Month: March 2017

Business Broker – Small Business Encyclopedia #how #to #start #a #business

#business broker

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Business Broker

Definition:A professional who assists in the buying and selling of businesses .

The principal value of a business broker is to act as a buffer between the buyer and the seller. A broker can say certain things to a buyer and certain things to a seller and wind up with a productive discussion. The broker can tell the owner the price is too high, relay what has to be done to make a deal–very openly and candidly–and discuss how the differences in viewpoint can be ironed out effectively.

If you’re in the market to buy an existing business, a broker can help you find businesses for sale that fit your parameters, including location, industry and size. The broker will typically charge you a commission of 5 to 10 percent of the purchase price, but the assistance brokers can offer, especially for first-time buyers, is often worth the cost. However, if you’re trying to save money, you might want to consider hiring a broker only when you’re near the final negotiating phase. Brokers can offer assistance in several ways:

  • Prescreening businesses for you. Good brokers turn down many of the businesses they’re asked to sell, either because the seller won’t provide full financial disclosure or because the business is overpriced. Going through a broker helps you avoid these bad risks.
  • Helping you pinpoint your interests. A good broker starts by finding out about your skills and interests, then helps you select the right business for you. With the help of a broker, you may discover that an industry you had never considered is the ideal one for you.
  • Negotiating. During the negotiating process is when brokers really earn their keep. They help both parties stay focused on the ultimate goal and smooth over problems.
  • Assisting with paperwork. Brokers know the latest laws and regulations affecting everything from licenses and permits to financing and escrow. They also know the most efficient ways to cut through red tape, which can slash months off the purchase process. Working with a broker reduces the risk that you’ll neglect some crucial form, fee or step in the process.

When it comes to selling your business, finding the right buyer can be time-consuming and daunting if you try to do it yourself. A seasoned business broker can read the market, knows who’s buying what and who’s got resources, and can weed out the so-called “tire kickers” from serious buyers with sufficient financial resources who are well-suited to run a business like yours. They will also ensure that news of the sale remains confidential, that loyal customers, staff, vendors and suppliers find out only when you’re ready to let them know.

Then there are administrative issues. An experienced business broker knows what paperwork to file, and when. They also coordinate efforts between lawyers, CPAs, bankers, insurance agents and others.

While it costs money to contract with a broker to sell your business, think of the commission you’d pay him or her as a kind of insurance. Your broker will protect your investment in the business by placing the proper value on your business, finding the right buyer, getting you the best price possible, protecting the confidentiality of the sale, handling all negotiations, ensuring that all transactions are legal, and seeing that the transition to new ownership is as wrinkle-free as possible.

Brokers’ fees generally range anywhere from 5 to 10 percent of the selling price of the business, depending on negotiations with the broker, state laws and other factors. This is usually money well spend, because the broker can usually get more money for the business, make negotiations run smoothly, handle a lot of clerical and other details, and make a sale possible, whereas an individual business seller might not be able to accomplish all these things.

One of the key functions of a business broker is to act as a cushion between the buyer and the

seller and negotiate the details of the deal at a time when emotions can, and do, run high. A small business is often one of the biggest assets a business owner has, one which he or she has spent considerable time and money building. An experienced broker knows how to price a business and can toot the business’s horn in a way you might not be able to. The buyer can ask the broker pointed questions that might be difficult to ask you directly and get the answers he or she needs. The broker can also help answer any questions or resolve any problems that develop during the course of the sale.

When it comes to choosing a business broker, make sure there’s good chemistry between you and your broker and that the two of you communicate well. You’re paying your broker to look out for your interests, negotiate successfully on your behalf, and complete the transaction in a timely and professional manner.

