I t’s safe to say Butler’s bank account balance is no longer in the double-digits.

“I’m so happy with how things have turned out, but I never thought my success would stem from cupcakes,” she tells us. “I always thought it would be music.”

Butler was born in Oklahoma and grew up on a farm in a small desert town in California, about an hour outside of Los Angeles. Since age 7, she dreamed of becoming a country singer. “Nothing else was even an option. I was going to be a country star, end of story,” she says.

But at 15 she needed a job, and she really wasn’t interested in working for anyone else. “I decided to buy some mops and buckets, and I went from door to door, ringing doorbells, offering to clean people’s homes.”

That’s how Gigi’s Cleaning Company was born.

She cleaned homes, offices, and construction sites (and sang in a band on the side) in California for five years before deciding she was ready to take the next step in her music career.

So, in 1994, she dropped out of college and moved to Nashville with $500, no job, no friends, and no place to live.

“When I got there, I continued cleaning. So I’d do that all day, then come home and nap, then I’d go sing at bars at night until 3 a.m. – and do it all over again the next day,” she says. “But when I turned 31, I got tired of getting my butt pinched and passing the tip jar around. I felt like I was failing since my dream was to sing. But I knew it just wasn’t working anymore.”

After giving up her dream of becoming a country star in 2005, Butler focused on building her cleaning business in Nashville.

“I was making pretty good money and learning how to be a boss, manage a team, and run a business, all without having to be in the corporate world, which was great since I never really wanted to sit in front of a computer screen in high heels, pantyhose, and a skirt,” she says.

Though content, Butler said she knew she wasn’t being challenged enough, “and something was still missing.”

In 2007, while cleaning a bathroom in a client’s home, Butler got a call from her brother.

“He was in New York for Labor Day Weekend and said, ‘You won’t believe this, but people are waiting in line for hours for cupcakes. And they’re not even as good as yours.”

Butler grew up surrounded by bakers. Her aunts, grandmothers, and mother were all talented in the kitchen – and she “inherited the gene.”

“It’s in my blood, but I never thought about pursuing it as a career or a business.”

She hung up the phone and looked at herself in the mirror and thought, I’m not afraid to fail, so I’m going to do this. I am going to open a cupcake shop.

A month later she was in Texas visiting her great aunt Bennie who owned a bakery. “I had no idea what I was doing, so I went there to learn.”

When she got back to Tennessee, she went to the bank to ask for a loan. “I had great credit and no debt, but they literally laughed in my face and said, ‘Seriously? A cupcake shop?'”

So, instead, she took $100,000 in cash advance loans from her credit cards.

After finding a location for the store – which she refers to as “the sweet spot,” since it’s near three universities, six hospitals, and right off Music Row – Butler’s parents came out to help her launch her new business. “My mom helped me develop recipes, and my dad did the store design. They also gave me some money, which I really needed.”

Before opening the shop, Butler used up all of the $100,000 in loans, plus the money her parents gifted her, and all of her savings – and she still had $6,500 in bills to pay ($4,500 in rent; $1,000 for ingredients; and $1,000 for her first two employees). She had just $33 in her bank account.

“I literally cleaned three houses the day before we opened the store to pay the plumber,” she says. “And then that same day, my contractor came in with a $15,000 dry wall bill he ‘forgot’ to give me. I literally fell to the floor and had a melt down.”

Butler had exactly one week to pay the $6,500 to her landlord, food supplier, and two employees – and told the contractor she’d need some time to pay off his bill.

“I didn’t know how I was going to do it,” she tells Business Insider. “I remember looking up, saying, ‘Please, just let the people come. Make them like my cupcakes. They have to like my cupcakes.'”

They didn’t like them; they loved them, she says.

Butler recalls an encounter with one customer that first week. “I was walking around greeting people, and one woman said, ‘I’m going to order a Scarlett’s Red Velvet flavor cupcake.’ So I told her we didn’t have that particular flavor that day, and she started screaming at me, ‘I’ve been waiting in line for that cupcake! You’re telling me you don’t have it. Are you some kind of idiot ?’ And you’d think I’d be offended, but I walked away and thought to myself, ‘Oh my god, people are yelling over my cupcakes because they want them! Cha-ching!'”

By March 1, 2008, a week after opening, Butler was able to pay off the $6,500 in bills. “And I still had $300 left,” she says proudly.

A few months later, Butler’s landlord, Alan Thompson, suggested she franchise her concept. “I said, ‘What’s franchising?'”

So together with Thompson, her parents, and her brother Randall, who was eventually appointed as chief operating officer of the company, Butler began franchising the Gigi’s Cupcakes brand in November 2008.

“I thought I’d open one shop and make $50,000 a year, and that’s it,” she says. “In fact, I didn’t even stop cleaning until I had 15 franchises.”

Today, 90 of the 92 Gigi’s Cupcakes stores are owned by franchisees.

She believes her brand has had so much success because the products – cupcakes, cookies, muffins, cakes, pies, and other baked goods – are “delicious and unique. Each flavor has a story,” she explains.

The other reason: “I was never afraid to fail, so I gave it my all.”

Butler, a single mom to her 3-year-old daughter, says her biggest challenge has been accepting the fact that she “no longer wears all the hats.”

“At the beginning, I did a little bit of everything. I’d be whipping up a batch of frosting, then have to run to a meeting, and then do paperwork. Now we have a great team to do all of those jobs, and my role is to be the face of the brand. But I still want to be everywhere, all at once, making sure everything is perfect, because this business is my baby – it has my name on it.”

