MPOB: E-Peniaga, e business.#E #business


e business

E business

E business

E business

E business

E-Peniaga adalah sistem laporan dan pengurusan digital bertujuan mengumpul dan memproses penyata bulanan Peniaga Buah Sawit, Bahan Penanaman Sawit dan Peniaga Minyak/Isirong Sawit mengikut Akta Lembaga Minyak Sawit Malaysia 1998, Peraturan-Peraturan Lembaga Minyak Sawit Malaysia (Pelesenan) 2005.

Sistem ini menggantikan proses penghantaran penyata bulanan oleh pelesen secara manual kepada digital. Setiap pelesen dikehendaki mendapatkan kata laluan masing-masing dengan menggunakan ‘link’ pendaftaran yang terdapat di sebelah.

Sila hubungi pegawai berikut atau e-mel [email protected] untuk sebarang pertanyaan.

  • Pn. Nurul Hufaidah Sharif (Peniaga Minyak) – No Telefon 03-78022824 / emel: [email protected]
  • Pn. Fatin Aqila Abdul Razak (Peniaga Minyak) – No Telefon 03-78022943 / emel: [email protected]
  • Pn. Aziana Misnan (Peniaga Buah) – No Telefon 03-78022955 / emel: [email protected]
  • Pn. Nooralfaziana Ahmat (Peniaga Buah) – No Telefon 03-78022991 / emel: [email protected]
  • Pn. Harisah bt. Hamid (Bahan Tanaman) – No Telefon 03-78022916 / emel: [email protected]

PERINGATAN : Sila ‘click’ pada alamat web ini http://e-peniaga.mpob.gov.my/training untuk ke laman latihan membuat penyata. Sila kembali ke laman utama ini untuk menghantar penyata bulanan.

Kerajaan Malaysia dan Lembaga Minyak Sawit Malaysia (MPOB) adalah tidak bertanggungjawab bagi apa-apa kehilangan atau kerugian yang disebabkan oleh penggunaan mana-mana maklumat yang diperolehi dari sistem ini. Syarikat-syarikat yang dirujuk di dalam laman web ini tidak boleh ditafsirkan sebagai ejen kepada, ataupun syarikat yang disyorkan oleh Lembaga Minyak Sawit Malaysia (MPOB)


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Study Abroad in Dubai, Summer School in Dubai, Dubai Business School, business schools.#Business #schools


business schools

Business schools

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Since 2006 CBL International Education has been a world leader in design and delivery of cutting-edge study abroad solutions in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. click for more

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Programme Overview

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Your opportunity to study abroad in Dubai begins here! CBL International has partnered with the Higher Colleges of Technology and Emirates Academy of Hospitality Management in Dubai to offer you cutting-edge, insightful lectures by local and international professors, successful managers and CEOs, and lawyers in the fields of Arabic business law, local business practices, management, hospitality, logistics, and economics.

While studying abroad in Dubai, you’ll have the chance to travel throughout the city and the Emirates, through activities and excursions designed to immerse you in the Middle East. Spend a day in Abu Dhabi, the capital of UAE, visiting the magnificent Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan Mosque, take a safari in the desert, cruise along Dubai creek in a dhow boat and much more!

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27 December 2017 – 6 January 2018

Our study abroad in Dubai programmes are packed with:

  • Informative Lectures
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  • Fantastic excursions to cultural attractions, and one-of-a-kind landmarks
  • A unique opportunity to immerse in Arabic culture

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  • Sears – s History Predicts Almost Everything Amazon – s Doing – The Atlantic,

    The History of Sears Predicts Nearly Everything Amazon Is Doing

    One hundred years ago, a retail giant that shipped millions of products by mail moved swiftly into the brick-and-mortar business, changing it forever. Is that happening again?

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    • Company. Sears might seem like a zombie today, but it’s easy to forget how transformative the company was exactly 100 years ago, when it, too, was capitalizing on a mail-to-consumer business to establish a physical retail presence.

      To understand Amazon—its evolution, its strategy, and perhaps its future—look to Sears.

      Mail was an internet before the internet. After the Civil War, several new communications and transportations systems—the telegraph, rail, and parcel delivery—made it possible to shop at home and have items delivered to your door. Americans browsed catalogues on their couches for jewelry, food, and books. Merchants sent the parcels by rail.

      From its founding in the late 19th century to its world-famous catalog, the history of Sears, Roebuck Company is well known. Less storied is its magnificently successful transition from a mailing company to a brick-and-mortar giant. Like Amazon among its online-shopping rivals, Sears was not the country’s first mail-order retailer, but it became the largest of its kind. Like Amazon, it started with a single product category—watches, rather than books. But, like Amazon, the company grew to include a range of products, including guns, gramophones, cars, and even groceries.