To find a business broker to help you sell your business, take these steps:

  • Check newspaper ads under “Business Opportunities.” Look in your local and regional papers, as well as in The Wall Street Journal. You’ll frequently see businesses for sale under this heading, and just as prospective buyers are invited to inquire about these businesses, prospective sellers should also check out who’s facilitating these sales.
  • Look in the Yellow Pages under “Real Estate” or “Business Brokers.” Be sure to find a broker who specializes in selling businesses, not simply real estate. Don’t let the broker list your business on a realtor’s multiple listing service. Any broker who wants to do this isn’t willing to devote the time and work necessary to sell your business.
  • Ask for referrals. Ask other business owners who’ve sold businesses who they worked with. Your local chamber of commerce can also provide referrals to business brokers, as can your banker, CPA, attorney, and financial planner.

Once you find a broker to work with, sign a contract that specifies what kind of advertising your broker will do and that the name of the business will not appear in any ads or other promotion.





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What is a social enterprise? What is a social business? Definitions by ClearlySo #business

#social business

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Our Blog

What is a social enterprise? Defining social enterprise and social business

19th September 2015

Over the past few years, as ClearlySo has grown and changed, the most common questions we have been asked are: What is a social enterprise? and What is a social business? .

We used to have a definition for each of these different phrases. We knew underneath both simply meant an organisation that seeks to be financially successful while creating social and/or environmental impact. It has commercial goals and it has impact goals it is really not that complicated.

With famous examples of these kinds of businesses Green and Blacks. Divine Chocolate or Ben and Jerry s people can understand what it means to consider social impact alongside financial return.

But sometimes it has felt pretty complicated. We ve all made diagrams like this one:

We argued in 2010 that The Time for Social Enterprise is Now :

Many people who approach us ask how social enterprises make their money, or how a social enterprise is different from a business (or indeed how it is different from a charity). Because there is such a range of high-impact organisations operating in such a myriad of ways, these questions are impossible to answer precisely except that, simply put, these businesses have impact and financial success at their core.

Sometimes it is useful to consider some organisations as impact first , like charities, and some as purely for profit . This spectrum of organisation types shows the range of organisations working to create change and there are many. It s also very limiting. Considering the landscape as charity vs. company or social enterprise vs. social business obscures the wider movement that sees business and finance as a force for good.

It means considering the majority of businesses (that do not exist with positive social impact as a core metric for business success) against then a small niche for charities, social enterprises, social businesses, co-operatives, mutuals, BCorps. community interest companies (that list just keeps getting longer). It means disregarding the idea that all businesses have an impact. Some have overwhelmingly positive impacts, some have overwhelmingly negative impacts, and many fall somewhere between the two.

Although these labels can be extremely useful (think about the Cabinet Office using legally defined social enterprise to determine who is eligible for social investment tax relief ), and many of our clients are examples of those who define themselves as social businesses or social enterprises. we work with all kinds of high-impact businesses.

Charities like the London Early Years Foundation are run as businesses; they run sustainable models that support their growth and their impact aims. Yes, they may reinvest their profits: this does not mean that they themselves are non-profit while traditional companies are for-profit . Profit, as June Sullivan. their CEO, explains, is not a dirty word.

Justgiving is an online donation platform that has revolutionised how we give to charity and it is a business.

Businesses can be early-stage ventures or they can be long-established companies that consider every aspect of their social and environmental impact, like HCT. It doesn t matter to us whether a company is structured as a charity, a company limited by shares, or a community interest company: what matters to us is what they do, how they plan to grow their business, and how they create social or environmental change.

For these businesses, the financial bottom line matters, and so does the social or environmental impact. We have over 5,000 of these businesses in our network, many of which are growing rapidly. We believe that these businesses can be both high-return and high-impact; we do not see an impact see-saw where investors and businesses trade off financial returns in order to achieve social impact.

In any industry, different types of businesses have different risk and return profiles. We are simply adding impact to the equation. All businesses have an impact, we just believe they should be accountable for it and we want to help those businesses that create positive impacts to thrive. We envision a future where if you don t care about your social impact, you won t have a sustainable business.

Where great business is founded upon great principles, it is possible to do good while doing well where enterprise and investment are powerful forces for good.