Butler says she plans to grow the business to 250 stores by 2019.

“But no matter how big we get, I’ll always make time to put on my apron and whip up a batch of frosting, because that’s what I love to do.”

SEE ALSO: Here’s Why One CEO Asks New Hires To Sing Their Favorite Song In Front Of The Entire Office





Tags : , , , , , , , ,

33 Best Home-Based Business Ideas in the Philippines #new #business

#home business ideas

#

33 Best Home-Based Business Ideas in the Philippines

There is an entrepreneur inside all of us that wants to come out.

However, we are limited by our own fears and beliefs; thus, we prefer to follow the business ideals set by others. Entrepreneurs are driven by one thing: PASSION.

If you have a passion for an activity, a skill that has remained dormant, or assets that only gather dust, the spirit of entrepreneurship will find a way for you to monetize them.

You can jump-start your entrepreneurial journey with a home-based business that requires these passions and skills and utilizes assets instead of letting them succumb to depreciation.

Related: 7 Home-Based Business Ideas without Spending Much Money

Before you start, it is advisable that you have three very important components in place:

  1. A fully functioning and mobile responsive website
  2. Accounts in the Big Three social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Google+
  3. Calling cards, printable brochures, and marketing materials

Finally, be prepared to network your services tirelessly during the first quarter of operations. You should get the word out, which means massive, ambitious online and offline networking activities.

Here are 33 ideas that you can consider for your home-based business in the Philippines.

Best Home-Based Business Ideas in the Philippines

1. Selling Products Online

From a plastic fork that was allegedly used by Michael Jordan to a potato chip that bears the likeness of US comedian Jay Leno, people make money by selling products online.

If you have talent with handicrafts or you plan to distribute a product in your region, going online opens a huge window of opportunity to find potential markets of buyers.

2. Freelance Writing

It is one of the basic skills that was taught to us while growing up. However, although everyone can write, not everyone can write a great, engaging content. Online job platform Elance cites “Writing Services” as the most in-demand service for freelancers.

3. Blogging

According to statistics. small businesses that have a blog generate 126% more leads than those that don’t. Blogging enhances your credibility, expertise, and reputation. Companies are in need of writers who can create relevant and engaging blogs for their business. Or, use your blog to earn both active and passive income.

Recommended Guide: How to Create and Start a Blog Site

4. Build Websites

Of the companies that generate between US$ 2.5 to US$ 4.5 million, 67% own websites. Only 53% of small business owners have websites. However, given the increasing popularity of smart phones for Internet surfing, the demand for company websites is expected to skyrocket in 2015.

Post navigation

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33 Free Places To Promote Your Website Online #business #development #jobs

#advertise my business

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33 Free Places to Promote Your Website Online

The ultimate list of where to promote your site online for free

Whether you ve already taken your business online or still looking for a simple solution to create a professional website. you probably already know that promoting your website is crucial to your success.

If you have no previous experience with site promotion, you re likely reaching for a bottle of Aspirin right now. But fear not, marketing your website isn t only simple, it can be done without even spending a penny!

With the right time and effort, you can find yourself attracting a whole slew of new clients to your great looking site! Here are the steps to find out how to promote your website.

Make sure Search Engines know your Site

It may or may not surprise you to hear that the majority of traffic from the internet is derived from search engines. With that said, search engines should be the first place that you turn to to promote your online presence. Ensure that search engines know that your site exists by submitting your link directly to them. Once that s out of the way, the best way to improve your search engine presence is by taking the time to improve your SEO .

Right now, the search engines that generate the most traffic are:

Google
Yahoo
Bing

  • Submit your site to Online Directories

    The modern day Yellow Pages, online directories are where potential clients turn to to find business solutions. Adding your site to online directories is extremely important as it greatly improves your site’s SEO by linking back to your website. When submitting your site, make sure to include important details like your location and business category so that your website will appear in sub-categories where new and potential clients can easily find you.

    Bonus!
    Restaurateurs should also take the time to get listed in these restaurant specific sites:

    Urban Spoon
    Open Table Restaurant Management Software
    Be sure to add the Open Table App to your Wix site as well for maximum exposure.

  • Invest in Social Link Building

    Social sites are where many web surfers spend the majority of their online time. Linking your content on popular social sites is a great way to put your business in the face of your known audience, and also a fantastic opportunity to gain quality backlinks by exposing your brand to broader audiences.

    Find Blogging Platforms and Article Submission Sites

    Blogging platforms and article-submission sites are a terrific way to market your site. All you need to do is write an original article related to your business and submit it to these sites. While it’s important to keep these articles informative, try to keep your tone friendly. Articles that sounds genuinely well-intentioned and have a less aggressive marketing tone, will likely draw more interest to your site than self-promotion alone. Blogs and articles are also great for promoting link building for SEO benefits.

    Share your Photos on Social Media

    Similarly to social network sites like Pinterest and Polyvore, photo sharing sites give you the opportunity to display visual content that is related to your business, and can be used to refer and link back to your website. Photo sharing sites are not for photographers alone any business can use these sites to post images of events, coworkers, news and everything in between, as long as it s connected to your biz.

    Picasa
    *Another Google Integrated site, sharing and tagging on this site come with additional SEO benefits.
    Flickr
    Photobucket

  • Looking for an easy way to create a professional website? Wix s web templates are optimized for SEO and mobile viewing are super easy to customize. Create your free website now!

    Other Cool Stuff

    Simple SEO Tips to Skyrocket Your Google Ranking

    SEO Tips: Write a Title that Google Will Love

    Take Control of What People See When They Google You





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