      From the start, Sears’s genius was to market itself to consumers as an everything store, with an unrivaled range of products, often sold for minuscule profits. The company’s feel for consumer demand was so uncanny, and its operations so efficient, that it became, for many of its diehard customers, not just the best retail option, but the only one worth considering.

      By building a large base of fiercely loyal consumers, Sears was able to buy more cheaply from manufacturers and wholesalers. It managed its deluge of orders with massive warehouses, like its central facility in Chicago, in which messages to various departments and assembly workers were sent through pneumatic tubes. In the decade between 1895 and 1905, Sears’s revenue grew by a factor of 50, from about $750,000 to about $38 million, according to Alfred D. Chandler Jr.’s 1977 book The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business. (By comparison, in the last decade, Amazon’s revenue has grown by a factor of 10.)

      Then, after one of the most successful half-centuries in U.S. corporate history, Sears did something really crazy. It opened a store.

      In the early 1920s, Sears found itself in an economy that was coming off a harsh post-World War recession, according to Daniel M. G. Graff and Peter Temin’s essay “Sears, Roebuck in the Twentieth Century.” The company was also dealing with a more lasting challenge: the rise of chain stores. To guide their corporate makeover, the company tapped a retired World War I general named Robert Wood, who turned to the U.S. Census and Statistical Abstract of the United States as a fount of marketing wisdom. In federally tabulated figures, he saw the country moving from farm to city, and then from city to suburb. His plan: Follow them with stores.

      The first Sears stores opened in the company’s existing mail-order warehouses, for convenience’s sake. But soon they were popping up in new locations. Not satisfied with merely competing with urban department stores like Macy’s, Wood distinguished new Sears locations by plopping them into suburbs where land was cheap and parking space was plentiful.

      Sears’s aesthetic was unadorned, specializing in “hard goods” like plumbing tools and car parts. Wood initially thought that young shoppers would prefer a cold, no-frills experience—he likened the first stores to “military commissaries.” This was a rare misstep; Sears ultimately redesigned their stores to appear more high-end.

      The company’s brick-and-mortar transformation was astonishing. At the start of 1925, there were no Sears stores in the United States. By 1929, there were 300. While Montgomery Ward built 90 percent of its stores in rural areas or small cities, and Woolworth focused on rich urban areas, Sears bet on everything—rural and urban, rich and poor, farmers and manufacturers. Geographically, it disproportionately built where the Statistical Abstract showed growth: in southern, southwestern, and western cities.

      Sears was not content to be a one-stop-shop for durable goods. Like Amazon today, the company used its position to enter adjacent businesses. To supplement its huge auto-parts business, Sears started selling car insurance under the Allstate brand. One might say the shift from selling products to services is analogous to the creation of Amazon Web Services—or even Amazon’s television shows. Analysts have wondered, why would Amazon want to sell books, diapers, and TV? But even the company’s seemingly eccentric decisions are centered on Sears’s old expertise: becoming an inextricable part of consumers’ lives.

      It’s remarkable how Sears’s rise anticipates Amazon’s. The growth of both companies was the result of a focus on operations efficiency, low prices, and a keen eye on the future of American demographics.

      So how might Sears’s experience predict Amazon’s future?

      First, Sears showed that physical retail doesn’t necessarily cannibalize the mailing business. So far, Amazon’s online sales have actually grown in regions where it has a physical store presence, according to CNBC.

      Second, it’s important to remember that, although Sears eventually became a dominant physical retailer, the transition was bumpy. Sears initially assumed that its blue-collar customers would appreciate a no-frills shopping experience. But it eventually beautified its stores to lure the whole family. The spartan design of Amazon’s bookstores already has its detractors, and the company may learn that even a logistics behemoth needs an interior decorator.

      Third, Amazon may find, like Sears, that size can be both an advantage and a bull’s-eye. Sears evolved to become a microcosm of the American economy, with its corporate operations spanning retailing, manufacturing, marketing, and transportation. Warehouses filled 100,000 orders a day, 16 Sears-operated manufacturing plants built name-brand kitchenware and furniture, and a New York branch concentrated in apparel marketing. Amazon is already on this very road; in fact, on Thursday, the company announced that it is adding several thousand marketing jobs in its New York office. But just as Sears attracted the ire of displaced merchants, particularly in rural areas, Amazon will find—and has already found—it impossible to expand without garnering animosity from retailers or regulators.

      Growing inequality in the U.S. may offer new challenges to building a truly national retailer. But once again, Sears offers a lesson. The company thrived as long as it used U.S. demographics as a guide—following Americans to the suburbs of the South and West, and selling parts for their favorite new toy, the automobile. Amazon, too, will thrive as long as it uses American demographics as a roadmap and takes advantage of new personal technology, like mobile phones for shopping and AI assistants for the home. In the last six months, Amazon has spent $13 billion to buy Whole Foods and its upscale urban locations. At the same time, it has offered discounts for low-income shoppers to become Prime subscribers. Perhaps Sears’s descendant can become an everything store for everyone.