Image: Aduna. whose superfruits create sustainable livelihoods in sub-Saharan Africa.





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Business Development jobs in the UK #business #law

#business development jobs

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Business Development jobs

Hays Sales consultants have in-depth knowledge of the business development jobs market, and will help you find your desired job. Whether it be a Business Development Manager. Business Development Executive or a more specialist development opportunity.

Our strong relationship with sought after employers across many industries include, FMCG, Manufacturing, IT, Media and Professional Services lead to Hays Sales being a fist choice for clients looking for business developers like yourself to join their teams.

Contact your nearest Hays Sales office to discuss the latest Business Development roles and how we can help you take the next step in your Business Development career.

We re currently recruiting for organisations across the UK including in London, Guildford, Leeds, Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester and many more so you can be sure you’ll find a job near you.

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Types of Businesses and Forms of Business Organizations #stocks #to #watch

#types of business

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A business is an organization that uses economic resources or inputs to provide goods or services to customers in exchange for money or other goods and services.

Business organizations come in different types and forms.

3 Types of Business

There are three major types of businesses:

1. Service Business

A service type of business provides intangible products (products with no physical form). Service type firms offer professional skills, expertise, advice, and other similar products.

Examples of service businesses are: schools, repair shops, hair salons, banks, accounting firms, and law firms.

2. Merchandising Business

This type of business buys products at wholesale price and sells the same at retail price. They are known as buy and sell businesses. They make profit by selling the products at prices higher than their purchase costs.

A merchandising business sells a product without changing its form. Examples are: grocery stores, convenience stores, distributors, and other resellers.

3. Manufacturing Business

Unlike a merchandising business, a manufacturing business buys products with the intention of using them as materials in making a new product. Thus, there is a transformation of the products purchased.

A manufacturing business combines raw materials, labor, and factory overhead in its production process. The manufactured goods will then be sold to customers.

Hybrid Business

Hybrid businesses are companies that may be classified in more than one type of business. A restaurant, for example, combines ingredients in making a fine meal (manufacturing), sells a cold bottle of wine (merchandising), and fills customer orders (service).

Nonetheless, these companies may be classified according to their major business interest. In that case, restaurants are more of the service type they provide dining services .

Forms of Business Organization

These are the basic forms of business ownership:

1. Sole Proprietorship

A sole proprietorship is a business owned by only one person. It is easy to set-up and is the least costly among all forms of ownership.

The owner faces unlimited liability ; meaning, the creditors of the business may go after the personal assets of the owner if the business cannot pay them.

The sole proprietorship form is usually adopted by small business entities.

2. Partnership

A partnership is a business owned by two or more persons who contribute resources into the entity. The partners divide the profits of the business among themselves.

In general partnerships, all partners have unlimited liability. In limited partnerships, creditors cannot go after the personal assets of the limited partners.

3. Corporation

A corporation is a business organization that has a separate legal personality from its owners. Ownership in a stock corporation is represented by shares of stock .

The owners (stockholders) enjoy limited liability but have limited involvement in the company’s operations. The board of directors. an elected group from the stockholders, controls the activities of the corporation.

In addition to those basic forms of business ownership, these are some other types of organizations that are common today:

Limited Liability Company

Limited liability companies (LLCs) in the USA, are hybrid forms of business that have characteristics of both a corporation and a partnership. An LLC is not incorporated; hence, it is not considered a corporation.

Nonetheless, the owners enjoy limited liability like in a corporation. An LLC may elect to be taxed as a sole proprietorship, a partnership, or a corporation.

Cooperative

A cooperative is a business organization owned by a group of individuals and is operated for their mutual benefit. The persons making up the group are called members. Cooperatives may be incorporated or unincorporated.

Some examples of cooperatives are: water and electricity (utility) cooperatives, cooperative banking, credit unions, and housing cooperatives.





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Business Development Jobs in Malaysia – Job Vacancy @ Job Search Malaysia #business #insurance

#business development jobs

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894Business Development jobs

Sales Marketing Consultant (Puchong, USJ,Bukit Jalil, Kajang, Balakong, PJ )

Company Confidential

  • High commission earning + Good basic pay
  • Friendly and Fun working environment
  • 5 days work only
  • Cheras (Selangor), Cyberjaya (Selangor), Kajang / Bangi / Serdang (Selangor), Klang / Port Klang (Selangor), Kuala Lumpur, Petaling Jaya (Selangor), Puchong (Selangor), Shah Alam / Subang (Selangor), Subang Jaya (Selangor)
  • Login to view salary
  • Responsibilities: To provide One Stop business solutions to all Small Medium Enterprise/Corporate customers. To provide excellent sales and customer service to every customers. To develop new business and servicing existing customer. To meet monthly sales target target set by management. To.

Fresh Graduate ( Assistant of Business Development )

  • Kuala Lumpur
  • Login to view salary
  • Job Description. Assist of business development executive to planning, execution and reporting. Management of website and email bases enquiries. Support business development in general activity. Preparing documents for attending meeting etc. Job Requirements. Fresh graduate are encouraged. Company.

Key Account Manager / S M Manager

  • Penang – Bayan Lepas, Bukit Minyak
  • Login to view salary
  • Responsibility Accountable for all branches management, development and expansion of the service offerings, providing direction and leadership to ensure profitable growth.
    Implemet key performance indicator to monitor productivity and drive performance of operational. marketing and.




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Busy #business #loans

#busy

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Main Entry: busy

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: engaged, at work

Synonyms: active, already taken, assiduous, at it, buried, diligent, employed, engaged, engrossed, having a full plate, having enough on one’s plate, having fish to fry, having many irons in the fire, hustling, in a meeting, in conference, in someone else’s possession, in the field, in the laboratory, industrious, occupied, on assignment, on duty, on the go, overloaded, persevering, slaving, snowed, swamped, tied up, unavailable, up to one’s ears, with a customer, working

Antonyms: idle, quiet, unbusy, unemployed, unengaged

Main Entry: busy

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: active, on the go

Synonyms: bustling, busy as a beaver, energetic, full, fussy, hectic, humming, hustling, lively, popping, restless, strenuous, tireless, tiring

Antonyms: idle, inactive, lazy

Main Entry: busy

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: nosy, impertinent

Synonyms: butting in, curious, forward, inquisitive, interfering, intrusive, meddlesome, meddling, nebby, obtrusive, officious, prying, pushy, snoopy, stirring, troublesome

Main Entry: active

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: very involved in activity

Synonyms: aggressive, agile, alert, alive, animated, assiduous, bold, brisk, bustling, busy, chipper, daring, dashing, determined, dexterous, diligent, dynamic, eager, energetic, engaged, enlivened, enterprising, enthusiastic, eventful, fireball, forceful, forcible, fresh, frisky, hard-working, high-spirited, hyper, industrious, intense, inventive, jumping, keen, lively, nimble, on the move, perky, persevering, purposeful, pushing, quick, rapid, ready, resolute, sharp, sprightly, spry, whiz*, zealous

Antonyms: disinterested, idle, indifferent, lazy, quiescent, quiet

Main Entry: assiduous

Part of Speech: adjective

Synonyms: active, attentive, busy, constant, diligent, eager beaver, exacting, grinding, indefatigable, industrious, laborious, persevering, plugging, scrupulous, sedulous, steady, studious, unflagging, untiring, whiz, zealous

Antonyms: lazy, neglectful, negligent

Main Entry: brisk

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: fast-moving; active

Synonyms: adroit, agile, alert, animated, bustling, busy, energetic, lively, nimble, quick, speedy, sprightly, spry, vigorous, vivacious, zippy