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    Video Prank at Domino’s Taints Brand, doing business as.#Doing #business #as


    The New York Times

    A Video Prank at Domino’s Damages Its Brand

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    April 15, 2009

    When two Domino’s Pizza employees filmed a prank in the restaurant’s kitchen, they decided to post it online. In a few days, thanks to the power of social media, they ended up with felony charges, more than a million disgusted viewers, and a major company facing a public relations crisis.

    In videos posted on YouTube and elsewhere this week, a Domino’s employee in Conover, N.C., prepared sandwiches for delivery while putting cheese up his nose, nasal mucus on the sandwiches, and violating other health-code standards while a fellow employee provided narration.

    The two were charged with delivering prohibited foods.

    By Wednesday afternoon, the video had been viewed more than a million times on YouTube. References to it were in five of the 12 results on the first page of Google search for “Dominos,” and discussions about Domino’s had spread throughout Twitter.

    As Domino’s is realizing, social media has the reach and speed to turn tiny incidents into marketing crises. In November, Motrin posted an ad suggesting that carrying babies in slings was a painful new fad. Unhappy mothers posted Twitter complaints about it, and bloggers followed; within days, Motrin had removed the ad and apologized.

    On Monday, Amazon.com apologized for a “ham-fisted” error after Twitter members complained that the sales rankings for gay and lesbian books seemed to have disappeared — and, since Amazon took more than a day to respond, the social-media world criticized it for being uncommunicative.

    According to Domino’s, the employees told executives that they had never actually delivered the tainted food. Still, Domino’s fired the two employees on Tuesday, and they were in the custody of the Conover police department on Wednesday evening, facing felony charges.

    But the crisis was not over for Domino’s.

    “We got blindsided by two idiots with a video camera and an awful idea,” said a Domino’s spokesman, Tim McIntyre, who added that the company was preparing a civil lawsuit. “Even people who’ve been with us as loyal customers for 10, 15, 20 years, people are second-guessing their relationship with Domino’s, and that’s not fair.”

    In just a few days, Domino’s reputation was damaged. The perception of its quality among consumers went from positive to negative since Monday, according to the research firm YouGov, which holds online surveys of about 1,000 consumers every day regarding hundreds of brands.

    “It’s graphic enough in the video, and it’s created enough of a stir, that it gives people a little bit of pause,” said Ted Marzilli, global managing director for YouGov’s BrandIndex.

    The Domino’s experience “is a nightmare,” said Paul Gallagher, managing director and a head of the United States crisis practice at the public relations firm Burson-Marsteller. “It’s the toughest situation for a company to face in terms of a digital crisis.”

    Mr. McIntyre was alerted to the videos on Monday evening by a blogger who had seen them. In the most popular video, a woman who identifies herself as Kristy films a co-worker, Michael, preparing the unsanitary sandwiches.

    “In about five minutes it’ll be sent out on delivery where somebody will be eating these, yes, eating them, and little did they know that cheese was in his nose and that there was some lethal gas that ended up on their salami,” Kristy said. “Now that’s how we roll at Domino’s.”

    On Monday, commenters at the site Consumerist.com used clues in the video to find the franchise location in Conover, and told Mr. McIntyre about the videos. On Tuesday, the Domino’s franchise owner fired the employees, identified by Domino’s as Kristy Hammonds, 31 and Michael Setzer, 32. The franchisee brought in the local health department, which advised him to discard all open containers of food, which cost hundreds of dollars, Mr. McIntyre said.

    Ms. Hammonds apologized to the company in an e-mail message Tuesday morning. “It was fake and I wish that everyone knew that. ” she wrote. “I AM SOO SORRY!”

    By Wednesday evening, the video had been removed from YouTube because of a copyright claim from Ms. Hammonds. Neither Ms. Hammonds nor Mr. Setzer were available for comment on Wednesday evening, said Conover’s chief of police, Gary W. Lafone.

    As the company learned about the video on Tuesday, Mr. McIntyre said, executives decided not to respond aggressively, hoping the controversy would quiet down. “What we missed was the perpetual mushroom effect of viral sensations,” he said.

    In social media, “if you think it’s not going to spread, that’s when it gets bigger,” said Scott Hoffman, the chief marketing officer of the social-media marketing firm Lotame. “We realized that when many of the comments and questions in Twitter were, ‘What is Domino’s doing about it’ ” Mr. McIntyre said. “Well, we were doing and saying things, but they weren’t being covered in Twitter.”

    By Wednesday afternoon, Domino’s had created a Twitter account, @dpzinfo, to address the comments, and it had presented its chief executive in a video on YouTube by evening.

    “It elevated to a point where just responding isn’t good enough,” Mr. McIntyre said.


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    Academics, Rutgers Business School, business address.#Business #address


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    cultivating business knowledge, ethics, and global perspective through innovative research and teaching

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