Antonyms: inactive, slow, sluggish, unenergetic

Main Entry: diligent

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: persevering, hard-working

Synonyms: active, assiduous, attentive, busy, careful, conscientious, constant, eager, eager beaver, earnest, grind*, indefatigable, industrious, laborious, occupied, operose, painstaking, persistent, persisting, pertinacious, plugging, sedulous, steadfast, studious, tireless, unflagging, unrelenting, untiring

Antonyms: inactive, indifferent, languid, lazy, lethargic, negligent

Main Entry: earnest

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: very enthusiastic

Synonyms: ardent, busy, devoted, diligent, eager, fervent, fervid, heartfelt, impassioned, industrious, keen, passionate, perseverant, purposeful, sedulous, sincere, urgent, vehement, warm, wholehearted, zealous

Antonyms: flippant, unconcerned, unenthusiastic, unpassionate, unpurposeful, unthoughtful

Main Entry: elaborate

Part of Speech: adjective

Definition: intricate; involved

Synonyms: busy, careful, complex, complicated, decorated, detailed, elegant, embellished, exact, extensive, extravagant, fancy, fussy, garnished, high tech, highly wrought, imposing, knotty, labored, labyrinthine, luxurious, many-faceted, minute, ornamented, ornate, ostentatious, overdone, overworked, painstaking, perfected, plush, posh, precise, prodigious, refined, showy, skillful, sophisticated, studied, thorough, with all the extras, with all the options, with bells and whistles

Antonyms: general, normal, plain, regular, simple, uncomplicated, unelaborate, uninvolved, usual

Main Entry: employed

Part of Speech: adjective

Synonyms: active, at it, at work, busy, engaged, hired, in a job, in collar, in harness, in place, inked, laboring, occupied, on board, on duty, on the job, on the payroll, operating, plugging away, selected, signed

Antonyms: idle, inactive, unemployed, unengaged, unoccupied

busy O.E. bisig “careful, anxious, busy, occupied,” cognate with O.Du. bezich, Low Ger. besig; no known connection with any other Germanic or Indo-European language. Still pronounced as in M.E. but for some unclear reason the spelling shifted to -u- in 15c. The word was a euphemism for “sexually active” in 17c. Of telephone lines, 1893. In M.E. sometimes with a sense of “prying, meddlesome,” preserved in busybody. Busy work is first recorded 1910. The verb is O.E. bisgian.





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Local SEO and Business Listings – WordPress Plugins #business #email #address

#business listings

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The Local SEO and Business Listings WordPress Plugin allows you to optimize your local business website through a step by step Local SEO Guide, a host of search engine optimization tools proven to increase Google – Bing – Yahoo local search rankings, a business listings scan tool, as well as, available functionality to create, correct and aggregate your local business listings on over 50 of the top Business Listings websites like Yelp, YP.com, Bing Places for Business and many more.

SEO expertise is NOT required to utilize this Plugin and optimize your website for Local Search. With the Step by Step Local SEO Guide we will walk you through the process.

Core Plugin Functionality

  1. Local SEO Road Maps
  2. Keyword Research Tool
  3. Competitor Keyword Spy Tool
  4. Suggested Content Submission Websites
  5. Proprietary Keyword Effectiveness Index – Judge how easy it will be to rank for specific keywords and how effective those keywords will be for your business.
  6. Business Listing Scan – Scan your business listings to see where you have missing listings or incorrect listings across the web.
  7. Local SEO Videos and Tutorials Updated Regularly – Get the latest information about optimizing your business for local search and tutorials on how to best utilize your Local SEO Tools.

Additional Available Local SEO Tools

  1. Competitor Analysis
  2. Web Analytics
  3. Search Metrics
  4. Social Engagement
  5. Web Buzz Monitoring
  6. Website Content Submission Tools
  7. Backlink Quality Check
  8. Competitor Backlink Spy
  9. Landing Page Optimization Tools
  10. Website SEO Audit
  11. Sitemap Generator
  12. Internal Link Audit and Optimization. and much, much more.

There are literally to many tools and features to list.

Local Business Listings

With one click you can run a Local Business Listings Report to see where you have missing or incorrect citations (business listings) across all the major local business aggregation websites like Yelp, YP.com, Facebook, Bing Local, Google My Business and more.

Additional Available Local Listings Functionality

This plugin also has the additional available functionality to allow you to seamlessly create or correct all business listing errors found in the business listing scan. You will also have additional monitoring and local listing updating features which will enable you to post to all your local listings at once with fresh information and content like announcements, coupons, deals, special events and more.

This Plugin gives you everything you need to out rank and crush your competitors in local search.





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How to Market a Home Party Business: 6 Steps #registering #a #business

#home party businesses

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How to Market a Home Party Business

Start with your friends and family.

  • Nobody can help you market yourself and your business better than those that know you the best. Let your friends and family know you are looking for hosts and hostesses for your business and let word-of-mouth take its course.
  • Ask your friends and family to host your first parties to get the ball rolling. They can benefit from the hostess rewards and you can get valuable experience at the same time. You also may be able to get some of their guests to book future parties.

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Befriend local business owners.

  • Not only can they pass on your information to their customers, but they also may let you post fliers or set out your business card in their place of business. Consider offering them a free product or service in return for use of their already established client base.
  • Be sure to select businesses that appeal to the same type of clients that would be interested in your home party business.

Connect with potential clients through social networking.

  • Social networking has spread beyond the traditional networking happy hour after work. Social networking can now be done online. There are many web sites through which you can connect with old friends who can be the source for a wider client base. These web sites can also lead to whole networks of people with specific interests in your niche.

Combine your efforts.

  • Join forces with other in-home party consultants to throw a one-stop-shopping party. Clients who may come with an interest in another home business may end up finding an interest in your party business. Choosing businesses that are different, yet, that compliment each other can make for a very interesting mix of customers.

Use your mailing options.

  • Electronic mail (e-mail) can cover quite a large territory. Distribute e-mails detailing the hostess special for a month along with an attached flier of the benefits of being a host. Send the note to your whole address book and ask recipients to forward it on to anyone they think might be interested. This is a cheap and quick way to market your home party business.
  • Although regular mail costs a little more, it appeals to a different set of people. Many of these potential clients that are not computer savvy, so a flier in their mailboxes is more likely to do the trick. If you have the time, you can hand-deliver the fliers.

Offer incentives.

  • Create your own incentive plan beyond the company’s offerings. Even if you just throw in an extra lipstick or a small food storage container, it gives your clients a great incentive to want to spread the word of your private party business.

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Unsecured Business Loans for Collateral-Free Cash #business #health #insurance

#unsecured business loans

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Credit Cards

Banking

Investing

Mortgages

Loans

Insurance

Credit Cards

Banking

Investing

Mortgages

Loans

Insurance

Unsecured Business Loans for Collateral-Free Cash

You can trust that we maintain strict editorial integrity in our writing and assessments; however, we receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners and get approved. Here’s how we make money .

An unsecured business loan has an attractive advantage over a secured loan: You don’t have to put up collateral, such as your home, your business equipment or inventory. So if your small business goes south and you can’t repay the loan, the lender cannot seize your personal or business assets.

Unsecured loans, however, will likely carry a higher APR than secured business loans, but they typically come with higher approval rates and faster funding. Although you don’t need collateral to qualify, you may still need strong business revenue, several years of operating history and fair or better personal credit — though this will depend on the individual lender’s requirements.

Here are five alternative lenders offering unsecured business loans or lines of credit of up to $100,000.

JUMP TO OUR RECOMMENDATIONS:

Lending Club: Lowest borrowing costs among online lenders for unsecured term loans and lines of credit.

OnDeck: Solid choice for an unsecured line of credit for working capital needs and handling unexpected expenses.

StreetShares: Good choice if you have strong credit and need working capital at a competitive APR.

Kabbage: Can be a smart option if you have bad credit and need working capital fast.

Fundbox: Sound choice if you have unpaid customer invoices and want to avoid a credit check.

Unsecured business loans: Summary of funding options.

If you want a term loan or line of credit with low rates: Lending Club

Lending Club’s APR ranges from 8% to 32%, making its loans and lines of credit slightly more expensive than SBA loans but the lowest among unsecured funding options online.

Lending Club also has less stringent requirements than banks, which typically require excellent personal credit and collateral to back loans. The lender requires a minimum 600 credit score, but collateral is only needed on loans and lines of greater than $100,000.

Before you apply for a Lending Club line of credit, find out whether you meet the minimum qualifications.

  • 600+ personal credit score.
  • 2+ years in business.
  • $75,000+ in annual revenue.
  • Own at least 20% of the business.
  • No recent bankruptcies or tax liens.
  • Provide collateral for loans and lines of credit of more than $100,000.

Lending Club is currently unavailable to borrowers in Iowa and Idaho.

If you need cash for working capital or unexpected expenses: OnDeck

OnDeck’s unsecured business line of credit is a good option for business owners who need working capital to manage cash flow or handle unexpected expenses. OnDeck’s APR is slightly higher than Lending Club’s borrowing costs, but requirements are less stringent. To qualify, you need at least a 600 personal credit score, nine months in business and $75,000 in annual revenue.
Each draw on the line of credit is repaid weekly over a period of six months, and borrowers can choose to repay sooner to save on interest with no prepayment penalties.

OnDeck’s line of credit doesn’t require a lien on your business’s assets, although you still have to sign a personal guarantee, which makes you personally liable for repaying the debt if your business fails to.

Before you apply for a OnDeck line of credit, find out whether you meet the lender s minimum qualifications.

  • 600+ personal credit score.
  • 9+ months in business.
  • $75,000+ in annual revenue.
  • No bankruptcies in the last two years.
  • Personal guarantee required.

If you need working capital and have good credit: StreetShares

When you have strong credit and need working capital at a competitive rate, StreetShares is a good option but the maximum loan or line of credit you can qualify for is 20% of your annual revenue. To qualify for StreetShares, you need a personal credit score of 600 or more, a year in business and $25,000 in revenue. The lender offers term loans and lines of credit of up to $100,000, with no collateral required. The possible drawback is the 20% cap: For example, if your business makes $300,000 per year, you can qualify for a loan of up to $60,000.

Before you apply for a StreetShares loan, find out whether you meet the lender s minimum qualifications.

  • 600+ personal credit score.
  • 1+ year in business.
  • $25,000+ in annual revenue.*
  • No bankruptcies in the past three years.
  • No current tax liens or collections (unless you have proper documentation).

You only need 6 months in business if you have $100,000+ in revenue.
StreetShares is currently unavailable to borrowers in North Dakota or South Dakota.

If you need working capital and have bad credit: Kabbage

Kabbage is a good option for borrowers with bad credit who need fast cash for short-term expenses; the company does not have a minimum credit score to qualify.

Funding is fast: Once approved, you can get access to funds immediately or, at most, within a few days. You’ll pay more for it, however, as Kabbage’s loan ranges from 32% to 108% APR. With a short repayment time frame and a higher APR, it’s likely not your best option for a large expense, such a new piece of expensive equipment for your company. Keep in mind that each new draw from the line starts its own six- or 12-month term with its own fee structure, so the cost of borrowing will increase.

Before you apply for a Kabbage loan, find out whether you meet the minimum qualifications.

  • No minimum personal credit score required.
  • 1+ year in business.
  • $50,000+ in annual revenue.
  • A business checking or online payment platform required.

If you have unpaid invoices and want to avoid a credit check: Fundbox

Fundbox is a good option if your business has unpaid customer invoices up to $100,000. The lender provides an unsecured cash advance (no collateral or personal guarantee required) for up to 100% of the value of your invoices, starting at $500. The company provides instant approval, with funding typically in one to three business days.

After receiving the cash advance, you’ll repay it in 12 equal weekly installments, plus a fee. If your customer ends up paying you before then, you can repay the advance in full to save on fees, with no penalties.

Before you apply for Fundbox’s invoice financing, find out whether you meet the lender s minimum qualifications.

  • No minimum personal credit score required.
  • No minimum annual revenue required.
  • Must use online accounting software that can link to Fundbox (such as Quickbooks, FreshBooks, Harvest).

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Home Party Business Opportunity #cool #business #ideas

#home party businesses

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Home Party Business Opportunity

Opportunities in the home party business are plentiful and the industry continues to expand. In these tough economic times, people seek opportunities to make additional income, or to replace lost income. The home party plan business works in good times and bad, but is it right for you?

Prior to starting your business, you should take a few moments to look inward. Determine if this business model is right for you and if you have the right stuff for this business. You can make a good living, work your own hours, and have time for your children and family when you work in the direct sales industry.

Are You a Good Fit For the Business?

To be a good fit for the home party business. you must ask yourself if you enjoy speaking in front of a group. You should also consider how you feel about giving product presentations and selling a product line. If you are reluctant to speak in front of a small group or to sell products, or you get the shakes just thinking about it, you might want to look for another line of work.

Marketing is an essential part of a home party business. You will have to promote and market your business. You will have to place ads, call people on the phone, hand out business cards, attend business group meetings and community functions, and constantly look for new ways to promote. Marketing never ends; marketing is an everyday component of the business and is the key to a successful career in home party plan selling. If the thought of selling gives you a migraine, this line of work is definitely not for you!

Before you start your business, you should decide if you want to work part-time or full-time. This business is the perfect choice no matter which you choose. You may opt to start part-time and then switch to full-time when you discover how much you enjoy it!

The last thing you need to do is select a product line. You should find products that you truly enjoy using. Your enjoyment will serve as an excellent selling point and motivate others to buy. There are so many different products to choose from: jewelry, kitchen aids, make-up, housewares, arts and crafts, lingerie, and adult products. Finding a product line you believe in will make selling so much easier!

Home Party Business Is Simple

The home party plan business is simple, but not easy. It is simple because you work with a company that supplies the products and basic marketing materials. It is not easy because owing a business is never easy. Building and running a successful business takes plenty of time and effort. However, if you want a business that offers the chance to make money, meet people, earn respect, and have fun while you work the home party business is the way to go!

When you take the time to invest in your education by participating in home party plan training then you will surely reach your goals working from home.

Deb Bixler retired from the corporate world in 2000 to enjoy life as an entrepreneur. In the first 9 months as a home party direct seller she built a home business and sales team which provided her with an income capable of replacing her corporate business salary of $80,000 per year. Deb manages the largest FREE home party plan resource center on the web. She is the creator of the CashFlowShow Game which provides affordable duplicate-able training to improve team retention and is the host of the weekly CashFlowShow – Direct Sales Radio show. Deb was recognized in the 2009 2010 Direct Sales Power 50 as one of the most influential people in direct sales worldwide and received the 2011 Direct Selling Women’s Alliance Speaker Of The Year award.

Why does Deb s bio state that she manages the largest FREE home party plan resource center on the web , yet the site that this statement links to appears to charge for every piece of advice it offers? Maybe the free stuff is slyly hidden somewhere on the site, or maybe the statement is just intentionally deceiving either way it s disappointing and obviously misleading. On the other hand, it proves she s mastered the savvy sales tactics, doesn t it? The only fail here is allowing the customer to spot that trick or tactic. Here s some real, free advice for sellers: be honest and treat your customers well. Otherwise, beware of backfire!

The website Cash Flow Show has over 500 pages of free training including the blog and the daily radio show.

Sorry that you find that deceiving. Actually we received an award as one of the top 3 blogs worldwide for direct sellers.

It was not meant to be a trick or tactic. Sorry you were disappointed!





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